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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EPA rule requires SO 2 emissions reduction from Texas coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting in 2012, power plants in 23 states must meet new sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions caps in order to comply with the Cross State Air Pollution ...

2

Emissions allowance prices for SO 2 and NO X remained low in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions allowances are a component of policy tools used to reduce emissions of air pollutants such as SO 2 or NO X. Such programs cap the total ...

3

The Temporal Efficiency of SO2 Emissions Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rain Program; and Rubin and Kling (1993) for a simulation of a potential banking program for hydrocarbon emission standards imposed on light-duty vehicle manufacturers. 4 A reasonable estimate of counterfactual emissions from all the units...

Ellerman, A Denny; Montero, Juan-Pablo

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

Why are allowance prices so low? : an analysis of the SO2 emissions trading program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the reduction in SO2 emissions by electric utilities between 1985 and 1993. We find that emissions have been reduced for reasons largely unrelated to the emission reduction mandate ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Assessment of SO2 Emissions Control Achieved in Practice During Startup and Shutdown  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a better understanding of the capability of modern flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to comply with the typical emission limitations for sulfur dioxide (SO2). These SO2 limitations have been included in some recently issued permits for new electric utility pulverized coal (PC)-fired boilers to apply during periods of boiler startup and shutdown.

2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Integrated Dry NOx/SO2 Emissions Control System, A DOE Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Integrated Dry NO X SO 2 Emissions Control System A DOE Assessment October 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry...

7

Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

At the request of the Subcommittee, EIA prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, andCO2 emissions.2 The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector Hg emissions and introducing RPS requirements.

J. Alan Beamon

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Measuring Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) Emissions in October, 2010 Catastrophic Eruption from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volcano in Java, Indonesia with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) José A. Morales-Collazo Geology This paper discusses sulfur dioxide (SO2) cloud emissions from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia during, Indonesia. In October 26th , 2010, a catastrophic eruption was reported from Merapi causing nearly 386

Gilbes, Fernando

9

A Meteorology-Based Approach to Detecting the Relationship between Changes in SO2 Emission Rates and Precipitation Concentrations of Sulfate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors present an analysis of correlations between SO2 emissions and wet SO2?4 concentrations over eastern North America that includes adjustments for the impact of meteorological variability. The approach uses multiple-...

Jeffrey R. Brook; Perry J. Samson; Sanford Sillman

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

EVALUATION OF AEROSOL EMISSIONS DOWNSTREAM OF AN AMMONIA-BASED SO2 SCRUBBER  

SciTech Connect

Depending on the size and type of boiler, the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required specific reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. To meet these requirements, SO{sub 2} reduction strategies have included installing scrubbing technology, switching to a more expensive low-sulfur coal, or purchasing SO{sub 2} allowances. It is expected that over the next 10 years there will be an increase in the price of low-sulfur coals, but that higher-sulfur coal costs will remain the same. Technologies must be strongly considered that allow the use of high-sulfur fuels while at the same time meeting current and future SO{sub 2} emission limits. One such technology is the ammonia based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) (NH{sub 3}-based FGD) system manufactured by Marsulex Environmental Technologies (MET). The MET scrubber is a patented NH{sub 3}-based FGD process that efficiently converts SO{sub 2} (>95%) into a fertilizer product, ammonium sulfate ([NH{sub 4}]{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). A point of concern for the MET technology, as well as other FGD systems, is the emission of sulfuric acid/SO{sub 3} aerosols that could result in increased opacity at the stack. This is a direct result of firing high-sulfur fuels that naturally generate more SO{sub 3} than do low-sulfur coals. SO{sub 3} is formed during the coal combustion process. SO{sub 3} is converted to gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by homogeneous condensation, leading to a submicron acid fume that is very difficult to capture in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The condensed acid can also combine with the fly ash in the duct and scale the duct wall, potentially resulting in corrosion of both metallic and nonmetallic surfaces. Therefore, SO{sub 3} in flue gas can have a significant impact on the performance of coal-fired utility boilers, air heaters, and ESPs. In addition to corrosion problems, excess SO{sub 3} emissions can result in plume opacity problems. Thus the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was contracted by MET and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the potential of a wet ESP for reducing SO{sub 3} emissions. The work consisted of pilot-scale tests using the EERC's slagging furnace system (SFS) to determine the effectiveness of a wet ESP to control SO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosol emissions in conjunction with a dry ESP and MET's NH{sub 3}-based FGD. Because these compounds are in the form of fine particles, it is speculated that a relatively small, highly efficient wet ESP following the MET scrubber would remove these fine aerosol particles. The performance target for the wet ESP was a particulate mass collection efficiency of >90%; this level of performance would likely ensure a stack opacity of <10%.

Dennis L. Laudal

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

12

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

13

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

14

SO2 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SO2 SO2 Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2 sulfur dioxide emissions

15

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Petroleum and Coal Products Industry, 1994. Petroleum refining is by far the largest component of the petroleum and ...

16

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

17

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces Title China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and...

18

SO2IS013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-02-12 - Report SO2IS013 -02-12 - Report SO2IS013 Inspection Report to Management on "Inspection of 2001 Safeguards and Security Survey of Los Alamos National Laboratory" Note: This report contains information that is protected by the Freedom of Information Act and the Privacy Act. The follow- ing summary of the report is public. BACKGROUND The Office of Inspector General received a complaint that the Department of Energy's 2001 Safeguards and Security Survey of Los Alamos National Laboratory was compromised. Specifically, the complaint alleged that: · the survey team was instructed to only document observations and not findings; · the survey period was shortened from two weeks to four days;

19

Framing SO2 Market Expectations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SO2 emission allowance prices surged from $200/ton in November 2003 to $1,600/ton in December 2005 and then fell to $500/ton in November 2006. For many unscrubbed generating units burning medium to high-sulfur coals, the escalating value of allowances required to offset emissions approached the magnitude of fuel costs. This extreme volatility raises the question whether prices have stabilized or whether conditions exist that will lead to future price disruptions. This report takes a systematic approach t...

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

20

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

22

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Iron and Steel Industries, 1994. Besides steel mills and blast furnaces, the primary metals industry also ...

23

Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E I A ) . "Status of Electricity Industry Restructuring." Electricity Industry Restructuring, andEmissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and

Fowlie, Meredith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

25

Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide Adsorbents for Diesel Emission Control Using Online Measurement of SO2 and SO3 in the Effluent  

SciTech Connect

Upcoming regulations regarding diesel engine emissions require substantial reduction in particulate matter and nitrogen oxides through aftertreatment methods. Since sulfur oxides in the exhaust greatly reduce the performance of the aftertreatment system, a dedicated trap for removal of sulfur oxides has been considered. Most adsorbents are more effective in removing SO{sub 3} than SO{sub 2}; hence oxidation catalysts have been employed to maximize the concentration of SO{sub 3} in the effluent. Although SO{sub 2} concentrations are easily measured, SO3 is less easily quantified. As a result, the only figure of merit for the SOx trap performance has been total capacity, provided by post-characterization. In this paper we describe a chromatographic method for measurement of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption in real time, which provides adsorbent performance data on breakthrough capacities and sulfur slip, especially important when operating at high space velocities. We also provide experimental measurements of break through capacities for SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} adsorption for some common metal oxide adsorbents using this analytical system.

Li, Liyu; King, David L.

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries Extended discussion here Carbon emissions per capita 1973 vs. 1991 by major end use. (Denmark comparison is 1972 and 1991) With the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto approaching, there is a great deal of excitement over policies designed to reduce future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels. At COP-3, more than 130 nations will meet to create legally binding targets for CO2 reductions. Accordingly, we have analyzed the patterns of emissions arising from the end uses of energy (and electricity production) in ten industrialized countries, with surprising and, in some cases, worrisome results. The surprise is that emissions in many countries in the early 1990s were lower than in the 1970s in an absolute sense and on a per capita basis; the worry

27

OpenEI - SO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4620 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

28

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Paper Industries, 1994. Paper and paperboard mills emit over 80 percent of the energy-related carbon in ...

29

The GHG Emissions List Analysis of Aluminum Industry in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The GHG Emissions List Analysis of Aluminum Industry in China. Author(s), Yuanyuan Wang, Hao Bai, Guangwei Du, Yuhao Ding, Kang...

30

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

31

Coal plants without scrubbers account for a majority of U.S. SO 2 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal-fired electric power plants make up the largest source of national sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions. The Cross-State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR) ...

32

Zero emissions systems in the food processing industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food processing industry is part of an interlinked group of sectors. It plays an important role in the economic development of every country. However, a strongly growing food processing industry greatly magnifies the problems of waste management, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, food processing industry, pineapple waste, zero emissions system

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc; Hans Schnitzer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for the Magnesium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Summary: A cooperative effort between EPA and US magnesium industry to reduce emissions of SF6. Created On: 7/1/2008 9:12 AM, Topic View:.

34

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lankas opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions. In this paper, energy use and CO 2 emissions ofinformation, this paper estimates industrial energy-relatedenergy-intensive products. Emissions from manufacturing of textiles, and paper

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2010. AugustChinas Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in ManufacturingChinas Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Biological Air Emissions Control for an Energy Efficient Forest Products Industry of the Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. wood products industry is a leader in the production of innovative wood materials. New products are taking shape within a growth industry for fiberboard, plywood, particle board, and other natural material-based energy efficient building materials. However, at the same time, standards for clean air are becoming ever stricter. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) during production of wood products (including methanol, formaldehyde, acetylaldehyde, and mercaptans) must be tightly controlled. Conventional VOC and HAP emission control techniques such as regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) and regenerative catalytic oxidation (RCO) require significant amounts of energy and generate secondary pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and spent carbon. Biological treatment of air emissions offers a cost-effective and sustainable control technology for industrial facilities facing increasingly stringent air emission standards. A novel biological treatment system that integrates two types of biofilter systems, promises significant energy and cost savings. This novel system uses microorganisms to degrade air toxins without the use of natural gas as fuel or the creation of secondary pollutants. The replacement of conventional thermal oxidizers with biofilters will yield natural gas savings alone in the range of $82,500 to $231,000 per year per unit. Widespread use of biofilters across the entire forest products industry could yield fuel savings up to 5.6 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year and electricity savings of 2.1 trillion Btu per year. Biological treatment systems can also eliminate the production of NOx, SO2, and CO, and greatly reduce CO2 emissions, when compared to conventional thermal oxidizers. Use of biofilters for VOC and HAP emission control will provide not only the wood products industry but also the pulp and paper industry with a means to cost-effectively control air emissions. The goal of this project was to demonstrate a novel sequential treatment technology that integrates two types of biofilter systems biotrickling filtration and biofiltration for controlling forest product facility air emissions with a water-recycling feature for water conservation. This coupling design maximizes the conditions for microbial degradation of odor causing compounds at specific locations. Water entering the biotrickling filter is collected in a sump, treated, and recycled back to the biotrickling filter. The biofilter serves as a polishing step to remove more complex organic compounds (i.e., terpenes). The gaseous emissions from the hardboard mill presses at lumber plants such as that of the Stimson Lumber Company contain both volatile and condensable organic compounds (VOC and COC, respectively), as well as fine wood and other very small particulate material. In applying bio-oxidation technology to these emissions Texas A&M University-Kingsville (TAMUK) and BioReaction (BRI) evaluated the potential of this equipment to resolve two (2) control issues which are critical to the industry: First, the hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions (primarily methanol and formaldehyde) and Second, the fine particulate and COC from the press exhaust which contribute to visual emissions (opacity) from the stack. In a field test in 2006, the biological treatment technology met the HAP and COC control project objectives and demonstrated significantly lower energy use (than regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs) or regenerative catalytic oxidizers (RCOs), lower water use (than conventional scrubbers) all the while being less costly than either for maintenance. The project was successfully continued into 2007-2008 to assist the commercial partner in reducing unit size and footprint and cost, through added optimization of water recycle and improved biofilm activity, and demonstration of opacity removal capabilities.

Jones, K; Boswell, J.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Climate Co-benefits of Tighter SO2 and NOx Regulations in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air pollution has been recognized as a significant problem in China. In its Twelfth Five Year Plan (FYP), China proposes to reduce SO2 and NOx emissions significantly, and here we investigate the cost of achieving those ...

Nam, Kyung-Min

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Climate Co-benefits of Tighter SO2 Regulations in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% and NOx by 10%. Further, regulations call for a reduction of sulfur emissions from coal-fired power plants emissions from 2010 levels and for the first time targets NOx emissions, calling for a 10% reduction by 2015 · Pollution-control-only scenario under the STR1 reduction schedule. · SO2 and NOx meet the 12th FYP goals

40

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) Carbon Intensity SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro- leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total 371.7 131.1 93.5 87.3 56.8 3.1 17.16 20 Food and Kindred Products 24.4 9.8 9.1 W W 0.1 20.44 21 Tobacco Products W 0.1 W W W W W 22 Textile Mill Products 8.7 5.5 1.7 0.6 1.0 * 28.21 23 Apparel and Other Textile Products W 1.3 0.4 W W W W 24 Lumber and Wood Products 4.9 3.4 0.7 W W 0.2 9.98 25 Furniture and Fixtures 1.6 1.1 0.3 * 0.1 0.1 23.19 26 Paper and Allied Products 31.6 11.0 8.3 4.3 7.8 0.3 11.88

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Balloon Sounding Technique for Measuring SO2 Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the development of a new technique for inexpensive measurements of SO2 profiles using a modified dual-ozonesonde instrument payload. The presence of SO2 interferes with the standard electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde ...

