National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for industrial transportation electric

  1. Industry and Government: Paving the way towards electric modes of transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, G.L.

    1995-06-01

    Government officials and the private sector have taken a renewed interest in supporting the development and commercialization of electric vehicles in the United States. The current electric vehicle renaissance is the result of three very important factors: the need to improve our environment, particularly our urban air quality; the need to enhance our energy security through increased use of domestically produced fuels; and the desire to increase our global economic competitiveness. In the past decade, research and development efforts related to electric vehicles (EVs) have increased dramatically in response to national imperatives to address the transportation sector`s contribution to air pollution and to our reliance on foreign oil. Also, it is recognized that development and expansion of a U.S. electric vehicle could contribute to an international competitive advantage and could assist in the conversion of traditionally defense-related industries to civilian applications.

  2. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  3. Electric Drive Transportation Association EDTA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transportation Association EDTA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA) Product: EDTA is the preeminent U.S. industry association...

  4. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  5. Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Place: Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region,...

  6. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  7. Charging Up with the Electric Drive Transportation Association | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Charging Up with the Electric Drive Transportation Association Charging Up with the Electric Drive Transportation Association May 20, 2014 - 4:51pm Addthis Test Drive 1 of 5 Test Drive Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Reuben Sarkar drives a Chevrolet Spark EV during the Electric Drive Transportation Association conference in Indianapolis, Indiana on May 20, 2014. The conference brings together industry leaders who are advancing electric vehicle technologies and

  8. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Successful Transportation Lab-Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborations Spotlighted at Summit Successful Transportation Lab-Industry Collaborations Spotlighted at Summit Five men stand outside in front of passenger car and white modular building. On display at the National Lab Impact Summit, a Toyota Mirai fuel cell electric vehicle from NREL paired with a 3D-printed building from ORNL can work together to produce and store renewable energy. Image Dennis Schroeder, NREL. May 18, 2016 On May 4, NREL hosted leaders from the business, government, and

  10. Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Revenue for Delivery Service Providers (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4C) Entity State Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Pacific Gas & Electric Co CA Investor Owned 58,038 366,593 243,892 4,112 672,635 San Diego Gas & Electric Co CA Investor Owned 596 91,379 113,352 0 205,326 Southern California Edison Co CA Investor Owned 4,502 517,154 90,847 0 612,503 Connecticut Light & Power Co CT Investor Owned 351,392 489,607 96,889 4,242 942,130 United

  11. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives ... Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved 1.0 Objective The objective of ...

  12. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  13. Some perspectives on the electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winer, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    Opinions regarding future directions of the U.S. electric utility industry are presented in the paper. Pertinent historical aspects and current industry rules are summarized. Major issues and trends in the electricity market are outlined, and recommendations are presented. It is concluded that new rules in the industry will be set directly by customers, and that customers want renewable energy resources.

  14. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Road Course Handling Test Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: ... Appendix A - Electric Vehicle Road Course Handling Test Data Sheet 13 Appendix B - Vehicle ...

  15. Department of Energy Receives Highest Transportation Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today received the Transportation Community Awareness and Emergency Response (TRANSCAER) Chairman's Award, one of industry's ...

  16. A Brief History of the Electricity Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data and evaluating electricity restructuring James Bushnell University of California Energy Inst. www.ucei.berkeley.edu Outline * Shameless flattery - Why EIA data are so important * Why are people so unhappy? - With electricity restructuring * What EIA data have helped us learn - Production efficiencies - Market efficiency - Market competition - Environmental compliance Why EIA is so important * Important industries undergoing historic changes - Restructuring/deregulation - Environmental

  17. Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shenzhen Soyin Electrical Appliance Industrial Co Ltd Place: Xixiang Town,Shenzhen, Guangdong...

  18. World electricity and gas industries; Pressures for structural change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahane, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Electric and gas utilities are central middlemen in the energy business. Worldwide, more than 50% of all primary energy is transformed by utilities and delivered to final consumers through utility wires and pipes. The structure and behavior of the electricity and gas industries and the role and behavior of utilities are therefore important to all other energy industry players. The electricity and gas industries are special. Unlike oil, coal, or wood, electricity and gas are transported from producers to consumers mostly via fixed grids. This means that supplies are generally tied to specific markets and, unlike an oil tanker on the high seas, cannot be easily diverted elsewhere. These grids are natural monopolies inasmuch as having more than one wire or pipe along a given route is generally unnecessary duplicative. In addition, both supply and grid investments are generally large and lumpy. Industrial organization theory suggests that the coordination of industries can be achieved either through hierarchies or through markets. Hierarchies are generally preferred when the transaction costs of coordinating through markets is too high. These two elements of electricity and gas industry structure are the means of hierarchical coordination. This paper discusses the possibilities for changing the structure of utilities to one which has greater reliance on markets.

  19. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Revision 2 Effective March 1, 1997 Battery Charging Prepared by Electric Transportation ... with the requirements of the vehiclebattery supplier as stated in the OwnerOperators ...

  20. Technology opportunities in a restructured electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the Strategic Research & Development (SR&D) program of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The intent of the program is to anticipate and shape the scientific and technological future of the electricity enterprise. SR&D serves those industry R&D needs that are more exploratory, precompetitive, and longer-term. To this end, SR&D seeks to anticipate technological change and, where possible, shape that change to the advantage of the electric utility enterprise and its customers. SR&D`s response to this challenge is research and development program that addresses the most probable future of the industry, but at the same time is robust against alternative futures. The EPRI SR&D program is organized into several vectors, each with a mission that relates directly to one or more EPRI industry goals, which are summarized in the paper. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  2. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective March 1, 1997 Braking Test Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications ... Activity Requirements 6 5.3 Dry Controlled Test 7 5.4 Wet Controlled Test 9 5.5 Wet Panic ...

  3. Center for Electric Drive Transportation at the University of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Drive Transportation at the University of Michigan - Dearborn Center for Electric Drive Transportation at the University of Michigan - Dearborn 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  4. Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites Work on ...

  5. Electrical and thermal transport properties of iron and iron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrical and thermal transport properties of iron and iron-silicon alloy at high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrical and thermal transport properties ...

  6. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were ...

  7. Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together in National Effort to Tackle Important New Electricity Area Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry ...

  8. Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry.

  9. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  10. Electric and Gas Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric and Gas Industries Association Place: Sacramento, CA Zip: 95821 Website: www.egia.org Coordinates:...

  11. Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing ...

  12. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry

  13. Stainless steel 4003 in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovacs, H.; Stoeckl, M.

    1998-12-31

    The world today sees a dramatic increase in the number of people and the quantities of articles and products which are to be transported. This results in an ever-increasing demand in the steels used in the transportation industry. Key factors are environmental regulations, safety, and life expectancy and product cost in determining which types steel to use. Especially the ferritic 12% chromium stainless steels has seen a significant development and usage in recent years. Compared to typical carbon steels high strength/low alloy steels and structural steels the 12% chromium steels offers improvement in corrosion and wear resistance and weldability outlining advantages in light weight construction and an overall saving. The paper presents the chemical composition and mechanical properties of grade 4003 which is increasingly used worldwide in areas of public transportation, rail transportation, mining industry and sugar industry, among others. The impact of corrosion and abrasion of this stainless steel versus the standard carbon grades and cost efficiency are discussed.

