Sample records for industries food products

  1. Production of Biogas from Wastewaters of Food Processing Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sax, R. I.; Holtz, M.; Pette, K. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    volume per day could be treated with the upflow process with a purification efficiency of order 90%. CSM APPLICATION Although the initial work at Wageningen was with potato starch wastewater, the first industrial scale application with this process... was carried out by Centrale Suiker Maatschappij (CSM) , the largest privately-owned beet sugar company in Holland. Their factories had been treating wastewater with oxidation ponds which carried the serious drawbacks of large energy consumption...

  2. Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

  3. Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

  4. Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with food, and NPK fluxes at farm level. The biofuels were crude rapeseed oil, horse draft, ethanol from a combination of a workhorse and a crude rapeseed oil-fuelled tractor. Ethanol from wheat had the largest impactIntegrating Food Production and Biodiversity Energy and Scale Issues in Implementation Kristina

  5. Creating Value Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

  6. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    power grid. The fact sheet contains performance data from the plant after one year of operation. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry More Documents &...

  7. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation on Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry, given by Kevin Chilcoat of Frito-Lay North America, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy...

  8. Opportunities for Enhancing the Texas Food-Processing Industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenthal, Marie; Capps, Oral Jr; Goodwin, H.L. Jr; Williams, Gary W.; Nichols, John P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tooe ZTA245.7 ~lrt9~-T~_ LIBRARY TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY JAN 24 1995 TEXAS STATE DOCUMENTS TEXAS STATE DEPOSITORY B-1719 NOVEMBER 1994 OPPORTUNITIES FOR ENHANCING THE TEXAS FOOD-PROCESSING INDUSTRY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station... ? Edward A. Hiler, Director? The Texas A&M University System ? College Station, Texas / (Blank Page in OrigIUIllblletiBl ' "f .? . ~ Opportunities for Erihancing the Texas Food-Processing Industry , Marie Wildenthal Oral Capps, Jr. H. L. Goodwin...

  9. Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Agricultural productivity and industrialization: A reformulation Debasis Mondal Sept 20, 2014 Abstract In this paper we examine the role of agricultural productivity on the process of industrialization industrialization by releasing labor from agriculture to industry. In fact, when agriculture is highly productive

  10. Hierarchical production scheduling in the process industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierarchical production scheduling in the process industry Anna Lindholm Nils-Petter Nytz are handled. The activities are are denoted production scheduling (PS) and detailed production scheduling (DPS. The focus is on production scheduling for chemical process industries with continuous production

  11. Energy And The Foods Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R.

    temperature of the outside air. Other factors limiting downward progression of SCT inc lude gas pressure-driven pumping systems and improperly designed hot-gas defrost systems. The chief factors limiting upward progression of the SST include excess... flows is performed, with the objective of determining where heat can be transferred from cooling to heating streams. The heat transfer can be either via recuperative heat exchangers or industrial heat pumps; the choice of which is defined...

  12. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  13. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    foods that many industry members felt were not compatible with organic agriculture, including ingredients made from genetically modified plants, irradiation

  14. Automated Tuning of a Vision-based Inspection System for Industrial Food Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payeur, Pierre

    Automated Tuning of a Vision-based Inspection System for Industrial Food Manufacturing Mai Moussa. INTRODUCTION For several years, the food industry has adopted automated vision-based inspection systems Ottawa, Canada [m.chetima, ppayeur]@uottawa.ca Abstract--Quality control in industrial food manufacturing

  15. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne`s process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  16. Production of degradable polymers from food-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.: Coleman, R.D.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Moon, S.H.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, billions of pounds of cheese whey permeate and approximately 10 billion pounds of potatoes processed each year are typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3{endash}6/ton; moreover, the transportation required for these means of disposal can be expensive. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that: Biologically converts existing food-processing waste streams into lactic acid and uses lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable polylactic acid (PLA) and modified PLA plastics and coatings. An Argonne process for biologically converting high-carbohydrate food waste will not only help to solve a waste problem for the food industry, but will also save energy and be economically attractive. Although the initial substrate for Argonne's process development is potato by-product, the process can be adapted to convert other food wastes, as well as corn starch, to lactic acid. Proprietary technology for biologically converting greater than 90% of the starch in potato wastes to glucose has been developed. Glucose and other products of starch hydrolysis are subsequently fermented by bacteria that produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is recovered, concentrated, and further purified to a polymer-grade product.

  17. Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile Economic Sustainability and Ecological and Comparisons · Production and Processing · Sales and Markets · Economic and Ecological Contributions Sawmills · 1/4 for Roundwood (post and pole, vigas, house logs), furniture, excelsior etc. ­ Sawmill

  18. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

  19. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Machala. Plasma for Bio-Decontamination, Medicine and FoodPotts, et al. "Plasma decontamination of sealed packages."

  20. Quantity Food Production Instructor: Jim Vernere Teaching Assistant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    knowledge and empathy of the responsibilities and duties of the food production manager and gain skill food is cooked and stored. 2. Develop further knowledge of the factors which affect food composition, preservation, processing, and service. 4. Understand principles of food service safety and accident prevention

  1. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major Model Components - Resource Assessment - Industry Structure - Product/Market Strategy - Economic Impacts Workforce Training Network Formation Resource Assessment Government Support Financing Economic Development Technology Profitability Resource Assessment Current & projected Commercial species Lesser-used species

  2. Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Trust of Oregon offers the Industrial and Agricultural Production Efficiency Program to customers of Portland General Electric, Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas. In order to...

  3. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    174 Preventing Food Contamination A Need for Innovation infurther prevent microbial contamination. Due largely becausequick migration of the contamination in the example given

  4. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    European market to genetically modified foods. She arguesfoods that many industry members felt were not compatible with organic agriculture, including ingredients made from genetically modifiedgenetically modified crops. Below, I discuss the distinction that co-op leaders make between food-

  5. China's food production under water and land limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoisungwan, Piyatida

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The future availability of the natural resources (water and land) needed for food production is highly uncertain. Evidence shows diminishing natural resources and growing food demand throughout many parts of the world. ...

  6. TrendSetter Solar Products Inc aka Trendsetter Industries formerly...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TrendSetter Solar Products Inc aka Trendsetter Industries formerly Six River Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: TrendSetter Solar Products Inc (aka Trendsetter Industries,...

  7. DONATED FOOD SERVICES REQUEST The Department of Housing and Food Services proudly donates Pepsi Products and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    DONATED FOOD SERVICES REQUEST The Department of Housing and Food Services proudly donates Pepsi in utilizing this service, please review the following important information. Pepsi products and food items: __________ Pitt Students Only? Yes____ No_____ At this event I would like... (Please List Specifically) Pepsi

  8. animal food production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of biotechnological processes in food production CiteSeer Summary: Knowledge Based BioEconomy KBBE is based mainly on taking advantages of modern, innovative technologies,...

  9. animals food products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of biotechnological processes in food production CiteSeer Summary: Knowledge Based BioEconomy KBBE is based mainly on taking advantages of modern, innovative technologies,...

  10. Forest Products Industry of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

  11. All Food Waste Food-soiled Paper Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    Soymilk or Juice Boxes Yogurt Containers Plastics #1 and #2 (Narrow-necked bottles only) Glass Bottles Food Waste Clean Paper #1 and #2 Plastic Bottles Anything else that can be COMPOSTED or RECYCLED, chopsticks Teabags Non-Compostable Coffee Lids Liquids or Ice Plastic Glass Metal Styrofoam Soymilk

  12. Economic Contributions of Florida's Agricultural, Natural Resource, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20081 Alan W. Hodges and Mohammad Rahmani2 1 economic sectors for food and kindred product manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input supplies, support services, and nature-based recreation/eco-tourism. In addition to farming, forestry

  13. Economic Contributions of Florida Agriculture, Natural Resources, Food and Kindred Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Manufacturing and Distribution, and Service Industries in 20061 Alan W. Hodges, Mohammad Rahmani, and W. David range of other economic sectors for food and kindred products manufacturing, wholesale and retail distribution, input suppliers, support services, and nature-based recreation. In addition to farms, forests

  14. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crout, Neil

    1 TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS A.G. GILLETT1 , N #12;2 ABSTRACT A recently developed semi-mechanistic temporal model to is used predict food product (exchangeable K, pH, % clay and % organic matter content). A raster database of soil characteristics

  15. Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Implications for Asia Pacific 56th AARES Annual Conference Fremantle, Western Australia 7-10 February 2012 William T. Coyle #12;Global Biofuel Production and Food Security: Making the Connection --Past analysis and the evidence about biofuels and spiking

  16. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United StatesSustainable Food and Energy Production in the United Statesquality of renewable energy production and then assessing

  17. Healthy soils for food system resiliency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban gardens produce a growing portion of food consumed in U.S. cities and throughout the world. Spreading out food production means less reliance on centralized food industries, making the food system less vulnerable to ...

  18. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  19. Ethanol: Producting Food, Feed, and Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 joint quarterly Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Todd Sneller (Nebraska Ethanol Board) discussed the food versus fuel issue.

  20. Foods as Production and Delivery Vehicles for Human Vaccines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korban, Schuyler S.

    the use of genetically modified plants. It has been demonstrated that plant-derived antigensReview Foods as Production and Delivery Vehicles for Human Vaccines Schuyler S. Korban, PhD, Sergei.E.B.), University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois Key words: food crops, transgenic plants, plant-based vaccines, oral

  1. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 7: INDUSTRIAL FOOD...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leak detection Preliminary study how laser perforation of blueberry can improve fruit infusion with more yield and better quality Laser food processing (marker and micro...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Organic Food The organic food industry is one of the fastest growing markets in the U.S. With the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequently Asked Questions about Organic Food The organic food industry is one of the fastest growing markets in the U.S. With the establishment of organic food standards by the U.S. Department choosing organic food, know the answers to consumer's most frequently asked questions. Q: What is meant

  3. Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

  4. The Use of Infrared Scanning in the Food and Fiber Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, D. F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I " THE USE OF INFRARED SCANNING IN THE FOOD AND FIBER INDUSTRY Dale F. Kuhn Infrared Scanning Inc. Overland Park, Kansas During the nineteenth century came the discovery In the food and fiber industry two extremes that all objects... the fields ing can detect a malfunction before a critical of physics and optics, technologists can convert situation arises. this radiation to an electronic signal and manip- Infrared scanning serves as an excellent tOOl,1 ulate it to solve problems...

  5. Cottonseed Products as Feed, Fertilizer, and Human Food.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1926-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the necessary amount of bulk for the cligcqtire organs to function properly. Under such conditions, COTTONSEED PRODUCTS AS FEED, FERTILIZER, AND HUMAN FOOD 15 roughages have a feeding value due to their bulk alone. A ton of liulls has as much of this value...TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION B. YOUNGBLOOD, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION. BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS - BULLETIN NO. 341 JUNE, 1926 -- I I I DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY COTTONSEED PRODUCTS AS r * 3 FEED, FERTILIZER, AND (5 y ': ,.-> HUMAN FOOD 3...

  6. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  7. Use of cooling-temperature heat for sustainable food production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food production and energy are undoubtedly interlinked. However, at present food production depends almost exclusively on direct use of stored energy sources, may they be nuclear-, petroleum- or bio-based. Furthermore, non-storage based “renewable” energy systems, like wind and solar, need development before bering able to contribute at a significant level. This presentation will point towards surplus heat as a way to bridge the gap between today’s food systems and truly sustainable ones, suitable to be performed in urban and peri-urban areas. Considering that arable land and fresh water resources are the base for our present food systems, but are limited, in combination with continued urbanisation, such solutions are urgently needed. By combining the use of surplus energy with harvest of society’s organic side flows, like e.g. food waste and aquatic based cash crops, truly sustainable and urban close food systems are possible at a level of significance also for global food security.

  8. Supply chain network optimization : low volume industrial chemical product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacha, Fred (Frederick Omondi)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical industry is a highly competitive and low margin industry. Chemical transportation faces stringent safety regulations meaning that Cost-To-Serve (C2S), costs associated with products net flow from manufacturers ...

  9. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, starch and corn refining, since these can be a source of fuel products. The sugar cane industry

  10. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  11. Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard Vlosky-Added Training in Other States · The Need for Training in Louisiana-Past Research #12;Industry Development & Adding Value #12;Value-Added Industry Development is Multi-Faceted Marketing Workforce Training Strategic

  12. Variety and industrial production : the case of housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimits-Cazaux, Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial processes have addressed with various degrees of success the question of housing production. If assembly-line methods have proven their efficiency in the production and distribution of low-cost housing, they ...

  13. Scope for industrial applications of production scheduling models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    ERP Level 4 MES / CPM Production & Control Level 3 Control systems/sensors (DCS, PLC, SCADA, BMS management, planning, scheduling, quality control, recipe management, setpoint definition, integrationScope for industrial applications of production scheduling models and solution methods Iiro

  14. Adapting to contradiction : competing models of organization in the United States organic foods industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haedicke, Michael Anthony

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    food producers such as Coca-Cola and Procter & Gamble rankprofessional worked for Coca-Cola as a sales manager on theof Coke products because Coca-Cola had offered a discounted

  15. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS: COMPARING PLA PLASTIC FOOD USE PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sections--agriculture, manufacture and transport. Energy inputs for each of these sections were determined in the analysis. BFS, however, avoids this energy input by purchasing a starch that is a waste stream from anotherLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS: COMPARING PLA PLASTIC FOOD USE PRODUCTS ON THE BASIS OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION Sin

  16. Panel Session Notes: Session 1: Food Security and Ag Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    related to food production, or is scarce energy the driver for changes? (Dr. Fred Kirschenmann) Nature. Not in the sense of regulations, but perhaps otherwise. Biotechnology to improve crops, such as pest resistance. Europe and USA are 40% of its saturating capacity, but the rest of the world still far behind

  17. Global product development in semiconductor industry : Intel -- Tick-Tock product development cadence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Cheolmin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates on changes in semiconductor industry's product development methodology by following Intel's product development from year 2000. Intel was challenged by customer's preference change, competitors new ...

  18. Meat Science and Animal Food Product Safety Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and depth in undergraduate education, graduate education, research and outreach in meat science and animal manufacturing industries and regulatory agencies. Graduate education, research, and outreach will focus on pre and international credibility of the meat products, and producer, consumer, and food handler education in food

  19. Streamlined carbon footprint computation : case studies in the food industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yin Jin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest barriers in product Carbon Footprinting is the large amount of time and effort required for data collection across the supply chain. Tesco's decision to downsize their carbon footprint project from the ...

  20. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry - Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoal Combustion ProductsCombustion Safety for Appliances Usingby

  1. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  2. Industrialization and manufacturing steps within the Global Product Lifecycle context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    steps within the Product Life cycle Management (PLM) context. Initially, PLM was focused almost. In the same time, the industrialization and the production are not sufficiently integrated into the PLM solutions. Currently, there is much to be gained by extending the coverage of PLM to production step

  3. An Overview of the Louisiana Primary Solid Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goal of this second study is to profile the primary solid wood products industry. In addition (including pulp and paper) and secondary manufacturing establishments (Jacob et al. 1987). The forest

  4. Microorganisms In Industry And Environment From Scientific and Industrial Research to Consumer Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Products Proceedings of the III International Conference on Environmental, Industrial and Applied and Bioinformatics Unit, Medical Biotechnology Department, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran Biotechnology Department, Biotechnology Research Center, Pasteur Institute of Iran, #69 Pasteur Ave., Tehran

  5. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    linkage between energy efficiency and productivity. Energyand increased energy efficiency in integrated paper andand Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1997.

  6. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the linkage between energy efficiency and productivity.and increased energy efficiency in integrated paper andand Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 1997.

  7. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    facility reliability Reduced wear and tear on equipment/equipment performance Shorter process cycle times Improved product quality/purity Increased reliability

  8. Production design for plate products in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We describe an optimization tool for a multistage production process for ... plates. The problem we solve yields a production design (or plan) for rectangular plate.

  9. Industrialization and manufacturing steps within the Global Product Lifecycle context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    steps within the Product Life cycle Management (PLM) context. Initially, PLM was focused almost. In the same time, the industrialization and the manufacturing are not sufficiently integrated into the PLM solutions. Actually, there is much to be gained by extending the coverage of PLM to production stage

  10. Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, N. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today...

  11. Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, N. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as combined heat and power (CHP). This paper discusses the differences between energy end-uses and service demands, proposes an approach for approximating service demands and discusses the ramifications of this alternative representation to energy modeling...

  12. Production design for plate products in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjeeb Dash

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 5, 2007 ... Abstract: We describe an optimization tool for a multistage production process for rectangular steel plates. The problem we solve yields a ...

  13. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  14. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy contributing to the state's economy. The food and fiber system in Texas is evolving and changing. The structure in state and local economies. Of particular interest is the relationship between the food and fiber system

  15. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  16. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  17. CALENDAR YEAR 2012 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compressor control types. Learn how to achieve cost savings through more effective production and use determine system efficiency, identify degraded fans, collect data for trending system operation://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/fan_systems.html Motor Systems Management Motor Systems Management training is designed to help facility personnel reduce

  18. India's pulp and paper industry: Productivity and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's pulp and paper sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both statistical and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that productivity declined over the observed period from 1973-74 to 1993-94 by 1.1% p.a. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's pulp and paper sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protection afforded by high tariffs on imported paper products and other policies, which allowed inefficient, small plants to enter the market and flourish. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with liberalization of the sector, and tighter environmental controls, the industry is moving towards higher efficiency and productivity. However, the analysis also shows that because these improvements are being hampered by significant financial and other barriers the industry might have a long way to go.