Gary A. Morris; Walter D. Komhyr; Jun Hirokawa; James Flynn; Barry Lefer; Nicholay Krotkov; Fong Ngan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Docket No. EO-05-01. As supporting documentation for "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode" this memo documents the fact that the observed 24-hour SO2 background concentrations during periods when meteorological conditions produce the highest impacts from Unit 1. Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report More Documents & Publications Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant"

43

US uranium mining industry: background information on economics and emissions  

SciTech Connect

A review of the US uranium mining industry has revealed a generally depressed industry situation. The 1982 U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production from both open-pit and underground mines declined to 3800 and 6300 tons respectively with the underground portion representing 46% of total production. US exploration and development has continued downward in 1982. Employment in the mining and milling sectors has dropped 31% and 17% respectively in 1982. Representative forecasts were developed for reactor fuel demand and U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production for the years 1983 and 1990. Reactor fuel demand is estimated to increase from 15,900 tons to 21,300 tons U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ respectively. U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ production, however, is estimated to decrease from 10,600 tons to 9600 tons respectively. A field examination was conducted of 29 selected underground uranium mines that represent 84% of the 1982 underground production. Data was gathered regarding population, land ownership and private property valuation. An analysis of the increased cost to production resulting from the installation of 20-meter high exhaust borehole vent stacks was conducted. An assessment was made of the current and future /sup 222/Rn emission levels for a group of 27 uranium mines. It is shown that /sup 222/Rn emission rates are increasing from 10 individual operating mines through 1990 by 1.2 to 3.8 times. But for the group of 27 mines as a whole, a reduction of total /sup 222/Rn emissions is predicted due to 17 of the mines being shutdown and sealed. The estimated total /sup 222/Rn emission rate for this group of mines will be 105 Ci/yr by year end 1983 or 70% of the 1978-79 measured rate and 124 Ci/yr by year end 1990 or 83% of the 1978-79 measured rate.

Bruno, G.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Young, J.K.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Validation of optical remote sensing measurement strategies applied to industrial gas emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2004 a field campaign was conducted at a power plant in Spain, aiming to validate the use of a miniaturized, fibre-optic, ultraviolet, differential optical absorption spectrometer (mini-DOAS) for sulfur dioxide (SO2) flux quantification. Emissions ...

C. Rivera; J. A. Garcia; B. Galle; L. Alonso; Yan Zhang; M. Johansson; M. Matabuena; G. Gangoiti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington,related to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsDenmark - Energy Efficiency Agreements. ... 4

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ation of slags from iron- and steel industry" pre- sented at the 4th Nordic Mini-symposium on CO2CO2 emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2 Nordic Plus) and Use of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP) Carl-Johan Fogelholm, Project leader, professor Sanni

Zevenhoven, Ron

48

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... is sequestered in chemical industry products, such as plastics and fertilizers, rather than emitted through combustion. [Energy ...

49

Guidelines for Particulate Control for Advanced SO2 Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in complying with Phase II of the Clean Air Act Amendments, this report delineates the effects of advanced SO2 control technologies on particulate control systems. This guide can prove invaluable to environmental engineers and planners who must select compatible systems and identify sound operating strategies for these technologies.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Utilization Potential of Advanced SO2 Control By Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results of literature surveys and preliminary market assessments, this report evaluates potential applications for advanced SO2 control by-products. Investigators formed their evaluations by comparing the marketability of these by-products with that of coal ash and wet scrubber sludge.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

Reductions in ozone concentrations due to controls on variability in industrial flare emissions in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High concentrations of ozone in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with industrial plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx. The emissions leading to these plumes can have significant temporal variability, ...

Nam, Junsang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effect on air and water emissions of energy conservation in industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental emissions for five large energy-consuming industries plus others are estimated for four US energy system scenarios for 1985 and 2000. Emissions are estimated by specifying fuel mixes to steam boilers and direct heat, combustion efficiencies, shifts in the relative shares of alternative industrial processes use of industrial cogenerators, and penetration of pollution-control technologies. Analyses show that emissions do not vary significantly among scenarios principally because of increased coal use and the reduced penetration rate of advanced pollution-control technologies in the low-energy-demand scenarios. Within scenarios, emissions from the chemical and iron and steel subsectors dominate all aggregate estimates. Hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide process emission coefficients for the chemical subsector must be improved.

Raskin, P D; Rosen, R A

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. Model-Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) Model was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency for use by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) in preparing future assessments of industrial-boiler emissions. The ICE Model user's manual includes a summary of user options and software characteristics, a description of the input data files, and a description of the procedures for operation of the ICE Model. Proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language are discussed. The ICE Model projects for each State the sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides emissions from fossil fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Projections of emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Elliott, D.J.; Hogan, T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",2008,2039,2000,1971,1892,109...

56

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",194,205,206,216,200,251,...

57

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",484,494,510,562,511,578,620...

58

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",343,340,385,429,377,399,...

59

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",99,103,107,108,97,111,10...

60

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",760,723,765,812,770,518...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",14281,14240,14060,1...

62

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",165,161,155,177,187,174,...

63

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",57,58,67,67,65,50,73,5...

64

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",1169,1151,1149,1126,...

65

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",293,304,281,207,217,194...

66

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission Regulations while Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion System Development for Medium-Sized Industrial Gas Turbines: Meeting Tight Emission and the oil & gas industries. The combustion system used in Solar's products are discussed along- bility for the introduction of new combustion systems for gas turbine products to enhance fuel

Ponce, V. Miguel

67

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application explore the implications for Canada's industrial sector of an economy-wide, compulsory greenhouse gas of these strengths is linked to challenges when it comes to forecasting the impact of greenhouse gas policy. We

68

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SIC Code Industry Group Total Net Electricity Natural Gas Petro-leum Coal Other (MMTC/ Quadrillion Btu) Total: 371.7: 131.1: 93.5: 87.3: 56.8: 3.1: ...

69

SO2 Compliance and Allowance Trading: Developments and Outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report takes a sharp look at specific questions about SO2 compliance under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. With several years of Phase I compliance behind us, what do we know about the allowance market and compliance costs? What factors will be in play between the present with its low allowance prices and the 2000-2005 period when uncertain fossil generation growth, drawdown of the allowance bank, and the prospect of major new environmental legislation could lead to very different fut...

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Sources of Emission Reductions: Evidence for US SO2 Emissions 1985-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an average heat rate (Btus per kwh) of 7,400 for the combined cycle units and we assume an average heat rate of 10,000 Btus/kwh for the generation being displaced. These figures imply that the heat input displaced by these new combined cycle units is 35... that have been observed since the end of 2002. If a round number were to be used for the total effect of the new combined cycle capacity in reducing the marginal cost of abatement, say $20 per ton, the implied annual savings in electricity cost is $180...

Ellerman, A Denny; Dubroeucq, Florence

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of a model for reactive emissions from industrial stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a model, CAPAS, capable of estimating short-term concentrations of primary and secondary pollutants resulting from point source emissions. The model is designed to simulate the complex interaction of plume dispersion and non-linear ... Keywords: Air pollutants, Dispersion models, Non-linear chemistry, Plume reactivity, Stiff solvers

Luis E. Olcese; Beatriz M. Toselli

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Strategies to Reduce Water Consumption in SO2 Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the need for more stringent controls for power plant emissions increases, so does the need for more cost-effective approaches to reducing these pollutants. Current methods employ technologies designed to reduce specific pollutants, which require combinations of different emission control systems to remove multiple pollutants and require significant process water. Some air pollution control suppliers and utilities are developing technologies that have potential to reduce multiple pollutants simultaneou...

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,emission factors through 2030 were from the factors used in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Proceedings: 1986 Joint Symposium on Dry SO2 and Simultaneous SO2/NOx Control Technologies, Volume 1: Sorbents, Process Research, an d Dispersion; Volume 2: Economics, Power Plant and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamental sorbent research, postfurnace injection, system impacts, and commercial applications were among the topics discussed at the second symposium on dry sorbent injection technologies. Injection of these sorbents offers an SO2 emissions control alternative that is potentially simpler and cheaper than conventional flue gas desulfurization systems.

1986-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Flue Gas Conditioning to Reduce Particulate Emissions in Industrial Coal-Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical technology has been used successfully to solve many of the operational and emissions problems that result from burning coal. This paper describes the use of blended chemical flue gas conditioners to significantly reduce particulate emissions in coal-fired industrial boilers. In many cases, these chemical conditioning agents have increased the efficiency of electrostatic precipitators and mechanical collectors by more than fifty percent. The effectiveness of this technology has been demonstrated on units generating 50,000 to 200,000 lbs./hr. steam. Results achieved at various industrial plants under actual operating conditions are presented.

Miller, B.; Keon, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Observations of SO2 production and transport from Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka using the MODerate resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer (MODIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, is one of the most active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) region and erupts violently on average every 6 months. We report the SO2 cloud mass, emission and transport rates for the eruption of Bezymianny ...

C. S. Kearney; K. Dean; V. J. Realmuto; I. M. Watson; J. Dehn; F. Prata

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic emission sources, SCE has identified and evaluated a number of alternative solutions and is currently implementing four demonstrations for promising technologies. The SCE program focuses on three major strategies: (1) reformulation, (2) application improvements, and (3) add-on controls. Vendors were identified, contacted, and evaluated for system performance. Industrial targets were selected based on need for assistance, magnitude of emissions, and number of facilities affected. Many facility operators were approached, interviewed, and analyzed. Three technologies were selected for installation at four host sites, with continuous monitoring of inlet and outlet VOC quantities. SCE intends to continue this demonstration project and to develop an effective technology transfer program to our industrial and commercial customers.

Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model, Version 6. 0. User's manual. Report for November 1984-August 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is a user's manual for the Industrial Combustion Emissions (ICE) model. It summarizes user options and software characteristics, and describes both the input data files and procedures for operating the model. It discusses proper formatting of files and creation of job-control language. The model projects for each state the emissions of sulfur oxides, sulfates, and nitrogen oxides from fossil-fuel combustion in industrial boilers. Emissions and costs of boiler generation, including emission-control costs, are projected for the years 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2010, 2020, and 2030.

Hogan, T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Sensitivity Study of a Theoretical Model Of SO2 Scavenging by Water Drops in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate at which SO2 is removed from air by a water drop has been investigated by solving numerically the convective diffusion equation for SO2 diffusing through air into a water drop where the species SO2H2O, HSO3?, SO3? and SO4? were assumed ...

L. B. Baboolal; H. R. Pruppacher; J. H. Topalian

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand Opportunities through 2030. Washington, DC: CCAP. Wang,cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001780 DOE is partnering with the University of Akron (Akron) to conduct research and training to develop an effective solid amine sorbent for large scale post-combustion CO2 capture from power plant flue gas. Sorbent materials developed by Akron consist of immobilized carbon and hydrogen structures (paraffin) distributed inside of the amine pores and aromatic amines located on the external surface and the pore mouth of the sorbent. The immobilized paraffinic amines have been shown to display excellent CO2 capture capacity by adsorbing CO2 at temperatures below 55 °C and releasing it at temperatures between 80-120 °C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that generally have large pore space, high surface area, and/or high thermal conductivity.

84

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Docket No. EO-05-01: Tables showing a summary of monitored SO2 concentrations during periods of highest impact as well as ERMOD modeling results for SO2 scenarios. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact More Documents & Publications Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

86

Green IS for GHG emission reporting on product-level? an action design research project in the meat industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and for reporting on the product-level. Green ... Keywords: GHG emissions, Green IS, PCF, action design research, design science, meat industry, product carbon footprint

Hendrik Hilpert, Christoph Beckers, Lutz M. Kolbe, Matthias Schumann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Broadband spectroscopic sensor for real-time monitoring of industrial SO{sub 2} emissions  

SciTech Connect

A spectroscopic system for continuous real-time monitoring of SO{sub 2}, concentrations in industrial emissions was developed. The sensor is well suited for field applications due to simple and compact instrumental design, and robust data evaluation based on ultraviolet broadband absorption without the use of any calibration cell. The sensor has a detection limit of 1 ppm, and was employed both for gas-flow simulations with and without suspended particles, and for in situ measurement of SO{sub 2} concentrations in the flue gas emitted from an industrial coal-fired boiler. The price/performance ratio of the instrument is expected to be superior to other comparable real-time monitoring systems.

Xu, F.; Zhang, Y.G.; Somesfalean, G.; Wang, H.S.; Wu, S.H.; Zhang, Z.G. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). Dept, of Physics

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Technological prospects and CO2 emission trading analyses in the iron and steel industry: A global model Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents the Iron and Steel Industry Model (ISIM). This is a world simulation model able to analyze the evolution of the industry from 1997 to 2030, focusing on steel production, demand, trade, energy consumption, CO2 emissions, technology dynamics, and retrofitting options. In the context of the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, the potential impacts of a CO2 emission market (e.g. the gains in terms of compliance costs, the country trading position, the evolution of the technology and the energy mixes) are also addressed. In particular, three emission trading scenarios are considered: an EU15 market, an enlarged EU market, and an Annex B market.