  14. The industrial role in the changing electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, B.

    1994-12-31

    Armco is a large customer on the West Penn Power, Ohio Power, and Ohio Edison systems. Two of the three utilities are considered low cost providers, one as a high cost provider. Even though all three utilities provide the same product in the same region of the country, the established regulatory system for setting rates has resulted in a price disparity between these suppliers that is economically unjustified. Deregulation and retail wheeling would correct this efficiency problem to the benefit of the ratepayers. Armco, along with many other energy intensive industrials, has a long history of involvement in traditional utility matters. Typically, this role has had two phases: First, at the local level, a partnership with the utility on the efficient transmission and distribution of energy into our facilities and involvement with the utility on the customer side of the meter with projects that affect power consumption and quality in the plant. The second phase is in the regulatory world. Typically, Armco is one of many adversaries jockeying for adoption of a particular revenue requirement and method of cost allocation in PUC hearings. At the state level, Armco has successfully appealed several PUC decisions that could adversely affect business. Armco management continues to support industrial positions at the federal level through trade associations such as ELCON. Armco`s role in the changing electric power industry is discussed.

  15. Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry According the latest Economic Census (2002), the trucking industry is the largest contributor of revenue in the transportation sector, contributing more than one-quarter of the sectors revenue. The air industry contributes just under one-quarter, as does other transportation and support activities, which include sightseeing, couriers and

  16. QER- Comment of Electric Drive Transportation Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find attached the comments of the Electric Drive Transportation Association regarding the first volume of the Department of Energy’s QER. If you have questions about our submittal or require further information, please contact me using the information provided below. Thank you for the opportunity to comment. Genevieve Cullen

  17. Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

  18. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of site personnel or our field engineers to provide ... interval is the range around the sample estimate that ... In 1994, industrial electric motor systems used in ...

  19. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  20. ConEd (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate and Custom Efficiency Programs offer incentives to directly metered electric customers in good standing who contribute to the system benefits charge ...

  1. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" ...onal",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 ...

  2. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives to their commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are...

  3. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, ...

  5. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative (MEC) encourages energy efficiency in the commercial and industrial sectors by giving customers a choice of several different financial incentive programs. First, ...

  6. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives for commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are provided on...

  7. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers July 22, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Kristen Honey Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Wollman Deputy Director of the Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program at the National

  8. Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

  9. State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Megawatthours) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A, 4B, 4D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 47,211,525 53,107,038 19,107,433 557,463 119,983,459 Connecticut 12,777,579 12,893,531 3,514,798 168,552 29,354,460 Maine 4,660,605 3,984,570 3,357,486 0 12,002,661 Massachusetts 20,071,160 26,076,208 7,960,941 360,983 54,469,292 New Hampshire 4,510,487 4,464,530 1,969,064 0 10,944,081 Rhode Island 3,070,347 3,657,679 887,150 27,928

  10. Service design in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, S.S.; Smith, S.A.; Wilson, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This essay reviews the basic concepts of product differentiation as they apply to service design in the electric power industry. Unbundling the quality attributes of service conditions benefits utilities as well as their customers. Each customer gains from new opportunities to match the quality and cost of service conditions to the characteristics of their end uses. A well designed product line of service conditions benefits every customer. The utility benefits from improved operating efficiency and from greater flexibility in meeting service obligations and competitive pressures. In addition, the utility obtains better information for planning investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. Together these features provide a foundation for a utility's business strategy. The basic principles of product design are described and a unified methodology for specifying and pricing service conditions is outlined. We also describe how the pricing of quality attributes enables the utility to price other service options systematically, such as long-term supply contracts, cogeneration, and standby service. 60 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  11. American Indian tribes and electric industry restructuring: Issues and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, D.; Busch, J.; Starrs, T.

    1997-07-01

    The US electric utility industry is undergoing a period of fundamental change that has significant implications for Native American tribes. Although many details remain to be determined, the future electric power industry will be very different from that of the present. It is anticipated that the new competitive electric industry will be more efficient, which some believe will benefit all participants by lowering electricity costs. Recent developments in the industry, however, indicate that the restructuring process will likely benefit some parties at the expense of others. Given the historical experience and current situation of Native American tribes in the US, there is good reason to pay attention to electric industry changes to ensure that the situation of tribes is improved and not worsened as a result of electric restructuring. This paper provides a review of electricity restructuring in the US and identifies ways in which tribes may be affected and how tribes may seek to protect and serve their interests. Chapter 2 describes the current status of energy production and service on reservations. Chapter 3 provides an overview of the evolution of the electric industry to its present form and introduces the regulatory and structural changes presently taking place. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of changes in the US electric industry with a specific focus on the implications of these changes for tribes. Chapter 5 presents a summary of the conclusions reached in this paper.

  12. United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment | Department of Energy Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment The objectives of the Market Assessment were to: Develop a detailed profile of the stock of motor-driven equipment in U.S. industrial facilities; Characterize and estimate the magnitude of opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of industrial motor systems; Develop a profile of motor system purchase and maintenance

  13. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  14. Public-policy responsibilities in a restructured electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Hirst, E.; Bauer, D.

    1995-06-01

    In this report, we identify and define the key public-policy values, objectives, and actions that the US electricity industry currently meets. We also discuss the opportunities for meeting these objectives in a restructured industry that relies primarily on market forces rather than on government mandates. And we discuss those functions that governments might undertake, presumably because they will not be fully met by a restructured industry on its own. These discussions are based on a variety of inputs. The most important inputs came from participants in an April 1995 workshop on Public-Policy Responsibilities and Electric Industry Restructuring: Shaping the Research Agenda. Other sources of information and insights include the reviews of a draft of this report by workshop participants and others and the rapidly growing literature on electric-industry restructuring and its implications. One of the major concerns about the future of the electricity industry is the fate of numerous social and environmental programs supported by today`s electric utilities. Many people worry that a market-driven industry may not meet the public-policy objectives that electric utilities have met in the past. Examples of potentially at-risk programs include demand-side management (DSM), renewable energy, low-income weatherization, and fuel diversity. Workshop participants represented electric utilities, public utility commissions (PUCs), state energy offices, public-interest groups, other energy providers, and the research community.

  15. (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Connecticut Utilities implement electric and gas efficiency rebate programs funded by Connecticut's public benefits charge through the Energy Efficiency Fund. The Connecticut Light and Power...

  16. Dakota Electric Association - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Lighting Chillers Heat Pumps Air conditioners Compressed air Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls Motors Motor VFDs...

  17. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective March 1, 1997 "Electric Vehicle Rough Road Course Test" Prepared by Electric ... Appendices Appendix A - Electric Vehicle Rough Road Test Data Sheet 15 Appendix B - ...

  18. Empire District Electric- Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers a Commercial/Industrial Prescriptive Rebate Program to its non-residential customers in Arkansas who purchase certain high-efficiency equipment for...

  19. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  20. Lodi Electric Utility- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility provides an on-bill financing program for the commercial and industrial customers. To participate, the customer must receive a rebate through the utility's rebate program, and...

  1. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  2. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  3. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  4. The status of electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morey, M.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation discusses current electric utility regulatory reform with a focus on the impacts of competition in the Midwest marketplace. Information and data are presented through 14 figures and 30 tables. Regulatory issues at the state and Federal levels are very briefly outlined, including reciprocity, unbundling, stranded cost recovery, and independent system operation. Graphical data on energy capacity by source, capacity additions, wholesale markets, electricity prices, and market development are also presented.

  5. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  6. Managing an evolution: Deregulation of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, S.K.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses the emerging competitive situation in the electric power industry as deregulation of electric utilities looms on the horizon. The paper supports this change, and the competition it will bring, but urges caution as changes are instituted, and the regulatory bodies decide how and how much to free, and at what rates. The reason for his urge for caution comes from historical experience of other industries, which were smaller and had less direct impact on every American.

  7. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power Country Denmark...

  8. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 34,740 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 6,150

  9. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1 Other Biomass 2 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 143,598 100.0 Total Renewable

  10. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,251 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  11. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 31 0.2 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 55,127 100.0

  12. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  13. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  14. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. ); Taylor, E.R. Jr. ); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  15. Electric Utility Industry Experience with Geomagnetic Disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as a few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration.