  19. California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

  1. Benefits of supplementing an industrial waste anaerobic digester with energy crops for increased biogas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nges, Ivo Achu, E-mail: Nges.Ivo_Achu@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Escobar, Federico; Fu Xinmei; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study demonstrates the feasibility of co-digestion food industrial waste with energy crops. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laboratory batch co-digestion led to improved methane yield and carbon to nitrogen ratio as compared to mono-digestion of industrial waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion was also seen as a means of degrading energy crops with nutrients addition as crops are poor in nutrients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was concluded that co-digestion led an over all economically viable process and ensured a constant supply of feedstock. - Abstract: Currently, there is increasing competition for waste as feedstock for the growing number of biogas plants. This has led to fluctuation in feedstock supply and biogas plants being operated below maximum capacity. The feasibility of supplementing a protein/lipid-rich industrial waste (pig manure, slaughterhouse waste, food processing and poultry waste) mesophilic anaerobic digester with carbohydrate-rich energy crops (hemp, maize and triticale) was therefore studied in laboratory scale batch and continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) with a view to scale-up to a commercial biogas process. Co-digesting industrial waste and crops led to significant improvement in methane yield per ton of feedstock and carbon-to-nitrogen ratio as compared to digestion of the industrial waste alone. Biogas production from crops in combination with industrial waste also avoids the need for micronutrients normally required in crop digestion. The batch co-digestion methane yields were used to predict co-digestion methane yield in full scale operation. This was done based on the ratio of methane yields observed for laboratory batch and CSTR experiments compared to full scale CSTR digestion of industrial waste. The economy of crop-based biogas production is limited under Swedish conditions; therefore, adding crops to existing industrial waste digestion could be a viable alternative to ensure a constant/reliable supply of feedstock to the anaerobic digester.

  2. The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gene

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the food and fiber sector's contribution from 1999 to 2001 can be attributed to a 5.8 percent annual growth in the state's economy over the period, while the growth in the food and fiber sector was just over 2 per- cent annually. Most of the growth... in the state's economy occurred in the retail sector, F.I.R.E., and services. Figure 2 compares the contribution of the food and fiber system to the other industries that make up the state?s economy. The largest single industry classification is services...

  3. The production and distribution of food is one of the most important economic activities in the world. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    produced and to respond to issues such as irradiation of foods, genetically modified foods, food in cell physiology and biochemistry, genetics and organic chemistry. A Principles of Nutrition (FOOD 2001The production and distribution of food is one of the most important economic activities

  4. Study of Reasons for the Adoption of Lean Production in the Automobile Industry: Questions for the AEC Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    Study of Reasons for the Adoption of Lean Production in the Automobile Industry: Questions IN THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY: QUESTIONS FOR THE AEC INDUSTRIES Scott Featherston1 ABSTRACT The primary intent in opting for an alternative? Were there pressures that gave automobile producers no option but to alter

  5. Opportunities for UPC Product and Service Suppliers: The Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    product and service suppliers. #12;4 UPC Suppliers To The Wood Products Industry Twenty-seven companies.3 percent of all corporate sales for these 27 respondent companies. An additional 15 companies indicated, from the largest timbers to small lengths of wood moulding are complying with customer requirements

  6. Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association, Canadian Pulp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association

  7. Evaluating the potential use of winter cover crops in cornsoybean systems for sustainable co-production of food and fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in displacement of grain crops with dedicated bioenergy crops such as switch grass, miscanthus, and hybrid poplar. Meeting the ambitious goals that have been set for bioenergy production without impacting food production, specifically that by displacing food production it will lead to higher food prices, increased incidence

  8. Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security. A topical lunch on October 4th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Conservation Agriculture and its Role in Soil Health, Sustainable Food Production and Food Security community more involved in the larger picture of sustainable land management to meet future food security Management will need involvement of soil science, agronomy, plant pathology, natural resource management

  9. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    food. They include cooking, boiling, baking, drying, refrigerating/freezing, dehydration, pasteurizing, fermentation, and irradiation.

  10. The Influence of Product Markets on Industrial Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, William

    ; Lace Finishing, or whatever. As recently as 1961, the Ministry of Labour’s official Industrial Relations Handbook could say: ‘When the agreement is made by a number of different employers or, as is often the case, by an employers’ association acting... of product markets is also reflected in the changing impact of collective bargaining. In a review of the micro-economic effects of trade unions, Metcalf notes that several studies in the 1980s had reported a negative association between union presence...

  11. The Impact of Product Contamination in a Multi-Stage Food Supply Chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chebolu-Subramanian, Vijaya

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IMPACT OF PRODUCT CONTAMINATION IN A MULTI- STAGE FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN A Dissertation by VIJAYA B. CHEBOLU-SUBRAMANIAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...-Subramanian THE IMPACT OF PRODUCT CONTAMINATION IN A MULTI- STAGE FOOD SUPPLY CHAIN A Dissertation by VIJAYA B. CHEBOLU-SUBRAMANIAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  12. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    . Sterilizing food containers (for example, by irradiation) without cleaning them eliminates biological hazards Resources FAPC-165 Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Timothy J. Bowser Food Processing Engineer Introduction

  13. Managing novelty at the interfaces between concept and product : case studies for the automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarewych, Lara Daniv, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Appearance of the product is a discerning factor for the consumers purchase decisions. Time from concept to product creation is a critical factor in the competitive automotive industry. The period to develop a product is ...

  14. Aggregate Production Planning for Process Industries under Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmarkar, U. S.; Rajaram, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as the oil refining and steel industries, there arerefining industry appears to be a particularly egregious example of jockeying by crude oil

  15. Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Food Processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, N.; Milmoe, P. H.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The food processing industry is the fourth largest consumer of energy in the US industrial sector. Food processors use nearly 1,200 trillion Btu of energy per year. The industry is comprised of more than 21,000 processing plants. Total production...

  16. New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the growing global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, C; Napier, JA; Clemente, TE; Cahoon, EB

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of oilseed metabolism and in the development of new oilseed platforms and metabolic engineering technologies.

  17. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

  18. California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Glen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food and Drug Administration Green Energy Management SystemC. GEMS Overview The Green Energy Management System (GEMS)the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS)

  19. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30, 2013DepartmentEnterprise ServersHot Food Holding

  20. INDUSTRIELL HYGIEN OCH PRODUKTSKERHET KMB030 Industrial Hygiene and Product Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIELL HYGIEN OCH PRODUKTSÄKERHET KMB030 Industrial Hygiene and Product Safety Poäng: 5 omfattar hygien, aseptik, Rena Rum, process design, rengöring (kemiskt/termiska förfaranden

  1. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Measuring consumer perceptions for the development of product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Measuring consumer perceptions for the development in "International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 33, 6 (2004) 507-525" DOI : 10.1016/j.ergon.2003.12.004 #12;2 International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics Abstract Product semantics, the "study of the symbolic qualities

  2. Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry in automotive industry INTRODUCTION Projectification and platform approaches have been two main transformation in the automotive industry. This sector provides an interesting empirical opportunity to study this question, since

  3. A CONTROL SYSTEM FOR TOBACCO SHRED PRODUCTION LINE BASED ON INDUSTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality insurance (Sun Xin, 2007). The Rockwell Automation Company introduced a new industrial EthernetA CONTROL SYSTEM FOR TOBACCO SHRED PRODUCTION LINE BASED ON INDUSTRIAL ETHERNET Li Zhang1 , Guang Industrial Corporation, Nanyang, He Nan, China, 473000 * Corresponding author, Address: College

  4. Aligning product and supply chain strategies in the mobile phone industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Robert (Robert Curtis)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing and managing the supply chain of a company in the mobile phone industry is particularly challenging. Short product lifecycles, rapidly evolving technology, globally linked distribution networks, increasing product ...

  5. Services and the Business Models of Product Firms: An Empirical Analysis of the Software Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Fernando F.

    Some product firms increasingly rely on service revenues as part of their business models. One possible explanation is that they turn to services to generate additional profits when their product industries mature and ...

  6. Research, Development and Demonstration of Bio-Mass Boiler for Food Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Steve; Knapp, David

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Frito-Lay is working to reduce carbon emissions from their manufacturing plants. As part of this effort, they invested in a â??biomass-firedâ?ť boiler at the Topeka, Kansas, plant. Frito-Lay partnered with Burns & McDonnell Engineering, Inc. and CPL Systems, Inc., to design and construct a steam producing boiler using â??carbon neutralâ?ť fuels such as wood wastes (e.g. tree bark), shipping pallets, and used rubber vehicle tires. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) joined with Frito-Lay, Burns & McDonnell, and CPL to analyze the reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that result from use of biomass-fired boilers in the food manufacturing environment. DOE support provided for the data collection and analysis, and reporting necessary to evaluate boiler efficiencies and reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. The Frito-Lay biomass-fired boiler has resulted in significant reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions from the Topeka production facility. The use of natural gas has been reduced by 400 to 420 million standard cubic feet per year with corresponding reductions of 24,000 to 25,000 tons of CO{sub 2}. The boiler does require auxiliary â??functions,â?ť however, that are unnecessary for a gas-fired boiler. These include heavy motors and fans for moving fuel and firing the boiler, trucks and equipment for delivering the fuel and moving at the boiler plant, and chippers for preparing the fuel prior to delivery. Each of these operations requires the combustion of fossil fuels or electricity and has associated CO{sub 2} emissions. Even after accounting for each of these auxiliary processes, however, the biomass-fired boiler results in net emission reductions of 22,500 to 23,500 tons of CO{sub 2} per year.

  7. Bioaccumulation and food chain transfer of corrosion products from radioactive stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.S.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two sets of experiments were conducted to determine if corrosion products from radioactive Type 347 stainless steel could be biologically transferred from sediment through a marine food chain, and whether corrosion products dissolved in seawater could be bioaccumulated and then eliminated. Corrosion products containing /sup 60/Co and /sup 63/Ni from the radioactive stainless steel were introduced into marine sediments. Infaunal polychaete worms exposed to these sediments bioaccumulated the radionuclides. The feeding of these worms to shrimp and fish resulted in a trophic transfer of the radioactive products across a one-step food chain. The magnitude of the transfers are described in terms of transfer factors. Dissolved corrosion products as measured by the radionuclides were also bioaccumulated by shrimp and fish concentrating more than fish. Concentration factors were calculated.

  8. Ergonomic Solutions for the Secondary Wood Products Industry On October 17th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazo, Rado

    Ergonomic Solutions for the Secondary Wood Products Industry On October 17th and 18th , 2001, you are invited to a conference entitled: Ergonomic Solutions for the Secondary Wood Products Industry. This seminar will be held at Executive Inn, in Louisville, Kentucky. Hear the latest developments in ergonomics

  9. eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry: A Comparison of the United States & Canada Olivian Pitis products industry in the United States and Canada. Both solid and pulp/paper companies were surveyed the United States & Canada. Objectives #12;All Respondents Results #12;1 company .05% of respondents North

  10. Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2. Using E-Commerce in the Forest The forest products industry is rapidly adopting e-commerce solutions as it advances in the information age. In this chapter, the unique e-commerce needs of this sector's small businesses are discussed. Current experience

  11. Aggregate Production Planning for Process Industries under Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmarkar, U. S.; Rajaram, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as petro- refining, petrochemicals, basic chemicals, cement,the context of the petrochemical industry, these producerscorrespond to the ten major petrochemical refining companies

  12. Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    1 Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis of how, Andrew J. Dougill and Piers M. Forster August 2010 Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 29 #12;2 The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) was established

  13. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

  14. Practical Training in Microalgae Utilization with Key Industry Engineering Group Key Industry Engineering Group s.r.o. has developed a biotechnology for the production of an animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practical Training in Microalgae Utilization with Key Industry Engineering Group Key Industry on a suspension of Planktochlorella microalgae. The product consists of a suspension of algae in the growing

  15. Strategic change and the coevolution of industry-university relationships : evidence from the forest products industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pertuzé Salas, Julio Alberto

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present an analysis of the dynamics of industry-university relationships tracing the origin of the relationship and its changes over time as the firm's strategies evolve. We analyze the strategic trajectories ...

  16. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  17. Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renner, Martin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning Division, the opportunity to push for new legislation that prioritized soil conservation practices over production control

  18. Industrial recovery capability. Final report. [Claus alumina catalyst for sulfur production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg, D.W.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an evaluation of the vulnerability - to a nuclear strike, terrorist attack, or natural disaster - of our national capacity to produce chlorine, beryllium, and a particular specialty alumina catalyst required for the production of sulfur. All of these industries are of critical importance to the United States economy. Other industries that were examined and found not to be particularly vulnerable are medicinal drugs and silicon wafers for electronics. Thus, only the three more vulnerable industries are addressed in this report.

  19. Establishment of a Graduate Certificate Program in Biobased Industrial Products – Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John R. Schlup

    2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A certificate of graduate studies in Biobased Industrial Products is to be established at Kansas State University (KSU) along with the development of a similar program at Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS. At KSU, the program of study will be coordinated through the steering committee of the Agricultural Products Utilization Forum (APUF); the certificate of graduate studies will be awarded through the Graduate School of Kansas State University. This certificate will establish an interdisciplinary program of study that will: (1) ensure participating students receive a broad education in several disciplines related to Biobased Industrial Products, (2) provide a documented course of study for students preferring a freestanding certificate program, and (3) provide a paradigm shift in student awareness away from petroleum-based feedstocks to the utilization of renewable resources for fuels and chemical feedstocks. The academic program described herein will accomplish this goal by: (1) providing exposure to several academic disciplines key to Biobased Industrial Products; (2) improving university/industry collaboration through an external advisory board, distance learning opportunities, and student internships; (3) expanding the disciplines represented on the students' supervisory committee; (4) establishing a seminar series on Biobased Industrial Products that draws upon expert speakers representing several disciplines; and (5) increasing collaboration between disciplines. Numerous research programs emphasizing Biobased Industrial Products currently exist at KSU and PSU. The certificate of graduate studies, the emphasis on interdisciplinary collaboration within the students? thesis research, the proposed seminar series, and formation of an industrial advisory board will: (1) provide an interdisciplinary academic experience that spans several departments, four colleges, four research centers, and two universities; (2) tangibly promote collaboration between KSU and PSU; (3) catalyze involvement of plant geneticists with researchers active in the development and utilization of biobased industrial products; and, (4) promote university/industry collaboration.

  20. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  1. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF ENERGY AND PRODUCTION IN PROCESS INDUSTRIES: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    ) The task of the auxiliary boiler, together with the recovery boiler, is to produce high-pressure steam (HPS, . . . , n) units, and delivers the raw material to department i + 1, working at rate ui+1 units; bj,i+1 · ui+1 units are consumed from buffer j for 1 Partially financed by JNICT/PRAXIS XXI program. Industrial

  2. Moving Toward Product Line Engineering in a Nuclear Industry Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    power have special institutions overseeing and regulating nuclear safety. Nuclear industry projects must conform to na- tional safety institutions and international regulations. In many cases, regulatory sophisticated and complex energy systems ever designed. Nuclear safety Permission to make digital or hard copies

  3. Understanding the link between aggregated industrial production and the carbon price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the link between aggregated industrial production and the carbon price. In The Economics of Green Energy Association (Boston), the BC3 Low Carbon Programme Workshop on "The Economics of Green Energy and Efficiency

  4. The Power of Integrality: Linkages between Product Architecture, Innovation, and Industry Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fixson, Sebastian K.

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial literature stream suggests that many products are becoming more modular over time, and that this development is often associated with a change in industry structure towards higher degrees of specialization. ...

  5. Highlights of Industrial Energy Audits with Application in Paper Product Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, M. N.; Bond, S. K.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience in executing comprehensive energy audits in varied industrial plants has resulted in a basic audit methodology and has revealed several interesting energy conservation opportunities applicable to paper products manufacturing. The most...

  6. Assessing and reducing product portfolio complexity in the pharmaceutical industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leiter, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overly complex product portfolios lead to inefficient use of resources and limit an organization's ability to react quickly to changing market dynamics. The challenges of reducing portfolio complexity are defining excess ...

  7. Aggregate Production Planning for Process Industries under Competition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karmarkar, U. S.; Rajaram, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurs in oil production, where the supply of crude is oftenproduction quantities and profits for refiners and the crude oilproduction quantities and profits for refiners and the crude oil

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  9. Organizational Assessment Of Integrating CAD And Product Data Management Tools In The Furniture Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Industry Furniture Manufacturing and Management Center Technical Report 1996-1997 Eric N. Wiebe Jennifer J of issues faced by furniture companies are given. The literature review closes by focusing on additional in manufacturing and design has popularized the concept of the virtual product database. Product Data Management

  10. Du, X., Kockelman, K. M. 1 1 TRACKING TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION ACROSS A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    commodities highlight the importance of food 35 and petroleum manufacturing sectors, in terms of production expansions) and exogenous economic shocks (e.g., increases in14 export demands).15 Other spatial IO commodity flows and transportation network flows to17 evaluate the indirect impacts of an unexpected event

  11. Production of bioenergy and biochemicals from industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    and agricultural wastewater, includ- ing methanogenic anaerobic digestion, biological hydro- gen production on wastewater treatment from pollution control to resource exploitation. Many bioprocesses can provide bioenergy. Recovery of energy and valuable materials might reduce the cost of wastewater treatment, and somewhat

  12. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ruijie

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

  13. Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    companies regularly increase production by adding additional manufacturing equipment, or increasing operating hours. This approach can add large new energy loads to the electrical grid and gas distribution networks. Alternately, increasing production...Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production, Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy John Seryak Gary Epstein Mark D’Antonio Engineer jseryak@ers-inc.com President gepstein@ers-inc.com Vice President mdantonio...