Ignacio Hidalgo; Laszlo Szabo; Juan Carlos Ciscar; Antonio Soria

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

90

Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

94

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Integrated Analysis of Fuel, Technology and Emission Allowance Markets: Electric Utility Responses to the Clean Air Act Amendments o f 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of the strategic responses of the electric utility industry to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The study analyzes the competitive interactions between fuel switching, scrubbing, and emission trading options and provides information on future regional coal demands and prices, the adoption of SO2 control technologies, compliance costs, and the character of SO2 emission allowance markets.

1993-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The SO2 Allowance Trading System: The Ironic History of a Grand Policy Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two decades have passed Two decades have passed since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 launched a grand experiment in market-based environmental policy: the SO2 cap-and-trade system. That system performed well but ...

Schmalensee, Richard

100

Production, Energy, and Carbon Emissions: A Data Profile of the Iron and Steel Industry  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

Information Center

2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have a large iron and steel industry, while another provinceand has a clustered steel industry; therefore, it is nothas many large industries, such as steel and cement, its CO

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Air pollutant emissions prediction by process modelling - Application in the iron and steel industry in the case of a re-heating furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring air pollutant emissions of large industrial installations is necessary to ensure compliance with environmental legislation. Most of the available measurement techniques are expensive, and measurement conditions such as high-temperature emissions, ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, CO2, Correlation method, Fume emissions, Multiple linear regression, NO2, Steelworks process modelling

Anda Ionescu; Yves Candau

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in Chinas cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emission reduction at Engen refinery in South Durban. Paperenergy consumed in refineries and other energy conversionCement Membrane separation Refinery gas Natural gas Bio-

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Air Pollution Control Systems for Stack and Process Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strict environmental regulations at the federal and local levels require that industrial facilities control emissions of particulates, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and hazardous air pollutants. To comply with regulations, industries must either modify the processes or fuels they use to limit the generation of air pollutants, or remove the pollutants from the process gas streams before release into the atmosphere. This report provides a comprehensive disc...

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy - environmental methods to reduce CO2emissions in Romanian iron and steel industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some energy-environmental methods for reducing the CO2 emissions in Romanian iron and steel processes, both technological, as well as combustion processes, in case of integrated, technological and energetic approach, using ... Keywords: CO2 emissions, emissions reduction, energy-environmental methods, integrated system, mathematical model

Ion Melinte; Mihaela Balanescu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non-dimensional parameters controlling RFC in furnaces were identified. These are: (i) The Boltzmann number; (ii) The Damkohler number, (iii) The dimensionless Arrhenius number, and (iv) The equivalence ratio. Together they define the parameter space where RFC is possible. It was also found that the Damkohler number must be small for RFC to exist and that the Boltzmann number expands the RFC domain. The experimental data obtained during the course of this work agrees well with the predictions made by the theoretical analysis. Interestingly, the equivalence ratio dependence shows that it is easier to establish RFC for rich mixtures than for lean mixtures. This was also experimentally observed. Identifying the parameter space for RFC is necessary for controlling the RFC furnace operation. It is hoped that future work will enable the methodology developed here to be applied to the operation of real furnaces, with consequent improvement in efficiency and pollutant reduction. To reiterate, the new furnace combustion technology developed enables intense radiation from combustion products and has many benefits: (i) Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions; (ii) Uniform and intense radiation to substantially increase productivity; (iii) Oxygen-free atmosphere to reduce dross/scale formation; (iv) Provides multi-fuel capability; and (v) Enables carbon sequestration if pure oxygen is used for combustion.

Atreya, Arvind

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Experiment Study on Adsorption Characteristics of SO2, NOx by Biomass Chars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different kinds of biomass chars of the wheat straws, rice straw, cotton straw collected at Nanjing, China, were pyrolysed in a fixed bed reactor at different temperatures and heating rates. The specific area and pore structure, micromorphology of different ... Keywords: Biomass char, Pyrolysis, Adsorption efficiency, SO2, NOx

Fei Lu; Ping Lu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

1 New Technologies, Industry Developments and Emission Trends in Key Sectors: The Energy Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Australias total primary energy consumption grew by 3.6 per cent per annum between 1993/94 and 1997/98, while primary energy use in the electricity sector rose by more than 5 per cent per year over the same period. Since 1993/94, brown coal has strongly expanded its share in the fuel mix of the interconnected electricity markets of Victoria, New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory, and South Australia. It has become the primary fuel source for electricity generation, substituting for hydro, natural gas and hard coal. At the national level, this has meant that the long-term trend towards greater use of natural gas has stalled in favour of coal, especially brown coal. Since Victorias brown coal plants have relatively low thermal efficiencies, this substitution has also had the effect of reducing the average thermal efficiency in the power market to the levels of the late 1980s (IEA, 2001b). It should be noted that the economic objective of reducing the price of power which has driven the first stage of reform in the electricity industry in Australia has perversely encouraged the aggregate use of energy in the economy. This, in turn, has added to the growth of greenhouse gas emissions, reinforcing the trend associated with the change in the fuel mix for electricity generation. This paper addresses non-transport energy-related activities including conventional and renewable forms of energy supply, cross-cutting technologies employed in the energy sector and, more briefly, energy use by the business and household sectors.

Ainsley Jolley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

112

Emissions data for stationary reciprocating engines and gas turbines in use by the gas pipeline transmission industry  

SciTech Connect

A.G.A. Project PR-15-613, conducted under the sponsorship of the Pipeline Committee (PRC), involved two phases. This final report for the overall project combines both of the separate phase reports into a single document. The project was entitled ''Compilation of Emissions Data for Stationary Reciprocating Engines and Gas Turbines in Use by the Gas Pipeline Transmission Industry (Update).'' The purpose of this project was to update the 1980 edition of the Compilation of Emissions Data. Phase I involved collection of emissions data from companies in the natural gas industry and from gas engine manufacturers and recommending engine and gas turbine models for testing under Phase II. Phase I was completed in March 1987 and the findings and recommendations were included in an interim report. Phase II involved emissions testing of a number of reciprocating engines and gas turbines. Phase II was completed in April 1988 and the findings are included in this project final report. 9 refs., 5 tabs.

Fanick, E.R.; Dietzmann, H.E.; Urban, C.M.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Conformal SO(2,4) Transformations for the Helical AdS String Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By applying the conformal SO(2,4) transformations to the folded rotating string configuration with two spins given by a certain limit from the helical string solution in AdS_3 x S^1, we construct new string solutions whose energy-spin relations are characterized by the boost parameter. When two SO(2,4) transformations are performed with two boost parameters suitably chosen, the straight folded rotating string solution with one spin in AdS_3 is transformed in the long string limit into the long spiky string solution whose expression is given from the helical string solution in AdS_3 by making a limit that the modulus parameter becomes unity.

Ryang, Shijong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Guidelines for the Beneficial Use of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This design guide describes the use of the by-products produced from advanced SO2 control processes as construction materials in high-volume applications such as road base stabilization, structural fills, manufactured aggregates, soil amendments, and concrete applications. The engineering data, major design parameters, standard specifications, and construction procedures in the report should help utility by-product managers and power plant managers incorporate these applications in their by-product manag...

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

116

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

119

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum","*","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

120

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

key resources for national energy consumption data in ChinaNBS published 2008 national energy consumption by industrialnational level, carbon emission factors for electricity consumption are calculated based on the energy

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

123

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the US pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the US (US EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the US This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the U.S. (U.S. EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the U.S. This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the cost-effective energy savings potential in case B increases to 22%.

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The effect of variability in industrial emissions on ozone formation in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient observations have indicated that high concentrations of ozone observed in the Houston/Galveston area are associated with plumes of highly reactive hydrocarbons, mixed with NOx, from industrial facilities. Ambient ...

Webster, Mort David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 10 years ENERGY STAR has developed a track record as a certification mark to hang buildings performance hat on. By implementing upgrade strategies and pursuing operations and maintenance issues simultaneously, ENERGY STAR has led the nation and many states to pursue greenhouse gas reduction initiatives using energy efficiency as a model program. In developing these partnerships with industry, states and local government, what has occurred is a variety of program approaches that works to accomplish strategically a reduction in emissions. Through its development, ENERGY STAR has become an integral player with many Green Buildings Program to help them carry the energy efficiency banner to higher levels of cooperation. What is occurring today is that more and more local programs are looking to green buildings as an approach to reducing problems they face in air pollution, water pollution, solid waste, needed infrastructure and better of resources needs and the growth of expensive utility infrastructures. EPA - Region 6's ENERGY STAR and Green Building Program assistance has led to some unique solutions and the beginning workups for the integrated expansion of effort to support State Implementation Plans in new innovative voluntary approaches to transform certain markets, similarly to those of energy efficient products. This presentation will be an overview of activity that is being spearheaded in Texas in the DFW and Houston metro areas in ENERGY STAR and Green Buildings. The voluntary programs impacts are reducing energy consumption, creating markets for renewables, reducing air polluting chemicals and reducing greenhouse gas emissions using verifiable approaches.

Patrick, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial sectors (Vermeeren, 2008). Steel industry ? TheDutch steel industry implemented 82 energy-saving projectsfoodstuffs, steel, and mining industries are the most

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",98,77,78,74,86,103,96,98,104,97,79,86,93,84,84,87,84,83,83,76,67 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*",1,1,1,"*",1,21,16,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*"

129

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",54,46,53,52,57,69,71,75,74,67,63,57,46,46,35,28,28,24,20,17,15 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

130

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah" Utah" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",29,26,27,30,27,30,30,30,30,28,31,32,30,32,34,31,34,25,22,30,25 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

131

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",93,89,92,90,98,88,86,92,91,84,82,85,83,70,59,58,59,59,55,43,45 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

132

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",6,3,6,6,5,3,3,3,3,3,3,1,3,3,4,2,2,4,3,1,3 " Petroleum","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

133

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum",2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

134

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",48,49,51,47,48,46,48,45,45,44,48,45,45,47,49,48,8,8,8,7,7 " Petroleum",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*",4,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

135

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",113,117,119,122,129,113,113,118,96,72,68,66,64,63,55,48,45,51,44,33,33 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*",1,1,"*","*","*","*","*",1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

136

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",28,30,29,28,30,32,15,24,22,24,13,13,23,11,13,10,11,8,12,11,12 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

137

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",133,172,133,134,139,191,162,162,178,174,139,142,128,128,137,125,119,125,124,121,116 " Petroleum",1,1,1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

138

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",7,10,15,14,15,6,6,7,13,16,13,16,11,12,12,11,8,13,10,10,14 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

139

Climate policy and the airline industry : emissions trading and renewable jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I assess the impact of the current EU Emissions Trading Scheme and a hypothetical renewable jet fuel mandate on US airlines. I find that both the EU Scheme up until 2020 and a renewable jet fuel mandate of ...

McConnachie, D. (Dominic Alistair)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

CHAPTER 4 (Addendum re Corrosion Kinetics) Corrosion Kinetics, WTE Emissions and the Effects of HCl and SO2 to Corrosion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ( )( ) ( )soxoxcon P RT D MZK = (65b) where: Mox = the molar mass of the oxide ox = density of the oxide 4

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SO2 impacts on forage and soil sulfur concentrations near coal-fired power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this research was to determine if S02 emissions from coal-fired power plants could be contributing to the copper deficiency in cattle. Copper (more)

Beene, Jack Stephen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

143

Does the CO2 emission trading directive threaten the competitiveness of European industry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, gas and water; non-metallic minerals; iron and steel; petroleum refining, coke and nuclear fuel industry refining, coke and nuclear fuels chemicals machinery and equipement, N.E.C. textile, textile sector, the loss in turnover is then the higher, the higher the four items below: 1. the cost of CO2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

144

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms  

SciTech Connect

Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana" Montana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",16,18,20,18,19,33,18,21,22,23,22,28,18,16,19,18,18,20,18,19,19 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*",2,19,2,2,2,24,26,3,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,2 " Natural Gas","*","*","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

147

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana" Louisiana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",91,98,100,106,115,89,86,106,100,102,92,87,89,87,87,82,81,65,62,58,65 " Petroleum",3,"*",40,111,114,61,58,64,66,62,60,79,61,83,20,19,17,13,15,26,48 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

148

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" Jersey" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",63,52,50,51,46,53,61,67,56,58,73,45,44,46,47,63,55,45,35,11,14 " Petroleum",9,7,4,4,5,6,5,4,5,4,5,3,2,3,2,2,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

149

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",38,38,31,38,35,35,35,34,35,22,34,30,28,32,33,29,28,32,32,16,13 " Petroleum",41,12,43,43,43,34,33,32,6,6,4,6,4,4,2,2,2,2,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-"

150

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum",2,1,1,1,2,1,1,"*",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*",1,"*","*","*","*",1 " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Total",2,1,1,1,2,1,1,"*",1,1,1,1,1,"*","*",1,"*","*","*","*",1

151

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",32,32,35,33,25,26,28,26,26,24,28,5,2,3,2,3,3,3,1,2,2 " Petroleum",46,17,26,28,47,89,95,98,96,111,94,34,66,13,18,21,21,18,1,1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