  16. NREL: Transportation Research - Electric Motor Thermal Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Motor Thermal Management A photo of a piece of laboratory testing equipment. NREL ... motors is helping to improve the performance and reliability of electric-drive vehicles. ...

  17. Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Electric Vehicle Acceleration, Gradeability, and Deceleration Test Procedure" Prepared by ... SAE J1666, "Electric Vehicle Acceleration, Gradeability and Deceleration Test Procedure." ...

  18. Assistance to States on Electric Industry Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen Andersen

    2010-10-25

    This project seeks to educate state policymakers through a coordinated approach involving state legislatures, regulators, energy officials, and governors’ staffs. NCSL’s activities in this project focus on educating state legislators. Major components of this proposal include technical assistance to state legislatures, briefing papers, coordination with the National Council on Electricity Policy, information assistance, coordination and outreach, meetings, and a set of transmission-related activities.

  19. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",32417,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3855,11.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3272,10.1 "

  20. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",39357,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",6033,15.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",4314,11 "

  1. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27674,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2499,9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1956,7.1 "

  2. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",6188,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1941,31.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",508,8.2 "

  3. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",33071,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",231,0.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",101,0.3 "

  4. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21022,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2412,11.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",858,4.1 " Solar","-","-"

  5. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14261,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10684,74.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",8425,59.1 "

  6. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",45575,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1984,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",747,1.6 "

  7. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  8. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",23982,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1623,6.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1340,5.6 "

  9. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3623,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2223,61.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1594,44 "

  10. Energy Department Partners with NESCAUM to Expand Electric Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efforts | Department of Energy Partners with NESCAUM to Expand Electric Transportation Efforts Energy Department Partners with NESCAUM to Expand Electric Transportation Efforts November 9, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis This electric vehicle charging station at the Charles Hotel in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was one of the first charging stations in the state. Massachusetts is a member of NESCAUM and is part of the a multi-state zero emission vehicle memorandum of understanding committing these

  11. Institutional contexts of market power in the electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foer, A.A.

    1999-05-01

    Market power is widely recognized as one of the principal issues that must be dealt with if the electricity industry is to make the transition from regulation to competition. In this article, the author provides a legal and economic introduction to what the antitrust community means by market power and offers a primer on why market power is so central an issue in the electricity industry. Finally and most importantly, he offers comments on the institutional contexts of market power, exploring a process which he calls Shermanization that helps explain the institutional aspect of moving from regulation to competition and holds implications for where oversight should reside during this complex transition.

  12. Perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, B.; Schaffhauser, A.

    1994-04-01

    This report offers perspectives on the future of the electric utility industry. These perspectives will be used in further research to assess the prospects for Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). The perspectives are developed first by examining economic, political and regulatory, societal, technological, and environmental trends that are (1) national and global in scope and (2) directly related to the electric utility industry. Major national and global trends include increasing global economic competition, increasing political and ethnic strife, rapidly changing technologies, and increasing worldwide concern about the environment. Major trends in the utility industry include increasing competition in generation; changing patterns of electricity demand; increasing use of information technology to control power systems; and increasing implementation of environmental controls. Ways in which the national and global trends may directly affect the utility industry are also explored. The trends are used to construct three global and national scenarios- ``business as usual,`` ``technotopia future,`` and ``fortress state`` -and three electric utility scenarios- ``frozen in headlights,`` ``megaelectric,`` and ``discomania.`` The scenarios are designed to be thought provoking descriptions of potential futures, not predictions of the future, although three key variables are identified that will have significant impacts on which future evolves-global climate change, utility technologies, and competition. While emphasis needs to be placed on understanding the electric utility scenarios, the interactions between the two sets of scenarios is also of interest.

  13. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry","All Sources",1,1,12,12 2015,"AR","Total Electric Power Industry","Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic",1,1,12,12 2015,"AZ","Total Electric Power ...

  14. NREL: Transportation Research - Hybrid Electric Fleet Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an energy storage system, and an electric motor to achieve a combination of emissions, ... This collected energy is used to propel the vehicle during normal drive cycles. The ...

  15. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: 1970-1991

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the U.S. electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  16. Reshaping the electric utility industry: Competitive implications for Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maschoff, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper briefly outlines some of the issues in the electric power industry restructuring. In addition, the impacts of these changes on the energy marketplace are discussed. Federal policy initiatives, state regulatory response, and utility management response are each described. Management skills are identified as the critical success factor for competition in the utility market.

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Wind",2,2,2,2,2,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0.1,0.1 "Total electric industry",3086,3246,3357,3359,3389,3362,3351,3357,3374,3365,3428,3392,3390,2701,2414,2447,...

  18. NREL: Transportation Research - Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) ... The fuel economy of medium- and heavy-duty EVs and PHEVs is ... Vehicle Operating Data Truck Platooning Truck Stop ...

  19. Electric power industry in Korea: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hoesung

    1994-12-31

    Electrical power is an indispensable tool in the industrialization of a developing country. An efficient, reliable source of electricity is a key factor in the establishment of a wide range of industries, and the supply of energy must keep pace with the increasing demand which economic growth creates in order for that growth to be sustained. As one of the most successful of all developing countries, Korea has registered impressive economic growth over the last decade, and it could be said that the rapid growth of the Korean economy would not have been possible without corresponding growth in the supply of electric power. Power producers in Korea, and elsewhere in Asia, are to be commended for successfully meeting the challenge of providing the necessary power to spur what some call an economic miracle. The future continues to hold great potential for participants in the electrical power industry, but a number of important challenges must be met in order for that potential to be fully realized. Demand for electricity continues to grow at a staggering rate, while concerns over the environmental impact of power generating facilities must not be ignored. As it becomes increasingly difficult to finance the rapid, and increasingly larger-scale expansion of the power industry through internal sources, the government must find resources to meet the growing demand at least cost. This will lead to important opportunities for the private sector. It is important, therefore, for those interested in participating in the power production industry and taking advantage of the newly emerging opportunities that lie in the Korean market, and elsewhere in Asia, to discuss the relevant issues and become informed of the specific conditions of each market.

  20. Informatics requirements for a restructured competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickle, S.; Marnay, C.; Olken, F.

    1996-08-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing a slow but nonetheless dramatic transformation. It is a transformation driven by technology, economics, and politics; one that will move the industry from its traditional mode of centralized system operations and regulated rates guaranteeing long-run cost recovery, to decentralized investment and operational decisionmaking and to customer access to true spot market prices. This transformation will revolutionize the technical, procedural, and informational requirements of the industry. A major milestone in this process occurred on December 20, 1995, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved its long-awaited electric utility industry restructuring decision. The decision directed the three major California investor-owned utilities to reorganize themselves by the beginning of 1998 into a supply pool, at the same time selling up to a half of their thermal generating plants. Generation will be bid into this pool and will be dispatched by an independent system operator. The dispatch could potentially involve bidders not only from California but from throughout western North America and include every conceivable generating technology and scale of operation. At the same time, large customers and aggregated customer groups will be able to contract independently for their supply and the utilities will be required to offer a real-time pricing tariff based on the pool price to all their customers, including residential. In related proceedings concerning competitive wholesale power markets, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recognized that real-time information flows between buyers and sellers are essential to efficient equitable market operation. The purpose of this meeting was to hold discussions on the information technologies that will be needed in the new, deregulated electric power industry.