  14. Structure of Cow-Calf Industry Beef production in Texas is a $7 billion industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , carcass evaluation, record-keeping, and organic and natural beef production. For more than a half century Cattle Short Course. Economic Benefit The economic benefit of the Beef Cattle Short Course was measured with these practices range from $8 to $25 per animal, resulting in a total economic benefit of $350,000 in 2011

  15. Development of a New Extended Motor Product Label for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, E.; Boteler, R.; Elliot, R. N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    opportunities ESL-IE-14-05-11 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Prescriptive Rebate Programs Provides a rebate for specific products that have been determined to be more efficient... of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Example: Prescriptive Rebates Example: NEMA Premium ® • Label identifies highest efficiency motors • Label is acceptable documentation for efficiency programs...

  16. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process residual like bagasse are now available (Cornland etsugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industrySection 7.4.7. ). The use of bagasse for energy is likely to

  17. The use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other equatorial climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Curtis B

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the use of daylight in the design of a controlled environment for food production in the Caribbean and other Equatorial climates. An expanding population has put a tremendous burden on the food ...

  18. Martn G. Marchetta, Frdrique Mayer, Raymundo Q. Forradellas, A reference framework following a proactive-product approach for Product Lifecycle Management, Computers in Industry 62 (2011) 672683

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a proactive-product approach for Product Lifecycle Management, Computers in Industry 62 (2011) 672­683 A reference framework following a proactive-product approach for Product Lifecycle Management Martín G Lorraine, 8 rue Bastien Lepage, BP 90647 (54010) Nancy Cedex, France Abstract Product Lifecycle Management

  19. Influence of combustion parameters on NOx production in an industrial boiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldajani, Mansour A.

    Influence of combustion parameters on NOx production in an industrial boiler M.A. Habib a,*, M; accepted 14 April 2007 Available online 24 June 2007 Abstract NOx formation during the combustion process occurs mainly through the oxidation of nitrogen in the combustion air (thermal NOx) and through oxidation

  20. Simultaneous Production and Distribution of Industrial Gas Supply-Chains Pablo A. Marchetti1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    -chains. In this industry, cryogenic air separation processes are used to produce oxygen, nitrogen, and argon both as gaseous and liquid products. Air separation units consume large amounts of electricity, mainly due American Air Liquide Inc., Delaware Research and Technology Center, Newark, DE 19702 3 Air Liquide, Paris

  1. CALENDAR YEARS 2012-3 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compressor control types. Learn how to achieve cost savings through more effective production and use determine system efficiency, identify degraded fans, collect data for trending system operation://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/fan_systems.html Motor Systems Management Motor Systems Management training is designed to help facility personnel reduce

  2. SUMMER-FALL 2011 SCHEDULE Workshops to Improve Industrial Productivity by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compressor control types. Learn how to achieve cost savings through more effective production and use determine system efficiency, identify degraded fans, collect data for trending system operation://www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices/fan_systems.html Motor Systems Management Motor Systems Management training is designed to help facility personnel reduce

  3. Divisionalization, product cannibalization and product location choice: Evidence from the U.S. automobile industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eui Kyo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    division's new product location choice. But this study didn't find any significant role of divisional status on new product location choice. And contrary to our expectation, the results of intra-firm divisional domain overlap and new product location choice...

  4. Addendum to industrial market assessment of the products of mild gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to review and update the 1988 report by J. E. Sinor Consultants Inc., Industrial Market Assessment of the Products of Mild Gasification, and to more fully present market opportunities for two char-based products from the mild gasification process (MGP): Formcoke for the iron and steel industry, and activated carbon for wastewater cleanup and flue gas scrubbing. Please refer to the original report for additional details. In the past, coal conversion projects have and liquids produced, and the value of the residual char was limited to its fuel value. Some projects had limited success until gas and oil competition overwhelmed them. The strategy adopted for this assessment is to seek first a premium value for the char in a market that has advantages over gas and oil, and then to find the highest values possible for gases, liquids, and tars, either on-site or sold into existing markets. During the intervening years since the 1988 report, there have been many changes in the national economy, industrial production, international competition, and environmental regulations. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) will have a large impact on industry. There is considerable uncertainty about how the Act will be implemented, but it specifically addresses coke-oven batteries. This may encourage industry to consider formcoke produced via mild gasification as a low-pollution substitute for conventional coke. The chemistry and technology of coke making steel were reviewed in the 1988 market assessment and will not be repeated here. The CAAA require additional pollution control measures for most industrial facilities, but this creates new opportunities for the mild gasification process.

  5. Addendum to industrial market assessment of the products of mild gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to review and update the 1988 report by J. E. Sinor Consultants Inc., ``Industrial Market Assessment of the Products of Mild Gasification, and to more fully present market opportunities for two char-based products from the mild gasification process (MGP): Formcoke for the iron and steel industry, and activated carbon for wastewater cleanup and flue gas scrubbing. Please refer to the original report for additional details. In the past, coal conversion projects have and liquids produced, and the value of the residual char was limited to its fuel value. Some projects had limited success until gas and oil competition overwhelmed them. The strategy adopted for this assessment is to seek first a premium value for the char in a market that has advantages over gas and oil, and then to find the highest values possible for gases, liquids, and tars, either on-site or sold into existing markets. During the intervening years since the 1988 report, there have been many changes in the national economy, industrial production, international competition, and environmental regulations. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) will have a large impact on industry. There is considerable uncertainty about how the Act will be implemented, but it specifically addresses coke-oven batteries. This may encourage industry to consider formcoke produced via mild gasification as a low-pollution substitute for conventional coke. The chemistry and technology of coke making steel were reviewed in the 1988 market assessment and will not be repeated here. The CAAA require additional pollution control measures for most industrial facilities, but this creates new opportunities for the mild gasification process.

  6. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP Market Potential in the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2% of the CHP capacity is made up of Alaskan Village power systems. Pulp & Paper 34% Refinery 11% Wood Products 8% Food 36% Village Power 2% Commercial 6% Other Industrial 3%...

  7. Technical Report #98T-010, Department of Industrial & Mfg. Systems Egnieering, Lehigh Univerisity COORDINATION PRODUCTION AND TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, David

    and production planning and analyze the costs introduced by coordination. Using a Lagrangean decomposition scheme process. Integration of a manufacturing supply chain involves myriad planning, control and coordination logistics have been dealt with separately both in industry and academia. In industry, a production plan

  8. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial by-product slags (Slag2PCC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    , it seems that carbonation of silicate minerals could be one of the solutions with most potential. More impor- tantly, it seems to be the only CO2 capture and storage (CCS) option for Finland (Koljonen et al industry, where it is used as a filler and coating pigment in paper. The potential for producing

  9. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic Feet)

  10. Emerging Opportunities in Industrial Electrification Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, P. S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the manufacturing sector. Nearly half of manufacturing energy use was in the process industries, which include chemicals, petroleum products, pulp and paper, foods, textiles, and tobacco. Metals production, primarily aluminum and steel, accounted for about 21... %, and metals fabrication, including transportation, machinery, instrumentation and electronics, and other metal products, about 19%. The balance of about 14% was used in other non-metals industries, such as stone, clay, and glass, rubber and plastics...

  11. Managing Rangeland Watersheds for Agricultural Production, Water Quality, and Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    raw food always safe Salinas River riparian corridors wildlife habitat water quality Juxtaposition of plant agriculture and grazed rangeland Salinas Valley example Chaparral wildlife habitat Year Food flows, retention basins, constructed wetlands, etc. 2012 technical reports on waterborne pathogens

  12. Remote foods shopping robot system in a supermarket Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Remote foods shopping robot system in a supermarket Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, National Inst as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. This system attempts to answer the challenge in this research is to help people buy fresh food in a supermarket from a remote location using the Internet. We

  13. Comparison of conventional and solar-water-heating products and industries report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noreen, D; LeChevalier, R; Choi, M; Morehouse, J

    1980-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    President Carter established a goal that would require installation of at least one million solar water heaters by 1985 and 20 million water-heating systems by the year 2000. The goals established require that the solar industry be sufficiently mature to provide cost-effective, reliable designs in the immediate future. The objective of this study was to provide the Department of Energy with quantified data that can be used to assess and redirect, if necessary, the program plans to assure compliance with the President's goals. Results deal with the product, the industry, the market, and the consumer. All issues are examined in the framework of the conventional-hot-water industry. Based on the results of this solar hot water assessment study, there is documented proof that the solar industry is blessed with over 20 good solar hot water systems. A total of eight generic types are currently being produced, but a majority of the systems being sold are included in only five generic types. The good systems are well-packaged for quality, performance and installation ease. These leading systems are sized and designed to fit the requirements of the consumer in every respect. This delivery end also suffers from a lack of understanding of the best methods for selling the product. At the supplier end, there are problems also, including: some design deficiencies, improper materials selection and, occasionally, the improper selection of components and subsystems. These, in total, are not serious problems in the better systems and will be resolved as this industry matures.

  14. Divisionalization, product cannibalization and product location choice: Evidence from the U.S. automobile industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eui Kyo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -firm divisional domain overlap with a rival division, relative to the focal division's own domain, is more likely to locate its new product (here new car model) closer to that rival's existing car models. And it was also found that divisional density affects a...

  15. carleton.ca Food Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    of foods, genetically modified foods, food contamination and preservation. The Carleton advantage Food and biochemistry, genetics and organic chemistry. A Principles of Nutrition (FOOD 2001) course allows you to gaincarleton.ca Food Science and Nutrition #12;The production and distribution of food is one

  16. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory delivers financially attractive systems that use biomass to produce industrial and consumer products.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of renewable biomass resources. A New Approach to Biomass #12;To create new uses for agricultural products biomass to produce industrial and consumer products. While biomass holds potential for a ready supply of renewable energy, the primary success factor for this resource--the ability to profitably produce products

  17. ISSUANCE 2015-05-12: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

  18. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Comparisons. Renewable and Sustainable Energy ReviewsEnergy Storage in a Renewable Energy Sytsem. Proceedings ofPractices, and Constraints. Renewable Agriculture and Food

  19. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1989 {sup 99}Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the {sup 99}Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem {sup 99}Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce {sup 99}Mo. Although Cintichem produced {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of {sup 99}Mo to US pharmaceutical companies.

  20. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that it took the automotive industry until 2002 to unifycounterparts in the automotive industry on lessons learned,but predating it, the automotive industry started developing

  1. The new food-tech city : adapting Chicago's post-stockyard urbanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnham, Justin (Justin Paul)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the latent potential of Chicago's former Union Stock Yard, which consequentially draws attention to the polarities of industrial food production. The Union Stock Yard was once symbolic of an era where ...

  2. Productivity of the U.S. freight rail industry: a review of the past and prospects for the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kriem, Youssef

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Productivity growth in the U.S. freight rail industry has slowed in recent years, raising the issue of the sustainability of the significant improvements achieved during the past three decades. Indeed, between 1979 and ...

  3. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  4. Seston food quality and Daphnia production efficiencies in an oligo-mesotrophic Subalpine Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brett, Michael T.

    biomass dynamics in Castle Lake during 1991. Life table experiments showed HUFA effects on D. rosea at the primary producer and herbivore interface is influ- enced by both the quality and quantity of food avail and Schulz 1998). While food quantity can be easily de- fined and studied, limnologists have debated what de

  5. China’s Shipbuilding Industry Development: A Boost for Naval Ship Production?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gabe

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jiangsu-based Rongsheng Heavy Industries is us- ing blockShipbuilding Industry. Yantai Raffles Mitsubishi Heavy

  6. Department of Industrial Engineering Spring 2010 Materials Handling for Oilseed Press and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    and Requirements for Pressing Food Grade Oil Overview Penn State Farm Operations has an expeller press for producing meal and oil from various seeds. The oil from the press is currently being used as biodiesel that needed to be replaced every two hours. The oil is worth two dollars per gallon as fuel, but if it can

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

  8. Separation, fractionation, concentration, and drying of food products: A technical case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers have investigated a new approach that separates juice into pulp and serum (liquid) fractions. The fractions are then processed individually and more efficiently to reduce the water content. Finally, the fractions are recombined at the site of use to obtain conventional or new products. Efforts to date have included laboratory and on-site studies of several fractionation schemes using energy-efficient membrane-based microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and hyperfiltration processes. These processes are used in combination with more conventional separation, concentration, and recombination methods such as centrifugation, vacuum evaporation, and homogenization. This technical case study provides an overview of the entire DOE/NFPA R D project and highlights the on-site testing of an advanced processing scheme for tomato juice. This scheme involves separation (centrifugation), concentration (hyperfiltration and evaporation), and recombination (homogenization) processes. The document is aimed at making field test and data analysis results available to other researchers and to private industry in a timely manner. The case study discusses project status; summarizes field testing efforts; and reviews potential technology impacts in terms of applications, energy savings, and preliminary economics.

  9. Productive Energy of Some Feeds and Foods as Measured by Gains of Energy by Growing Chickens.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the animal. Metabolizable energy is the energy of the food less the energy in the excrement, both fecal and urinal and, in case of ruminants, in gases pro- duced by fermentation. It includes all the energy of the food which can be used by the animal... ............................ Citrus pulp, dried ----------,,--- Citrus pulp, dried ---- - ----------- Citrus pulp, dried ---------------- Cocoanut oil meal ---------------- Cocoanut oil meal ------------,--- Corn bran ---------,---------,-,, Corn bran...

  10. agricultural food chains: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE Physics Websites Summary: Graduate Profile AGRICULTURE, FOOD & WINE "I was amazed that I could be a part of the food industry in a scientific way."...

  11. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  12. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  13. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  14. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  15. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  16. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  17. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  18. Energy Efficiency Improvements and Cost Saving Opportunities in the Corn Wet Milling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, C.; Worrell, E.

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry in the food and kindred products group (SIC 20). Plants typically spend approximately $15 to 25 million per year on energy, one of its largest operating costs, making energy efficiency...

  19. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena [Dipartimento Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lusvardi, Gigliola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 183, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano [ZETADI S.r.l., Via dell'Artigianato 10, Ferno (Italy)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  20. Characterization of the bacterial metagenome in an industrial algae bioenergy production system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Shi [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fulbright, Scott P [Colorado State University; Zeng, Xiaowei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yates, Tracy [Solix Biofuels; Wardle, Greg [Solix Biofuels; Chisholm, Stephen T [Colorado State University; Xu, Jian [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Lammers, Peter [New Mexico State University

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation of oleaginous microalgae for fuel generally requires growth of the intended species to the maximum extent supported by available light. The presence of undesired competitors, pathogens and grazers in cultivation systems will create competition for nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, iron and other micronutrients in the growth medium and potentially decrease microalgal triglyceride production by limiting microalgal health or cell density. Pathogenic bacteria may also directly impact the metabolism or survival of individual microalgal cells. Conversely, symbiotic bacteria that enhance microalgal growth may also be present in the system. Finally, the use of agricultural and municipal wastes as nutrient inputs for microalgal production systems may lead to the introduction and proliferation of human pathogens or interfere with the growth of bacteria with beneficial effects on system performance. These considerations underscore the need to understand bacterial community dynamics in microalgal production systems in order to assess microbiome effects on microalgal productivity and pathogen risks. Here we focus on the bacterial component of microalgal production systems and describe a pipeline for metagenomic characterization of bacterial diversity in industrial cultures of an oleaginous alga, Nannochloropsis salina. Environmental DNA was isolated from 12 marine algal cultures grown at Solix Biofuels, a region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and 16S amplicons were sequenced using a 454 automated pyrosequencer. The approximately 70,000 sequences that passed quality control clustered into 53,950 unique sequences. The majority of sequences belonged to thirteen phyla. At the genus level, sequences from all samples represented 169 different genera. About 52.94% of all sequences could not be identified at the genus level and were classified at the next highest possible resolution level. Of all sequences, 79.92% corresponded to 169 genera and 70 other taxa. We apply a principal component analysis across the initial sample set to draw correlations between sample variables and changes in microbiome populations.

  1. Methane Digesters and Biogas Recovery - Masking the Environmental Consequences of Industrial Concentrated Livestock Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Camillo, Nicole G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Production . C.Benefits and Renewable Energy Production One source ofsource of renewable energy production from such facilities.

  2. ISSUANCE 2015-06-25: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Residential and Commercial Water Heaters; Correction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Residential and Commercial Water Heaters; Correction

  3. Impact of product design choices on supply chain performance in the notebook computer industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sailer, Chad (Chad Darren)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intel Corporation is the world's leading manufacturer of processors for personal computers. As the company strives to maintain its leadership position in this industry, it identifies significant trends in the industry and ...

  4. Product strategy in response to technological innovation in the semiconductor test industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Robert W. (Robert Wei-Pang), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the market boom of 2000 in the semiconductor industry changed significantly. The changes included stricter limits on capital cost spending, and the increased propensity of the industry to outsource the manufacturing ...

  5. Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Food Processors Association today set ambitious goals to reduce energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial sector. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Manager Douglas Kaempf...

  6. Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

  7. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    without the use of fossil fuel energy. Examining seasonalof renewable energy as the longevity of fossil fuel reservessuch energy production can completely replace fossil fuels.

  8. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and manage their “product lifecycle process” has now comePRELIMINARY DRAFT The Product Lifecycle Process In order toproducts called the “product lifecycle process”. Often a “

  9. The impact of including water constraints on food production within a CGE framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jonathan (Jonathan Early)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the long-term relationship between water resources, irrigated land use change and crop production within a computable general equilibrium modeling framework. The modeling approach is developed on a ...

  10. The Taiwanese Notebook Computer Production Network in China: Implication for Upgrading of the Chinese Electronics Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yungkai

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Learning the Technology of Electronics. ” World Development,Underdevelopment of Malaysian Electronics. ” Paper for the 3Series No. 15. China Electronics Industry Yearbook, 2004.

  11. Multiscale structures of lipids in foods & Fatty acid metabolism Revised version submitted to Progress in Lipid Research March 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Ferrand, France; * RMT LISTRAL: Mixed Technological Network combining academic and industrial partners, devoted On a nutritional standpoint, lipids are now being studied beyond their energy content and fatty acid (FA) profiles in native and formulated food products and (iv) the food matrix. Further work should be accomplished now

  12. WOSMIP II- Workshop on Signatures of Medical and Industrial Isotope Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Murray; Achim, Pascal; Auer, M.; Bell, Randy; Bowyer, Ted W.; Braekers, Damien; Bradley, Ed; Briyatmoko, Budi; Berglund, Helena; Camps, Johan; Carranza, Eduardo C.; Carty, Fitz; DeCaire, Richard; Deconninck, Benoit; DeGeer, Lars E.; Druce, Michael; Friese, Judah I.; Hague, Robert; Hoffman, Ian; Khrustalev, Kirill; Lucas, John C.; Mattassi, G.; Mattila, Aleski; Nava, Elisabetta; Nikkinin, Mika; Papastefanou, Constantin; Piefer, Gregory R.; Quintana, Eduardo; Ross, Ole; Rotty, Michel; Sabzian, Mohammad; Saey, Paul R.; Sameh, A. A.; Safari, M.; Schoppner, Michael; Siebert, Petra; Unger, Klaus K.; Vargas, Albert

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Medical and industrial fadioisotopes are fundamental tools used in science, medicine and industry with an ever expanding usage in medical practice where their availability is vital. Very sensitive environmental radionuclide monitoring networks have been developed for nuclear-security-related monitoring [particularly Comprehensive Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) compliance verification] and are now operational.

  13. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Sharon Elder

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the sixth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organized and hosted two technology transfer meetings; (2) Collaborated with the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) to host a Natural Gas Outlook conference in Pittsburgh, PA; (3) Provided a SWC presentation at the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) meeting in Jackson Hole, WY; and (4) Completed and released a stripper well industry documentary entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering America's Forgotten Wells''.

  14. Industrial applications of electron accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleland, M R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the industrial applications of electron accelerators for modifying the physical, chemical or biological properties of materials and commercial products by treatment with ionizing radiation. Many beneficial effects can be obtained with these methods, which are known as radiation processing. The earliest practical applications occurred during the 1950s, and the business of radiation processing has been expanding since that time. The most prevalent applications are the modification of many different plastic and rubber products and the sterilization of single-use medical devices. Emerging applications are the pasteurization and preservation of foods and the treatment of toxic industrial wastes. Industrial accelerators can now provide electron energies greater than 10 MeV and average beam powers as high as 700 kW. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron beams is stimulating interest in the use of X-rays (bremsstrahlung) as an alternative to gamma rays from radioactive nuclides.

  15. he need for efficient food production has never been greater. One in seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    is undernourished1 . Urbani- zation and biofuel production are reducing land availability, and climate change, lack fallen in one-quarter of countries. Meanwhile, developing nations and the growing world population'sfoodcomesfrom farms that raise both. Animals pull ploughs and carts, and their manure fertilizes crops, which supply

  16. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  17. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  18. Manufacturing industry challenges and responses to EU, California, and other product-targeted environmental regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directive (2002/96/EC, “WEEE” ) the EU expanded its scope ofe-waste”) regulation like WEEE, decided to take matters intake its cues from RoHS and WEEE. While industry lobbying

  19. Productivity and competition in the U.S. trucking industry since deregulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parming, Veiko Paul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980 Congress passed the Motor Carrier Act, substantially liberating trucking carriers from a federal regulatory structure that had exercised broad economic control over the industry for over four decades. Changes in ...

  20. Supply chain management for fast-moving products in the electronic industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zafiriou, Konstantinos F

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Thesis was to strategically redesign and transform the supply chain of a series of detonators in a leading Company serving the oil and gas industry. The scope of the Thesis included data gathering and ...

  1. The Taiwanese Notebook Computer Production Network in China: Implication for Upgrading of the Chinese Electronics Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yungkai

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing in China saves some cost for the Taiwanese NBin China for Taiwanese NB industry---cost incentives? ”in China saves about 1% of component costs (6 U.S. dollars)

  2. Combining Optimization and Simulation for Strategic and Operational Industrial Gas Production and Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linderoth, Jeffrey T.

    ) are typically produced in bulk through a cryogenic air separation process. Air Products plans its production Engineering Bethlehem, PA {wag3,jtl3,jis6}@lehigh.edu Peter Connard Jim Hutton Air Products and Chemicals, Inc availability. The paper concludes with a case study using data from Air Products. Keywords: Enterprise

  3. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Final report, September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jerry; McWhinney, Jr., Robert T.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study program is part of the DOE Integrated Industry Cogeneration Program to optimize, evaluate, and demonstrate cogeneration systems, with direct participation of the industries most affected. One objective is to characterize five major energy-intensive industries with respect to their energy-use profiles. The industries are: petroleum refining and related industries, textile mill products, paper and allied products, chemicals and allied products, and food and kindred products. Another objective is to select optimum cogeneration systems for site-specific reference case plants in terms of maximum energy savings subject to given return on investment hurdle rates. Analyses were made that define the range of optimal cogeneration systems for each reference-case plant considering technology applicability, economic factors, and energy savings by type of fuel. This study also provides guidance to other parts of the program through information developed with regard to component development requirements, institutional and regulatory barriers, as well as fuel use and environmental considerations. (MCW)

  4. Green-IT: Green Initiative for Energy Efficient, Eco-products in the Construction Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhar, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GREEN-IT aims to introduce a product database [e2pilot] in the European building construction product sector and accelerate the EU market transformation towards regulated Energy Performance of Buildings....

  5. Sustainability in the product cycle : adopting a shared standard for the apparel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Alice C. (Alice Catherine)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decisions made by product designers strongly influence the social and environmental impacts that a consumer product will have over its lifetime. This study examines the Sustainable Apparel Index, a decision-support tool ...

  6. Presentation 2.7: Energy and the Forest Products Industry in Malaysia Zulkifli Bin Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    balanced utilization of oil, gas, hydro & coal To prolong lifespan of Malaysia's oil reserves for future in the production of wood products are collected to be used as raw materials to produce fibre boards

  7. Pricing and licensing of software products and services : a study on industry trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Shivashis

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The software product business reached the $150 billion mark at the end of 2005. The pricing and licensing of new products, maintenance services, services and service maintenance have become an important strategy to deliver ...

  8. Digital production pipelines: examining structures and methods in the computer effects industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bettis, Dane Edward

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer animated films require collaboration: blending artistic concept with technical skill, meeting budget constraints and adhering to deadlines. The path which production follows from initial idea to finished product is known as the pipeline...

  9. Communicating Knowledge: A Case Study for Improving Technician Productivity in the Telecom Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Sonia M.

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizational success is based on productivity. Productivity at the Mountainside Moonpies Corporation is currently in decline due to the swift advancement of telecommunication technology, an aging workforce, and minimal ...

  10. Lost Opportunities in Industrial Energy Efficiency: New Production Lean Manufacturing and Lean Energy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , plant wide energy use is mainly a function of three variables: weather conditions, production quantity and operating hours. For example, as outdoor temperatures increase in the summer time, plant electricity use may also increase due to air... of production factors. Next, imagine dedicated production presses that shut off during idle cycle times. This equipment uses energy directly proportional to production quantity, regardless of the operating hours. Lighting equipment for this same operation...

  11. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

  12. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004-2008. China Automotive Industry Yearbooks 2004, 2005,Latin America: The Automotive Industry in Argentina, Chilein the Chinese Automotive Industry. Discussion Paper Series,

  13. How managing more efficiently substances in the design process of industrial products? An example from the aeronautics sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemagnen, Maud; Brissaud, Daniel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowering environmental impacts of products, i.e. ecodesign, is considered today as a new and promising approach environment protection. This article focuses on ecodesign in the aeronautical sector through the analysis of the practices of a company that designs and produces engine equipments. Noise, gas emissions, fuel consumptions are the main environmental aspects which are targeted by aeronautics. From now on, chemical risk linked to the use of materials and production processes has to be traced, not only because of regulation pressure (e.g. REACh) but also because of customers requirements. So far, the aeronautical sector hasn't been focusing much on managing chemical risks at the design stage. However, new substances regulations notably require that chemical risk management should be by industries used as early as possible in their product development process. The aeronautics sector has therefore to elaborate new chemical risk management. The aim of this paper is to present a new method hat should be adap...

  14. ENZYMES AND MICROORGANISMS IN FOOD INDUSTRY WASTE PROCESSING AND CONVERSION TO USEFUL PRODUCTS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroad, P.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. L, 1 Alcohol: a Brazil answer the energy sis. ence, 195:an answer d-j energy cris-j s in Brazil (20). ut retuwl ng

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eighth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) issuing subcontracts, (2) SWC membership class expansion, (3) planning SWC technology transfer meetings, and (4) extending selected 2001 project periods of performance. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  16. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting two fall technology transfer meetings, (2) SWC membership class expansion, and (3) planning the SWC 2003 Spring meeting. In addition, a literature search that focuses on the use of lasers, microwaves, and acoustics for potential stripper well applications continued.

  17. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the four quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period, Penn State primary focus was on finalizing all subcontracts, planning the SWC technology transfer meeting and two workshops in the southern US, and preparing the next SWC newsletter. Membership in the SWC now stands at 49.

  18. Establishment of an Industry-Driven Consortium Focused on Improving the Production Performance of Domestic Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) Nomination and election of the Executive Council members for the 2006-07 term, (2) Finalize and release the 2006 Request for Proposals (RFP), (3) Invoice and recruit members, (4) Plan for the spring meeting, (5) Improving communication efforts, and (6) Continue distribution of the DVD entitled: ''Independent Oil: Rediscovering American's Forgotten Wells''.

  19. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the SWC fall technology transfer meetings in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and State College, Pennsylvania, (2) planning of the upcoming SWC spring proposal meeting, (3) release of the SWC Request-for-proposals (RFP), (4) revision of the SWC By-Laws, and (5) the SWC Executive Council nomination and election for 2005-2006 term members.

  20. Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesko, J. E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented...

  1. Effects of Biofuel Policies on World Food Insecurity -- A CGE Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiamin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The food vs. fuel debate has heated up since the 2008 global food crisis when major crop prices dramatically increased. Heavily subsidized biofuel production was blamed for diverting food crops from food production and diverting resources from food...

  2. Effects of Biofuel Policies on World Food Insecurity -- A CGE Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiamin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The food vs. fuel debate has heated up since the 2008 global food crisis when major crop prices dramatically increased. Heavily subsidized biofuel production was blamed for diverting food crops from food production and diverting resources from food...

  3. Industrial Productivity Assessment Or One of the Best Ways to Save Energy is to Find Ways to Produce More Product!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, D.

    The success of an energy program is often judged by measuring the change in energy consumption over time. It can be argued that a more valid method would measure the change in energy consumption per pound (or other unit) of product since this takes...

  4. Solar production of industrial process steam at the Home Cleaning and Laundry Co. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the operation and performance evaluation period at the Home Laundry Solar Industrial Process Heat Project at Pasadena, California. The installation comprises 6496 ft/sup 2/ (603.5 m/sup 2/) of linear parabolic trough concentrating collectors supplying solar thermal energy for use in laundry and dry cleaning processes. The design phase began in September 1977, and an acceptance test was conducted during the week of April 12, 1982. The plant has been in operation since May 1982, with the 12-month Phase III (operational) period starting in October 1982. The objective of the operational evaluation experiment was to maximize energy delivery to the industrial participant while characterizing system performance. Data were acquired for monthly documentation of system performance, maintenance requirements, and operating costs.

  5. Supply Chain Integration, Product Modularity, and Market Valuation: Evidence from the Solar Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Jane; Joglekar, Nitin

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    data set of public firms in the solar energy industry for the 2007 financial year. Clean technologies have experienced an accelerated adoption cycle with the increasing attention on climate change, rising oil prices and a supportive global regulatory... : concentrated solar power through reflecting mirrors, and photovoltaic (PV) generation through either thin-film or crystalline cells (NREL 2011). For the purpose of this study, we focus on the more common PV generation as it has a well defined supply chain...

  6. The Production Tax Credit is Key to a Strong U.S. Wind Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector, January 2000 |The PlanetCategory 2

  7. Holiday Foods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances L.; Sweeten, Mary K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ....... . .... . .......... . ... . .. . ..... . .. . .. . . ... . ... . Serving ... . ................... . ... . . . . . .. .. . . ..... . . . .. .. .. . .. . Clean-up .. . ................ . .... . ....... .. . ... . .. . Holiday Food Service Styles ......... . . ... ................ . Spring..., serve cold foods over beds of ice. Keep hot foods in dishes such as a chafing dish or food warmer . Clean-up Put leftover foods back in the refrigerator as soon after the meal as possible. Foods should not be left out for more than 1 or 2 hours...

  8. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  9. Change management, production ramp up and the sustainable supply chain in the transportation industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortin, Sean (Sean Dubé)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ramp up phase is always the most risky part of any project, especially with a product material the company and its partners have very little experience with. One result of this lack of experience is frequent engineering ...

  10. A cross-industry analysis and framework of aftermarket products and services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englezos, Petros

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis looks at how supply chains of Aftermarket Products and Services are structured. The study includes an overall examination of the Aftermarket Function, as well as an overview and examination of Aftermarket Supply ...

  11. Product line-up design based on preference measurement : a case study on TV industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chang Bae, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sony, in 2010, introduced innovative product line-up setting process for its TV, using the technique of market segmentation and conjoint analysis. This practice was expected to increase its sales compared to traditional ...

  12. agro-industrial products materiels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. Naik Director, UWM on "Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs)" held at San Antonio, TX, January 22-28, 2001. Department Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of 110...

  13. eBusiness in the Forest Products Industry Opportunities and Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 $USTrillion Asia Pacific Latin America W estern Europe North America (Forrester & Professor Louisiana Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State

  14. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. the consortium creates a partnership with the US petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the third quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. During this reporting period the SWC entered into a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) to provide an additional $100,000 in co-funding for stripper well production-orientated projects.The SWC hosted its first meeting in which members proposed research projects to the SWC membership. The meeting was held on April 9-10, 2001 in State College, Pennsylvania. Twenty three proposals were submitted to the SWC for funding consideration. Investigators of the proposed projects provided the SWC membership with a 20 minute (15 minute technical discussion, 5 minute question and answer session) presentation. Of the 23 proposals, the Executive Council approved $921,000 in funding for 13 projects. Penn State then immediately started the process of issuing subcontracts to the various projects approved for funding.

  15. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  16. TrendSetter Solar Products Inc aka Trendsetter Industries formerly Six

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company)LibraryDatasetsElectricRiver Solar | Open

  17. Bringing food products into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    , Spain, Sweden and the UK For these purposes, EU countries also include Andorra, Canary Islands, The Channel Islands, The Isle of Man, Liechtenstein, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland (except for caviar where, the Faroe Islands, Greenland or Iceland, when you are allowed a combined weight of up to 10kg per person

  18. Sustainability of the cement and concrete industries UWM Center for By-Products Utilization, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Sustainability of the cement and concrete industries T.R. Naik UWM Center for By of the most widely used construction materials in the world. However, the production of portland cement); production of one ton of portland cement produces about one ton of CO2 and other GHGs. The environmental

  19. Document: P1332 Category: Physical Sciences, Chemical/Materials License Status: Available for licensing Texas Industry Cluster: Petroleum Refining & Chemical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightsey, Glenn

    for licensing Texas Industry Cluster: Petroleum Refining & Chemical Products Lower-cost fuel cells Problem, and they offer an alternative to petroleum-burning internal combustion engines. The U.S. Environ- mental and as a replacement for off-grid small power and grid production power plants. Development Stage/IP Status Lab

  20. Industrial market assessment of the products of mild gasification: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinor, J.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to determine the best available conditions, in terms of market volumes and prices, for the products from a mild gasification facility. A process feasibility study will then have to determine the cost of building and operating a facility to make those products. The study is presented as a summary of the options available to a coal producer for creating added product value. For this reason, three specific coal mines owned by AMAX Inc. were chosen, and the options were analyzed from the viewpoint of increasing the total revenue derived from those coals. No specific mild gasification, or mild devolatilization technology was assumed during the assessment. The analysis considers only product prices, volumes, and specifications. It does not assign any intangible value or national benefit to substituting coal for oil or to producing a cleaner fuel. Although it would be desirable to conceive of a product slate which would be immune from energy price fluctuations, such a goal is probably unattainable and no particular emphasis was placed on it. 76 figs., 75 tabs.

  1. AI Industrial Engineering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the California Energy Commission’s (Commission) energy policies and programs that save energy and money for California’s manufacturing and food processing industries to help retain businesses in-state and reduce greenhouse gases...

  2. Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 1: Industrial study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. (Carborundum Co., Falconer, NY (United States). Monofrax-S Plant)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been conducted to understand and prevent the formation of cracks in alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS) refractory blocks during solidification processing. A fundamental approach has been taken, centered on the development of a three-dimensional mathematical model to predict heat flow and stress generation in fused-cast AZS refractory blocks. In the first part of a two-part study, the voidless'' casting process has been carefully examined in an industrial setting. From a survey of the distribution, frequency of occurrence, and fracture surface morphology of cracks, an attempt was made to link the crack types found in the study to process variables. In-mold temperature data collected for a single casting throughout the normal cooling period have been used to validate the heat-flow model which is described in Part 2. The stress analysis, cause of the different cracks, and remedial action are also presented in Part 2.