152

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West Virginia" West Virginia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",876,970,1000,949,990,572,630,636,631,648,568,618,478,506,446,438,427,353,286,167,105 " Petroleum",1,1,"*","*","*",1,1,1,"*","*",1,3,1,"*","*",1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","-"

153

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",91,95,85,70,64,72,63,72,64,64,63,55,53,48,41,43,36,38,38,30,34 " Petroleum",120,123,105,67,52,48,36,62,83,56,42,40,31,34,35,33,13,13,6,3,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

154

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal","*","*",2,3,3,4,4,4,4,3,11,1,2,1,1,1,1,1,2,2,1 " Petroleum",35,26,26,19,17,35,39,39,42,41,39,24,20,21,22,20,21,21,20,21,15 " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

155

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",363,368,339,356,386,353,372,399,411,369,360,336,325,335,322,329,315,325,329,267,229 " Petroleum",16,14,10,13,15,22,20,19,24,25,21,26,24,24,24,26,6,23,13,15,17 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","-","*","-","-","-","*","*"

156

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",721,677,620,437,487,316,334,289,274,240,194,218,224,255,265,266,253,251,253,234,232 " Petroleum",3,4,4,5,6,4,1,1,1,6,18,18,11,2,3,7,6,6,"*",1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","-","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-"

157

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",96,89,86,81,70,75,86,70,71,71,80,63,60,62,62,60,69,62,60,36,49 " Petroleum",11,5,6,48,14,2,15,33,67,41,38,64,1,12,16,8,3,2,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","-","*","-","-","-","-"

158

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois" Illinois" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",845,801,806,777,761,655,751,842,830,732,484,402,367,369,384,351,308,301,344,237,231 " Petroleum",4,6,5,4,11,4,6,2,15,24,15,7,1,4,2,1,"*",1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

159

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",436,474,491,425,416,391,421,465,461,417,379,270,260,240,236,205,197,192,196,160,108 " Petroleum",168,200,182,235,227,194,220,213,325,296,221,265,185,213,193,190,117,116,58,43,32 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

160

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",1273,1330,1136,1155,1138,843,894,936,912,881,818,732,715,741,795,801,757,661,554,383,385 " Petroleum",3,3,1,"*","*",2,6,4,5,3,2,3,2,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",95,83,96,114,117,88,92,100,95,98,93,70,83,83,86,82,80,78,76,60,52 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*",15,17,14,27,17,15,10,7,6,"*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

162

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama" Alabama" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",485,483,488,520,488,503,553,537,543,515,483,435,417,425,385,428,430,423,335,262,194 " Petroleum",1,2,1,1,1,1,2,2,4,3,2,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

163

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa" Iowa" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",182,203,190,198,180,166,155,153,173,155,155,139,134,138,135,135,131,134,149,90,104 " Petroleum","*","*","*",6,11,11,5,8,7,5,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,5,2,4 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","-","-","-","-","*","*","*"

164

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",818,791,810,892,812,613,583,607,567,597,530,486,428,474,460,445,380,336,307,225,241 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*",16,7,5,9,8,8,7,4,5 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*"

165

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",14,9,9,9,10,13,12,13,13,8,11,4,4,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2 " Petroleum",4,2,"*","*","*",3,4,4,4,4,3,4,3,3,2,2,2,2,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",1,1,"*","*","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*"

166

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",241,216,221,228,212,208,228,231,247,237,238,235,241,248,261,258,256,252,222,194,43 " Petroleum",26,31,23,30,29,9,10,12,24,30,14,11,8,14,13,16,12,12,1,1,"*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

167

New Technology for America`s Electric Power Industry. Emissions reduction in gas turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is examining alternatives to straight natural gas firing. Research has shown that the addition of certain catalytic agents, such as in hydrogen co-firing, shows promise. When hydrogen co-firing is used in tandem with steam injection, a decrease in both CO and NO{sub x} emissions has been observed. In-process hydrogen production and premixing with the natural gas fuel are also being explored.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",11,11,9,8,9,10,10,11,6,1,19,11,5,3,3,3,3,2,3,1,1 " Petroleum",40,38,25,20,16,12,26,37,40,39,26,22,6,5,4,5,3,3,1,"*",1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other1",1,1,1,1,"*",4,5,5,5,5,6,"*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

169

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",67,64,64,60,66,76,88,79,70,72,69,68,64,65,71,60,66,65,66,62,61 " Petroleum","*","*","*","*","*",1,1,"*",1,1,2,4,1,2,3,1,1,1,"*","*","*" " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",12,13,13,13,13,13,12,12,13,13,36,15,16,11,12,12

170

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine" Maine" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",5,4,4,4,4,4,4,4,3,2,6,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,1,"*","*" " Petroleum",39,34,8,8,7,26,27,30,38,40,25,21,10,9,9,11,7,11,6,4,2 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",11,11,12,12,12,12,7,10,9,9,9,8,8,19,28,9

171

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire" Hampshire" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",37,30,39,36,34,37,37,45,36,36,42,40,35,30,34,37,35,36,33,29,33 " Petroleum",23,13,12,11,11,11,9,9,16,16,5,5,5,21,17,9,2,3,1,1,1 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","*","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*",1,"*",1,1,"*","*","*","*","*","*"

172

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas" Kansas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",77,69,60,64,65,90,105,98,107,105,102,103,113,119,104,112,98,102,85,46,40 " Petroleum",1,"*","*",1,"*",1,1,1,"*",2,3,6,5,9,8,12,3,3,2,1,1 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Total",78,69,60,64,65,90,106,99,107,107,106,109,118,128,112,124,101,105,87,47,41

173

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",805,728,719,649,528,462,452,486,497,490,488,479,495,517,524,583,619,617,481,247,211 " Petroleum",13,15,4,6,4,28,31,34,40,38,39,47,36,42,33,35,37,36,29,24,28 " Natural Gas","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-",39,41,34,33,33,32,31,31,27,27,27,29,28,25,24,25

174

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese cement and iron/steel industry is underway. http://data required for the steel industry included total primaryrepresentatives of the steel industry, the government, and

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Impacts on Regenerated Catalyst on Mercury Oxidation, DeNOX Activity, and SO2-to-SO3 Conversion - Addendum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes NOX activity, SO2 conversion, and chemical analysis bench-scale results for 24 different catalyst samples. The sample set analyzed in the test program represents one of the largest ever assembled constituting both regenerated and new catalyst exposed at full scale. This report is an addendum to EPRI Report 1012657, Impacts on Regenerated Catalyst on Mercury Oxidation, DeNOX Activity, and SO2-to-SO3 Conversion.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

Walls of massive Khler sigma models on SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield wall solutions in massive K\\"ahler nonlinear sigma models on SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N) in three-dimensional spacetime. We show that SO(2N)/U(N) and Sp(N)/U(N) models have 2^{N-1} and 2^N discrete vacua, respectively. We explicitly construct the exact BPS multiwall solutions for N\\le 3.

Masato Arai; Sunyoung Shin

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

177

EXTENSION OF ISO 14001 ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR THE METAL CASTING INDUSTRY TO INCLUDE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions legislation in the United States is forthcoming. Manufacturers have dealt with past emissions regulations differently, some through implementing environmental management systems (more)

Miller, Gretchen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optimization of Trona/Limestone Injection for SO2 Control in Coal-Fired Boilers  

SciTech Connect

Mobotec USA develops and markets air pollution control systems for utility boilers and other combustion systems. They have a particular interest in technologies that can reduce NOx, SOx, and mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers, and have been investigating the injection of sorbents such as limestone and trona into a boiler to reduce SOx and Hg emissions. WRI proposed to use the Combustion Test Facility (CTF) to enable Mobotec to conduct a thorough evaluation of limestone and trona injection for SO{sub 2} control. The overall goal of the project was to characterize the SO{sub 2} reductions resulting from the injection of limestone and trona into the CTF when fired with a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal used in one of Mobotec's Midwest installations. Results revealed that when limestone was injected at Ca:S molar ratios of 1.5 to 3.0, the resulting SO{sub 2} reductions were 35-55%. It is believed that further reductions can be attained with improved mixing of the sorbent with the combustion gases. When limestone was added to the coal, at Ca:S molar ratios of 0.5 to 1.5, the SO{sub 2} reductions were 13-21%. The lower reductions were attributed to dead-burning of the sorbent in the high temperature flame zone. In cases where limestone was both injected into the furnace and added to the coal, the total SO{sub 2} reductions for a given Ca:S molar ratio were similar to the reductions for furnace injection only. The injection of trona into the mid-furnace zone, for Na:S molar ratios of 1.4 to 2.4, resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 29-43%. Limestone injection did not produce any slag deposits on an ash deposition probe while trona injection resulted in noticeable slag deposition.

None

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potentials in the Iron and steel Industry in China. Reportfor the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guidein the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. Report LBNL-41724.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NETL: Emissions Characterization - TVA Cumberland Plant Plume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumberland Power Plant Plume Study Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Cumberland fossil plant (CUF) at Cumberland City, Tennessee will...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel prices differ between industries andelectricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the iron and steel industryprice of electricity paid by the iron and steel industry in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the cement industryprice of electricity paid by the cement industry in 2009 isElectricity Conservation Supply Curve for the Cement Industry .

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy, Proceedings of the ACEEE 2003 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington, DC: American

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Compilation of emissions data for stationary reciprocating gas engines and gas turbines in use by the natural gas pipeline transmission industry  

SciTech Connect

This publication compiles the available exhaust emission data for stationary reciprocating engines and gas turbines used by the natural gas pipeline transmission industry into a single, easy-to-use source. Data in the original issue and the revisions were obtained from projects sponsored by the A.G.A. PRC and from inhouse projects within a number of the A.G.A. member companies. Additional data included in this reissue were obtained from additional emissions measurement projects sponsored by the A.G.A. PRC, and from A.G.A. member companies and natural gas engine manufacturers.

Urban, C.M.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Torvanger, A. (Senter for Anvendt Forskning, Oslo (Norway) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Pulp and Paper Industry, Energy Policy 25 (7-9):on reducing energy use Pulp and Paper Magazine. Milleron the US pulp and paper industry, Energy Policy, Volume

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of energy, the U.S. pulp and paper industry9 Figure 3. Primary Energy Use in U.S. Paperpolicies on the US pulp and paper industry, Energy Policy,

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceNew Energy and Industrial Technology Development (NEDO).

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrenceof Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantguide policy makers in designing better sector-specific energy

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment and Sustainable Energy. http://www.senternovem.nl/Industries Association. Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI),Report_2007Fnl.pdf Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI), 2009a.

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry LBNL-Agreements on Energy Efficiency- Danish Experiences.Cooperation to Improve Energy Efficiency Through Voluntary

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STAR for Industry Energy Guides 52 include both process-s sector- wide energy efficiency guides provide informationfor Cement Making: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supporting policies offered by the government Energy/GHGpolicy package, and include a real threat of increased government regulation or energy/energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Trace gas and particle emissions from domestic and industrial biofuel use and garbage burning in central Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In central Mexico during the spring of 2007 we measured the initial emissions of 12 gases and the aerosol speciation for elemental and organic carbon (EC, OC), anhydrosugars, Cl?, NO[subscript 3]?, and 20 metals from 10 ...

Christian, T. J.

197

Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Intensity in the Iron and Steel Industry: A Comparison of Physical and Economic Indicators,energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. We show that macro-economic indicators,

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average unit price of electricity and coal used inyear. The weighted average unit price of Bituminous coal,coal, and coke consumed in the steel industry in 2010 is used as the fuel price

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tonne CO2/MWh) Sintering Coke Making Iron Making Blastadopted in China include: Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), Top-steel industry is coal and coke, the weighted average CO 2

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Average prices for spot sulfur dioxide emissions allowances at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The weighted average spot price for sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions allowances awarded to winning bidders at Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) annual auction on ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low Cost and High Efficient Facility for Removal of $\\SO_{2}$ and $\\NO_{x}$ in the Flue Gas from Coal Fire Power Plant

Pei, Y J; Dong, X; Feng, G Y; Fu, S; Gao, H; Hong, Y; Li, G; Li, Y X; Shang, L; Sheng, L S; Tian, Y C; Wang, X Q; Wang, Y; Wei, W; Zhang, Y W; Zhou, H J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect including estimates for reduced CO/sub 2/ emissions technologies  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. The option concerns a ''hydrogen economy'' based on coal. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. This process produces a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and either mainly or only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Should the greenhouse effect be found to be a myth in the future, the carbon would be taken out of storage and utilized as a clean fuel, the impurities having been previously removed. This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. Total capital cost estimates have been made to replace all conventional coal burning power plants in the US with technologies that eliminate emissions of CO/sub 2/. These include removal, recovery and disposal of CO/sub 2/, nuclear, solar, photovoltaics, biomass, and HYDROCARB. 12 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Supplementary Material For Manuscript "Particulate sulfate ion concentration and SO2 emission trends in the United States through 2010" by J.L. Hand et al.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.00 Point Reyes National Seashore CA PORE1 38.122 -122.909 97 1.12 0.11 -1.2 0.00 Redwood NP CA REDW1 41

Meskhidze, Nicholas

206

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

207

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and from unconventional reserves; energy intensity of oilunconventional production; venting and flaring of associated gas; CO 2 and SO 2 emissions from oil

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and from unconventional reserves; energy intensity of oilunconventional production; venting and flaring of associated gas; CO 2 and SO 2 emissions from oil

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Environmental Protection- Industrial Compliance (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Industrial Compliance Section develops and administers Certificates of Approval for the Construction and/or Operation of various industrial facilities. Industries with air emissions and/or...