  1. Local government: The sleeping giant in electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, S.

    1997-11-01

    Public power has long been a cornerstone of consumer leverage in the electric industry. But its foundation consists of a much broader and deeper consumer authority. Understanding that authority - and present threats to it - is critical to restructuring of the electric industry as well as to the future of public power. The country has largely forgotten the role that local governments have played and continue to play in the development of the electric industry. Moreover, we risk losing sight of the options local governments may offer to protect consumers, to advance competition in the marketplace, and to enhance opportunities for technology and economic development. The future role of local government is one of the most important issues in the restructuring discussion. The basic authority of consumers rests at the local level. The resulting options consumers have to act as more than just respondents to private brokers and telemarketing calls are at the local level. And the ability for consumers to shape the marketplace and standards for what it will offer exists at the local level as well.

  2. Cyber Security Challenges in Using Cloud Computing in the Electric Utility Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Bora A.

    2012-09-01

    This document contains introductory material that discusses cyber security challenges in using cloud computing in the electric utility industry.

  3. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. |

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

  4. Strategies for promoting renewables in a new electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes strategies for promoting renewable resources in an era characterized by competitive pressures in the electric industry. It begins with a background section to describe the perspective from which I am writing and the nature of the pressures confronting renewables in 1996. Then, the paper turns to a discussion of the regulatory and other options to promote renewables in this environment. The major conclusion of the paper is that there is no {open_quotes}magic bullet{close_quotes} to guide the development of renewables through the developing competitive era within the electric industry. Indeed, it appears that the job can get done only through a combination of different measures at all levels of government. The author believes that among the most effective measures are likely to be: a national renewable resources generation standard; conditions attached to restructuring events; regional interstate compacts; regional risk-sharing consortia supported by federal and state tax and fiscal policy; and state {open_quotes}systems benefits charges;{close_quotes}

  5. RESIDENTIAL",,,,"COMMERCIAL",,,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,,"TRANSPORTATION",,,,"OTHER",,,,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "RESIDENTIAL",,,,"COMMERCIAL",,,,"INDUSTRIAL",,,,"TRANSPORTATION",,,,"OTHER",,,,"TOTAL"

  6. Distributed generation technology in a newly competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifenberger, J.P.; Ammann, P.R.; Taylor, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    The electric utility industry is in the midst of enormous changes in market structure. While the generation sector faces increasing competition, the utilities` transmission and distribution function is undergoing a transition to more unbundled services and prices. This article discusses the extent to which these changes will affect the relative advantage of distributed generation technology. Although the ultimate market potential for distributed generation may be significant, the authors find that the market will be very heterogeneous with many small and only a few medium-sized market segments narrowly defined by operating requirements. The largest market segment is likely to develop for distributed generation technology with operational and economical characteristics suitable for peak-shaving. Unbundling of utility costs and prices will make base- and intermediate-load equipment, such as fuel cells, significantly less attractive in main market segments unless capital costs fall significantly below $1,000/kW.

  7. The electrical transport properties of liquid Rb using pseudopotential theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, A. B. Bhatt, N. K. Thakore, B. Y. Jani, A. R.; Vyas, P. R.

    2014-04-24

    Certain electric transport properties of liquid Rb are reported. The electrical resistivity is calculated by using the self-consistent approximation as suggested by Ferraz and March. The pseudopotential due to Hasegawa et al for full electron-ion interaction, which is valid for all electrons and contains the repulsive delta function due to achieve the necessary s-pseudisation was used for the calculation. Temperature dependence of structure factor is considered through temperature dependent potential parameter in the pair potential. Finally, thermo-electric power and thermal conductivity are obtained. The outcome of the present study is discussed in light of other such results, and confirms the applicability of pseudopotential at very high temperature via temperature dependent pair potential.

  8. Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

  9. Applying electrical utility least-cost approach to transportation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, G.A.; Growdon, K.; Lagerberg, B.

    1994-09-01

    Members of the energy and environmental communities believe that parallels exist between electrical utility least-cost planning and transportation planning. In particular, the Washington State Energy Strategy Committee believes that an integrated and comprehensive transportation planning process should be developed to fairly evaluate the costs of both demand-side and supply-side transportation options, establish competition between different travel modes, and select the mix of options designed to meet system goals at the lowest cost to society. Comparisons between travel modes are also required under the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA). ISTEA calls for the development of procedures to compare demand management against infrastructure investment solutions and requires the consideration of efficiency, socioeconomic and environmental factors in the evaluation process. Several of the techniques and approaches used in energy least-cost planning and utility peak demand management can be incorporated into a least-cost transportation planning methodology. The concepts of avoided plants, expressing avoidable costs in levelized nominal dollars to compare projects with different on-line dates and service lives, the supply curve, and the resource stack can be directly adapted from the energy sector.

  10. Secretary Chu to Kick-off the Electric Drive Transportation Association's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation Motorcade | Department of Energy to Kick-off the Electric Drive Transportation Association's Innovation Motorcade Secretary Chu to Kick-off the Electric Drive Transportation Association's Innovation Motorcade April 18, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Tuesday, April, 19, 2011, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will help kick-off the Electric Drive Transportation Association Annual Conference by participating in the Innovation Motorcade, an all electric vehicle motorcade that

  11. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Custom Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dakota Electric will conduct an inspection of the project site prior to approval, and grant applications must earn pre-approval from Dakota Electric before any work begins. To qualify for rebates...

  12. Salem Electric- Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salem Electric provides incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. Available rebates include:

  13. National Grid (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Grid offers various rebate programs for industrial and commercial customers to install energy efficiency measures. 

  14. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy

  15. Oncor Electric Delivery - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Contact Oncor Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Oncor Electric Delivery Website http:www.takealoadofftexas.comindex.aspx?idcommercial-standard-offer...

  16. DTE Energy (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Program for Business offers prescriptive incentives for both electric and natural gas energy efficient improvements in areas of lighting, HVAC, processes, compressed air,...

  17. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data ... and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and ...

  18. Austin Utilities (Gas and Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    commercial location per year, 5,000 per industrial location per year Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Austin Utilities Website http:www.austinutilities.compages...

  19. Resilient design of recharging station networks for electric transportation vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kris Villez; Akshya Gupta; Venkat Venkatasubramanian

    2011-08-01

    As societies shift to 'greener' means of transportation using electricity-driven vehicles one critical challenge we face is the creation of a robust and resilient infrastructure of recharging stations. A particular issue here is the optimal location of service stations. In this work, we consider the placement of battery replacing service station in a city network for which the normal traffic flow is known. For such known traffic flow, the service stations are placed such that the expected performance is maximized without changing the traffic flow. This is done for different scenarios in which roads, road junctions and service stations can fail with a given probability. To account for such failure probabilities, the previously developed facility interception model is extended. Results show that service station failures have a minimal impact on the performance following robust placement while road and road junction failures have larger impacts which are not mitigated easily by robust placement.

  20. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  1. Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Work on optimizing electrical and thermal transport properties of n-type skutterudites via a multiple-element-void-filling approach is presented.

  2. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses (Fact Sheet).

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Web site and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ◆ DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES Indianapolis Public Transportation DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES NREL/PIX 13504, 13505, 13583 THE INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CORPORATION (INDYGO) provides transit service in the Indianapolis Metropolitan area, using 226 vehicles to serve 28 fixed and demand response routes. IndyGo vehicles accumulated more than 9 million miles and transported 11 million

  3. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to commercial and industrial electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment and measures in eligible facilities. Incentives are...

  4. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 1999: Mergers and Other Corporate Combinations, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Presents data about corporate combinations involving investor-owned utilities in the United States, discusses corporate objectives for entering into such combinations, and assesses their cumulative effects on the structure of the electric power industry.

  5. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 2000: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  6. Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are limited to 50% of the project cost up to a maximum of $100,000. Customers who wish to participate in this rebate program should call Dakota Electric Association before the new equipme...

  7. RG&E (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  8. Duke Energy (Electric)- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy’s Smart $aver Incentive program offers rebates to non-residential customers to install energy efficient equipment in commercial/industrial facilities. All Duke Energy Ohio...