  3. Department of Industrial Engineering Fall 2012 Laser Non-Contact Measurement of Moving Product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    With a non-contact measurement system improvements can be made in the inspection area ultimately eliminating Product Overview ArcelorMittal produces steel rails for railroads, cranes, transit agencies companies The team visited the factory again to conduct more measurements for the prototype and CAD models

  4. A Member of the Food Chain?: Quantifying Primary Productivity from Nazi Germany to the International Biological Program, 1933-74

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Adam Christopher

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dependence and the Estonian Oil Shale Industry. Linkoepingfactory construction, oil shale ( Olschiefer ), petroleum (9 Initially marginal, Estonian oil shale supplies played an

  5. Re-utilization of Industrial CO2 for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Brian

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a 36-month Phase II cooperative agreement. Under this project, Touchstone Research Laboratory (Touchstone) investigated the merits of incorporating a Phase Change Material (PCM) into an open-pond algae production system that can capture and re-use the CO2 from a coal-fired flue gas source located in Wooster, OH. The primary objective of the project was to design, construct, and operate a series of open algae ponds that accept a slipstream of flue gas from a coal-fired source and convert a significant portion of the CO2 to liquid biofuels, electricity, and specialty products, while demonstrating the merits of the PCM technology. Construction of the pilot facility and shakedown of the facility in Wooster, OH, was completed during the first two years, and the focus of the last year was on operations and the cultivation of algae. During this Phase II effort a large-scale algae concentration unit from OpenAlgae was installed and utilized to continuously harvest algae from indoor raceways. An Algae Lysing Unit and Oil Recovery Unit were also received and installed. Initial parameters for lysing nanochloropsis were tested. Conditions were established that showed the lysing operation was effective at killing the algae cells. Continuous harvesting activities yielded over 200 kg algae dry weight for Ponds 1, 2 and 4. Studies were conducted to determine the effect of anaerobic digestion effluent as a nutrient source and the resulting lipid productivity of the algae. Lipid content and total fatty acids were unaffected by culture system and nutrient source, indicating that open raceway ponds fed diluted anaerobic digestion effluent can obtain similar lipid productivities to open raceway ponds using commercial nutrients. Data were also collected with respect to the performance of the PCM material on the pilot-scale raceway ponds. Parameters such as evaporative water loss, temperature differences, and growth/productivity were tracked. The pond with the PCM material was consistently 2 to 5°C warmer than the control pond. This difference did not seem to increase significantly over time. During phase transitions for the PCM, the magnitude of the difference between the daily minimum and maximum temperatures decreased, resulting in smaller daily temperature fluctuations. A thin layer of PCM material reduced overall water loss by 74% and consistently provided algae densities that were 80% greater than the control pond.

  6. Project Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Project Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food City Studio, City of Vancouver Identify Local Food Waste Market and Food Recovery Industry 3 City Studio, City of Vancouver Identify Food Recovery Models

  7. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the thirteenth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) hosting three fall technology transfer meetings in Wyoming, Texas, and Pennsylvania, (2) releasing the 2004 SWC request-for-proposal (RFP), and (3) initial planning of the SWC spring meeting in Golden Colorado for selecting the 2004 SWC projects. The Fall technology transfer meetings attracted 100+ attendees between the three workshops. The SWC membership which attended the Casper, Wyoming workshop was able to see several SWC-funded projects operating in the field at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The SWC is nearing the end of its initial funding cycle. The Consortium has a solid membership foundation and a demonstrated ability to review and select projects that have relevancy to meet the needs of domestic stripper well operators.

  8. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory will establish, promote, and manage a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that will be focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period include: (1) organizing and hosting the Spring SWC meeting in Pearl River, New York, (2) working with successful applicants and Penn State's Office of Sponsored Research to get subcontracts in place, and (3) planning three SWC technology transfer meetings to take place in the fall of 2003. During this reporting period, the efforts were focused primarily on the organizing and hosting the SWC Spring proposal meeting and organizing the fall technology transfer meetings.

  9. LonMark Open Solutions: An Industry Update-New Products, Solutions, Educational Programs, Standards, and how They Affect the Future of Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Standardization of enterprise data model LONMARK Update, Programs, And Resources Who is LONMARK International? ? Independent, non-profit member supported organization ? Product Manufacturers ? System Integrators ? Engineers ? End Users Vision ? LONMARK...1 LONMARK Open Solutions Programs and Industry Update Ron Bernstein LonMark International a non-profit industry trade and standards development association supporting the open buildings control market Agenda ? Trend Towards Open Systems...

  10. NPDES Individual Permit for Industrial Facilities - Mail Merge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WATER DISCHARGES ASSOCIATED WITH INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY FROM FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRY......44 I. CONTENTS OF PLAN. ......

  11. A systems approach to food accident analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helferich, John D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

  12. Remote Shopping Robot System -Development of a hand mechanism for grasping fresh foods in a supermarket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    supermarkets, in this research, we propose "remote shopping robot system" as a concrete application efficiency. II. REMOTE SHOPPING ROBOT SYSTEM A. Concept In the case of industrial products, objects haveRemote Shopping Robot System -Development of a hand mechanism for grasping fresh foods

  13. Industrial Energy-Efficiency Improvement Program. Annual report to the Congress and the President 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial energy efficiency improvement program to accelerate market penetration of new and emerging industrial technologies and practices which will improve energy efficiency; encourage substitution of more plentiful domestic fuels; and enhance recovery of energy and materials from industrial waste streams is described. The role of research, development, and demonstration; technology implementation; the reporting program; and progress are covered. Specific reports from the chemicals and allied products; primary metals; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass, paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metals; transportation equipment; machinery (except electrical); textile mill products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products are discussed. Additional data from voluntary submissions, a summary on progress in the utilization of recovered materials, and an analysis of industrial fuel mix are briefly presented. (MCW)

  14. Philadelphia Gas Works- Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philadelphia Gas Works' (PGW) Commercial and Industrial Equipment rebates are available to all PGW commercial and industrial customers installing high efficiency boilers or eligible commercial food...

  15. Workbook for prioritizing petroleum industry exploration and production sites for remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.J.

    1998-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Workbook is to provide a screening-level method for prioritizing petroleum exploration and production sites for remediation that is based on readily available information, but which does not require a full characterization of the sites being evaluated. The process draws heavily from the Canadian National Classification System for Contaminated Sites, and fits into the framework for ecological risk assessment provided in guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Using this approach, scoring guidelines are provided for a number of Evaluation Factors relating to: (1) the contaminants present at the site; (2) the potential exposure pathways for these contaminants; and (3) the potential receptors of those contaminants. The process therefore incorporates a risk-based corrective action (RBCA) framework to estimate the relative threat posed by a site to human health and to ecological systems. Physical (non-toxic) disturbance factors have also been incorporated into the process. It should also be noted that the process described in this Workbook has not yet been field tested at petroleum E and P sites. The first logical step in the field testing of this process is to apply the method at a small number of sites to assess the availability of the information that is needed to score each evaluation factor. Following this evaluation, the Workbook process should be applied at a series of sites to determine the effectiveness of the process at ranking sites according to their relative need for remediation. Upon completion of these tests, the Workbook should be revised to reflect the findings of the field tests.

  16. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China‘s overall energy needs, Chinese ?green industries? – especially those firms engaged in wind turbine and solar

  17. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute] [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, OK (United States). ITT Research Institute; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G. [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)] [Bonner and Moore Management Science, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  18. High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing a crisis due to doubling of fertilizer, grain, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-efficiency Forage Systems for Texas Beef Production The cattle industry in Texas is facing for adaptation, water· use efficiency, pest resistance, and forage nutritive value. New, efficient beef) and high plant nutrient efficiency grasses. Develop improved management systems to incorporate the new

  19. Electrotechnologies in Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, K. R.

    The Industrial Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) promotes the efficient use of electricity to improve the competitive position of the American industry. Electrotechnologies that improve productivity, improve quality...

  20. Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Selected Industrial Sectors in the Lower Fraser Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete Industry Lime Industry Refined Petroleum Products (Bulk Storage) Other Petroleum and Coal Products and Planing Mill Products Industry Wire and Wire Products Industries Hydraulic Cernent Industry Ready Mixed

  1. Partial Oxidation Gas Turbine for Power and Hydrogen Co-Production from Coal-Derived Fuel in Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a feasibility study of a new type of gas turbine. A partial oxidation gas turbine (POGT) shows potential for really high efficiency power generation and ultra low emissions. There are two main features that distinguish a POGT from a conventional gas turbine. These are associated with the design arrangement and the thermodynamic processes used in operation. A primary design difference of the POGT is utilization of a non?catalytic partial oxidation reactor (POR) in place of a conventional combustor. Another important distinction is that a much smaller compressor is required, one that typically supplies less than half of the air flow required in a conventional gas turbine. From an operational and thermodynamic point of view a key distinguishing feature is that the working fluid, fuel gas provided by the OR, has a much higher specific heat than lean combustion products and more energy per unit mass of fluid can be extracted by the POGT expander than in the conventional systems. The POGT exhaust stream contains unreacted fuel that can be combusted in different bottoming ycle or used as syngas for hydrogen or other chemicals production. POGT studies include feasibility design for conversion a conventional turbine to POGT duty, and system analyses of POGT based units for production of power solely, and combined production of power and yngas/hydrogen for different applications. Retrofit design study was completed for three engines, SGT 800, SGT 400, and SGT 100, and includes: replacing the combustor with the POR, compressor downsizing for about 50% design flow rate, generator replacement with 60 90% ower output increase, and overall unit integration, and extensive testing. POGT performances for four turbines with power output up to 350 MW in POGT mode were calculated. With a POGT as the topping cycle for power generation systems, the power output from the POGT ould be increased up to 90% compared to conventional engine keeping hot section temperatures, pressures, and volumetric flows practically identical. In POGT mode, the turbine specific power (turbine net power per lb mass flow from expander exhaust) is twice the value of the onventional turbine. POGT based IGCC plant conceptual design was developed and major components have been identified. Fuel flexible fluid bed gasifier, and novel POGT unit are the key components of the 100 MW IGCC plant for co producing electricity, hydrogen and/or yngas. Plant performances were calculated for bituminous coal and oxygen blown versions. Various POGT based, natural gas fueled systems for production of electricity only, coproduction of electricity and hydrogen, and co production of electricity and syngas for gas to liquid and hemical processes were developed and evaluated. Performance calculations for several versions of these systems were conducted. 64.6 % LHV efficiency for fuel to electricity in combined cycle was achieved. Such a high efficiency arise from using of syngas from POGT exhaust s a fuel that can provide required temperature level for superheated steam generation in HRSG, as well as combustion air preheating. Studies of POGT materials and combustion instabilities in POR were conducted and results reported. Preliminary market assessment was performed, and recommendations for POGT systems applications in oil industry were defined. POGT technology is ready to proceed to the engineering prototype stage, which is recommended.

  2. Final Technical Report - High-Performance, Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Tubes for Production of Ethylene adn Other Industrial Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKimpson, Marvin G.

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken by Michigan Technological University and Special Metals Corporation to develop creep-resistant, coking-resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tubes for use in industrial-scale ethylene pyrolysis and steam methane reforming operations. Ethylene pyrolysis tubes are exposed to some of the most severe service conditions for metallic materials found anywhere in the chemical process industries, including elevated temperatures, oxidizing atmospheres and high carbon potentials. During service, hard deposits of carbon (coke) build up on the inner wall of the tube, reducing heat transfer and restricting the flow of the hydrocarbon feedstocks. About every 20 to 60 days, the reactor must be taken off-line and decoked by burning out the accumulated carbon. This decoking costs on the order of $9 million per year per ethylene plant, accelerates tube degradation, and requires that tubes be replaced about every 5 years. The technology developed under this program seeks to reduce the energy and economic cost of coking by creating novel bimetallic tubes offering a combination of improved coking resistance, creep resistance and fabricability not available in current single-alloy tubes. The inner core of this tube consists of Incoloy(R) MA956, a commercial ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloy offering a 50% reduction in coke buildup combined with improved carburization resistance. The outer sheath consists of a new material - oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Alloy 803(R) developed under the program. This new alloy retains the good fireside environmental resistance of Alloy 803, a commercial wrought alloy currently used for ethylene production, and provides an austenitic casing to alleviate the inherently-limited fabricability of the ferritic Incoloy(R) MA956 core. To provide mechanical compatibility between the two alloys and maximize creep resistance of the bimetallic tube, both the inner Incoloy(R) MA956 and the outer ODS Alloy 803 are oxide dispersion strengthened materials produced using mechanical alloying technology. To minimize cost, the bimetallic tube is produced by direct powder co-extrusion. This technology has potential for domestic energy savings of up to 4.1 trillion BTU/year (4.3 x 1015J/year) and a reduction of 370,000 tons (340,000 tonnes) of CO2 emissions in short-residence-time ethylene furnaces. This represents an energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction of about 3.3%. If the technology is also applied to other types of ethylene pyrolysis furnaces, total energy savings and CO2 emissions reductions could increase by up to five times. The work involved: Developing powder and consolidation processing protocols to produce an oxide-dispersion strengthened variant of Alloy 803 exhibiting creep strength comparable to Incoloy? Alloy MA956, Developing a direct powder co-extrusion protocol for fabricating co-extruded bimetallic Incoloy? Alloy MA956 / ODS Alloy 803 tubes, Characterizing the properties of the ODS Alloy 803 material, the welding characteristics of the bimetallic tubes, and the coking characteristics of the Incoloy? MA956 alloy, and Documenting the potential energy savings and user requirements for these bimetallic pyrolysis furnace tubes. The project demonstrated that oxide dispersion strengthened Alloy 803 can be produced successfully using conventional mechanical alloying technology. The oxide dispersion strengthened bimetallic radiant coil technology explored under this program has significant potential for energy savings and productivity improvements for domestic ethylene producers. In today's competitive market, however, domestic furnace manufacturers and ethylene producers appear reluctant to pay any cost premium for higher-performance coil materials offering either higher temperature capabilities or longer service life. Interest in oxide dispersion strengthened radiant coils is likely to increase if furnace and ethylene producers begin to focus more on increasing tube wall temperatures to improve productivity.

  3. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  4. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a division of SGM) PLM Product lifecycle management R&Ddesign software. Product lifecycle management (PLM) software

  5. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of IndustrialLaboratory. Burlington, MA: Office of Energy Efficiencyand Renewable Energy. (Food-4) (Motorsys-8) (Overview)

  6. assure food safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Analysis Officers (EIAOs) on collecting product, food contact surface, and environmental (non-food contact surface) samples using the Intensified Verification...

  7. A National Resource for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alloys, and metal matrix composite products carbon fibe's manufacturing industries. These industries call upon ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization-efficient manufacturing processes and materials targeting products of the future. The Department of Energy's first

  8. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  9. Diverse Applications of Pinch Technology Within the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spriggs, H. D.; Ashton, G.

    the use of pinch technology in a wider range of industries including food, pulp and paper, cement brewing and dairy product processes. These processes have featured; batch and continuous operations; solids, liquids and gas processing; use... retrofit design procedures, evaluation of capital-energy trade-offs, appropriate integration of cogeneration schemes and design methods for improving flexibility. Published results of early applications in ICI (1) and later in Union Carbide (2) were...

  10. Economic evaluation and conceptual design of optimal agricultural systems for production of food and energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major technical and economic considerations which determined the scope of the study and the structure of the linear programming (LP) models are discussed. Four models, each representing a typical crop, beef, dairy, or swine farm in conjunction with ethanol facilities are characterized by the same general behavioral and mathematical model structure. Specific activities, constraints, and data for each of the four models are presented. An overview of the model structure is provided in the context of the general scope and background assumptions, and of its LP implementation. Simulated initial conditions and outcomes are reported for typical Illinois farms. Policy implications are discussed as related to agriculture, energy, and inter-industry coordination. (MHR)

  11. Innovation and the state : development strategies for high technology industries in a world of fragmented production : Israel, Ireland, and Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breznitz, Dan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most unexpected changes of the 1990s is that firms in a number of emerging economies not previously known for their high-technology industries have leapfrogged to the forefront in new Information Technologies ...

  12. Irrigation systems are critical for food production and supporting regional economies. The efficiency of these systems plays an important role in the sustainable use of fresh water.The FarmNet project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    Irrigation systems are critical for food production and supporting regional economies$/hectare/year) · Lower peak demand on irrigation water distribution system resulting in improved quality of service benchmarked against fixed-schedule irrigation systems. Embedded Systems; Networked Systems; Making Sense

  13. Achieving and sustaining an optimal product portfolio in the healthcare industry through SKU rationalization, complexity costing, and dashboards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilliard, David (David John)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After years of new product launches, and entry into emerging markets, Company X, a healthcare company, has seen its product portfolio proliferate and bring costly complexity into its operations. Today, Company X seeks to ...

  14. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Center (a division of SGM) PLM Product lifecycle managementProduct lifecycle management (PLM) software is used by cara French firm, provides PLM software to most of the world‘s

  15. Industrial policy and the Indian electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Robert (Robert Eric)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, production within India's Electronics sector amounted to a low $12 billion when compared to the global output of $1400 billion. The slow growth in the local industry is often judged to be the result of late ...

  16. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for...

  17. additives food preservatives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    writers and columnists, Good Food Epicure features industry news, restaurant, bar and wine reviews, recipes, the latest kitchen Peters, Richard 228 Data Preservation in High...

  18. american food market: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    writers and columnists, Good Food Epicure features industry news, restaurant, bar and wine reviews, recipes, the latest kitchen Peters, Richard 335 Market Research Berkeley...

  19. antifungal food preservative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    writers and columnists, Good Food Epicure features industry news, restaurant, bar and wine reviews, recipes, the latest kitchen Peters, Richard 198 Data Preservation in High...

  20. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  1. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce G. Miller

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting period (i.e., 10/01/05-09/30/06), is attached. At the annual funding meeting held in November 2004, eleven projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005. Of these fourteen 2005 projects, eleven have been completed and the final reports are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2005 and the council selected five projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2006, except for one that started October 1, 2006.

  3. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) has been successfully operating the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by PSU, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with PSU responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes PSU and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. A second contract was executed with DOE NETL starting in October 2003 to continue the activities of CPCPC. An annual funding meeting was held in October 2003 and the council selected ten projects for funding. Base funding for the projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten projects have been completed and the final reports for these 2004 projects are attached. An annual funding meeting was held in November 2004 and the council selected eleven projects for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2005. Three additional projects were selected for funding during the April 2005 tutorial/funding meeting. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on July 1, 2005.

  4. 2015-01-16 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Notice of Information Collection Extension

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of information collection extension regarding consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 16, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  5. Proceedings of the Seventh Walnut Council Research Symposium 15GTR-NRS-P-115 BIOREFINERY OPPORTUNITIES FOR FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capabilities to succeed with biorefineries. Most forest products companies already have the first capability the acquisition of woody residues for making new products while minimizing competition for valuable timber companies to look at the overall biorefinery effort and acquire the expertise to move thermal

  6. Econometric and Neural Network Analysis of the Labor Productivity and Average Gross Earnings Indices in the Romanian Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Econometric and Neural Network Analysis of the Labor Productivity and Average Gross Earnings and models that were used consist of several lag econometric models, ARIMA processes, as well as feed forward AGEI and LPI. Key-Words: - labor productivity, econometric model, ARIMA, VAR, neural network, forecast

  7. EPOK Centre for Organic Food and Farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food and Farming Research on Organic Animal Husbandry in Sweden on organic production is coordinated by EPOK (Centre for Organic Food and Farming) at the Swedish University that have the potential to mitigate environmental effects. Publisher: EPOK ­ Centre for organic food

  8. CALIFORNIA ENERGY PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PETROLEUM AND NON-PETROLEUM ................................................... 40 PRODUCT DEFINITIONS Major Petroleum Product Storer and Terminal Weekly Report Major petroleum product storers, terminalCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION REPORTING ACT (PIIRA) PROGRAM REPORTING

  9. Innovative New Industrial Technologies: An Industry/DOE Joint Endeavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, T. J.

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Industrial Programs supports research and development leading to improved energy efficiency and greater overall productivity in the industrial sector. Its basic strategy is a program of cost-shared R...

  10. FOOD SCIENCE & HUMAN NUTRITION http://foodsciencehumannutrition.umaine.edu/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    companies with product development. Value-added and food safety research. Improving the post-harvest quality and vegetable products, food safety, food microbiology, seafood quality and product development and human nutrition faculty areas of expertise. Graduate thesis research is under the supervision

  11. A multi-attribute value assessment method for the early product development phase with application to the business airplane industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downen, Troy Douglas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) market. The method is also used to extract quantitative evidence indicating the existence of enterprise-related attributes for consumer value in products. Marking the first independent review of the loss function-based ...

  12. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  14. MFR PAPER 1065 The food service industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .,upported bJ naltonal ad\\ertl\\lng to gain entn intl) the re- tatl market \\l oreo\\t.:r. there are pre,- e\\aluated the producl.~ SURVEY RESULTS The fO"~1\\\\lng 1\\ an anal},i ... of the ...une} re"'pon,e, \\\\hlloh highlight

  15. Heat Recovery in the Forge Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shingledecker, R. B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy figures reveal that in 1979 the forging and stamping operations were the primary consumers of energy (27%) within the 'Fabricated Metals Products Industry' (SIC 34). Industrial furnaces utilized by the forging industry often...

  16. Industrial Crops and Products 43 (2013) 802811 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    copolymers (Lee, 1996) to replace petro-derived plastics (Yu et al., 1999). Of the various biodegradable Accepted 10 August 2012 Keywords: Biodegradable plastics Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Sucrose Two-stage batch (ATCC 29714) for production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a biodegradable plastic, was explored

  17. From Geometric Modeling to Product Data Models: Collaboration Between Engineering, Computer Science, and Industry at Leeds University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitney, Daniel

    to include concurrent engineering.1 In both cases, the Unit has established strong ties with the Computer with defining product data models that will support concurrent engineering. Both fabrication and assembly in manufacturing must be structured like concurrent engineering activities: the users of the research must be part

  18. Indiana Michigan Power- Commercial and Industrial Rebates Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Indiana Michigan Power offers rebates for HVAC equipment, variable frequency drives, commercial refrigeration equipments, food service equipment and lighting measures for commercial and industrial...

  19. Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasenda, S.K.; Hassler, C.C.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.

  20. Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

  1. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  2. Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving Transformational Energy Productivity Gains Industrial Scale Demonstration of Smart Manufacturing Achieving...

  3. author research productivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 -Forest industry production Authorities Renewable Energy Websites Summary: FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities...

  4. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  5. Comparing the Effects of Mutualism and Competition on Industrial Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, Rebecca B.

    stations. The diversity of industries situated in the region include food processing industries, oil refining, chemical and bio-chemical produc- tion facilities, as well as heavy industrial facilitiesComparing the Effects of Mutualism and Competition on Industrial Districts Christopher J.K. Knighta

  6. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support small farmers in developing products and bringing them to market. Siete del Norte to help fund the development of the Northern New Mexico Food Hub and to reopen the...

  7. Urbanization and the Transition from Agrarian to Industrial Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fields, Gary

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modes of production - feudalism, antiquity - linked to thebridge the historical abyss between feudalism and industrial

  8. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  9. Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................................... 6 ..5 Food irradiation

  10. 2013 FDA FOOD CODE FDA/CFSAN Retail Food Protection Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    foods that require cold holding or hot holding during storage and display 12 CFP Issue 2012-I-004 #12 industry · Result of the efforts and recommendations of many collaborating individuals, agencies-1-935239-02-4 2013 #12;2013 Marks 20 Years! Since the first Edition in 1993, government and industry stakeholders

  11. Agricultural production in the United States by county: a compilation of information from the 1974 census of agriculture for use in terrestrial food-chain transport and assessment models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shor, R.W.; Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial food-chain models that simulate the transport of environmentally released radionuclides incorporate parameters describing agricultural production and practice. Often a single set of default parameters, such as that listed in USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109, is used in lieu of site-specific information. However, the geographical diversity of agricultural practice in the United States suggests the limitations of a single set of default parameters for assessment models. This report documents default parameters with a county-wide resolution based on analysis of the 1974 US Census of Agriculture for use in terrestrial food chain models. Data reported by county, together with state-based information from the US Department of Agriculture, Economic and Statistics Service, provided the basis for estimates of model input parameters. This report also describes these data bases, their limitations, and lists default parameters by county. Vegetable production is described for four categories: leafy vegetables; vegetables and fruits exposed to airborne material; vegetables, fruits, and nuts protected from airborne materials; and grains. Livestock feeds were analyzed in categories of hay, silage, pasture, and grains. Pasture consumption was estimated from cattle and sheep inventories, their feed requirements, and reported quantities of harvested forage. The results were compared with assumed yields of the pasture areas reported. In addition, non-vegetable food production estimates including milk, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, eggs, goat milk, and honey are described. The agricultural parameters and land use information - in all 47 items - are tabulated in four appendices for each of the 3067 counties of the US reported to the Census of Agriculture, excluding those in Hawaii and Alaska.

  12. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  13. The Texas Industrial Energy Conservation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldrop, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cesses listed. Chart1-lndustrial Target Groups SIC CODE INDUSTRY 201 Meat Products 204 Feed and Grain 207 Fats and Oils 26 Paper and Allied Products 28 Chemicals and Allied Products 30 Rubber and Plastics 33 Primary Metals 34 Fabricated Metals... industry seminars. In the preparation of workbooks for industrial processes, a screening of engineering firms was 763 ESL-IE-82-04-139 Proceedings from the Fourth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 4-7, 1982 conducted in order...

  14. RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piskur, Jure; Ling, Zhihao; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Ishchuk, Olena P.; Aerts, Andrea; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Compagno, Concetta; Bisson, Linda; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Gabaldon, Toni; Phister, Trevor

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The yeast Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis can cause enormous economic losses in wine industry due to production of phenolic off-flavor compounds. D. bruxellensis is a distant relative of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Nevertheless, these two yeasts are often found in the same habitats and share several food-related traits, such as production of high ethanol levels and ability to grow without oxygen. In some food products, like lambic beer, D. bruxellensis can importantly contribute to flavor development. We determined the 13.4 Mb genome sequence of the D. bruxellensis strain Y879 (CBS2499) and deduced the genetic background of several ?food-relevant? properties and evolutionary history of this yeast. Surprisingly, we find that this yeast is phylogenetically distant to other food-related yeasts and most related to Pichia (Komagataella) pastoris, which is an aerobic poor ethanol producer. We further show that the D. bruxellensis genome does not contain an excess of lineage specific duplicated genes nor a horizontally transferred URA1 gene, two crucial events that promoted the evolution of the food relevant traits in the S. cerevisiae lineage. However, D. bruxellensis has several independently duplicated ADH and ADH-like genes, which are likely responsible for metabolism of alcohols, including ethanol, and also a range of aromatic compounds.

  17. An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

  18. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  19. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  20. College of Food, Agricultural, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10. Undergraduate Student/Faculty Ratio and Class Size 11. Faculty Full-time Equivalent by Track 12 market for graduates · Record of collaboration (and leadership) within national network of peer ­ Food Production and Security; Energy and Environment; Health and Wellness ­ capture grand challenges

  1. Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an industrial ecology'' approach to sustainable economic development.

  2. Regional secondary resource utilization parks: The industrial parks of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.; Holter, G.M.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. One potential solution takes the form of the secondary resource utilization park. The premise is simple: Provide a strategically located facility where a broad range of secondary resources are separated, refined or converted, and made into new products on the site. The secondary material resources would come from municipal solid waste, demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous forms. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would also minimize transportation costs and could provide a test case for an ``industrial ecology`` approach to sustainable economic development.

  3. Attitudes about Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Nicole Alexis

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 18% of adolescents are obese. Attitudes about Food is a cross sectional study that seeks to identify lifestyle factors associated with adolescent obesity such as fast food consumption, physical activity, attitudes about fast food...

  4. Safe Home Food Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

  5. FOOD AND DRINK REGULATIONS Serving hot food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    . · No other sources of heating water may be used. Serving cold food · Food should be refrigerated prior in `batches' should the service time required extend beyond two hours. · No refrigeration should be used

  6. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  7. Reducing Food Safety Risks in Community Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    as good agricultural practices (GAPs) -- has been pointed to by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration of the final products. Good agricultural practices are the basic environmental and operational conditions outlines the recommended agricultural practices

  8. Food sovereignty and agricultural trade policy commitments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in Agricultural, Food and Bioenergy Trade (AGFOODTRADE)" (Grant Agreement No. 212036) research project, funded production with enough barrier protection to shelter it from world price fluctuations and unfair trading

  9. Center for Food Safety & AgSecurity Investigator Vitae Executive Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    for Innovative Food Technology 45 Joliette Drive Napoleon, Ohio 43545 dave.beck@eisc.org Center for Innovative Soup Company, Napoleon, Ohio " 1974-1977, Industrial Engineer " 1978-1979 Senior Industrial Engineer

  10. Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengde; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Yomano, Lorraine; Grabar, Tammy B; Moore, Jonathan C

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides derivatives of Escherichia coli constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

  11. THE FOOD VALUE OF SEA MUSSELS By Irving A. Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    value . Mussels a cheap food . Preservation methods . Canning . Pickling . Drying . Cold storage by the Chinese, is now relished by the American palate. Raising frogs for market is now a profitable industry

  12. Theorizing Food Sovereignty: An analysis of public and academic discourse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winsauer, Emily A.

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    outspoken critics of the globalization of the neoliberal industrial model of agriculture. The development of the global food sovereignty movement over the last two decades constitutes a significant political and social response to the inequalities present...

  13. Environmental and Community Awareness: A Local Foods Profile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hummer, Sara

    2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumption in a global industrial economy has been linked to both environmental damage and community erosion. The local food movement has been shown to provide a catalyst to community building as well as increased ...

  14. alternative food processing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of biotechnological processes in food production CiteSeer Summary: Knowledge Based BioEconomy KBBE is based mainly on taking advantages of modern, innovative technologies,...

  15. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  16. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry-specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the energy efficiency in chemical plants, with a focus on the situation in California.

  17. Industry Partners Panel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  18. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  19. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, A R; Norman, E B; Hurley, D L; Lo, B T; Chan, Y D; Guillaumon, P V; Harvey, B G

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found...

  20. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;88 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Graduate Catalogue 2013­14 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers aims to offer specialized training in a variety of fields in food and agriculture, and to prepare

  1. Proper Usage of Drugs and Chemicals in Food Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulations exist to ensure the proper distribution and usage of veterinary drugs and to prevent adulteration of the food supply with illegal drug residues through drug misuse in food produc- ing animals. The Food and Drug Administration... of omission or commission, violative residues in livestock and poultry (by irresponsible and illegal distribution and use of drugs) violates state and federal laws. When FSIS inspectors detect violative drug residues in food products derived from ani- mals...

  2. The following are appendices A, B1 and B2 of our paper, "Integrated Process Modeling and Product Design of Biodiesel Manufacturing", that appears in the Industrial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    Design of Biodiesel Manufacturing", that appears in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research a Biodiesel Process Model To access NIST TDE Data Engine in Aspen Plus version 2006.5 or V7.0 Step 1. Enter

  3. Ripe for investment : refocusing the food desert debate on smaller stores, wholesale markets and regional distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamis, Laurie P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis argues that food distribution systems must be strengthened in order to address the challenge of urban food access. The argument rests on a historical analysis of the supermarket industry and a comparative study ...

  4. Measurements of Fission Products from the Fukushima Daiichi Incident in San Francisco Bay Area Air Filters, Automobile Filters, Rainwater, and Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Smith; K. J. Thomas; E. B. Norman; D. L. Hurley; B. T. Lo; Y. D. Chan; P. V. Guillaumon; B. G. Harvey

    2013-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of environmental media were analyzed for fallout radionuclides resulting from the Fukushima nuclear accident by the Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, CA. Monitoring activities in air and rainwater began soon after the onset of the March 11, 2011 tsunami and are reported here through the end of 2012. Observed fallout isotopes include $^{131}$I, $^{132}$I,$^{132}$Te,$^{134}$Cs, $^{136}$Cs, and $^{137}$Cs. Isotopes were measured on environmental air filters, automobile filters, and in rainwater. An additional analysis of rainwater in search of $^{90}$Sr is also presented. Last, a series of food measurements conducted in September of 2013 are included due to extended media concerns of $^{134, 137}$Cs in fish. Similar measurements of fallout from the Chernobyl disaster at LBNL, previously unpublished publicly, are also presented here as a comparison with the Fukushima incident. All measurements presented also include natural radionuclides found in the environment to provide a basis for comparison.

  5. Local Food, Sustainability, and Cuba's National Food Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusco, Audrey Corinne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to manufacture agrochemicals. Due to the extremity of the economic shock that followed the collapse of the Soviet Bloc and 3 the trade blockade imposed by the United States government, Cuba was forced to quickly reinvent its agriculture system.1... the period, Cuba was able to increase food production despite the reduction in supplies of petroleum and agrochemicals. It is important to understand the Cuban model because it is the largest attempted conversion from conventional agriculture to organic...

  6. Industrial Engineering Roles In Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , be they processes, products or systems · Typical focus areas include: ­ Project Management ­ Manufacturing ­ Quality Measurement and Improvement ­ Program Management ­ Ergonomics/Human Factors ­ Technology, Production and Distribution ­ Supply Chain Management ­ Productivity, Methods and Process Engineering

  7. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year`s project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  8. A Generalized Method for Estimation of Industrial Energy Savings from Capital and Behavioral Programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luneski, R. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, NEEA engaged the food processing industry in the Northwest with a behavior based program called Continuous Energy Improvement (CEI). Industrial energy efficiency programs have historically been limited to large ...

  9. Essays on Foreign Investment, Agglomeration Economies, and Industrial Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Luosha

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry names 1.Grain mill products 2.Forage 3.Vegetable oil refiningIndustry names Mean Mean and 2007 -18.29 (means fall by 18 1.Grain mill products percentage) 2.Forage 3.Vegetable oil refining

  10. Dekkera bruxellensis, a Non-conventional Ethanol Production Yeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : risks and benefits 16 2.3 Bioethanol industry 17 3 Ethanol production overview 19 3.1 Industrial ethanol

  11. Safer Food with Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Britta; Vestal, Andy; Van Laanen, Peggy

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication answers questions about food irradiation and how it helps prevent foodborne illnesses. Included are explanations of how irradiation works and its benefits. Irradiation is a safe method of preserving food quality and ensuring its...

  12. CEMI Industrial Efficiency (text version) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video. Well Legrand is a small to medium sized manufacturer. We make electronic products for power, light, and data in the...

  13. Innovation and the big builders : barriers to integrating sustainable design and construction practices into the production homebuilding industry : the case of Pulte Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Justin T. (Justin Talbott)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The homebuilding industry has held a dominant presence in the U.S. economy over the past century. It has been a source of profit, shelter and jobs for countless Americans. In order to meet the needs of an ever-burgeoning ...

  14. Four Simple Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    luncheon meat, cold cuts, deli-style meat and poul- try until steaming hot. Chill: Refrigerate or freeze Safe Food Handling and Preparation USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline: 1-800-535-4555 FDA's Food. August, 2004 Separate: Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from other foods in your grocery shopping

  15. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers-level courses in agriculture were offered by the School of Arts and Sciences at AUB as early as 1914. Between

  16. Energy Management in a Multi-Industry Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tenneco operates in seven of the nation's ten most energy intensive industries: Petroleum Refining, Chemicals Manufacturing, Pulp and Paper, Transportation Equipment, Primary Metals, Food Processing, and Machinery. This diversification...

  17. Radio Frequency & Microwave Energy for the Petro Chemical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raburn, R.

    Electro-Magnetic Energy has finally made its way into the Petro-Chemical market twenty-five years after market acceptance in the Food Processing Industry. Major factors influencing this change are tighter environmental regulations, price competition...

  18. OVERVIEW OF MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL LAND APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    biosolids NR 214 ­ Industrial by-products NR 518 ­ Solid waste SITES MUST BE APPROVED AND PERMITTED PRIOR,000 80,000 Biosolids 210,000 70,000 Industrial wastes 1,146,000 345,000 Solid waste na na Source: Fred on material Biosolids: 25 % of organic-N + 100% of NH4-N. Second and third year credits Industrial

  19. Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, A. R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed...

  20. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted): ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Only homemade food may be provided by your organization. Initial ______ No prepared food may

  1. Certificate Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Six Sigma Certificate Industrial and Systems Engineering San José State University September, 2008 #12;1 Lean Enterprise and Six Sigma Lean Enterprise about transforming the old mass production-to-cradle design, incorporating design for manufacturability, reproducibility, product lifecycle, etc. Six Sigma

  2. BTU Accounting for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, R. O.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

  3. LIVSMEDELSHYGIEN KLG050 Food Hygiene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIVSMEDELSHYGIEN KLG050 Food Hygiene Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: UG Kursansvarig: Göran Molin. Goran in Food Hygiene. #12;

  4. The Productivity Dilemma in Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrer, T. G.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry's needs, improve productivity, and reduce costs is known, but the technology transfer needed to impact our industrial productivity has not taken place. A key factor in accomplishing technology transfer and implementation is the availability...

  5. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  6. A Case Study of Food Safety Culture Within a Retailer Corporate Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santibanez-Rivera, Rodrigo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The retail business has been negatively affected due to the increasing customer concerns about food safety and the recent events related to microbiological and chemical contamination of food products, such as the melamine in infant formula...

  7. Gloucester County, New Jersey Industry City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Gloucester County, New Jersey Industry City Number of Employees IT Service Provider Paulsboro 600 Oil Refinery Westville 479 Durable Medical Equipment Sewell 500 Flowers and Florist Wholesale Supply Sewell 550 Petroleum Refining Paulsboro 550 Warehousing Pitman 800 Packaged Frozen Food Merchant

  8. Energy, water and process technologies integration for the simultaneous production of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    production process from gasification. Keywords: Bioethanol; Energy and Food Production; Integrated Process production of corn. Figure 1.- Bioethanol Production expectations (source US DOE) However, there are limits

  9. MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring@ilp.mit.edu, or visit http://ilp-www.mit.edu. MIT and Automotive Industries The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics important to the automotive industry

  10. Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

  11. The structural preconditions for maximizing FDI spillovers in Colombia : a sectoral impact analysis of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on Industry output, labor payments, firm productivity, and the productive structure (1995-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, Benjamin G. (Benjamin Gabriel)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Do multinational corporations (MNCs) crowd out domestic firms in developing countries, or is foreign direct investment (FDI) complementary to domestic firm profitability, productivity, and employment? Empirical literature ...

  12. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users The

  13. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users

  14. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP »summerlectures [ICO]default Sign InIndustrial

  15. ICP-PECVD PRODUCTION TOOL FOR INDUSTRIAL AlOX AND Si-BASED PASSIVATION LAYERS B.F.P. Roos1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of different materials on silicon solar wafers using inductively coupled plasma (ICP). One of the major features of the ICP technology is the high plasma density at low kinetic ion energy. These plasma on the SINGULAR production tool platform is discussed. A special focus will be placed on a-SiOxNy/SiNx and Al

  16. Energy resource management for energy-intensive manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, C.W.; Levangie, J.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to introduce energy resource management into an energy-intensive manufacturing industry is presented. The food industry (SIC No. 20) was chosen and 20 companies were selected for interviews, but thirteen were actually visited. The methodology for this program is detailed. Reasons for choosing the food industry are described. The substance of the information gained and the principal conclusions drawn from the interviews are given. Results of the model Energy Resource Management Plan applied to three companies are compiled at length. Strategies for dissemination of the information gained are described. (MCW)

  17. MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSU at Work in Africa: Food and Agricultural Export Value Chain Development The Challenge Global, and other high-value export products, small- and medium-scale producers have struggled to access these markets. Paving the way for these producers to supply high-value food and agricultural export markets

  18. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

  19. Industrial Decision Making 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?...

  20. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  1. Using a complex system approach to address world challenges in Food and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Mil, H G J; Windhab, E J; Perrot, N; van der Linden, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World food supply is crucial to the well-being of every human on the planet in the basic sense that we need food to live. It also has a profound impact on the world economy, international trade and global political stability. Furthermore, consumption of certain types and amounts foods can affect health, and the choice of livestock and plants for food production can impact sustainable use of global resources. There are communities where insufficient food causes nutritional deficiencies, and at the same time other communities eating too much food leading to obesity and accompanying diseases. These aspects reflect the utmost importance of agricultural production and conversion of commodities to food products. Moreover, all factors contributing to the food supply are interdependent, and they are an integrative part of the continuously changing, adaptive and interdependent systems in the world around us. The properties of such interdependent systems usually cannot be inferred from the properties of its parts. In a...

  2. Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................26 1.2.7 Food irradiation

  3. Utilization of high-carbohydrate food wastes as the feedstock for degradable plastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, S.P.; Coleman, R.D.; Tsai, TenLin S.; Bonsignore, P.V.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastestreams from food processing industries have become an economic burden as well as a serious environmental problem. In the United States, billions of pounds of potato processed each year is typically discarded or sold as cattle feed at $3-6/ton. For large food processing plants, removal of more than 1 million gallons of waste/day/plant is required. As a potential solution to this economic and environmental problem, Argonne National Laboratory is developing technology that (1) bioconverts existing food processing wastestream into lactic acid, and (2) utilizes lactic acid for making environmentally safe, degradable plastics. Although the initial substrate for Argonne's process development is potato waste, the process will be applied to many other high-carbohydrate food wastes. Argonne has developed a process to bioconvert greater than 90% of the fermentable starch in solid potato waste to glucose. Lactic acid is produced from glucose via fermentation and subsequently recovered/purified for plastic synthesis. A continuous lactic acid fermentation and recovery process has been designed. Batch fermentation data showed good cell growth and excellent yields (greater than 95%) of lactic acid production from the hydrolyzed potato waste. Three product recovery processes (electrodialysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and esterification) are being evaluated. Plastics containing lactic acid can be designed to have various mechanical properties and degradation rates. Argonne is developing lactic acid plastics that have some novel features. These environmentally-safe, degradable plastics have many attractive applications such as composting bags and agriculture mulch films. Other potential applications of lactic acid polymers include programmable pesticide and fertilizer delivery systems.

  4. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantialmore »investments.« less

  5. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burrows, Keith [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Fthenakis, Vasilis [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  6. Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

  7. Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    green streets, and green energy interventions in cities.farming, public space, green energy, social, and educational

  8. Ethanol: Producting Food, Feed, and Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ethanol Ethanol blend prices are generally 10 cents lower Net Ethanol price at wholesale today is more than 1.50+gal lower than gasoline. Higher blends may emerge in the...

  9. Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    green streets, and green energy interventions in cities.farming, public space, green energy, social, and educationalFor example, energy intensive green house agriculture may

  10. Dehulling cottonseed for use in food products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wink, Robert Earl

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carborundum wheel could be exchanged for the wire brush. The housing had an opening at the top to allow seed to be fed into the unit, and also an opening at the lower part of the housing to allow the seed to be released into the collection box.... The collection box was located directly below the cylindrical housing. A sliding plate was used to separate the cylindrical housing from the collection box. When conducting a test with the Barley Pearler, the wire brush or the Carborundum wheel was first...

  11. Phase 2: Seminars to US industry of TDA feasibility study. US export potential for oil and gas suppliers to Russian production associations. Final report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Russian Production Association Varyeganneftegas Joint Stock Company (VNG JSC). It is a report Phase II of the Russian Oilfield Study, and it had two main objectives. The first was to enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. private sector in sales of oilfield equipment and services; the second goal was to assist the World Bank and VNG JSC in efforts to rehabilitate their oilfields by familiarizing VNG representatives with U.S. production and service capabilities in the petroleum sector. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Background; (2) The Planning Stage; (3) The Implementation Stage; and (4) Conclusions.

  12. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

  13. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

  14. A Primer on Food Additives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food... additives do and why modern food technology has made them necessary, and recounts how Congress and the Federal Government have responded to con sumer demands for controls. Atter spending many months with the mid European immigrants who found work...

  15. Carbohydrate Foods n the past, when Momma prepared those

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    foods containing simple sugars (fruit juices, rich desserts, milk products). Because diabetes cooling rack 1 - Paring knife 1 - Bread knife 1 - Serving plate or basket 1 - Pair tongs or serving

  16. Pinch Application- Heat Pump Study in a Food Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Y. T.; Tripathi, P.

    was to appropriatly place and size the heat pump system in a food plant. A change in the process configuration was recommended as a result of this study to increase the heat pump profitability and to improve the product quality....

  17. The University of British Columbia Food, Nutrition and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    process control (SPC) can be used to continually improve manufacturing processes. Be able to collect data in a food processing plant and construct sampling plans and control charts appropriate for any production

  18. New Challenges to Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indzembi, Franck Corentin

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The countries of Sub-Saharan Africa remain among the globe's least developed and most food insecure nations. Policymakers argue that the answers to increased agricultural productivity and financial growth lie in the adoption ...

  19. Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility. Final report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brink, D.F.; Kendall, J.M.; Youngblood, S.B.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar facility that generates 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F) process steam has been designed and constructed by Acurex Corporation and has operated for 1 yr supplying steam to the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The facility consists of 1068 m/sup 2/ (11,520 ft/sup 2/) of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 1 (5000 gal) flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW (25 hp) circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg (682,400 lb) of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value. The successful completion of the first year of operation has demonstrated the technical feasibility of generating industrial process steam with solar energy.

  20. MIT and the Building/Construction Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    devoted to improving the ability of companies to efficiently customize products and services in various in these areas. Please note that this is not a comprehensive summary of research being conducted at MIT in the topic areas listed above. MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring the intellectual power of MIT

  1. Materials needs and opportunities in the pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelini, P. [comp.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) supports research and development (R&D) in industry, the DOE national laboratories, and in universities to develop energy efficient, environmentally-acceptable industrial technologies. The Office of Industrial Technologies is working with seven energy-intensive industries to develop R&D roadmaps that will facilitate cooperative government-industry efforts to achieve energy-efficient, environmentally-acceptable, sustainable industries of the future. The forest products industry is one of the industries with which OIT is working to develop an R&D roadmap. The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program of the Office of Industrial Technologies sponsors long-term, directed research on materials that will enable industry to develop and utilize more energy-efficient, sustainable processes and technologies. The purpose of the study described in this report was to identify the material R&D needs and opportunities for the pulp and paper mill of the future.

  2. Electrotechnologies and Industrial Pollution Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, P. S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    content, and nonferrfms industrial efficiency and productivity has been cited in reverb melting furnaces produce high percentage~ of a number of publications [1-4]; these benefits continue metal oxides. These pollutants are greatly reduced in to drive... or in furnaces are capable of heat treating metals in vacu~m, development and which could be of value to low oxygen, or inert atmospheres, and operate witH no manufacturers in meeting productivity and exhaust gases. Thus, metal oxide formationl...

  3. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Forming and Springback Behavior and the Resulting Effects on Industrial Application on a Structural Part in Mass Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prexl, A.; Hoffmann, H. [Institute of Metal Forming and Casting, Technische Universitaet Muenchen D-85747 Garching (Germany); Golle, M. [Institute of Metal Forming and Casting, Technische Universitaet Muenchen D-85747 Garching (Germany); Institute of Punching and Blanking, Pforzheim University, D-75175 Pforzheim (Germany); Kudrass, S.; Wahl, M. [AUDI AG, D-85045 Ingolstadt (Germany)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Springback prediction and compensation is nowadays a widely recommended discipline in finite element modeling. Many researches have shown an improvement of the accuracy in prediction of springback using advanced modeling techniques, e.g. by including the Bauschinger effect. In this work different models were investigated in the commercial simulation program AutoForm for a large series production part, manufactured from the dual phase steel HC340XD. The work shows the differences between numerical drawbead models and geometrically modeled drawbeads. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was made for a reduced kinematic hardening model, implemented in the finite element program AutoForm.

  4. aspects industrial safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production and industrial ecology. The (more) L.W. Baas 2005-01-01 47 C:UsersDebbie ReedDesktopACBS 2014ANS degree checklists 201420152014-2015 ANS Industry...

  5. The natural and industrial cycling of indium in the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Sarah Jane O'Connell

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indium is an important metal whose production is increasing dramatically due to new uses in the rapidly growing electronics, photovoltaic, and LED industries. Little is known, however, about the natural or industrial cycling ...

  6. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  7. AgFoodTradeAgFoodTrade New Issues in Agricultural,New Issues in Agricultural,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AgFoodTradeAgFoodTrade New Issues in Agricultural,New Issues in Agricultural, Food & Bioenergy TradeFood & Bioenergy Trade AgFoodTradeAgFoodTrade New Issues in Agricultural,New Issues in Agricultural, Food & Bioenergy TradeFood & Bioenergy Trade AgFoodTradeAgFoodTrade New Issues in Agricultural

  8. PETROLEUM INDUSTRY INFORMATION REPORTING ACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compliance. The Energy Commission uses the new refinery reports when creating the Weekly Fuels Watch Report refinery production and inventories. Monthly data of refinery inputs and outputs have a variety of regular use data by refineries to support analyses of total energy use by industry type within the state

  9. Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy

    2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and spoil food, sometimes without changing the food's taste, smell, or appearance. Cesium 137, Cobalt 60: Metals that are produced by nuclear reaction and give off ionizing radiation as gamma rays. Chemical Sprout Inhibitors: Certain chemicals being used... flipping is not required and processing can be accomplished in seconds. In the X-Ray Mode, electrons are accelerated to near the speed of light using microwaves into a dense metal which emits X-Rays that pass through the product breaking the DNA chain...

  10. Measuring U.S. Consumer Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling Experiments: The Role of Price,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Measuring U.S. Consumer Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling attributes of price, product benefits, and technology influence consumer demand for genetically modified food Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling Experiments: The Role of Price, Product Benefits and Technology

  11. Creating An Agent-Based Model To Establish Food Security In Malawi 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Deirdre

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Malawi’s agricultural sector is unable to establish food security for the majority of the population. Food security in Malawi is defined by access to maize, the staple food for over 96% of the population. Current rates of domestic maize production...

  12. Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs J A R R E T T E . B Y R in the diversity and complexity of food webs of giant kelp forests, one of the most productive habitats on Earth. We demonstrate this by linking natural variation in storms with measured changes in kelp forest food

  13. MFR PAPER 1187 The Role of Fish in Meeting the World's Food Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ignore the impending energy shortage, there has to be a concern regarding the future of the world's food supply. There is no doubt that we can raise the food production efficiency of our arable land to a point major net food exporting countries in the world-Canada, Australia, and the United States-and already

  14. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  15. An Energy Conservation Program in the Food Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farner, C. T.

    programs and central headquarters. Some of the tools involved in this endeavor include: Annual strategy meetings with facility energy coordinators to share ideas and map out the coming year's programs and goals. New York Approve capital funding beyond... has not been embraced as fully as we would like, but there have been some success es. Our new Corporate headquarters in Rye Brook, New York was designed and built on energy conscious building envelope principles and includes a Honeywell EMS...

  16. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry - Fact Sheet,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEANSprings Gets anColoring

  17. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry - Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"DepartmentToward Targets of EfficientModelby

  18. "A High Speed Laser Profiling Device for Refractory Lininig Thickness Measurements In a Gasifier with Cross-Cut to the Metals, Forest Products, Chemical and Power Generation Industries"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel Bonin; Tom Harvill; Jared Hoog; Don Holve; Alan Alsing; Bob Clark; Steve Hrivnak

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process Metrix began this project with the intent of modifying an existing ranging system and combining the same with a specially designed optical scanner to yield three dimensional range images that could be used to determine the refractory lining thickness in a gasifier. The goal was to make these measurements during short outages while the gasifier was at or near operating temperature. Our initial estimates of the photon counts needed for the modulation-based range finder were optimistic, and we were forced to undertake a redesign of the range finder portion of the project. This ultimately created significant and unanticipated time delays that were exacerbated when Acuity Technologies, the subcontractor responsible for delivering the redesigned range finder, failed to deliver electrical components capable of meeting the specific range error requirements needed for accurate lining thickness measurement. An extensive search for an alternate, off-the-shelf solution was unsuccessful, and Process Metrix was forced to undertake the electronics development internally without project funds. The positive outcome of this effort is a documented set of range finder electronics that have exceptional accuracy, simplicity, temperature stability and detection limit; in sum a package perfectly suited to the measurement requirements and within our control. It is unfortunate yet understandable, given the time delays involved in reaching this milestone, that the Department of Energy decided not to continue the project to completion. The integration of this electronics set into the optomechanical hardware also developed within the scope of the project remains as follow-on project that Process Metrix will finish within the calendar year 2008. Testing in the gasifier is, at this point, not certain pending the award of additional funding needed for field trials. Eastman, our industrial partner in this project, remains interested in evaluating a finished system, and working together we will attempt to secure funding from alternate sources that have been referenced by our contract monitor. It remains our hope and goal to follow this project through to completion, thereby achieving the objectives outlined at the start of our effort.

  19. Food Safety Participant Materials for Notebook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    foods. · Not eating foods that have been irradiated. · Eating whole foods instead of processed foodsUNIT 5: Food Safety Participant Materials for Notebook #12;Navigating for Success Food Safety p 1 Food Safety Good food safety practices are crucial to reducing foodborne illnesses. Nutrition educators

  20. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the international market. Refined anchovy oil is an excellent product for many applIcations or it can be transformedFish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief

  1. The Texas Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldrop, T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry is Texas' largest consumer of energy (46+% of total). With foresight of the escalating cost of energy, it was apparent these additional costs to industry would have two adverse effects. First, the cost of their product to the consumer would...

  2. Master's programme in Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagergren, Jens

    Master's programme in Industrial and Environmental Biotechnology Programme outline The two and Environmental Biotechnology involves the use of enzymes and microorganisms to make products specifically are not ranked. EMAIL master@bio.kth.se industrial and environmental Biotechnology involves the understanding

  3. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslan, Beyza Caliskan

    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Science and Industry Advance with Mathematics and computational science have become essential tools in the development of advances in science and technology with ethanol a viable solution to the world's dependence on fossil fuels? Can biofuel production be optimized

  4. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,WBCSD), Geneva, Switzerland. IEA (1997) Voluntary actions

  5. Action Plan Food Science and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitze, Patrick

    Agroquímica y Tecnolo- gía de Alimentos (Institute of Agrochemicals and Food Technology) in Valencia. During

  6. Purdue extension Food Entrepreneurship Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be labeled organic if they are produced from genetically modified organisms or are irradiated. Organic meatPurdue extension FS-14-W Food Entrepreneurship Series Department of Food Science Katherine Clayton food science Extension outreach specialist Deidre Bush former Extension assistant Kevin Keener food

  7. KEITH SCHAEFER brings more than 25 years of leadership experience to his position of Chairman, City Paper Box, an international manufacturer of paper products serving the food service industry. Throughout his career, he has held a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    as Chief Executive Officer and President of BPL Global, Ltd., a smart grid, clean technology company heKEITH SCHAEFER brings more than 25 years of leadership experience to his position of Chairman, City

  8. The nutritional impact of domestic food programs in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keplinger, Keith Oswald

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    event in U. S. legislative history. Even more recent is the evolution of domestic food programs from the status of being primarily vents for surplus agricultural production to their present form where they exist as welfare programs in their own right... of the Food Stamp Program on food consumption in the Southern U. S. Many of the same variables are included in the analysis athough the specification is different. In particular, the food stamp variable, interacting with other independent variables...

  9. Global Energy Efficient IT Equipment Industry 2015 Market Research...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the world's main region market conditions,...

  10. Global High-purity Pentoxide Industry 2015 Market Research Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the world's main region market conditions,...

  11. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the ITP, the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) provide energy, waste, and productivity assessments at no charge to small and mid-sized manufacturers while providing...

  12. PPL Electric Utilities- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PPL Electric Utilities offers rebates and incentives for commercial and industrial products installed in their service area. The program offers rebates for lighting, heat pumps, refrigeration...

  13. Wells Public Utilities- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SMMPA develops innovative products and services to help them deliver value to customers. With help from SMMPA, Wells Public Utilities provides incentives for its commercial and industrial custome...

  14. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Custom Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dakota Electric's Custom Energy Grant Program is offered for any commercial or industrial customer that installs qualifying energy-efficient products which exceed conventional models and result in...

  15. Food Newsletter Summary July 2013 Scotland Food and You survey published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    attitudes towards the decontamination of meat and the use of freezing to reduce campylobacter in chicken. Food Navigator Insect protein `similar to conventional meat' The crude protein content in several edible insect species is similar to that in conventional meat products according to a new study from

  16. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  18. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IndustryCouncil.shtml The new members that joined the Industry Council include NPP owneroperators with analysis capability: Tyrone Stevens of Exelon, and SMR vendors:...

  19. West Pico Food | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills, New York: EnergyMountain, Utah:Orange,WestFood Jump

  20. Covered Product Category: Commercial Refrigerators and Freezers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    because the air near the floor is cooler, especially in commercial kitchens. Ergonomics is another advantage to this configuration because food products are placed in the...

  1. Food for fuel: The price of ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

  2. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  3. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 3, MARCH 2008 1421 On the Use of a Lower Sampling Rate for Broken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    the continuity of the process and production chains of many industries. The list of the indus- tries industries, petrochemical industries, and domestic appliance industries. Induction motors are often used

  5. Industry Analysis February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    technology ­ Clean tech/ clean technology #12;7 Industry Studies · IbisWorld ­ U.S. and global industry-Industries · Biodiesel ­ Biofuel ­ Alternate fuels ­ Green fuels ­ Renewable fuels/energy ­ Green energy ­ Green Canada, Census, Industry Canada, the OECD, European Union, IMF, World Bank, UN . . . Never pay for stats

  6. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    : Occupational biomechanics, work physiology, industrial ergonomics, environmental hygiene, cognitive engineeringINDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor

  7. Urban agriculture as a tool for neighborhood fabric repair in post-industrial Detroit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbank, Sandra Trubow

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on Detroit as a post-industrial city that suffers from abandonment, vacancy, and food security issues. I address this problem through the lens of agriculture, asking how urban farming can be used to ...

  8. The Soviet Farm Complex : industrial agriculture in a Socialist context, 1945-1965

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jenny Leigh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "The Soviet Farm Complex" is a history of food, farming and the environment in the postwar Soviet Union. It tells the story of how different technical and institutional authorities created an industrial Soviet countryside ...

  9. When the cows come home : post post-industrial urban agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Marissa A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few decades, the industrialization of food has become increasingly influenced by the consolidation of its controlling corporations. This consolidation has isolated meat processing facilities from small farmers, ...

  10. California’s Industrial Energy Efficiency Best Practices Technical Outreach and Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazama, D. B.; Wong, T.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the California Energy Commission’s (Commission) energy policies and programs that save energy and money for California’s manufacturing and food processing industries to help retain businesses in-state and reduce greenhouse gases...

  11. For Immediate Release --Friday, July 11, 2014 Potato Growers of Alberta and industry partners to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Joy

    For Immediate Release -- Friday, July 11, 2014 Potato Growers Research capacity in Alberta's potato industry will be significantly enhanced due years from the Potato Growers of Alberta (PGA), McCain Foods, ConAgra Lamb

  12. CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    solutions for the production of healthy and sustainable food. As a research funder dedicated to improving to Nutrition Index (ATNI),2 which will rate companies' performance in providing nutritious products human and animal health, the Wellcome Trust has a growing interest in this area and our 2010

  13. Development Food Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center Linen Services Food Stores Farrall Agriculture Engineering International Center Erickson IM Sports Kedzie Morrill Hall of Agriculture Marshall Adams Eppley Center McPhail Equine Performance Ramp 1 Plant Transportation Services IPF Storage Bldg No. 1 IPF Storage Bldg No. 3 Nuclear Magnetic Resonator Chittenden Ramp

  14. Science & Research Agriculture & Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science & Research Agriculture & Food Climate & Environment Consumers EU Priorities 2020 EU Treaty for nuclear fusion project ITER | EurActiv http://www.euractiv.com/en/science/funding-crisis-for-nuclear for nuclear fusion project ITER A multi-billion euro international research project has run into deep

  15. Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscal Policy and Utah's Oil and Gas Industry Michael T. Hogue, Research Analyst Introduction for oil and gas extraction firms. A recent review by the Government Accountability Office indicates features of Utah's oil and gas industry. The Oil and Gas Industry in Utah Reserves and Production Oil

  16. Optimization of Industrial Applications with Hardware in the Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of industrial robots integrated in complex robot cells. Trajectory optimizers are usually based on models and with changes of the robot task. Index Terms Industrial robotics, Trajectory optimization, Derivative free with Hardware in the Loop I. INTRODUCTION To reduce production costs, industrial robots must work as fast

  17. Review: Eating Together: Food, Friendship, and Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food, Friendship, and Inequality By Alice P. Julier ReviewedFood, Friendship, and Inequality. Champaign, IL: UniversityFood, Friendship, and Inequality, sociologist Alice P.

  18. Canada’s Bitumen Industry Under CO2 Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y.-H. Henry

    We investigate the effects of implementing CO2 emissions reduction policies on Canada’s oil sands industry, the largest of its kind in the world. The production of petroleum products from oils sands involves extraction of ...

  19. Accelerating time-to-market in the global electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folgo, Elena Jean

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In today's electronics industry, fast time-to-market (TTM) and time-to-profit (TTP) is key to customer satisfaction and firm competitiveness. Optimizing the product development and new product introduction (NPI) process ...

  20. Innovation incentives and competition in the hard disk drive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiaohua Sherry

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Firms in the hard disk drive industry are continually engaging in R & D and improving the quality of their products. We explore various determinants of the product innovation incentives for firms concerned with both their ...

  1. Energy Management and Computers in the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerfeld, J. T.; Hartley, E. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dryer hood waste heat. o Biomass feedstocks for the production of specialized chemial products. o Crossing of the stone groundwood process with the thermomechanical pulping process. 236 ESL-IE-81-04-42 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy...

  2. AVLIS industrial access program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

  3. LIVSMEDELSHYGIEN KLG 050 Food Hygiene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIVSMEDELSHYGIEN KLG 050 Food Hygiene Antal poäng: 3.0. Valfri för: K4Li. Kursansvarig: Göran Molin som för samhället i sin helhet. Litteratur Molin, G.: Lectures in Food Hygiene. #12;

  4. Biological production of products from waste gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

  5. Partnerships for Industrial Productivity Through Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, W. E.

    of myself as a gold miner. Some 75% to 85% of my studies and efforts ended in failure. The remaining 15% was worth the gold mine, and HAVE produced such savings as: A An average of 15% to 18% of the total energy usage of all the facilities surveyed..., with a 2 year payback or less. If the payback period could have been 3 to 4 years the average would have been between 25% and 35% B. Over 4.0 megawatts oC demand in one year C. Over S8OO,OOO per year in one facility D. Over 55% of the energy...

  6. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Research Foundation, Petten, The Netherlands (1997).Energy Research Foundation, Petten, The Netherlands (1995).

  7. Forest Products Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen andMeetingonupSault Ste.

  8. University Food Permit For Serving Food or Refreshments on University Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    University Food Permit For Serving Food or Refreshments on University Property Not Required__________________________________________ Date ___________________ When applicable, this permit must be reviewed by the Environmental Hygiene only) #12;Caterer/Restaurant/ Market ADDITIONAL FOOD SOURCES: University Food Permit (Page 2) Foods

  9. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRS Issuesof the U.S.

  10. FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................... 21 1.2.4. Food irradiation ....1 FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY Radioactivity in Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science on behalf of the Food Standards Agency and the Scottish Environment

  11. Success Story Production of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Success Story Production of Chemicals from Biologically Derived Succinic Acid (BDSA) The BDSA, automobile bumpers, and an array of other industrial and consumer products. Known as the BDSA (Biologically it as a platform chemical to produce 1,4-butanediol (BDO) and related products, tetrahydrofuran and - butyrolactone

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -fired power plants derive energy by burning coal in their furnaces. These power plants generally use either. The by-product materials include coal combustion by-products, wood ash, pulp and paper industry by recycling and research needs are discussed. #12;3 2.0 MATERIALS 2.1 COAL-COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Coal

  13. Coal production 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

  14. Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

  15. External research and energy efficiency in the process industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaarsberg, T.M.; Foust, T.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process industries in the US are under enormous pressure. These industries, even more than US industry on average, face skyrocketing environmental costs, a rapidly changing electricity market, potential climate change policies, aging infrastructure and strong international competition. To be profitable they must reduce their costs and environmental impacts while increasing their product quality, turnaround time, productivity and output. Most of these industries have already cut costs and labor as much as possible. Therefore, to survive, these industries must innovate. History shows that industries that are the most innovative are the most successful. These industries are vital to the US economy. For example, the metals, pulp and paper, chemicals and the petroleum refining industries account for more than $800 billion in products shipped and employ more than three million workers. Although the US has shifted dramatically toward services with 77% of workers and 74% of GDP now in the service sector, what many have missed is that the process industries are important customers for many of these new services. ServOnly the last two years of NSF industrial R and D data provide any breakout of non-manufacturing R and D. This paper discusses the past, current and possible future role of eternal research and development (R and D)--much of which is now in the service sector--in fostering innovation and thus energy efficiency in these industries. The authors suggest that these industries are more innovative than previously thought because of external research.

  16. Cash Flow Impacts of Industrial Steam Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    of thermal transfer tasks within the majority of manufacturing industries, it is widely perceived as a "support" utility. In other words, steam is considered a power source subordinate to process lines that are the real focus of manufacturing activity... be directed to productive functions, enabling the plant to extend production runs or perhaps even begin new product lines. RETURN ON INVESTMENT Global competition and decentralized corporate structures provide formidable challenges for manufacturing...

  17. The case of the European Pulp and Paper IndustriesThe case of the European Pulp and Paper Industries October 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Industries October 2003 Wood-using industries and woody biomass Wood-using industries and woody biomass #12-Electricity Directive · « Intelligent Energy for Europe » Programme · EU policy options on RES-Heat · Communication production from biomass in the EU PPI in 2001 - 2010 (estim.) Energy production from biomass in the EU PPI

  18. The Industrial Electrification Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, I. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI's role as the research organization of the electric power industry, in coordination with potential user industries, is to 1) define the viability of candidate electrification technologies by monitoring the state-of-the-art and continuously...

  19. and Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    technologicalandlogisticssystemsbygathering, structuring, and managing information. Indus- trial engineers apply their knowledge not only45 Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 220 Engineering Lab Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Contact: James R. Rinderle

  20. Demographics and industry returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry category Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing Toysindustry Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing ToysIndustries are associated with high demand by children (child care, toys) and

  1. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY SUMMER 2013 Industrial Engineering COOP Student needed-Fri, for summer 2013. Student must be enrolled in BS Engineering program. (Preferably completed 2-3 yrs

  2. Industry Analysis October 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Different regulations for some industries in Canada, the U.S. and Europe ie. telecommunications, energy of energy, materials, industrial waste, byproducts #12;Contact Constance Adamson Stauffer Library adamsonc

  3. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough periodAutomotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi

  4. Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

  5. State Level Analysis of Industrial Energy Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; Shipley, A. M.; Brown, E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the global aluminum market. Similarly, increases in electricity prices combined with declining old-growth timber inventories lead to a decline in the wood products and primary paper industries. The outlook for these industries is equally uncertain.... Available: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/esr/ esr sum.html. Washington, D.C.: USDOE. [DOE/EIA] Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration. 2000. Annual Energy Outlook 2001. DOE/EIA 0383(2001). Washington, D.C.: Department...

  6. Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

  7. Gas production response to price signals: Implications for electric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, M.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas production response to price signals is outlined. The following topics are discussed: Structural changes in the U.S. gas exploration and production industry, industry outlook, industry response to price signals, and implications for electric power generators.

  8. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Mario A. Rotea Professor and Department Head #12;2Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Outline · Undergraduate Degree Programs · Graduate Degree Programs · The Faculty · The Research · Summary #12;3Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Programs ­ BSME & BSIE 0 20 40 60

  9. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. combustion industry is among the most productive, efficient, and technologically sophisticated in the world and remains vital to the nation’s economic competitiveness and national security. As the industry looks forward, it confronts tremendous growth opportunities but also significant technical and market challenges. Future industry success will depend on the industry's ability to respond to competitive pressures as well as public expectations for a clean and sustainable industry. Much progress has been made in understanding the fundamental science of combustion; however, much more is needed as regulatory and competitive forces push the industry to develop combustion equipment with better performance, lower environmental impact, and greater flexibility. Immense opportunities exist for companies to develop and apply new technology responding to these needs. Unfortunately, few companies can accept the high technical and financial risk required for the research if the technology is not adopted widely enough to provide a payback on their investment.

  10. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

  11. The US glass industry: An energy perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, E.; Elaahi, A.; Lowitt, H.E.

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the state of the US glass industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. The specific objectives were: to update and verify energy consumption and production data for the various process steps in 1985; to determine the potential energy savings attainable by replacing current practices with state-of-the-art and advanced (year 2010) production practices and technologies; and to identify areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. The results of this study concluded that for the year 2010 production level, there is potential to save between 21 and 44 percent of the projected energy use by replacing current technology practices with state-of-the-art and advanced technologies. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement were selected from the identified list, primarily based on their energy savings potential and the opinions of industry experts. 100 refs.

  12. Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Economic Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Timothy G Contributions of the Florida Craft Brewing Industry to the Florida Economy Executive Summary The Florida Brewers on the state's economy, which was conducted using the University of Florida's Food and Resource Economics

  13. Industrial Dojo Program Fosters Industrial Internet Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Launches Cloud Foundry 'Industrial Dojo,' Contributes to Open Source to Foster Continued...

  14. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center offers a diverse set of capabilities and instruments for industrial projects. Industrial users are invited to contact Fredrik...

  15. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of crude oil and oil products; (iii) retrofitting existingof petroleum products, limit proliferation of oil usingand product mix in energy-intensive industries; converting oil-

  16. Holiday Food Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy Energy Department'sHobartFood

  17. Temporary Food Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Us Ted Donat -Temescal1Food

  18. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take of industries including consulting, technology development, software, supply chain manufacturing, engineering

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , mining, cement, and inorganic chemicals · Industrial production growth rate is about 1% #12;Challenges for mechatronics in Jordan · The size of the "production, automation, and manufacturing" industry is small and rubber 9. Construction 10. Wood industry and furniture #12;FFF Projects over the years 0 20 40 60 80 100