210

Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

212

An Experimental Test of a Theoretical Model to Determine the Rate at which Freely Falling Water Drops Scavenge SO2 in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental method involving the UCLA Rain Shaft is described. This method allows determining the rate at which SO2 is scavenged from air by freely falling water drops. In the present experiment water drops of radii near 300 ?m were allowed ...

C. Walcek; P. K. Wang; J. H. Topalian; S. K. Mitra; H. R. Pruppacher

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

215

Reversible uptake of COS, CS2 and SO2; Ionic liquids with O-alkylxanthate, O-alkylthiocarbonate, and O-alkylsulfite anions  

SciTech Connect

Further development of CO2 binding organic liquids to capture and release carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide and sulfur dioxide. This paper investigates a brand new class of ionic liquids which have potential as chemical sensors for acid gas capture. Applications to flue gas scrubbing are discussed with an emphasis on capture and release of COS, CS2 and SO2 with amidine and guanidine bases with alcohols. Formal spectroscopic characterization is presented.

Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.; Phan, Lam

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Dairy Industry under New Zealand's Emissions Trading Scheme: Analysis of Farmers' Attitudes towards Climate Change: The Expense Created by the NZETS and the Point that Farmers will Begin to Reduce Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Adaptation to actual climate change and contingency planning to reduce vulnerability from likely climate change effects is crucial for the New Zealand dairy industry. Thus (more)

Fowles, Craig

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Top-down estimate of anthropogenic emission inventories and their interannual variability in Houston using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique  

SciTech Connect

The 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000 and 2006) field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. Houston is known for having serious problems with non-attainment of air quality standards. We present a method that uses three models and aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories using an inverse modeling technique. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional variational (3D-VAR and 4D-VAR) inverse modeling techniques based on a least-squares method to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of CO, NOy (sum of all reactive nitrogen compounds), and SO2 emissions predicted by the 4-km-resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. We found that in 2006 the prior daytime emissions in the urban area of Houston have to be reduced by 40% {+-} 12% for CO and 7% {+-} 13% for NOy. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be reduced by 41% {+-} 15% for CO and 51% {+-} 9% for NOy. Major ports around Houston have their NOy emissions reduced as well, probably due to uncertainties in near-shore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the interannual emission variability between 2000 and 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have been reduced by 8% {+-} 20%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% {+-} 12% from 2000 to 2006. In the Houston Ship Channel, the daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% {+-} 17%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions sources.

Brioude, J.; Kim, S. W.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S. H.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, Michael; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, Gabrielle; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry banner Industry banner Neutron scattering research has applications in practically every field, and neutron research at ORNL is leading to productive partnerships with the industrial and business communities. We welcome proposals for all types of research, including those involving proprietary work. Recent studies have led to discoveries with potential applications in fields such as medicine, energy, and various metals technologies. For more information, please see our recent research highlights. Research Collaborations Industry-Driven Research Benefits Plastics Manufacturing Corning uses VULCAN to test limits of ceramic material for car emission controls, filtration devices Neutrons Probe Inner Workings of Batteries Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match

219

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); University of technology, faculty of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, Janusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nations CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking Industrial Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions: Aapplication of Energy Efficiency in Industry, Vienna,for Promoting Industrial Energy Efficiency in Developing

McKane, Aimee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

224

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Title Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...

225

and Industry Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the long-run dynamic implications of market-based regulation of carbon dioxide emissions in the US Portland cement industry. We consider several alternative policy designs, including mechanisms that use production subsidies to partially offset compliance costs and border tax adjustments to penalize emissions associated with foreign imports. Our results highlight two general countervailing market distortions. First, following Buchanan (1969), reductions in product market surplus and allocative inefficiencies due to market power in the domestic cement market counteract the social benefits of carbon abatement. Second, tradeexposure to unregulated foreign competitors leads to emissions leakage which offsets domestic emissions reductions. Taken together, these forces result in social welfare losses under policy regimes that fully internalize the emissions externality. In contrast, market-based policies that incorporate design features to mitigate the exercise of market power and emissions leakage can deliver welfare gains. 1

Meredith Fowlie; Mar Reguant; Stephen P. Ryan; Meredith Fowlie; Mar Reguant; Stephen P. Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

227

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

228

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India's Iron and Steel Industry Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry Publication Type Report...

229

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and Steel Industry in China Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China Publication Type...

230

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

231

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

Cox, Daryl [ORNL; Papar, Riyaz [Hudson Technologies; Wright, Dr. Anthony [ALW Consulting

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy Analysis in the Industrial Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide emissions in heavy manufacturing. This talk will focus on the U.S. iron and steel industry, illustrating how it compares internationally and describing the...

234

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal GEIA-ACCENT Emission Data Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) Agency/Company /Organization: National Aeronautics and Space Administration Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.geiacenter.org/ References: Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA)[1] "The GEIA /ACCENT data portal provides gridded emission data; emission data are usually separated into three main categories : anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning emissions, and natural emissions: anthropogenic emissions include emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel consumption, industry and agricultural sources. biomass burning emissions include emissions from forest fires, savannah fires, and sometimes large croplands fires.

236

Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Harmful Exhaust Emissions Monitoring of Road Vehicle Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road vehicle improve the quality of people's life, however harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbon (HC), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), have become more and more unacceptable ... Keywords: optic absorption spectroscopy based gas sensor, harmful exhaust emission monitoring, engine vibration

Chuliang Wei; Zhemin Zhuang; H. Ewald; A. I. Al-Shamma'a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Another example with similar monitoring requirements is the Southern California RECLAIM program that implemented separated markets for nitrogen oxide (NOx) and SO2 emissions from power plants, refineries and other large stationary sources. This program did... to the allocation of permits, an emission standard specific to buses. It may also be optimal to use 28 I thank one of the referees for pointing out this case and its relevance for the Los Angeles RECLAIM market. 26 different utilization factors (eq) for each group...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are available for emissions from purchased electricity, stationary combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning equipment, and several industrial sectors. References...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Mercury Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants Mercury Emissions Control NETL managed the largest funded research program in the country to develop an in-depth understanding of fossil combustion-based mercury emissions. The program goal was to develop effective control options that would allow generators to comply with regulations. Research focus areas included measurement and characterization of mercury emissions, as well as the development of cost-effective control technologies for the U.S. coal-fired electric generating industry. Control Technologies Field Testing Phase I & II Phase III Novel Concepts APCD Co-benefits Emissions Characterization

242

Non-local charges and quantum integrability of sigma models on the symmetric spaces SO(2n)/SO(n)xSO(n) and Sp(2n)/Sp(n)xSp(n)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-local conserved charges in two-dimensional sigma models with target spaces $SO(2n)/SO(n){\\times}SO(n)$ and $Sp(2n)/Sp(n){\\times}Sp(n)$ are shown to survive quantization, unspoiled by anomalies; these theories are therefore integrable at the quantum level. Local, higher-spin, conserved charges are also shown to survive quantization in the $SO(2n)/SO(n){\\times}SO(n)$ models.

J. M. Evans; D. Kagan; C. A. S. Young

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Volunteering for market-based environmental regulation : the substitution provision of the SO? emissions trading program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we explore the practical and welfare implications of a system of voluntary compliance within a market-based environmental regulation. The Substitution Provision of the SO2 emissions trading program allows the ...

Montero, Juan Pablo

245

State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2006 (Update) (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In May 2005, the EPA published two final rules aimed at reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. CAIR [51] requires 28 States and the District of Columbia to reduce emissions of SO2 and/or NOx. CAMR [52] requires the States to reduce emissions of mercury from new and existing coal-fired plants.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current anthropogenic CO 2 emissions worldwide. Given increasing cement demand and production, the industrys absolute energy

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Texas Industries of the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the Texas Industries of the Future program is to facilitate the development, demonstration and adoption of advanced technologies and adoption of best practices that reduce industrial energy usage, emissions, and associated costs, resulting in improved competitive performance. The bottom line for Texas industry is savings in energy and materials, cost-effective environmental compliance, increased productivity, reduced waste, and enhanced product quality. The state program leverages the programs and tools of the federal Department of Energy's Industries of the Future. At the federal level, there are nine Industries of the Future: refining, chemicals, aluminum, steel, metal casting, glass, mining, agriculture, and forest products. These industries were selected nationally because they supply over 90% of the U.S. economy's material needs and account for 75% of all energy use by U.S. industry. In Texas, three IOF sectors, chemicals, refining and forest products, account for 86% of the energy used by industry in this state.

Ferland, K.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

250

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

251

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

252

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

253

Aluminum: Industry of the future  

SciTech Connect

For over a century, the US aluminum industry has led the global market with advances in technology, product development, and marketing. Industry leaders recognize both the opportunities and challenges they face as they head into the 21st century, and that cooperative R and D is key to their success. In a unique partnership, aluminum industry leaders have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to focus on innovative technologies that will help to strengthen the competitive position of the US aluminum industry and, at the same time, further important national goals. This industry-led partnership, the Aluminum Industry of the Future, promotes technologies that optimize the use of energy and materials in operations and reduce wastes and energy-related emissions. Led by The Aluminum Association, industry leaders began by developing a unified vision of future market, business, energy, and environmental goals. Their vision document, Partnerships for the Future, articulates a compelling vision for the next 20 years: to maintain and grow the aluminum industry through the manufacture and sale of competitively priced, socially desirable, and ecologically sustainable products. Continued global leadership in materials markets will require the combined resources of industry, universities, and government laboratories. By developing a unified vision, the aluminum industry has provided a framework for the next step in the Industries of the Future process, the development of a technology roadmap designed to facilitate cooperative R and D.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air pollutant emissions. Steam distribution system energyimprovements to steam distribution systems primarily focusenergy in industrial steam distribution systems. Improve

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A-Z Index - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Smart Grid (Electrical System) Study; SO 2 Emissions (Electricity Industry) Solar Electricity Generation; Solar Energy Potential (map) Photovoltaic; Solar ...

256

NICE3: Industrial Refrigeration System  

SciTech Connect

Energy Concepts has developed an absorption-augmented system as a cost-effective means of achieving more cooling capacity with a substantial reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions for industrial refrigeration. It cuts fuel consumption by 30% by combining an internal combustion engine with a mechanical compression refrigeration system and an absorption refrigeration system. The absorption system is powered by engine waste heat. Conventional industrial refrigeration uses mechanical vapor compression, powered by electric motors, which results in higher energy costs. By the year 2010, the new system could cut fuel consumption by 19 trillion Btu and greenhouse emissions by more than 1 million tons per year.

Simon, P.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

257

Recovery Act: Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material Background Worldwide carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from human activity have...

258

Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry (CII), 2007. ?Energy Saving in After TreatmentTechnologies for Energy Savings/GHG Emissions Reduction (Practice Case Study 300: Energy Savings by Reducing the Size

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

LIGHT METALS 2007 Volume 6: The Material Recycling Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Management of Airborne Metal Emissions in the Recycling Industry [pp. 1173-1190] Karen Hagelstein and John E Heinze. Improved UBC Melting...

260

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Gas Turbine Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, preliminary design information regarding gas turbine emissions has been unreliable, particularly for facilities using steam injection and other forms of Best Available Control Technology (BACT). This was probably attributed to the lack of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies are getting a better grasp of emissions, but there are still problem areas, particularly CO and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The lag in data has resulted in the imposition of a CO reactor as BACT for the gas turbine. With the renewed concern about the environment, air permits will have a high profile with offsets being the next fix beyond BACT. 'The manner in which technology developers and electric utilities will share emissions reductions in the coming era of pollution allowance trading is becoming prominent on the agendas of strategic planners at technology vendors and the electric power industry....' (1) Therefore, it becomes increasingly important that the proponents of gas turbine-based facilities establish more reliable data on their proposed emissions. This paper addresses the gas turbine emissions experiences of eight cogeneration plants utilizing: 1) steam injection for both NOx control and power augmentation, 2) CO reactors, 3) selective catalytic reduction units. It also looks at possible regulatory actions.

Frederick, J. D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: Emissions Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control Emissions Characterization In anticipation of the 1990 CAAAs, specifically the draft Title III regarding the characterization of potential HAPs from electric steam generating units, DOE initiated a new Air Toxics Program in 1989. The DOE Mercury Measurement and Control Program evolved as a result of the findings from the comprehensive assessment of hazardous air pollutants studies conducted by DOE from 1990 through 1997. DOE, in collaboration with EPRI, performed stack tests at a number of coal-fired power plants (identified on map below) to accurately determine the emission rates of a series of potentially toxic chemicals. These tests had not been conducted previously because of their cost, about $1 million per test, so conventional wisdom on emissions was based on emission factors derived from analyses of coal. In general, actual emissions were found to be about one-tenth previous estimates, due to a high fraction of the pollutants being captured by existing particulate control systems. These data resulted in a decision by EPA that most of these pollutants were not a threat to the environment, and needed no further regulation at power plants. This shielded the coal-fired power industry from major (tens of millions) costs that would have resulted from further controlling these emissions. However, another finding of these studies was that mercury was not effectively controlled in coal-fired utility boiler systems. Moreover, EPA concluded that a plausible link exists between these emissions and adverse health effects. Ineffective control of mercury by existing control technologies resulted from a number of factors, including variation in coal composition and variability in the form of the mercury in flue gases. The volatility of mercury was the main contributor for less removal, as compared to the less volatile trace elements/metals which were being removed at efficiencies over 99% with the fly ash. In addition, it was determined that there was no reliable mercury speciation method to accurately distinguish between the elemental and oxidized forms of mercury in the flue gas. These two forms of mercury respond differently to removal techniques in existing air pollution control devices utilized by the coal-fired utility industry.