  9. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Performance Issues for a Changing Electric Power Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the factors affecting reliability within the electric bulk power system. Historical and projected data related to reliability issues are discussed on a national and regional basis. Current research on economic considerations associated with reliability levels is also reviewed.

  16. Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1997-07-01

    This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

  17. NREL: Transportation Research - Power Electronics and Electric Machines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Electronics and Electric Machines A photo of a researcher using testing equipment in a lab. NREL R&D is making wide-scale adoption of electric-drive vehicles more feasible by developing technologies and components with superior reliability, efficiency, and durability, while dramatically decreasing costs. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's power electronics and electric machines research focuses on systems for electric-drive vehicles (EDVs) that control the flow of electricity

  18. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  19. Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell

  20. Hydrothermal industrialization electric-power systems development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The nature of hydrothermal resources, their associated temperatures, geographic locations, and developable capacity are described. The parties involved in development, required activities and phases of development, regulatory and permitting requirements, environmental considerations, and time required to complete development activities ae examined in detail. These activities are put in proper perspective by detailing development costs. A profile of the geothermal industry is presented by detailing the participants and their operating characteristics. The current development status of geothermal energy in the US is detailed. The work on market penetration is summarized briefly. Detailed development information is presented for 56 high temperature sites. (MHR)

  1. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  2. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corneli, Steve; Kihm, Steve; Schwartz, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  3. Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1996-08-01

    Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

  4. Electric Drive Transportation Association Conference | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric Machines) Workshop on July 24, 2012 held at the Doubletree O'Hare, Chicago, IL. 4_rogers_ed.pdf (1.3 MB) More Documents & Publications Power Electronics and Thermal Management Breakout Session Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors (APEEM) R&D Program Overview

    Test Drive 1 of 5 Test Drive Deputy

  5. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size(b)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ",,,,,"1,000","Row"

  6. The Impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on Industrial End Users of Electric Motor-Driven Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Answers to frequently asked questions about the impacts of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 on industrial end users of electric motor-driven systems.

  7. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  8. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  9. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  10. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  11. NREL: Transportation Research - How Much Do Electric Cars Pollute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Much Do Electric Cars Pollute? Depends on When and Where You Plug In Picture of charging stations in parking garage. A new study suggests reducing fossil fuel use in the ...

  12. NREL: Transportation Research - NREL to Offer Fuel Cell Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Offer Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Ride and Drive at Sustainable Smart Home Opening on July 9 July 7, 2016 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will showcase several ...

  13. NREL: Transportation Research - Power Electronics and Electric Machines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities and Electric Machines Facilities NREL's power electronics and electric machines thermal management test facilities feature a wide range of equipment and enable world-class experimental and modeling capabilities. NREL researchers excel at testing and measurement in the areas of heat transfer, reliability characterization, and thermal and thermomechanical modeling. The following list describes NREL's innovative testing capabilities and equipment. A photo of four researchers in

  14. Electricity industry development trends and the environmental programs in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, P.

    1995-12-01

    The process of industrialization in the Czech Republic, which is more intensive than in other parts of central Europe, has been under way since the mid-nineteenth century. Over the last 40 years, large-scale industrial activity was based on extensive use of domestic primary energy sources, especially brown-coal/lignite. The escalation of this usage inflicted heavy devastation to large portions of industrial zones and, as a result, worsened living conditions through atmospheric pollution and other environmental impacts in large regions of central Europe. The Czech electricity industry and CEZ, a.s. (the nation`s principal electricity generator, responsible for meeting eighty percent of national electricity demand, and operator of the nationwide EHV transmission system) has been challenged to cope with all environmental issues by the end of 1997, in compliance with the strict limits set by the Clean Air Act of 1991, which are comparable to standard implemented in advanced industrial countries. A review of the critical environmental issues is presented and the role of the individual and of the State is analyzed. The approach of CEZ, a.s., towards a better natural environment and its response to legal environment provisions have been incorporated into the company`s development program. It comprises decommissioning the most obsolete fossil-fuel fired power stations; rehabilitation of thermal power plants; supplementing the coal/lignite-fired units selected for future operation with FGD systems and retrofitting them with DENOX equipment; a larger share of nuclear electricity generation after the completion of the Temelin NPP (2 units of 1000MW each) and, last but not least, initiating DSM (demand-side management) programs of energy-electricity savings in the Czech Republic.

  15. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session II: State and Industry Perspectives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pete Devlin U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program October 27, 2008 Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session II: State and Industry Perspectives 2 Opportunities * Potential multi-use options for CHP-hydrogen deployment - Forklifts in warehouses, replacing battery usage - Backup power applications - Bus routes, with fuel cell buses replacing conventional diesel transit buses - LDV Commercial Fleets - Airports: ground service

  16. The effect of electron induced hydrogenation of graphene on its electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Sung Oh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Teizer, Winfried [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-07-22

    We report a deterioration of the electrical transport properties of a graphene field effect transistor due to energetic electron irradiation on a stack of Poly Methyl Methacrylate (PMMA) on graphene (PMMA/graphene bilayer). Prior to electron irradiation, we observed that the PMMA layer on graphene does not deteriorate the carrier transport of graphene but improves its electrical properties instead. As a result of the electron irradiation on the PMMA/graphene bilayer, the Raman D band appears after removal of PMMA. We argue that the degradation of the transport behavior originates from the binding of hydrogen generated during the PMMA backbone secession process.

  17. Synthesis of economic criteria in the design of electric utility industrial conservation programs in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper lays out a set of economic criteria to guide the development of electricity conservation programs for industrial customers of the Costa Rican utilities. It puts the problem of utility and other public policy formulation in the industrial conservation field into the context of ongoing economic and trade liberalization in Costa Rica, as well as the financial and political pressures with which the country`s utilities must contend. The need to bolster utility financial performance and the perennial political difficulty of adjusting power rates for inflation and devaluation, not to mention maintaining efficient real levels, puts a premium on controlling the costs of utility conservation programs and increasing the degree of cost recovery over time. Industrial conservation programs in Costa Rica must adopt a certain degree of activation to help overcome serious market failures and imperfections while at the same time avoiding significant distortion of the price signals guiding the ongoing industrial rationalization process and the reactivation of growth.

  18. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  19. U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, B.C.B.; Wang Yingshi

    1997-11-01

    Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

  20. SO{sub 2} trading program as a metaphor for a competitive electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    This very brief presentation focuses on the competitive market impacts of sulfur dioxide SO{sub 2} emissions trading. Key points of the presentation are highlighted in four tables. The main principles and results of the emissions trading program are outlined, and the implications of SO{sub 2} trading for the electric industry are listed. Parallels between SO{sub 2} trading and electric utility restructing identified include no market distortion by avoiding serious disadvantages to competitors, and avoidance of stranded costs through compliance flexibility. 4 tabs.

  1. " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group,"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Total Inputs of Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products for Heat, Power," " and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Billion Btu)" ,,,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,,,"Biomass" " "," ",," "," "," ","Wood Residues","Wood-Related"," " " ","

  2. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," ","

  3. "Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total

  4. NREL: Transportation Research - NREL Evaluates Propane-to-Electricity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shuttle Bus Conversion at Zion National Park Evaluates Propane-to-Electricity Shuttle Bus Conversion at Zion National Park July 14, 2016 Photo of shuttle buses in mountain setting. NREL is evaluating the drive-cycle characteristics of a fleet of propane-powered shuttle buses operating at Zion National Park. The National Park Service (NPS) originally deployed the propane buses in 2000 to reduce congestion along the park's main traffic corridor. As the propane-powered fleet ages and associated

  5. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  6. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. )

    1991-11-01

    This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

  7. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

  8. The revenue requirement approach to analysis of alternative technologies in the electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The advancement of coal-based power generation technology is of primary interest to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The interests are well-founded due to increasing costs for premium fuels and, more importantly, the establishment of energy independence to promote national security. One of DOE's current goals is to promote the development of coal-fired technology for the electric utility industry. This paper is concerned with the economic comparison of two alternative technologies: the coal gasification-combined cycle (GCC) and the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-combined cycle. The revenue requirement analysis was used for the economic evaluation of engineering alternatives in the electric utility industry. The results were compared based on year-by-year revenue requirement analysis. A computer program was written in Fortran to perform the calculations.

  9. Visioning the 21st Century Electricity Industry: Outcomes and Strategies for America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lauren Azar Senior Advisor to the Secretary U. S. Department of Energy 8 February 2012 Visioning the 21 st Century Electricity Industry: Strategies and Outcomes for America http://teeic.anl.gov/er/transmission/restech/dist/index.cfm We all have "visions," in one form or another: * Corporations call them strategic plans * RTOs ... transmission expansion plans or Order 1000 plans * State PUCs ... integrated resource plans * Employees ... career goals Artist: Paolo Frattesi Artist: Paolo

  10. Antitrust Enforcement in the Electricity and Gas Industries: Problems and Solutions for the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Francois

    2006-06-15

    Antitrust enforcement in the electricity and gas industries raises specific problems that call for specific solutions. Among the issues: How can the anticompetitive effects of mergers be assessed in a changing regulatory environment? Should long-term agreements in energy purchasing be prohibited? What are the benefits of preventive action such as competition advocacy and market surveillance committees? Should Article 82 (a) of the EC Treaty be used to curb excessive pricing?. (author)

  11. Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.W.

    1995-10-01

    The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

  12. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  13. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  14. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40-47951 April 2010 Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation Preprint T. Markel To be presented at the MIT Energy Initiative Transportation Electrification Symposium Cambridge, Massachusetts April 8, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive

  15. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    951 April 2010 Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation Preprint T. Markel To be presented at the MIT Energy Initiative Transportation Electrification Symposium Cambridge, Massachusetts April 8, 2010 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive

  16. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.

    2010-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)--which include all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles--provide a new opportunity for reducing oil consumption by drawing power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure--from battery manufacturing to communication and control between the vehicle and the grid--must provide access to clean electricity, satisfy stakeholder expectations, and ensure safety. Currently, codes and standards organizations are collaborating on a PEV infrastructure plan. Establishing a PEV infrastructure framework will create new opportunities for business and job development initiating the move toward electrified transportation. This paper summarizes the components of the PEV infrastructure, challenges and opportunities related to the design and deployment of the infrastructure, and the potential benefits.

  17. Making evolution work for us: Structural adaptation in the electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, J.

    1994-09-01

    Adoption of a thoughtful model of reform with the unbundling of generation as its keystone could make the evolutionary process work for the industry and its stakeholders alike. Integration of transition cost recovery into this approach would defuse utilities` concerns that exposure to competition could lead to financial meltdown. Evolution, biologists now theorize, takes place not in glacial, steady progression but in volatile spasms. Surely this principle of dynamis and stasis is illustrated by the sudden wave of reform activity underway in electricity markets - a startling departure after decades in which the utility industry was the very symbol of stability in American business. The change agent has been the onset of effective competition in bulk power generation, beginning with the thin wedge of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. As competition in the power supply area grew, spurred by low natural gas prices and advances in the cost effectiveness of smaller generating units, Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 1992, embracing competition in bulk power markets as the cornerstone of federal electricity policy. Passage of EPAct alone will not, in and of itself, restructure bulk power markets, of course. Rather, it will result in the opening of transmission systems over time and the establishment of truly competitive power markets, with private initiative and actions by federal and state regulators. Even more recently, before the industry could catch its breath and accommodate to the substantial changes set in motion by EPAct, the ripening of retail wheeling proposals in California and Michigan has spurred a further quantum leap in the nature of the debate over the industry`s future.

  18. Modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Wesley C.; Drumm, Clifton Russell; Pautz, Shawn D.; Turner, C. David

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the theoretical background on modeling electron transport in the presence of electric and magnetic fields by incorporating the effects of the Lorentz force on electron motion into the Boltzmann transport equation. Electromagnetic fields alter the electron energy and trajectory continuously, and these effects can be characterized mathematically by differential operators in terms of electron energy and direction. Numerical solution techniques, based on the discrete-ordinates and finite-element methods, are developed and implemented in an existing radiation transport code, SCEPTRE.

  19. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  20. Convergence of natural gas and electricity industries means change, opportunity for producers in the U. S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dar, V.K. Jefferson Gas Systems Inc., Arlington, VA )

    1995-03-13

    The accelerating deregulation of natural gas and electricity distribution is the third and most powerful wave of energy deregulation coursing through North America. The first wave (1978--92) provided the impetus for sculpting competitive markets in energy production. The second (1986--95) is now breaking to fashion competitive bulk logistical and wholesale consumption markets through open access on and unbundling of gas pipeline and storage capacity and high voltage transmission capacity. The third wave, the deregulation of gas and electric retail markets through open access and nondiscriminatory, unbundled local gas and electric distribution tariffs, began in the early 1990s. It will gather momentum for the next 5 years and crest at the turn of the century, affecting and molding almost $300 billion/year in retail energy sales. The transformation will have these strategic implications: (1) the convergent evolution of the gas and electric industries; (2) severe margin compression along the energy value chain from wellhead to busbar to the distribution pipes and wires; and (3) the rapid emergency of cyberspace retailing of energy products and services. The paper discusses merchant plants, convergence and producers, capital flows, producer federations, issues of scale, and demand, margins, and value.

  1. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  2. Automated system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash from electric precipitator hoppers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.K. Konovalov; O.V. Yashkin; V.V. Ermakov

    2008-03-15

    A system for removal and pneumatic transport of fly ash is examined, in which air pulses act on batches (pistons) of ash formed in a duct. Studies are made of the effect of several physical parameters on the force required to displace a piston of ash and these serve as a basis for choosing a system for removal and pneumatic transport of ash simultaneously from several hoppers of an electric precipitator. This makes it possible to separate the ash particles according to size without introducing additional components. Formulas are given for calculating the structural and dynamic parameters of this system and measurements of indirect dynamic parameters are used to calculate the input-output characteristics of the system. In order to optimize the system, configurations for summing several ducts into a single transport duct for pneumatic ash transport are proposed. Some variants of dry ash utilization and the advantages of producing of size-separated particles are considered.

  3. Performance enhancement using power beaming for electric propulsion earth orbital transporters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagle, J.E.

    1991-08-01

    An electric propulsion Earth orbital transport vehicle (EOTV) can effectively deliver large payloads using much less propellant than chemical transfer methods. By using an EOTV instead of a chemical upper stage, either a smaller launch vehicle can be used for the same satellite mass or larger satellite can be deployed using the same launch vehicle. However, the propellant mass savings from using the higher specific impulse of electric propulsion may not be enough to overcome the disadvantage of the added mass and cost of the electric propulsion power source. Power system limitations have been a major factor delaying the acceptance and use of electric propulsion. This paper outlines the power requirements of electric propulsion technology being developed today, including arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and ion engines. Power supply characteristics are discussed for nuclear, solar, and power-beaming systems. Operational characteristics are given for each, as are the impacts of the power supply alternative on the overall craft performance. Because of its modular nature, the power-beaming approach is able to meet the power requirements of all three electric propulsion types. Also, commonality of approach allows different electric propulsion approaches to be powered by a single power supply approach. Power beaming exhibits better flexibility and performance than on-board nuclear or solar power systems.