263

HIGH SO2 REMOVAL EFFICIENCY TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of performance tests at six full-scale wet lime- and limestone-reagent flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The objective of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of low capital cost sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal upgrades for existing FGD systems as an option for complying with the provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The upgrade options tested at the limestone-reagent systems included the use of organic acid additives (dibasic acid (DBA) and/or sodium formate) as well as increased reagent ratio (higher excess limestone levels in the recirculating slurry solids) and absorber liquid-to-gas ratio. One system also tested operating at higher flue gas velocities to allow the existing FGD system to treat flue gas from an adjacent, unscrubbed unit. Upgrade options for the one lime-based system tested included increased absorber venturi pressure drop and increased sulfite concentration in the recirculating slurry liquor.

Gary M. Blythe; James L. Phillips

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Analysis of the European Emission Trading Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An international emissions trading system is a featured instrument in the Kyoto Protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases among major industrial countries. The ...

Reilly, John M.

265

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 Emission reduction in 2030. Results are presented forand paper industries. Area b 2030 production (Mt) a A1 B2electrode technology by 2030. g Humphreys and Mahasenan,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Air Transport into and out of the Industrial Highveld Region of South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eolian dust and industrially derived sulfur aerosols have been shown to be major summer and winter constituents of the ubiquitous southern African haze layer. Industrial emissions from the South African industrialized Highveld are exported out of ...

M. T. Freiman; S. J. Piketh

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu announced six projects that aim to find ways of convert captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products. The innovative projects -...

268

Environment- Emissions/ Anode Effect II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... The emissions of F- is a significant environmental aspects of aluminum industry. Therefore the government have established regulations aimed...

269

The origin of Californias zero emission vehicle mandate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry in California, combined to make the idea of mandating (electric) zero emission vehiclesIndustry felt that CARB had not seriously addressed the question of the commercial viability of electric vehicles.

Sperling, Dan; Collantes, Gustavo O

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

271

Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues Electronics Industry: Markets & Issues Speaker(s): William M. Smith Date: March 17, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Electronics represents a unique opportunity to get in on the beginning of an incredible growth spurt, for an already huge industry; $400 billion/year in the U.S. now, moving up by 10%-20% per year in several sectors. This is quite unlike many other U.S. industrial sectors, which often involve mature businesses requiring assistance to stay afloat. The potential for forming business partnerships with electronics firms to deal with issues in energy efficiency, water availability/quality, air quality, productivity/yield, HVAC, power quality, wastewater, air emissions, etc., is staggering. The industrys oligopic nature provides serious opportunities

272

Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Title Avoided emissions from high penetration of photovoltaic electricity in the United States Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Zhai, Pei, Peter H. Larsen, Dev Millstein, Surabi Menon, and Eric R. Masanet Journal Energy Volume 47 Start Page 443 Date Published 2012 Abstract This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO2, SO2 and NOx assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided emissions vary significantly across the country-mainly due to three state-specific factors: the existing resource mix of power plants (power grid fuel mix), the emission intensity of existing fossil fuel power plants and the PV capacity factor within each state. The avoided emissions per solar PV capacity (g/W) - for ten U.S. states -ranged from 670 to 1500 for CO2, 0.01e7.80 for SO2 and 0.25e2.40 for NOx. In general, avoided emissions are likely to be higher in locations with 1) higher share of coal plants; 2) higher emission of existing fossil fuel plants; and 3) higher PV capacity factor. To further illustrate the quantitative relationship between avoided emissions and the three state-specific factors, we conducted a sensitivity analysis. Finally, we estimated the change in avoided emissions in a coal-intensive state by varying the operational constraints of fossil-fuel power plants. At the 10% penetration level avoided emissions were not constrained by the ramp rate limitations, but the minimum capacity requirement significantly affected the avoided emission estimates.

273

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions of a Diesel Engine From Various Biodiesel Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing fuel prices, stricter government policies, and technological developments made it possible to seek for renewable alternatives, called biofuels, to petroleum fuel. Biodiesel, a biofuel that is produced from chemically mixing animal fat, vegetable oils, or recycled restaurant grease with alcohol and catalyst, is gaining popularity in recent years as a substitute for petroleum diesel. Ninety percent (90%) of U.S. biodiesel industry makes use of soybean oil as its feedstock. However, soybean oil alone cannot meet such a huge demand on biofuel production. Hence, it is important to identify and get more information about other feedstocks, specifically on its effects on the performance and exhaust emissions of diesel engines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and emissions of two diesel engines operating on different biodiesel fuels (i.e. canola oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, and chicken fat) and compare them to the performance and emissions when the engine is operated on soybean oil-based biodiesel and petroleum-based diesel. Results indicated that an engine operating on biodiesel generates a little less power and torque at any given speed than one running on diesel. Such power and torque loss were attributed to the biodiesel's lower energy content. The lower heating value (energy content) of biodiesel can be reflected in the specific fuel consumption, i.e., to generate the same power, more biodiesel is needed. The reduction in torque and power of less than 10% indicates that in some cases biodiesel has better combustion than diesel. Unfortunately, the high efficiency of combustion may give rise to increased combustion temperature which may lead to higher exhaust emissions. The gradual decrease in the total hydrocarbon and CO2 emissions, as blends were increased from B20 to B100, was also found to be an indication of better combustion using biodiesel fuels than petroleum diesel. However, NOx emissions were higher, predominantly at low speeds for most biodiesel and blends and therefore may require some additives or engine modifications/or adjustments to equalize the NOx emissions of diesel. Other emissions particularly SO2 were lower than standards require.

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Process-Related Emissions in the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector International Energy Outlook 2009 Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector result from both energy use and production processes. Together, energy- and process-related emissions in the industrial sector account for about one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions.a Process-related emissions are a direct byproduct of production. Because releases of carbon dioxide are inherent in the production of iron and steel, cement, and aluminum, the potential for reducing process-related emissions is limited. As a result, carbon abatement will face significant technological challenges in the industrial sector. In addition, there are no economical substitutes for these materials or their production processes, and none is likely be available in the near term.

278

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

279

Emissions Modeling for Electric Vehicles: Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable debate and numerous publications comparing the emissions from alternative fuel vehicles with those of internal combustion engine vehicles. Considering the highly competitive nature of the automotive industry, the size of the automotive fuels markets, and intense regulatory scrutiny of emissions, there is no easy method of establishing agreement on all of the analytical factors involved in emissions analysis from vehicles. However, agreement on many of the factual parameters sh...

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Crafting of the National Low-Emission Vehicle Program: a Private Contract Theory of Public Rulemaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and industry associations repre- senting service stations, vehicle dealerships, gas companies, emission control equip- ment manufacturers, electric

Fern, Danielle F.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last...

282

THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 INDUSTRIAL ENERGY USE BASELINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine total energy consumption for that industry. However, if specific energy intensities per unit consumption, and emissions generated by energy consumption, a comprehensive, baseline data set of industrial branches of Canadian industry, forms the goal of this report. An adequate baseline energy consumption

283

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated Recovery Act funds to more than 25 projects that capture and sequester CO2 emissions from industrial sources - such as cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, paper mills, and manufacturing facilities - into underground formations. Large-Scale Projects Three projects are aimed at testing large-scale industrial carbon capture

287

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

290

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

291

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

292

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

293

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

294

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

295

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

296

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

297

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

298

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

299

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

300

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

302

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

303

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

304

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

305

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

306

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

307

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

308

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

309

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

310

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

311

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

312

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

313

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

314

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

315

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

316

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

317

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

318

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

319

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

320

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

322

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

323

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

324

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

325

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

326

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

327

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

328

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

329

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

330

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

331

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

332

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

333

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

334

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

335

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

336

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

337

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

338

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

339

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

340

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

342

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

343

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

344

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

345

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

346

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

347

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

348

Glossary Term - Neutron Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron Previous Term (Neutron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Niobe) Niobe Neutron Emission After neutron emission, an atom contains one less neutron. Neutron emission is one...

349

Glossary Term - Proton Emission  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proton Previous Term (Proton) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Quark) Quark Proton Emission After proton emission, an atom contains one less proton. Proton emission is one process...

350

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

351

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

352

The cost of reducing utility S02 emissions : not as low as you might think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common assertion in public policy discussions is that the cost of achieving the SO2 emissions reductions under the acid rain provisions of the Clean Air Act ("Title IV") has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV ...

Smith, Anne E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

354

Continuous Emission Monitoring (CEM) System Application and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of gases and particulate matter are emitted daily from industrial plants and fossil-fueled steam generating facilities. The gases include sulfur dioxide (SO2), the nitrogen oxides (NOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2). All of these gases affect the environment in some manner. Sulfur dioxide and the nitrogen oxides are precursors to acid rain. High levels of nitrogen oxides lead to the generation of photochemical smog, while carbon dioxide is implicated in climate change (global warming).

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

355

China-International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China-International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project China-International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Jump to: navigation, search Name China-International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Energy (USDOE), Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Alliance for Energy Efficient Economy (India), Confederation of Indian Industry Sector Energy Focus Area Industry Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Technology characterizations Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country China Eastern Asia References International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project[1] Overview China "China is prioritizing a low carbon, energy efficient economy and has

356

International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Jump to: navigation, search Name International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Energy (USDOE), Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Alliance for Energy Efficient Economy (India), Confederation of Indian Industry Sector Energy Focus Area Industry Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Technology characterizations Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country China, India Eastern Asia, Southern Asia References International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project[1] Overview China "China is prioritizing a low carbon, energy efficient economy and has

357

Impact of recent energy legislation on the aluminum industry  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the aluminum industry's technology in energy use and emissions control. Data on consumption and pollution levels are presented. A history of the aluminum industry in the Pacific Northwest, its role in providing power reserves, and how that role fits into the present power situation are given. The Northwest Power Act, the rates the industry will probably pay as a result of the Act, the implications of those rates to the industry, as well as the availability of federal power to the industry are discussed. Finally, the Act's effects on the relative competitiveness of the industry in both domestic and world markets are examined.

Edelson, E.; Emery, J.G.; Hopp, W.J.; Kretz, A.L.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microsensors for Continuous Emission Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous emission monitors have evolved during the last fifteen years to include smaller and more compact units. The trend in miniaturizing detectors, as well as all electronic components, is the focus of this report. Micro- sensors, miniature spectrometers, and nano-sized sensors are only a few of the developments that are currently being incorporated into gas sensing instruments by industrial laboratories, research institutes and universities. This report focuses on the use of miniaturized sensors an...

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Final Report for project titled "New fluoroionomer electrolytes with high conductivity and low SO2 crossover for use in electrolyzers being developed for hydrogen production from nuclear power plants"  

SciTech Connect

Thermochemical water splitting cycles, using the heat of nuclear power plants, offer an alternate highly efficient route for the production of hydrogen. Among the many possible thermochemical cycles for the hydrogen production, the sulfur-based cycles lead the competition in overall energy efficiency. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce hydrogen. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) selected the fuel cell MEA design concept for the SDE in the HyS process since the MEA concept provides a much smaller cell footprint than conventional parallel plate technology. The electrolyzer oxidizes sulfur dioxide to form sulfuric acid at the anode and reduces protons to form hydrogen at the cathode. The overall electrochemical cell reaction consists of the production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. There is a significant need to provide the membrane materials that exhibit reduced sulfur dioxide transport characteristics without sacrificing other important properties such as high ionic conductivity and excellent chemical stability in highly concentrated sulfuric acid solutions saturated with sulfur dioxide. As an alternative membrane, sulfonated Perfluorocyclobutyl aromatic ether polymer (sPFCB) were expected to posses low SO2 permeability due to their stiff backbones as well as high proton conductivity, improved mechanical properties. The major accomplishments of this project were the synthesis, characterizations, and optimizations of suitable electrolyzers for good SDE performance and higher chemical stability against sulfuric acid. SDE performance results of developed sPFCB polyelectrolytes have shown that these membranes exhibit good chemical stability against H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

Dennis W. Smith; Stephen Creager

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Carbon Emission Analysis System Design of Coal-Fired Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide is the main cause of global warming, that emission has been the world's attention. and the power industry is an important source of carbon dioxide emissions, this paper try to design the system of power plants for carbon emissions coal-fired ... Keywords: Analysis system, Carbon emissions, Energy saving

Han Jieping; Zhang Chengzhen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-???????­???¢???????Energy, Carbon-???????­Dioxide-???????­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC-based concrete with HFC in infrastructure we can reduce energy use in concrete production by 70%, and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 98%; thus the potential to reduce the impact of building materials on global warming and climate change is highly significant. Low Temperature Solidification (LTS) is a breakthrough technology that enables the densification of inorganic materials via a hydrothermal process. The resulting product exhibits excellent control of chemistry and microstructure, to provide durability and mechanical performance that exceeds that of concrete or natural stone. The technology can be used in a wide range of applications including facade panels, interior tiles, roof tiles, countertops, and pre-cast concrete. Replacing traditional building materials and concrete in these applications will result in significant reduction in both energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions.

Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Healthcare and Medical Equipment Industry - Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ TechWatch highlights the measures that the healthcare and medical equipment industry is taking to improve emissions and immunity performance and reduce power quality (PQ) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) problems.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Canadas Bitumen Industry Under CO2 Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of implementing CO2 emissions reduction policies on Canadas oil sands industry, the largest of its kind in the world. The production of petroleum products from oils sands involves extraction of ...

Chen, Y.-H. Henry

365

Impact of Ground-level Aviation Emissions on Air Quality in the Western United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aviation industry has experienced sustained growth since its inception result- ing in an increase in air pollutant emissions. Exposure to particulate matter less than (more)

Clark, Eric Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

electric power industry that EIA projects continued reliance on them for at least two decades. ... energy-related car bon emissions will be about 550 million

367

Recovery, reuse, and recycle of industrial waste  

SciTech Connect

The major goal of this work is to produce a document useful in planning efforts aimed at elimination of industrial wastes through the application of recycle, recovery, and reuse technology. The pollutants considered in this study are basically organic and inorganic by-products from wastewater effluents, solid residue and gaseous emissions from industrial operations. The first section contains chapters on methodology currently available for recovery of industrial and hazardous waste, and developing technology for recycle, reuse and recovery. The second section contains chapters on 5 technical categories, used for recovery namely, sorption, molecular separation, phase transition, chemical modification, and physical dispersion and separation.

Noll, K.E.; Haas, C.N.; Schmidt, C.; Kodukula, P.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Source category survey: mineral wool manufacturing industry. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains background information which was used for determining the need for new source performance standards (NSPS) for the mineral wool manufacturing industry in accordance with Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. Air pollution emissions and growth trends of the mineral wool industry are examined. Manufacturing processes, control strategies, and state and local air pollution regulations are discussed. The impact of a potential NSPS on particulate and carbon monoxide emissions is calculated.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Water Efficient and Low Pollution Textile Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy Efficient Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy Efficient Water Efficient and Low Pollution Textile Industry year month institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory address Berkeley abstract p Emerging energy efficiency greenhouse gas GHG and pollution mitigation technologies will be crucial for the textile industry as it responds to population and economic growth that is expected to spur a rapid increase in textile consumption over the coming decades and a corresponding increase in the industry textquoteright s absolute energy use and GHG and other pollutant emissions This report gives an overview of textile industry processes and compiles available information on the energy savings environmental and other benefits costs commercialization status and references for emerging technologies to reduce the industry

370

Thermionic emission cooling in single barrier heterostructures Ali Shakouria)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Te3, the current industry standard, must be found. A so- lution is to use thermionic emission is an indication of the relatively high thermal resistance of the ceramic package and the soldering layer used

371

New England Wind Forum: Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Emissions Markets Emission markets are a tool used on a state, regional, national, or global basis to limit emissions of various pollutants and greenhouse gases, typically in an approach referred to as "cap-and-trade". Several programs are in place or being developed that apply to electric generation sources in New England. In some of these programs, a wind generator can apply for and receive a form of tradable emission rights (usually in the form of set-aside allowances) in recognition of emissions a wind generator displaces on the system. In these cases, tradable emission rights have a market value and can be sold to bring a supplemental revenue stream to a wind generator. In other programs (such as the federal sulfur dioxide (SO2) program) in which participation is limited to emitters, wind generators cannot directly participate in programs, but the program drives up the cost of all emitting generation technologies, making wind power more competitive. The Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management has information about clean-air activities and initiatives in New England. The Environmental Protection Agency provides information about state and regional cap-and-trade programs for various pollutants.

372

Title V Semi-Annual Emissions Report for Permit P100R1 July 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011  

SciTech Connect

Reports of actual emissions from permitted sources in Section 2.0 shall be submitted on a 6 month basis. Reports shall not include emissions from insignificant activities. Emission estimates of criteria pollutants NOx, CO, SO2, PM and VOCs shall not include fugitive emissions. Emission estimates of HAPs shall include fugitive emissions. The reports shall include a comparison of actual emissions that occurred during the reporting period with the facility-wide allowable emission limits specified in Section 2.11 of this permit. The report required by Condition 4.1 shall be submitted within 90 days from the end of the reporting period. The semiannual report required by Condition 4.2 shall be submitted within 45 days from the end of the reporting period. The reporting periods are January 1st to June 30th and July 1st to December 31st. This condition is pursuant to 20.2.70.302.E.1 NMAC.

Whetham, Walter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

374

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Construction Industry Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in one of our country's most vital industries. ... An industry-led program to disseminate practical ... fire-proofing materials, connections, and steel trusses; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources ...

377

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: About Industrial Distributed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through energy efficiency and fossil fuel displacement by using alternative fuels and capturing waste energy streams Providing...

378

Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

Perez, J. M.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

380

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

382

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

383

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

384

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

385

Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More than $155 Million for Industrial More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Secretary Chu Announces More than $155 Million for Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects November 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC- Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department of Energy is awarding more than $155 million in funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for 41 industrial energy efficiency projects across the country. These awards include funding for industrial combined heat and power systems, district energy systems for industrial facilities, and grants to support technical and financial assistance to local industry. The industrial sector uses more than 30 percent of U.S. energy and is responsible for nearly 30 percent of U.S. carbon emissions.

386

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

387

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

388

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

389

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

390

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

391

Trends Online Methane Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Introduction Annual Estimates of Global Anthropogenic Methane Emissions: 1860-1994 - D.I. Stern and R.K. Kaufmann Contents-Trends | CDIAC Home 102001...

392

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking Industrial Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions.and L. Price. 1999. Energy Efficiency and Carbon DioxideGalitsky. 2004. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reduction of CO2 emissions and utilization of slag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Expectations from the industry partners (as pre- sented at the kick-off meeting): Applicability of the steel emissions is 314 #12;CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Con- crete and steel manufacturers produce of industrial by-products and residues is the possibility to use CO2 in local flue gases for the carbonation

Zevenhoven, Ron

394

Climate VISION: Industry Associations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Aluminum Aluminum Association (Coordinating aluminum industry Climate VISION activities) The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum products, as well as suppliers to the industry. The Association provides leadership to the industry through its programs and services which aim to enhance aluminum's position in a world of proliferating materials, increase its use as the "material of choice," remove impediments to its fullest use, and assist in achieving the industry's environmental, societal, and economic objectives. Automobile Manufacturers Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Coordinating automobile industry Climate VISION activities) The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association

395

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

SciTech Connect

The industrial sector consumes nearly 40% of annual global primary energy use and is responsible for a similar share of global energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Many studies and actual experience indicate that there is considerable potential to reduce the amount of energy used to manufacture most commodities, concurrently reducing CO2 emissions. With the support of strong policies and programs, energy-efficient technologies and measures can be implemented that will reduce global CO2 emissions. A number of countries, including the Netherlands, the UK, and China, have experience implementing aggressive programs to improve energy efficiency and reduce related CO2 emissions from industry. Even so, there is no silver bullet and all options must be pursued if greenhouse gas emissions are to be constrained to the level required to avoid significant negative impacts from global climate change.

Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

398

Catalysts for Lean Engine Emission Control - Emissions & Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

controlling NOx emissions from lean engines is challenging. Traditionally, for the stoichiometric gasoline engine vehicles that dominate the U.S. passenger car market, a three-way...

399

Greenhouse gases and the metallurgical process industry  

SciTech Connect

The present lecture offers a brief review of the greenhouse effect, the sources of greenhouse gases, the potential effect of these gases on global warming, the response of the international community, and the probable cost of national compliance. The specific emissions of the metallurgical process industry, particularly those of the steel and aluminum sectors, are then examined. The potential applications of life-cycle assessments and of an input-output model in programs of emissions' abatement are investigated, and, finally, a few remarks on some implications for education are presented.

Lupis, C.H.P.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Industrial Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy although, freight costs, favorable exchange rates and high capacity utilization will encourage future industrial investment. Industry will eventually enter a new period of major investment. Future industrial investment will be an opportunity to influence the energy efficiency of these facilities for generations to come. Program managers must begin engaging industrial customers now, in order to exploit this unprecedented opportunity to change future energy use patterns. This paper reviews recent market trends and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: Why has industrial investment declined? What is the outlook for industrial investment? How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?

Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

403

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge May 5, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that 48 research and development projects across the country have been selected as award winners of the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge. The grantees will receive a total of $13 million to fund the development of transformational industrial processes and technologies that can significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions throughout the industrial sector. The funding will be matched by more than $5 million in private industry funding to support a total of $18 million in projects that will enhance America's energy security and strengthen our economy.

405

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.unido.org/fileadmin/user_media/Publications/Pub_free/UNEnergy2009P Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change Screenshot References: Policies and Measures to Realise Industrial Energy Efficiency and Mitigate Climate Change[1]

406

DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge DOE Announces Awardees for the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge May 5, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that 48 research and development projects across the country have been selected as award winners of the Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge. The grantees will receive a total of $13 million to fund the development of transformational industrial processes and technologies that can significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions throughout the industrial sector. The funding will be matched by more than $5 million in private industry funding to support a total of $18 million in projects that will enhance America's energy security and strengthen our economy.

407

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil production dropping by 28 percent from 1990 to 2009, methane emissions from petroleum exploration and production have declined by the same percentage. Residential wood...

408

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

409

Forest products industry of the future: Building a sustainable technology advantage for America`s forest products industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US forest, wood, and paper industry ranks as one of the most competitive forest products industries in the world. With annual shipments valued at nearly $267 billion, it employs over 1.3 million people and is currently among the top 10 manufacturing employers in 46 out of 50 states. Retaining this leadership position will depend largely on the industry`s success in developing and using advanced technologies. These technologies will enable manufacturing plants and forestry enterprises to maximize energy and materials efficiency and reduce waste and emissions, while producing high-quality, competitively priced wood and paper products. In a unique partnership, leaders in the forest products industry have teamed with the US Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) to encourage cooperative research efforts that will help position the US forest products industry for continuing prosperity while advancing national energy efficiency and environmental goals.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

411

Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy...

412

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: General Equilibrium Emissions Model (GEEM) Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Offsets and Certificates, Transportation Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations Country: Kenya, Thailand UN Region: Eastern Africa, Caribbean Coordinates: 13.7240216°, 100.5798602°

413

Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Supporting RBEC Transition to Low-Emission Development Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UNDP Bratislava Regional Center Partner Interministerial committees headed by the national focal point on climate change Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://europeandcis.undp.org/e Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Kazakhstan, Moldova, Republic of Kosovo, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan

414

The Copper Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...These products are sold to a wide variety of industrial users. Certain mill products??chiefly wire, cable, and most

415

NIST Industry Day 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at www.fedbizopps.gov. Search NIST-AMD-INDUSTRY-DAY-2012 in the Quick Search engine. Deadline for registration ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Industrial Development Projects (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes municipalities and counties to issue bonds or interest coupons to finance industrial projects, including energy generation facilities.

417

America's Booming Wind Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharing key findings from two new Energy Department reports that highlight the record growth of America's wind industry.

418

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation and lets industry pick winning technologies. TheTransforming the Oil Industry intothe Energy Industry BY DANIEL SPERLING AND SONIA YEH A C C E

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

From Industry Protection to Industry Promotion: IT Policy in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazilian banking automation industry. Science, TechnologyBrazilian liberalisation of the IT industry on technologicalWorking paper. Computer Industry Almanac, Inc. (1999).

Botelho, Antonio Jose Junqueira; Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Tigre, Paulo Bastos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Emissions Trading, Electricity Industry Restructuring, and Investment in Pollution Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economy of State-Level Electricity Restructuring. Resources109-129. [15] Bushnell, J. "Electricity Resource Adequacy:Version 1.0, 1999b. [33] Electricity for Identification

Fowlie, Meredith

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction from Aluminum Industry in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

422

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",271,264,273,233,222,214,154,241,256,221,223,198,194,187,158,121,100,93,69,47,51 " Petroleum",138,127,76,64,44,40,50,38,...

423

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"2Other Renewables includes biogenic municipal solid waste, wood, black liquor, other wood waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, and other biomass...

424

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Minnesota) (Minnesota) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Climate Policies This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80

425

EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN POSITRON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26-29, 1979 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INLBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION INl. LBL-9783 EMISSION AND TRANSMISSION NOISE PROPAGATION IN

Gullberg, G.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

nitrous oxide emisssions from industrial sources, 1990, 2005, 2008, and 2009 4.5. Waste management sources In 2009, treatment of residential and commercial wastewater produced 92...

427

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 25, 2004) Industry Summary. 1992 (est. ).11 May 2004) Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado Pageor (800) LUNG-USA. Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado

Landman, BA, Anne; Bialick, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

For Industry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D accelerates battery technology | More news Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry For Industry | For Industry SHARE There are a few different way of "working" with...

431

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Print Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

432

Making Industry Part of the Climate Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the energy efficiency of industry is essential for maintaining the viability of domestic manufacturing, especially in a world economy where production is shifting to low-cost, less regulated developing countries. Numerous studies have shown the potential for significant cost-effective energy-savings in U.S. industries, but the realization of this potential is hindered by regulatory, information, workforce, and financial obstacles. This report evaluates seven federal policy options aimed at improving the energy efficiency of industry, grounded in an understanding of industrial decision-making and the barriers to efficiency improvements. Detailed analysis employs the Georgia Institute of Technology's version of the National Energy Modeling System and spreadsheet calculations, generating a series of benefit/cost metrics spanning private and public costs and energy bill savings, as well as air pollution benefits and the social cost of carbon. Two of the policies would address regulatory hurdles (Output-Based Emissions Standards and a federal Energy Portfolio Standard with Combined Heat and Power); three would help to fill information gaps and workforce training needs (the Superior Energy Performance program, Implementation Support Services, and a Small Firm Energy Management program); and two would tackle financial barriers (Tax Lien Financing and Energy-Efficient Industrial Motor Rebates). The social benefit-cost ratios of these policies appear to be highly favorable based on a range of plausible assumptions. Each of the seven policy options has an appropriate federal role, broad applicability across industries, utilizes readily available technologies, and all are administratively feasible.

Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology; Cortes, Rodrigo [Georgia Institute of Technology; Deitchman, Benjamin H [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

434

Excess Emissions (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This regulation establishes requirements for a source whose operation results in an excess emission and to establish criteria for a source whose operation results in an excess emission to claim an...

435

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

436

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

437

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

438

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

439

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated using the eGRID post 2006 emission factor for all subject years (1990-2009); the CA-CP Calculator uses a different (lower) factor (eGRID pre 2006) for years 1990-2006. WUSTL deviated from the CA-CP Calculator on this emission factor because using the pre and post eGRID factors skews GHG emissions

Dobbins, Ian G.

442

Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Role of Standards,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Role of Standards, Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Role of Standards, Certification, and Energy Management in Climate Change Mitigation Speaker(s): Aimee McKane Date: March 18, 2008 - 12:30pm Location: 90-3122 The industrial sector represents more than one third of both global primary energy use and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. In developing countries, the portion of the energy supply consumed by the industrial sector is frequently in excess of 50% and can create tension between economic development goals and a constrained energy supply. Further, countries with an emerging and rapidly expanding industrial infrastructure have a particular opportunity to increase their competitiveness by applying energy-efficient best practices from the outset in new industrial

444

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Agency/Company /Organization: Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sector: Energy Focus Area: Conventional Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Industry, Transportation, Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.nwcouncil.org/energy/grac/20090130_Supply%20Curves_NWPCC_FINAL.pdf Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves Screenshot References: Selected GHG Emission Supply Curves[1] Background "The ECL supply curve model includes data on potential emission reductions for approximately 60 separate technology options. It allows the examination of multiple scenarios involving the inclusion or exclusion of technology

446

DOE Strengthens Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Strengthens Public Registry to Track Greenhouse Gas Emissions April 17, 2006 - 10:20am Addthis Announces Revised Guidelines for U.S. Companies to Report and Register Reductions WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced revised guidelines for the department's Voluntary Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program, known as "1605 (b)" that encourage broader reporting of emissions and sequestration by utilities, and industries, as well as small businesses and institutions. The revised guidelines strengthen the existing public registry for emissions and sequestration data and introduce new methods for U.S. businesses and institutions to calculate entity-wide emission reductions that contribute to the President's goal of substantially

447

People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asia Asia » People's Republic of China People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have more than doubled 2000 alone. At 1.92 billion metric tons of carbon in 2008, the People's Republic of China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. Even with the reported decline in Chinese emissions from 1997 to 1999, China's industrial emissions of CO2 have grown phenomenally since 1950, when China stood tenth among nations based on annual fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. From 1970 to 1997, China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions grew at an annual rate of

448

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

449

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Derivation of average cost of emission reduction by blending?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend is, ?+ ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect to unblended

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Industrial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Industrial Dataset Summary Description The Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Database is a collection of all the publicly available data from energy efficiency assessments conducted by IACs at small and medium-sized industrial facilities. Source Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Centers Date Released September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords assessment energy efficiency Industrial manufacturing small and medium-sized Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon copy_of_iac_database.xls (xls, 28.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Standards Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Daily Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

451

Low Grade Waste Heat Driven Desalination and SO2 Scrubbing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 15% of the electricity required to produce aluminum is lost as waste heat ... An Overview of Energy Consumption and Waste Generation in the Recovery of...

452

Bauxite Residue Use to Remove SO2 from Gas Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

453

Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact More Documents & Publications Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department...

454

Update on Enhanced Mercury Capture by SO2 Controls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the interim results of two projects that focus on understanding and enhancing mercury capture by wet gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first project is collecting data from bench scale experiments to determine the reactions and kinetics governing the fate of oxidized memory absorbed by wet FGD liquors. The second project is a 200-MW-scale demonstration of a low-temperature mercury oxidation catalyst at Lower Colorado River Authority's (LCRA's) Fayette Power Project.

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Design of oil consumption measuring system to determine the effects of evolving oil sump composition over time on diesel engine performance and emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automotive industry is currently struggling because of the increasingly stricter emissions standards that will take effect in the near future. Diesel engine emissions are of particular interest because they are still ...

Ortiz-Soto, Elliott (Elliott A.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development (SESD), Secretariat of Industry Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, - Industrial Processes

458

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) Annual Emission Fees (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Fees Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Renewable Operating Permit (ROP) is required by Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. The ROP program clarifies the requirements that apply to a facility that emits air contaminants. Any facility in Michigan

459

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

460

Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industrial Partnerships Office 6/13 Richard Rankin Director----Roger Werne Deputy Director-----Yvonne King Administrator Nina Potter Manager Intellectual Property

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

462

Search - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) 423-8988 Operated by Lawrence Livermore ...

463

Construction Industry Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Translates a CIS/2 (CIMsteel Integration Standards) file into a 3D interactive VRML model of a steel structure or an IFC (Industry Foundation Classes ...

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

464

Technologies - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) 423-8988

465

OpenEI - Industrial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by...

466

Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23.6 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per capita in 2006. The industrial sector (agriculture is excluded) is responsible for 28.7 percent of the GHG emissions in the U.S. However, the U.S. industrial sector has numerous economically viable opportunities to reduce energy use and GHG emissions. Energy efficiency, including new clean technologies, plays a significant role in increasing productivity and reducing energy intensity, and thus emissions. Increasing energy efficiency in industrial processes is central to addressing climate change issues in the industrial sector. This paper describes the energy-efficiency programs, methodologies, and technologies that can economically lead to significant GHG reductions in the industrial sector. The paper also discusses the impacts of climate change policies and programs to the application of advanced low-carbon industrial technologies.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

468

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech, though the 2020s is a likely turning point for both emission trajectories. Both emission pathways must meet all announced and planned policies, targets and non-fossil generation targets, or an even wider efficiency gap will exist. The savings potential under Max Tech varies by sector, but the industrial sector appears to hold the largest energy savings and emission reduction potential. The primary source of savings is from electricity rather than fuel, and electricity savings are magnified by power sector decarbonization through increasing renewable generation and coal generation efficiency improvement. In order to achieve the maximum energy savings and emission reduction potential, efficiency improvements and technology switching must be undertaken across demand sectors as well as in the growing power sector. From an economic perspective, the cost of conserved energy analysis indicates that nearly all measures for the iron and steel and cement industry are cost-effective. All 23 efficiency measures analyzed for the cement industry are cost-effective, with combined CO2 emission reduction potential of 448 Mt CO2. All of the electricity savings measures in the iron and steel industry are cost-effective, but the cost-effective savings potential for fuel savings measures is slightly lower than total technical savings potential. The total potential savings from these measures confirm the magnitude of savings in the scenario models, and illustrate the remaining efficiency gap in the cement and iron and steel industries.

Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

470

The potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential potential for avoided emissions from photovoltaic electricity in the United States Pei Zhai a, * , Peter Larsen a, b , Dev Millstein a , Surabi Menon a , Eric Masanet c a Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA b Management Science & Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA c McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 29 April 2012 Accepted 16 August 2012 Available online 29 September 2012 Keywords: Photovoltaics Emissions Energy model United States a b s t r a c t This study evaluates avoided emissions potential of CO 2 , SO 2 and NO x assuming a 10% penetration level of photovoltaics (PV) in ten selected U.S. states. We estimate avoided emissions using an hourly energy system simulation model, EnergyPLAN. Avoided

471

The Role of Hydropower Reservoirs in Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent publications of measurements and analyses of reservoir greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have sparked debate about the carbon neutrality of hydropower. This report describes the results of two initial tasks of a multiyear study to assess the importance of carbon cycling and GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs and operations in the United States. The risks this issue presents to the U.S. hydropower industry are discussed, and a plan to resolve uncertainties is presented. Throughout this report, r...

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

472

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Greenhouse Gas Emissions | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

473

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of the March 1992 `Recent Developments` section of Nuexco. Specific issues mentioned are: (1) closure of Yankee Rowe, (2) steam-generator tube plugging at Trojan, (3) laser enrichment in South Africa, (4) the US uranium industry, (5) planning for two nuclear units in Taiwan, and (6) the establishment of a Czech/French joint venture.

NONE

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Geothermal industry assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

476

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match "In fundamental research, we want to know everything. Industry wants to know enough to answer a question." Research Contact: Mike Crawford September 2011, Written by Deborah Counce Mike Crawford and Souleymane Diallo Mike Crawford of Dupont (right) and Souleymane Diallo, instrument scientist for the Backscattering Spectrometer at SNS, prepare a material sample for an experiment on the instrument. Industrial users are starting to eye the potential of neutron science for solving problems that can't be solved in any other way. At the same time, the SNS and HFIR neutron science facilities at ORNL are exploring ways to woo such users and to make a match of it, to the benefit of both.

477

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emissions emissions Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for emissions. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords emissions New Zealand projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2010 New Zealand emissions outlook (xls, 1.2 MiB)

480

High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial so2 emissions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

482

Mercury Emissions Data Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the visual materials included in presentations given at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina on April 3, 2002. Participants included representatives from EPRI, DOE, RMB Consulting & Research, and EERC. The MACT Working Group gave a presentation on "Variability in Hg Emissions Based on SCEM Data." The visuals in the report are a set of graphs documenting results of mercury emissions over time, using semi-continuous emissions monitor (SCEM) data. The EPA Utility Working Group gave a ...

2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

Greenhouse Gas Emission Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... climate change as a serious problem and that greenhouse gas (GHG ... models to determine the baselines of GHG emissions and the effect of GHG ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

484

SF6 Emissions Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emissions Overview Joanna Eckstein and Penny Avery Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned...

485

Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Others wanting to learn more about greenhouse gas emissions and their reduction. About the ... based on ensuring the sustainability of finite natural resources.

486

Supporting sustainability with software - an industrial perspective (keynote)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supporting sustainability with software is often summed up in the expression ??Green IT?? and directly relates to the reduction of CO2 emissions and energy used by IT. The amount of CO2 used in the IT industry covers 2\\% of the overall CO2 ...

Frank-Dieter Clesle

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

488

NETL: Emissions Characterization - CMU Emissions Characterization Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Emissions Characterization Study Source Emissions Characterization Study The emissions characterization study is being performed in conjunction with the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study [PDF-744KB], a larger effort that includes ambient measurements and atmospheric modeling of the Pittsburgh region. The main objectives of this portion of the study are: To achieve advanced characterization of the PM in the Pittsburgh region. Measurements include the PM size, surface, volume, and mass distribution; chemical composition as a function of size and on a single particle basis; temporal and spatial variability. To obtain accurate current fingerprints of the major primary PM sources in the Pittsburgh region using traditional filter-based sampling and state-of-the-art techniques such as dilution sampling and single particle analysis using mass spectroscopy and LIBS.

489

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

490

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

491

CANCELED: Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency - the Role of Standards,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANCELED: Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency - the Role of Standards, CANCELED: Trends in Industrial Energy Efficiency - the Role of Standards, Certification, and Energy Management in Climate Change Mitigation Speaker(s): Aimee McKane Date: January 31, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELED. WE MAY RESCHEDULE IT SOON. The industrial sector represents more than one third of both global primary energy use and energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. In developing countries, the portion of the energy supply consumed by the industrial sector is frequently in excess of 50% and can create tension between economic development goals and a constrained energy supply. Further, countries with an emerging and rapidly expanding industrial infrastructure have a particular opportunity to increase their competitiveness by applying

492

Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) Air Emissions Reduction Assistance Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State of Iowa may provide financial assistance in the form of loans

493

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

494

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Climate Policies Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

495

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Act (Maryland) Reduction Act (Maryland) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires the State to reduce statewide

496

Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

Zohner, Steven K

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

Lacombe, Romain H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Dynamics of Implementation of Mitigating Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions from Commercial Aviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO2 emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

Kar, Rahul

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Dynamics of implementation of mitigating measures to reduce CO? emissions from commercial aviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO? emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

Kar, Rahul, 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z