  4. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2013-02-15

    Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49,014 71,281 2000's 75,826 64,052 62,738 62,698 57,672 59,773 58,760 2010's 63,611 64,749 67,551 69,164 69,953 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  6. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  7. DOE National Power Grid recommendations: unreliable guides for the future organization of the bulk electric-power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk electric power supply industry needs leadership to meet its problems effectively, economically, and with the least injury to the environment during the rest of the century. The industry's pluralistic character, which is one of its strengths, and the range of the federal antitrust laws have blunted industry response to the challenge of supplying adequate bulk power. DOE failed to recognize the leadership vacuum and to use the opportunity provided by its Final Report on the National Power Grid Study to adopt a more effective role. DOE can still recover and urge Congress to pass the necessary enabling legislation to establish a regional bulk power supply corporation that would generate and transmit electric power for sale to federally chartered, privately owned electric utilities having no corporate links to their wholesale customers. 87 references.

  8. Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-16

    Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

  9. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  10. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  11. Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave

    2005-08-15

    The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Low-temperature electrical transport in B-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lin; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhaosheng; Quan, Baogang; Li, Junjie Gu, Changzhi

    2014-05-05

    B-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films are grown using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition method, and their electrical transport properties varying with temperature are investigated. When the B-doped concentration of UNCD film is low, a step-like increase feature of the resistance is observed with decreasing temperature, reflecting at least three temperature-modified electronic state densities at the Fermi level according to three-dimensional Mott's variable range hopping transport mechanism, which is very different from that of reported B-doped nanodiamond. With increasing B-doped concentration, a superconductive transformation occurs in the UNCD film and the highest transformation temperature of 5.3?K is observed, which is higher than that reported for superconducting nanodiamond films. In addition, the superconducting coherence length is about 0.63?nm, which breaks a reported theoretical and experimental prediction about ultra-nanoscale diamond's superconductivity.

  13. Light absorption and electrical transport in Si:O alloys for photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirabella, S.; Crupi, I.; Miritello, M.; Simone, F.; Di Martino, G.; Di Stefano, M. A.; Di Marco, S.; Priolo, F.

    2010-11-15

    Thin films (100-500 nm) of the Si:O alloy have been systematically characterized in the optical absorption and electrical transport behavior, by varying the Si content from 43 up to 100 at. %. Magnetron sputtering or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition have been used for the Si:O alloy deposition, followed by annealing up to 1250 deg. C. Boron implantation (30 keV, 3-30x10{sup 14} B/cm{sup 2}) on selected samples was performed to vary the electrical sheet resistance measured by the four-point collinear probe method. Transmittance and reflectance spectra have been extracted and combined to estimate the absorption spectra and the optical band gap, by means of the Tauc analysis. Raman spectroscopy was also employed to follow the amorphous-crystalline (a-c) transition of the Si domains contained in the Si:O films. The optical absorption and the electrical transport of Si:O films can be continuously and independently modulated by acting on different parameters. The light absorption increases (by one decade) with the Si content in the 43-100 at. % range, determining an optical band gap which can be continuously modulated into the 2.6-1.6 eV range, respectively. The a-c phase transition in Si:O films, causing a significant reduction in the absorption coefficient, occurs at increasing temperatures (from 600 to 1100 deg. C) as the Si content decreases. The electrical resistivity of Si:O films can be varied among five decades, being essentially dominated by the number of Si grains and by the doping. Si:O alloys with Si content in the 60-90 at. % range (named oxygen rich silicon films), are proved to join an appealing optical gap with a viable conductivity, being a good candidate for increasing the conversion efficiency of thin-film photovoltaic cell.

  14. Electrical transport characteristics of DNA wrapped carbon nanotubes contacted to palladium and palladium oxide electrodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Leonard, Francois; Jones, Frank Eugene; Talin, Albert Alec

    2005-03-01

    DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes (DNA-CNT) have generated attention due the ability to disperse cleanly into solution, and by the possibility of sorting nanotubes according to size and conductivity. In order to learn more about the effects of DNA on the electrical transport characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes, we fabricate and test a series of devices consisting of DNA-wrapped CNTs placed across gold, palladium, and palladium oxide electrodes. In addition, we look at how DNA functionalized CNTs react to presence of hydrogen, which has previously been shown to affect the conductivity of CNTs when in contact with palladium.

  15. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  16. Industrial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  17. Mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, and applications for market-based rates in a deregulating electric utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.J.

    1999-05-01

    In this article, the author reviews FERC's current procedures for undertaking competitive analysis. The current procedure for evaluating the competitive impact of transactions in the electric utility industry is described in Order 592, in particular Appendix A. These procedures effectively revised criteria that had been laid out in Commonwealth Edison and brought its merger policy in line with the EPAct and the provisions of Order 888. Order 592 was an attempt to provide more certainty and expedition in handling mergers. It established three criteria that had to be satisfied for a merger to be approved: Post-merger market power must be within acceptable thresholds or be satisfactorily mitigated, acceptable customer protections must be in place (to ensure that rates will not go up as a result of increased costs) and any adverse effect on regulation must be addressed. FERC states that its Order 592 Merger Policy Statement is based upon the Horizontal Merger Guidelines issued jointly by the Federal Trade Commission and the Antitrust Division Department of Justice (FTC/DOJ Merger Guidelines). While it borrows much of the language and basic concepts of the Merger Guidelines, FERC's procedures have been criticized as not following the methodology closely enough, leaving open the possibility of mistakes in market definition.

  18. "Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","

  19. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  20. Ultra-Efficient and Power Dense Electric Motors for U. S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Schiferl, Richard F.; Umans, Stephen D.

    2013-03-12

    The primary purpose of this project was to combine the ease-of-installation and ease-of-use attributes of industrial induction motors with the low-loss and small size and weight advantages of PM motors to create an ultra-efficient, high power density industrial motor that can be started across-the-line or operated from a standard, Volts/Hertz drive without the need for a rotor position feedback device. PM motor products that are currently available are largely variable speed motors that require a special adjustable speed drive with rotor position feedback. The reduced size and weight helps to offset the magnet cost in order make these motors commercially viable. The scope of this project covers horsepower ratings from 20 ? 500. Prototypes were built and tested at ratings ranging from 30 to 250 HP. Since fans, pumps and compressors make up a large portion of industrial motor applications, the motor characteristics are tailored to those applications. Also, since there is extensive use of adjustable frequency inverters in these applications, there is the opportunity to design for an optimal pole number and operate at other than 60 Hz frequency when inverters are utilized. Designs with four and eight pole configurations were prototyped as part of this work. Four pole motors are the most commonly used configuration in induction motors today. The results of the prototype design, fabrication, and testing were quite successful. The 50 HP rating met all of the design goals including efficiency and power density. Tested values of motor losses at 50 HP were 30% lower than energy efficient induction motors and the motor weight is 35% lower than the energy efficient induction motor of the same rating. Further, when tested at the 30 HP rating that is normally built in this 286T frame size, the efficiency far exceeds the project design goals with 30 HP efficiency levels indicating a 55% reduction in loss compared to energy efficient motors with a motor weight that is a few

  1. Reduction in tribological energy losses in the transportation and electric utilities sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinkus, O.; Wilcock, D.F.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    This report is part of a study of ways and means of advancing the national energy conservation effort, particularly with regard to oil, via progress in the technology of tribology. The report is confined to two economic sectors: transportation, where the scope embraces primarily the highway fleets, and electric utilities. Together these two sectors account for half of the US energy consumption. Goal of the study is to ascertain the energy sinks attributable to tribological components and processes and to recommend long-range research and development (R and D) programs aimed at reducing these losses. In addition to the obvious tribological machine components such as bearings, piston rings, transmissions and so on, the study also extends to processes which are linked to tribology indirectly such as wear of machine parts, coatings of blades, high temperature materials leading to higher cycle efficiencies, attenuation of vibration, and other cycle improvements.

  2. Oxygen Transport Kinetics in Infiltrated SOFCs Cathode by Electrical Conductivity Relaxation Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-07-01

    Infiltration has attracted increasing attention as an effective technique to modify SOFC cathodes to improve cell electrochemical performance while maintaining material compatibility and long-term stability. However, the infiltrated material's effect on oxygen transport is still not clear and detailed knowledge of the oxygen reduction reaction in infiltrated cathodes is lacking. In this work, the technique of electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) is used to evaluate oxygen exchange in two common infiltrated materials, Ce{sub 0.8}Sm{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.9} and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3-?}. The ECR technique is also used to examine the transport processes in a composite material formed with a backbone of La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-?} and possessing a thin, dense surface layer composed of the representative infiltrate material. Both the surface oxygen exchange process and the oxygen exchange coefficient at infiltrate/LSCF interface are reported. ECR testing results indicate that the application of infiltrate under certain oxygen partial pressure conditions produces a measureable increase in the fitted oxygen exchange parameter. It is presently only possible to generate hypotheses to explain the observation. However the correlation between improved electrochemical performance and increased oxygen transport measured by ECR is reliably demonstrated. The simple and inexpensive ECR technique is utilized as a direct method to optimize the selection of specific infiltrate/backbone material systems for superior performance.

  3. Solar-electric power: The U.S. photovoltaic industry roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-01-01

    To meet this challenge, we — the U.S.-based PV industry — have developed this roadmap as a guide for building our domestic industry, ensuring U.S. technology ownership, and implementing a sound commercialization strategy that will yield significant benefits at minimal cost. Putting the roadmap into action will call for reasonable and consistent co-investment by our industry and government in research and technology development.

  4. This document is to provide input for a probable future state of the electric system and electric industry in 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Renz - Renz Consulting State of the Electric System in 2030 The Issue Last month's SGN article by Joe Miller discussed how the transition to a Smart Grid might take place. Joe's article was part of a series that has discussed the seven Principal Characteristics of a Smart Grid. While those seven characteristics promise a future in which the power grid supports and enables the needs of 21 st century society, such a grid does not exist today. And it will not exist tomorrow unless there is a

  5. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price Correction/Update Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Smith Electric Vehicles: Advanced Vehicle Electrification + Transportation Sector Electrification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Smith Electric Vehicles at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Smith Electric...

  7. Electric industry restructuring and environmental issues: A comparative analysis of the experience in California, New York, and Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.; Galen, P.S.

    1996-08-01

    Since the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) issued its April 20, 1994, Blue Book proposal to restructure the regulation of electric utilities in California to allow more competition, over 40 states have initiated similar activities. The question of how major public policy objectives such as environmental protection, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and assistance to low-income customers can be sustained in the new competitive environment is also an important element being considered. Because many other states will undergo restructuring in the future, the experience of the {open_quotes}early adopter{close_quotes} states in addressing public policy objectives in their electric service industry restructuring processes can provide useful information to other states. The Competitive Resource Strategies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Utility Technologies, is interested in documenting and disseminating the experience of the pioneering states. The Center for Energy Analysis and Applications of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory assisted the Office of Utility Technologies in this effort with a project on the treatment of environmental issues in electric industry restructuring.

  8. Electricity and technical progress: The bituminous coal mining industry, mechanization to automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devine, W.D. Jr.

    1987-07-01

    Development and use of electric mobile machinery facilitated the mechanization of underground bituminous coal mining and has played a lesser but important role in the growth of surface mining. Electricity has been central to the rise of mechanically integrated mining, both underground (after 1950) and on the surface (recently). Increasing labor productivity in coal mining and decreasing total energy use per ton of coal mined are associated with penetration of new electric technology through at least 1967. Productivity declined and energy intensity increased during the 1970s due in part to government regulations. Recent productivity gains stem partly from new technology that permits automation of certain mining operations. On most big electric excavating machines, a pair of large alternating current (ac) motors operate continuously at full speed. These drive direct current (dc) generators that energize dc motors, each matched to the desired power and speed range of a particular machine function. Direct-current motors provide high torque at low speeds, thus reducing the amount of gearing required; each crawler is independently propelled forward or backward by its own variable-speed dc motors. The principal advantages of electric power are that mechanical power-transmission systems - shafts, gears, etc. - are eliminated or greatly simplified. Reliability is higher, lifetime is longer, and maintenance is much simpler with electric power than with diesel power, and the spare parts inventory is considerably smaller. 100 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  10. Evidence of nonclassical plasma transport in hollow cathodes for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2007-03-15

    Measurements, simplified analyses, and two-dimensional numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity cannot account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a 25-27.5 A electric propulsion hollow cathode. The cathode consisted of a 1.5 cm hollow tube with an {approx}0.28 cm diameter orifice and was operated with 5.5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of xenon flow using two different anode geometries: a segmented cone and a circular flat plate. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields as much as four times colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed (>4). It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulas for electron-ion streaming instabilities improves qualitatively the comparison between the numerical results and the time-averaged measurements. Simplified analyses that have been based largely on the axial measurements support the conclusion that additional resistivity is required in Ohm's law to explain the measurements. The combined results from the two-dimensional simulations and the analyses bound the range of enhanced resistivity to be 3-100 times the classical value.

  11. Multiple-Filled Skutterudites: High Thermoelectric Figure of Merit through Separately Optimizing Electrical and Thermal Transports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Weiqing; Yang, Jiong; Yang, Jihui; Wang, Hsin; Salvador, James R.; Shi, Xun; Chi, Miaofang; Cho, Jung Y; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong

    2011-01-01

    Skutterudites CoSb{sub 3} with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

  12. Electrical transport properties of Ti-doped Fe2O3(0001) epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Bo; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Droubay, Timothy C.; McCloy, John S.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Heald, Steve M.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2011-12-30

    The electrical transport properties for compositionally and structurally well-defined epitaxial ?-(TixFe1?x)2O3(0001) films have been investigated for x ? 0.09. All films were grown by oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy using two different growth rates: 0.050.06 /s and 0.220.24 /s. Despite no detectable difference in cation valence and structural properties, films grown at the lower rate were highly resistive whereas those grown at the higher rate were semiconducting (? = ?1 ???cm at 25?C). Hall effect measurements reveal carrier concentrations between 1019 and 1020 cm?3 at room temperature and mobilities in the range of 0.1 to 0.6 cm2/V??s for films grown at the higher rate. The conduction mechanism transitions from small-polaron hopping at higher temperatures to variable-range hopping at a transition temperature between 180 and 140 K. The absence of conductivity in the slow-grown films is attributed to donor electron compensation by cation vacancies, which may form to a greater extent at the lower rate because of higher oxygen fugacity at the growth front.

  13. A premium price electricity market for the emerging biomass industry in the UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettle, R.

    1995-11-01

    The Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation (NFFO) is the means by which the UK Government creates an initial market for renewable sources of electricity. For the first time the third round of the competition for NFFO contracts included a band for {open_quote}energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes{close_quote}. The NFFO Order which obliges the Regional Electricity Companies (RECs) in England and Wales to contract for a specified electricity generating capacity from renewable resources was made in December 1994. It required 19.06 MW of wood gasification capacity and 103.81 MW from other energy crops and agricultural and forestry wastes. The purpose of these Orders is to create an initial market so that in the not too distant future the most promising renewables can compete without financial support. This paper describes how these projects are expected to contribute to this policy. It also considers how the policy objective of convergence under successive Orders between the price paid under the NFFO and the market price for electricity might be accomplished.

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric