National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for industrial so2 emissions

  1. Analysis of Strategies for Multiple Emissions from Electric Power SO2, NOX, CO2, Mercury and RPS

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee, the Energy Information Administration prepared an initial report that focused on the impacts of reducing power sector NOx, SO2, and CO2 emissions. The current report extends the earlier analysis to add the impacts of reducing power sector mercury emissions and introducing renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements.

  2. Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: SO2, Nox, CO2

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report responds to a request received from Senator David McIntosh on June 29, 2000 to analyze the impacts on energy consumers and producers of coordinated strategies to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide at U.S. power plants.

  3. EVALUATION OF AEROSOL EMISSIONS DOWNSTREAM OF AN AMMONIA-BASED SO2 SCRUBBER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2002-04-01

    Depending on the size and type of boiler, the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required specific reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. To meet these requirements, SO{sub 2} reduction strategies have included installing scrubbing technology, switching to a more expensive low-sulfur coal, or purchasing SO{sub 2} allowances. It is expected that over the next 10 years there will be an increase in the price of low-sulfur coals, but that higher-sulfur coal costs will remain the same. Technologies must be strongly considered that allow the use of high-sulfur fuels while at the same time meeting current and future SO{sub 2} emission limits. One such technology is the ammonia based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) (NH{sub 3}-based FGD) system manufactured by Marsulex Environmental Technologies (MET). The MET scrubber is a patented NH{sub 3}-based FGD process that efficiently converts SO{sub 2} (>95%) into a fertilizer product, ammonium sulfate ([NH{sub 4}]{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). A point of concern for the MET technology, as well as other FGD systems, is the emission of sulfuric acid/SO{sub 3} aerosols that could result in increased opacity at the stack. This is a direct result of firing high-sulfur fuels that naturally generate more SO{sub 3} than do low-sulfur coals. SO{sub 3} is formed during the coal combustion process. SO{sub 3} is converted to gaseous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by homogeneous condensation, leading to a submicron acid fume that is very difficult to capture in a dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The condensed acid can also combine with the fly ash in the duct and scale the duct wall, potentially resulting in corrosion of both metallic and nonmetallic surfaces. Therefore, SO{sub 3} in flue gas can have a significant impact on the performance of coal-fired utility boilers, air heaters, and ESPs. In addition to corrosion problems, excess SO{sub 3} emissions can result in plume opacity problems. Thus the Energy & Environmental Research

  4. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  5. Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994...

  6. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, by Industry, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions > Total Table Total Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Manufacturing Industries, 1994 Carbon Emissions (million...

  7. Evaluation of simultaneous SO2/NOx control technology. Final report, October 1990-May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, K.R.; Hansen, W.F.

    1993-09-01

    The report gives results of work concentrating on characterizing three process operational parameters of a technology that combines sorbent injection and selective non-catalytic reduction for simultaneous sulfur dioxide/nitrogen oxide (SO2/NOx) removal from coal-fired industrial boilers: injection temperature, sorbent type, and reductant/pollutant stoichiometric ratio. Up to 80% reduction of SO2 and NOx at reactant/pollutant stoichiometric ratios of 2 and 1.5, respectively, was achieved. SO2 emission reductions from slurry injection were enhanced moderately when compared with dry sorbent injection methods, possibly caused by sorbent fracturing to smaller, more reactive particles. Emissions from ammonia (NH3) slip (unreacted nitrogen-based reducing agent) and nitrous oxide (N2O) formation were reduced in comparison with other published results, while similar NOx reductions were obtained.

  8. Controlling NOx emission from industrial sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, R.K.; Nueffer, W.; Grano, D.; Khan, S.; Staudt, J.E.; Jozewicz, W.

    2005-07-01

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx Budget Program, and the NOx SIP Call rulemakings. In addition to these regulations, the recent Interstate Air Quality Rulemaking proposal and other bills in the Congress are focusing on additional reductions of NOx. Industrial combustion sources accounted for about 18016 of NOx emissions in the United States in 2000 and constituted the second largest emitting source category within stationary sources, only behind electric utility sources. Based on these data, reduction of NOx emissions from industrial combustion sources is an important consideration in efforts undertaken to address the environmental concerns associated with NOx. This paper discusses primary and secondary NOx control technologies applicable to various major categories of industrial sources. The sources considered in this paper include large boilers, furnaces and fired heaters, combustion turbines, large IC engines, and cement kilns. For each source category considered in this paper, primary NOx controls are discussed first, followed by a discussion of secondary NOx controls.

  9. Curbing Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Industrial Boilers in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Price, Lynn K; Lu, Hongyou; Liu, Xu; Tsen, Katherine; Xiangyang, Wei; Yunpeng, Zhang; Jian, Guan; Rui, Hou; Junfeng, Zhang; Yuqun, Zhuo; Shumao, Xia; Yafeng, Han; Manzhi, Liu

    2015-10-28

    China’s industrial boiler systems consume 700 million tons of coal annually, accounting for 18% of the nation’s total coal consumption. Together these boiler systems are one of the major sources of China’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, producing approximately 1.3 gigatons (Gt) of carbon dioxide (CO2) annually. These boiler systems are also responsible for 33% and 27% of total soot and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions in China, respectively, making a substantial contribution to China’s local environmental degradation. The Chinese government - at both the national and local level - is taking actions to mitigate the significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air pollution related to the country’s extensive use of coal-fired industrial boilers. The United States and China are pursuing a collaborative effort under the U.S.-China Climate Change Working Group to conduct a comprehensive assessment of China’s coal-fired industrial boilers and to develop an implementation roadmap that will improve industrial boiler efficiency and maximize fuel-switching opportunities. Two Chinese cities – Ningbo and Xi’an – have been selected for the assessment. These cities represent coastal areas with access to liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports and inland regions with access to interprovincial natural gas pipelines, respectively.

  10. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program, which helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Meeting State Carbon Emission Requirements through Industrial Energy Efficiency: The Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This case study describes the Southern California Gas Company’s Industrial End User program that helps large industrial customers increase energy efficiency and reduce energy use and GHG emissions.

  12. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  13. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. W. Allendorf; D. K. Ottesen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1998-11-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom of line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  14. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  15. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, V. V.; Davies, R. W.; Holbery, J.

    2006-04-01

    This report analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities.

  16. One-Dimensional SO2 Predictions for Duct Injection

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-10-05

    DIAN1D is a one-dimensional model that predicts SO2 absorption by slurry droplets injected into a flue gas stream with two-fluid atomizers. DIANUI is an interactive user interface for DIAN1D. It prepares the input file for DIAN1D from plant design specifications and process requirements.

  17. Enhanced SO2 Concentrations Observed over Northern India: Role of Long-range Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallik, C.; Lal, S.; Naja, M.; Chand, Duli; Venkataramani, S.; Joshi, H.; Pant, P.

    2013-01-17

    Volcanic emissions and coal burning are among the major sources of SO2 over the continental environment. In this study, we show episodes of long-range transport of volcanic SO2 from Africa to Northern India using satellite observations. Monthly averaged SO2 from OMI were of the order of 0.6-0.9 DU during November, 2008 over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), which far exceeded background values (<0.3 DU) retrieved from observations across different locations over North India during 2005-2010. The columnar SO2 loadings were much higher on November 6 over most of the IGP and even exceeded 6 DU, a factor of 10 higher than background levels at some places. These enhanced SO2 levels were, however, not reciprocated in satellite derived NO2 or CO columns, indicating transport from a non-anthropogenic source of SO2. Backward trajectory analysis revealed strong winds in the free troposphere, which originated from the Dalaffilla volcanic eruption over the Afar region of Ethiopia during November 4-6, 2008. Wind streams and stable atmospheric conditions were conducive to the long-range transport of volcanic plume into the IGP. As most of the local aerosols over IGP region are below 3 km, a well separated layer at 4-5 km is observed from CALIPSO, most likely as a result of this transport. Apart from known anthropogenic sources, the additional transport of volcanic SO2 over the IGP region would have implications to air quality and radiation balance over this region.

  18. The effect of SO2 on mineral carbonation in batch tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    CO2 sequestration is a key element of future emission-free fossil-fueled power plants. Other constituents of flue gas must also be captured and rendered innocuous. Contemporary power plants remove SOx from exit gases, but next-generation plants may simultaneously treat CO2, SOx, and other pollutants. Pioneering tests at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center investigated the combined treatment of CO2 and SO2 in a mineral-carbonation process. SO2 was removed from the gas stream, and as a small fraction of the total volume of mineralizing gas, it did not inhibit the carbonation reaction. The results indicate that this approach to CO2 sequestration could be used to treat multiple pollutants.

  19. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and

  20. Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March ...

  1. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",123615,113429,135133,186320,213725,288261,368728,466093,474527,472326,424044,468920,460025,479716,532836,567267,598960,591936,609416,554692,537679,573035,537827,532016,534873 "Natural

  2. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",1231,659,1067,2192,1784,1685,1521,3276,3458,3317,2740,2961,2100,5191,31138,26808,28804,28716,30315,28932,27401,36452,38256,34966,35118 "Natural

  3. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",99931,90222,83823,91500,119354,176269,216052,211528,216609,226357,259650,264498,286311,297404,417500,460041,508105,512033,464520,430505,458841,468879,540689,522031,480864 "Natural

  4. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",70007,90671,111585,201596,232586,271800,530275,680050,682504,642737,577847,569995,545792,527893,537663,539691,547446,536134,498669,508871,581609,714951,793006,802209,887372 "Natural

  5. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",187419,203816,190049,228280,255068,261594,379321,332295,339864,386689,422783,406276,405000,442941,533290,806603,915074,927928,828237,722001,838330,856101,888651,883212,931708 "Natural

  6. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",296237,272707,285211,381921,423894,422362,611096,728833,834982,883283,876816,817139,788519,806646,901203,970849,1004788,1031517,985754,929710,1254199,1273057,1252700,1466280,1403502 "Natural

  7. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",199709,185073,183247,241651,265949,247826,338318,370877,418872,490422,507490,522200,471904,535303,584707,658445,624913,669016,642197,676214,895584,983464,893411,871431,902063 "Natural

  8. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",63526,68216,73702,75879,71513,64087,68625,71467,89748,90139,96242,95639,97918,95986,101453,112255,109681,117039,94470,97854,126282,117281,110572,107938,99934 "Natural

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",3229,10397,11717,23520,37512,33573,42205,42039,39260,47569,45178,52634,58508,60644,69422,70840,70629,78943,69863,78900,70225,77311,93718,104570,100041 "Natural

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",156939,200702,203862,230553,252712,294302,362921,358465,346823,362690,354593,369039,358670,370730,396468,406682,453444,439598,409709,388720,425868,392676,374114,405484,400043 "Natural

  11. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",90609,77393,37116,43057,54267,40125,65730,67796,75871,66365,68531,68116,66065,69615,88588,78278,78763,76762,94981,82425,77122,89686,94690,97996,106348 "Natural

  12. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",149428,157176,149531,208591,255793,258025,278644,276798,279119,293134,292645,280869,247379,239803,214011,264723,301916,318865,368301,348474,537257,481519,683418,746419,794530 "Natural

  13. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",21804,21923,26957,48632,56528,51264,75552,102252,110055,133084,174467,205767,213903,217822,245827,243631,282135,265797,169786,235651,245005,257386,300430,290808,298461 "Natural

  14. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",328298,314945,360893,649158,643705,664660,760207,1022707,1037604,1157246,1150521,1250636,1193241,1191814,1258662,1318060,1426879,1462973,1485827,1209189,2085965,2172699,2204132,2247165,2213291 "Natural

  15. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",74880,76673,78406,95907,89405,100412,108043,108024,114991,112210,108869,117506,115993,110039,102417,110454,109339,116982,114705,122615,106452,118616,118121,113826,109400 "Natural

  16. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",280590,262221,259319,338397,419602,635141,851401,958827,903023,1096135,996972,979095,949261,1041860,1113082,1049810,1118338,1159444,1158512,1191338,1209571,1240828,1266369,1269116,1288932 "Natural

  17. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",30379,35219,54683,80578,104316,104355,165245,177379,226662,226553,228180,216716,210658,216996,215214,230523,223531,207801,218040,191445,205896,195251,171280,177034,182269 "Natural

  18. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",334864,364291,337533,430430,458950,448084,480396,494970,576589,592090,585566,632119,612135,581623,594287,721440,716364,718321,683539,636769,563557,619731,562293,544624,534050 "Natural

  19. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",55972,56438,49857,83949,117386,111860,136911,189547,190542,223296,200877,220539,279910,231117,277674,289507,268063,278805,263005,276636,220087,238627,227184,226261,213816 "Natural

  20. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",102380,93865,91218,107963,116023,184338,315497,388675,470639,483344,492024,558143,526538,681326,625874,713793,695681,701570,694797,630859,1091442,1045752,1102087,1068857,965899 "Natural

  1. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",3425770,3537968,3625314,4890928,5468885,6100901,8103586,9247549,9774485,10470741,10402086,10679025,10787045,10918087,11761081,12624901,13241327,13459993,13019310,12332252,14768599,15258782,15498937,15696398,15741783 "Natural

  2. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",75942,74612,77622,73584,67035,68211,73160,71833,72868,65726,78479,71176,70031,74549,76060,78823,77315,86718,97033,84291,72229,66566,70208,70953,73346 "Natural gas",24,32,43,31,32,28,24,20,22,26,21,32,23,11,21,21,18,18,15,67,17,17,18,17,17

  3. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",2678,2913,2945,2496,2411,2528,2657,2436,2377,2224,2352,2003,4545,4179,12561,8368,14490,13929,13523,14632,10598,10080,10152,10210,15458 "Natural gas",13,10,10,11,11,11,12,11,15,13,15,9,10,10,13,11,13,11,11,9,12,12,10,12,12

  4. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",22489,23613,21336,32674,36693,36140,48338,56547,49229,52823,60439,69394,70766,72877,74807,78901,105738,130165,124044,124899,142176,134872,131544,129444,125036 "Natural gas",74,79,70,55,67,80,83,86,73,64,79,58,51,58,36,17,17,9,3,7,8,6,10,6,7

  5. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",28407,39974,42818,46853,49433,47566,60452,64793,64512,63888,64999,77596,91396,93908,90489,93098,100573,101386,94727,96615,107836,99745,101864,98418,102580 "Natural gas",26,27,26,25,26,31,33,35,32,30,26,24,21,24,17,12,11,11,9,11,6,2,1,1,1

  6. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",908,770,7247,503,1311,1313,3007,2737,2879,2816,2847,3419,5880,12228,21148,826,6824,12175,11335,11392,9645,9330,10225,11777,12265 "Natural gas",29,29,34,32,28,19,15,19,23,17,13,9,20,9,10,8,7,6,2,4,6,3,3,4,4

  7. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Natural gas",0,0,0,0," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","

  8. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",792,2209,1435,1287,1387,1663,1680,1060,1015,1274,1572,1475,2154,1433,12585,3354,4019,4820,4805,4357,3617,3211,2070,278,86 "Natural gas",403,373,325,426,95,121,93,89,89,110,122,127,106,76,902,582,579,537,455,588,53,50,52,51,49

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",2094,3029,2301,1616,3801,1603,3358,4111,1689,1787,4238,3737,3116,987,2999,3506,3816,3005,3148,3177,5267,6079,6088,2978,6107 "Natural gas",6,8,4,2,3,2,3,3,2,2,3,3,1,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,2,2,1,1,1

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",72805,92466,103353,107646,114216,99306,163998,147940,144691,148303,148788,152375,147800,153599,171226,170930,190205,168878,170396,182534,198945,218025,209712,224123,201125 "Natural gas",11,10,11,6,6,2,4,3,3,2,7,1,2,3,3,3,4,6,4,3,3,3,2,1,1

  11. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",31498,29975,32930,39191,44555,50230,93495,112481,108414,123188,114657,131419,124338,113912,112947,115880,117443,108221,116046,99115,71337,70094,65762,76140,85243 "Natural gas",4,6,17,6,7,6,6,2,2,2,1,2,3,4,2,64,4,1,2,6,6,4,3,10,7

  12. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",559,540,292,401,546,476,1538,2006,2016,1840,1726,1423,1117,1593,6269,2349,2978,4015,3934,4090,4323,4505,4521,4465,5574 "Natural gas",8,8,11,13,14,14,13,13,12,15,20,22,23,22,7,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

  13. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",36332,37512,40857,51044,47095,214124,244867,278286,282500,284301,287448,272978,265412,259499,262294,261255,272677,254326,251603,229197,233251,251845,243295,238056,265492 "Natural gas",12,12,40,17,4,6,6,4,4,4,3,8,4,3,3,3,2,2,2,2,7,3,4,6,6

  14. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",34022,30926,31068,52422,57174,66187,83399,85598,88204,89899,95334,91757,91775,77334,102028,108278,104657,109711,101136,97511,129370,125407,106236,90988,105228 "Natural gas",7,15,18,9,11,31,14,7,4,6,4,3,3,3,4,3,3,1,1,1,3,2,3,3,1

  15. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",14254,16726,13490,16901,20469,20711,19989,22596,19849,19767,20971,17185,19797,30725,23733,25315,24694,22706,20068,36432,20996,20385,22070,20386,17702 "Natural gas",0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,1,1

  16. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",63940,66824,63689,74955,71501,77133,76598,69205,71725,73730,74657,69360,68130,70701,60647,61435,58084,62785,65736,61065,56657,60780,53652,53558,51742 "Natural gas",0,0,2,0,0,0,1,1,6,3,0,0,0,2,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,1,1

  17. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",10164,7366,4640,5225,7841,7856,9315,8488,9169,53291,54356,51433,49197,49926,52960,48612,49659,50086,52898,50190,52644,52075,56550,54099,53261 "Natural gas",52,57,58,49,53,60,55,63,53,45,37,28,21,97,41,12,20,13,18,13,15,12,11,6,7

  18. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",2166,2689,1694,24041,36405,32333,36146,40115,38096,41306,37066,33607,38594,44473,46296,39840,40221,49137,41011,40508,37609,39548,42845,33246,41324 "Natural gas",8,8,16,15,13,11,14,7,11,10,7,15,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0," ","

  19. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",2395,2333,2866,4464,15060,12671,38115,50089,61099,69561,51500,50631,48855,50013,80835,63535,61420,73406,67588,58450,50184,56327,55383,57266,69123 "Natural gas",33,37,73,79,51,32,29,23,25,22,14,29,23,33,40,41,36,41,43,51,49,46,40,30,22

  20. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",12014,17706,16538,17799,16546,19273,22214,26645,31168,30757,38493,51035,50982,62371,69031,73913,81488,82737,78595,75755,63018,57673,58306,50395,59574 "Natural gas",43,23,22,23,22,21,20,17,18,9,8,9,10,14,11,12,14,11,12,168,9,8,7,8,9

  1. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",43936,51793,63584,81442,127715,123709,246364,392943,482961,516957,488210,481288,481923,473655,497039,497620,532992,556780,522206,439975,415724,472747,424519,374981,378382 "Natural gas",62,54,43,36,21,9,8,8,4,7,4,8,8,4,2,2,2,1,1,2,1,2,1,1,1

  2. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",52698,56827,87164,94480,127427,132855,136415,137982,130699,138294,150488,141328,141498,156233,153590,191764,195793,178826,178368,210373,152684,147327,146371,189694,146402 "Natural gas",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1

  3. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",7425,13959,11463,13100,15640,11050,11305,14027,8697,12104,12828,13522,12580,18027,14858,17160,13840,7342,6383,6143,16823,14892,16478,10708,7280 "Natural gas",46,52,39,27,52,63,69,44,32,34,30,28,23,28,24,18,19,10,10,7,9,6,6,4,2

  4. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Natural Gas",10,11,19,20,18,17,14,15,15,13,12,18,17,19,15,14,18,14,14,10,11,11,11,7,3 "Natural gas",2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0

  5. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",13839,15332,12825,11249,13129,11929,13720,9194,11957,10723,14375,12596,25263,14439,14224,26837,24162,26742,16418,35460,33368,30740,31866,32623,31176 "Natural gas",1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Other","

  6. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",80454,78177,89276,144447,143016,130005,234674,265029,290290,297970,341496,370895,374163,396595,500011,533235,563085,614328,610082,570892,849088,895318,843606,796681,838243 "Natural gas",4,7,20,7,4,1,1,0,0,0,0,2,1,1,3,1,2,1,1,2,1,1,3,1,2

  7. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",23525,23545,21953,24864,28075,32614,24593,27565,37366,34547,37057,35348,32849,35716,33918,30837,33609,33601,32715,33485,29978,32977,30210,28162,31653 "Natural gas",22,17,17,12,12,15,18,19,8,1,3,6,3,3,2,1,1,1,1,3,2,1,1,1,0

  8. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",3362,2820,1690,1695,3221,4203,3123,2707,2256,3945,7475,9309,19572,68959,85701,89418,76615,65080,80288,55300,71156,73657,73826,63973,62933 "Natural gas",36,43,21,19,41,46,43,33,30,29,23,23,22,43,41,17,15,12,19,18,17,12,7,2,2

  9. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Coal",45629,49564,48004,85490,74270,83774,91179,91675,92333,96307,92960,92260,102300,94749,87414,106527,115147,107547,105501,113255,94338,82028,85538,84633,108365 "Natural gas",2,1,2,3,1,2,1,2,2,0,0,2,172,3,2,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1

  10. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  11. Assessment of the feasibility of reducing emissions from gasoline and LPG industrial equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bekken, M.; Wood, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    In 1994, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) approved a State Implementation Plan (SIP) to bring California`s South Coast Air Basin into compliance with federal ozone standards. The plan includes the adoption of emission controls for previously un(der)regulated off-road vehicles and equipment. Off-road industrial equipment in the 25 to 175 horsepower range has been designed to meet power and fuel economy priorities, with little effort going to emission reductions. California`s plan requires substantial emission reductions for such equipment. The application of catalysts or other emission control technologies to spark-ignited industrial equipment can feasibly and cost-effectively achieve the emission reductions required in the SIP. The paper discusses off-road catalyst application, availability, and packaging. In addition, other technologies to reduce emissions are addressed, including engine, fuel system, and exhaust system modifications, and the use of alternate fuels. Anticipated costs are also discussed. There is good reason to presume that spark-ignited industrial equipment will be able to achieve the required emission reductions in the time frame indicated in the SIP.

  12. Nonferrous industry particulate emissions: source category report. Final report, June 1983-August 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, M.; Minden, A.

    1986-12-01

    The report gives results of the development of particulate-emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the nonferrous industry. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from nonferrous plants, the data were summarized and rated in terms of reliability. Size-specific emission factors were developed from these data for the major processes used in the manufacture of nonferrous metals. A detailed process description is presented with emphasis on factors affecting the generation of emissions. There were replacements for Sections 7.1 (Primary Aluminum Production), 7.3 (Primary Copper Smelting), 7.6 (Primary Lead Smelting), 7.7 (Primary Zinc Smelting), and 7.11 (Secondary Lead Smelting) of EPA report AP-42. A Compilation of Air Pollutant Emissions Factors, was prepared, containing the size-specific emission factors developed during the program.

  13. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Emission type", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990 "Sulfur dioxide (short tons)" "Natural Gas",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Natural gas",38,37,26,36,40,40,39,24,39,46,47,41,42,47,52,42,45,47,46,44,13,10,9,10,8 "Petroleum",32,34,26,58,2,2,1,11,8,23,25,28,21,55,137,97,127,50,17,35,17,3,2,0,14

  14. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact | Department of Energy Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact Docket No. EO-05-01: Tables showing a summary of monitored SO2 concentrations during periods of highest impact as well as ERMOD modeling results for SO2 scenarios. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods of Highest Impact (285.92 KB) More Documents & Publications Answer of

  15. Post-harvest carbon emissions and sequestration in southern United States forest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Row, C.

    1997-12-31

    Whether the forest industries in the southern United States are net emitters or sequesters of carbon from the atmosphere depends on one`s viewpoint. In the short-term, the solid-wood industries-lumber, plywood, and panels--appear to sequester more carbon than is in the fossil fuels they use for processing. The paper industries, however, emit more carbon from fossil fuels than they sequester in the pulp and paper they manufacture. This viewpoint is quite limited. If one considers the life-cycles of solid-wood and paper products from seedlings to landfill, these industries sequester more carbon than they emit from burning fossil fuels. These industries also generate large amounts of energy by replacing fossil fuels with biofuels from processing residues, and wood-based products produce more energy from incineration and landfill gases. Use of the carbon in these biofuels in effect keeps fossil fuel carbon in the ground, considering that at least that amount of carbon would be emitted in producing alternative materials. Another way of looking the emission balances is that wood-based materials, pound for pound or use for use, are the most {open_quotes}carbon efficient{close_quotes} group of major industrial materials. 5 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources into useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers.

  17. Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

    2007-12-03

    We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

  18. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

  19. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-15

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  20. Pollutant emissions reduction and performance optimization of an industrial radiant tube burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scribano, Gianfranco; Solero, Giulio; Coghe, Aldo

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation performed upon a single-ended self-recuperative radiant tube burner fuelled by natural gas in the non-premixed mode, which is used in the steel industry for surface treatment. The main goal of the research activity was a systematic investigation of the burner aimed to find the best operating conditions in terms of optimum equivalence ratio, thermal power and lower pollutant emissions. The analysis, which focused on the main parameters influencing the thermal efficiency and pollutant emissions at the exhaust (NO{sub x} and CO), has been carried out for different operating conditions of the burner: input thermal powers from 12.8 up to 18kW and equivalence ratio from 0.5 (very lean flame) to 0.95 (quasi-stoichiometric condition). To significantly reduce pollutant emissions ensuring at the same time the thermal requirements of the heating process, it has been developed a new burner configuration, in which a fraction of the exhaust gases recirculates in the main combustion region through a variable gap between the burner efflux and the inner flame tube. This internal recirculation mechanism (exhaust gases recirculation, EGR) has been favoured through the addition of a pre-combustion chamber terminated by a converging nozzle acting as a mixing/ejector to promote exhaust gas entrainment into the flame tube. The most important result of this solution was a decrease of NO{sub x} emissions at the exhaust of the order of 50% with respect to the original burner geometry, for a wide range of thermal power and equivalence ratio. (author)

  1. Low Emissions Burner Technology for Metal Processing Industry using Byproducts and Biomass Derived Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Ajay; Taylor, Robert

    2013-09-30

    path forward to utilize both fossil and alternative liquid fuels in the same combustion system. In particular, experiments show that straight VO can be cleanly combusted without the need for chemical processing or preheating steps, which can result in significant economic and environmental benefits. Next, low-emission combustion of glycerol/methane was achieved by utilizing FB injector to yield fine droplets of highly viscous glycerol. Heat released from methane combustion further improves glycerol pre-vaporization and thus its clean combustion. Methane addition results in an intensified reaction zone with locally high temperatures near the injector exit. Reduction in methane flow rate elongates the reaction zone, which leads to higher CO emissions and lower NOx emissions. Similarly, higher air to liquid (ALR) mass ratio improves atomization and fuel pre-vaporization and shifts the flame closer to the injector exit. In spite of these internal variations, all fuel mixes of glycerol with methane produced similar CO and NOx emissions at the combustor exit. Results show that FB concept provides low emissions with the flexibility to utilize gaseous and highly viscous liquid fuels, straight VO and glycerol, without preheating or preprocessing the fuels. Following these initial experiments in quartz combustor, we demonstrated that glycerol combustion can be stably sustained in a metal combustor. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) measurements in glycerol/methane flames resulted in flow-weighted Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) of 35 to 40 μm, depending upon the methane percentage. This study verified that lab-scale dual-fuel burner using FB injector can successfully atomize and combust glycerol and presumably other highly viscous liquid fuels at relatively low HRR (<10 kW). For industrial applications, a scaled-up glycerol burner design thus seemed feasible.

  2. Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn

    2005-06-01

    Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

  3. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surfacemore » sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  4. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Energy-Efficiency and Air-Pollutant Emissions-Reduction Opportunities for the Ammonia Industry in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Ding; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Chen, Wenying

    2015-06-01

    As one of the most energy-intensive and polluting industries, ammonia production is responsible for significant carbon dioxide (CO2) and air-pollutant emissions. Although many energy-efficiency measures have been proposed by the Chinese government to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality, lack of understanding of the cost-effectiveness of such improvements has been a barrier to implementing these measures. Assessing the costs, benefits, and cost-effectiveness of different energy-efficiency measures is essential to advancing this understanding. In this study, a bottom-up energy conservation supply curve model is developed to estimate the potential for energy savings and emissions reductions from 26 energy-efficiency measures that could be applied in China’s ammonia industry. Cost-effective implementation of these measures saves a potential 271.5 petajoules/year for fuel and 5,443 gigawatt-hours/year for electricity, equal to 14% of fuel and 14% of electricity consumed in China’s ammonia industry in 2012. These reductions could mitigate 26.7 million tonnes of CO2 emissions. This study also quantifies the co-benefits of reducing air-pollutant emissions and water use that would result from saving energy in China’s ammonia industry. This quantitative analysis advances our understanding of the cost-effectiveness of energy-efficiency measures and can be used to augment efforts to reduce energy use and environmental impacts.

  6. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  7. Benchmarking the energy efficiency of Dutch industry: An assessment of the expected effect on energy consumption and CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phylipsen, Dian; Blok, Kornelis; Worrell, Ernst; De Beer, Jeroen

    2002-06-01

    As part of its energy and climate policy the Dutch government has reached an agreement with the Dutch energy-intensive industry that is explicitly based on industry's relative energy efficiency performance. The energy efficiency of the Dutch industry is benchmarked against that of comparable industries in countries world-wide. In the agreement, industry is required to belong to the top-of-the-world in terms of energy efficiency. In return, the government refrains from implementing additional climate policies.This article assesses the potential effects of this agreement on energy consumption and CO2 emissions by comparing the current level of energy efficiency of the Dutch industry - including electricity production - to that of the most efficient countries and regions. At the current structure achieving the regional best practice level for the selected energy-intensive industries would result in a 5plus or minus 2 percent lower current primary energy consumption than the actual level. Most of the savings are expected in the petrochemical industry and in electricity generation. Avoided CO2 emissions would amount to 4 Mt CO2. A first estimate of the effect of the benchmarking agreement in 2012 suggests primary energy savings of 50-130 PJ or 5-10 Mt CO2 avoided compared to the estimated Business as Usual development (5-15 percent). This saving is smaller than what a continuation of the existing policies of Long Term Agreements would probably deliver.

  8. Production, Energy, and Carbon Emissions: A Data Profile of the Iron and Steel Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Energy-related carbon emissions in manufacturing analysis and issues related to the energy use, energy efficiency, and carbon emission indicators.

  9. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  10. Ultra-High Efficiency and Low-Emissions Combustion Technology for Manufacturing Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a transformational combustion technology for high temperature furnaces to reduce the energy intensity and carbon footprint of U.S. manufacturing industries such as steel, aluminum, glass, metal casting, and petroleum refining. A new technology based on internal and/or external Flue Gas Recirculation (FGR) along with significant enhancement in flame radiation was developed. It produces "Radiative Flameless Combustion (RFC)" and offers tremendous energy efficiency and pollutant reduction benefits over and above the now popular "flameless combustion." It will reduce the energy intensity (or fuel consumption per unit system output) by more than 50% and double the furnace productivity while significantly reducing pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions (10^3 times reduction in NOx and 10 times reduction in CO & hydrocarbons and 3 times reduction in CO2). Product quality improvements are also expected due to uniform radiation, as well as, reduction in scale/dross formation is expected because of non-oxidative atmosphere. RFC is inexpensive, easy to implement, and it was successfully tested in a laboratory-scale furnace at the University of Michigan during the course of this work. A first-ever theory with gas and particulate radiation was also developed. Numerical programs were also written to design an industrial-scale furnace. Nine papers were published (or are in the process of publication). We believe that this early stage research adequately proves the concept through laboratory experiments, modeling and computational models. All this work is presented in the published papers. Important conclusions of this work are: (1) It was proved through experimental measurements that RFC is not only feasible but a very beneficial technology. (2) Theoretical analysis of RFC was done in (a) spatially uniform strain field and (b) a planar momentum jet where the strain rate is neither prescribed nor uniform. Four important non

  11. Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River PowerPlant: Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling ... Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Letter from Elizabeth Chimento and ...

  12. Table 10 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrial Sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008," "DOEEIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December ...

  13. Table 6 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Energy and Industry...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008," "DOEEIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December ...

  14. AmeriFlux US-SO2 Sky Oaks- Old Stand

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oechel, Walt [San Diego State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SO2 Sky Oaks- Old Stand. Site Description - The Sky Oaks Old site is located near the Sky Oaks Field station, owned and operated by San Diego State University. Chaparral vegetation, associated with a Mediterranean climate, covers nearly half of the rough and rocky terrain. Precipitation is almost exclusively confined to the winter months. During the summer and early fall, hot and dry Santa Ana winds from the northeast bring desert heat to the site. A high intensity natural wildfire occurred in July of 2003. The stand age at the time of the wildfire was 80 years old, following an early wildfire poorly characterized. Following the 2003 wildfire, most native chaparral began to regrow from root stocks reaching a height of 1.0 m in 2008.

  15. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, William; Masanet, Eric; Sathaye, Jayant; Xu, Tengfang

    2012-06-15

    China’s annual cement production (i.e., 1,868 Mt) in 2010 accounted for nearly half of the world’s annual cement production in the same year. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the cement industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model, the cumulative cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Chinese cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh, and the total technical electricity saving potential is 279 TWh. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 144 Mt CO2 and the CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 161 Mt CO2. The fuel CSC model for the cement industry suggests cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 4,326 PJ which is equivalent to the total technical potential with associated CO2 emission reductions of 406 Mt CO2. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. We also developed a scenario in which instead of only implementing the international technologies in 2010-2030, we implement both international and Chinese domestic technologies during the analysis period and calculate the saving and cost of conserved energy accordingly. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese cement industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  16. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

    2000-07-01

    The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the U.S. (U.S. EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the U.S. This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then

  17. Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the US pulp and paper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

    2000-07-01

    The pulp and paper industry accounts for over 12% of total manufacturing energy use in the US (US EIA 1997a), contributing 9% to total manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions. In the last twenty-five years primary energy intensity in the pulp and paper industry has declined by an average of 1% per year. However, opportunities still exist to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in the manufacture of paper in the US This report analyzes the pulp and paper industry (Standard Industrial Code (SIC) 26) and includes a detailed description of the processes involved in the production of paper, providing typical energy use in each process step. We identify over 45 commercially available state-of-the-art technologies and measures to reduce energy use and calculate potential energy savings and carbon dioxide emissions reductions. Given the importance of paper recycling, our analysis examines two cases. Case A identifies potential primary energy savings without accounting for an increase in recycling, while Case B includes increasing paper recycling. In Case B the production volume of pulp is reduced to account for additional pulp recovered from recycling. We use a discount rate of 30% throughout our analysis to reflect the investment decisions taken in a business context. Our Case A results indicate that a total technical potential primary energy savings of 31% (1013 PJ) exists. For case A we identified a cost-effective savings potential of 16% (533 PJ). Carbon dioxide emission reductions from the energy savings in Case A are 25% (7.6 MtC) and 14% (4.4 MtC) for technical and cost-effective potential, respectively. When recycling is included in Case B, overall technical potential energy savings increase to 37% (1215 PJ) while cost-effective energy savings potential is 16%. Increasing paper recycling to high levels (Case B) is nearly cost-effective assuming a cut-off for cost-effectiveness of a simple payback period of 3 years. If this measure is included, then the

  18. International Experience with Key Program Elements of IndustrialEnergy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-SettingPrograms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-02-02

    Target-setting agreements, also known as voluntary ornegotiated agreements, have been used by a number of governments as amechanism for promoting energy efficiency within the industrial sector. Arecent survey of such target-setting agreement programs identified 23energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programsin 18 countries. International best practice related to target-settingagreement programs calls for establishment of a coordinated set ofpolicies that provide strong economic incentives as well as technical andfinancial support to participating industries. The key program elementsof a target-setting program are the target-setting process,identification of energy-saving technologies and measures usingenergy-energy efficiency guidebooks and benchmarking as well as byconducting energy-efficiency audits, development of an energy-savingsaction plan, development and implementation of energy managementprotocols, development of incentives and supporting policies, monitoringprogress toward targets, and program evaluation. This report firstprovides a description of three key target-setting agreement programs andthen describes international experience with the key program elementsthat comprise such programs using information from the three keytarget-setting programs as well as from other international programsrelated to industrial energy efficiency or GHG emissionsreductions.

  19. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  20. Coupled Physical/Chemical and Biofiltration Technologies to Reduce Air Emissions from Forest Products Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-12-31

    The research is a laboratory and bench-scale investigation of a system to concentrate and destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including hazardous air pollutants, formed from the drying of wood and the manufacture of wood board products (e.g., particle board and oriented strandboard). The approach that was investigated involved concentrating the dilute VOCs (<500 ppmv) with a physical/chemical adsorption unit, followed by the treatment of the concentrated voc stream (2,000 to 2,500 ppmv) with a biofiltration unit. The research program lasted three years, and involved three research organizations. Michigan Technological University was the primary recipient of the financial assistance, the USDA Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) and Mississippi State University (MSU) were subcontractors to MTU. The ultimate objective of this research was to develop a pilot-scale demonstration of the technology with sufficient data to provide for the design of an industrial system. No commercialization activities were included in this project.

  1. Potentials for reductions of carbon dioxide emissions of industrial sector in transitional economies -- A case study of implementation of absorption heat devices and co-generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remec, J.; Dolsak, N.

    1996-12-31

    World carbon dioxide emissions, caused by commercial energy-generation, contribute to about 57% of global warming potential. Central and East European (CEE) countries together with former USSR emitted about 25% of the world carbon dioxide emissions, predominantly because of high energy intensity of their industries and dependence on coal. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the high level of carbon dioxide emissions per unit of output, which significantly exceeds the levels of the industry in the European Union. CEE countries` most pressing environmental goal is a reduction of local air and water pollution. Therefore, when analyzing potentials for the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions in these countries, they need to concentrate on the activities which would also decrease local pollution. The paper focuses on technologies which would reduce the need for fossil fuel burning by improving energy efficiency in industry. Process industries are very energy intensive. Structure changes of the products are carried out with operations which require input and output of heat. Heat demand is usually met by combustion of fossil fuels, cold is produced with electricity. Technical potentials of absorption heat devices (AHD) and co-generation in process industry as well as their market penetration potentials are analyzed for Slovenia, one of the fastest transforming CEE economies.

  2. Monitoring atmospheric emissions from petrochemical industries using low-level solid state sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szinyei, W.J.; Kimbell, C.L. (Tracor Atlas, Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1988-01-01

    Low level solid state sensors provide an inexpensive alternative to monitoring part per billion levels of pollution over wide areas on a continuous basis. Solid state sensors such as those manufactured by Tracer Atlas for hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans are commonly applied in personnel protection applications, to monitor for and warn against high levels of certain toxic gases. Although these devices are not precision analytical instruments, with the proper configuration and electronics they can give reliable indication of the presence at the part per billion level of certain polluting gases. These sensors are sufficiently stable so that a general idea of pollutant level at any given time can be established. The configuration, operation and application of sensors sensitive to hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans are discussed in particular. Sensitivity, repeatability, and measurement range is also addressed. In low level applications, solid state sensors would be used as perimeter monitors around plants where there might be low level emissions of a pollutant gas that would need to be monitored on a continuous basis. Connecting a distributed group of sensors to an intelligent data gathering system such as a personal computer can allow spatial distributions in time and time weighted averages of pollutant levels to be calculated and charted.

  3. Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission intensities and line ratios from a fast neutral helium beam J-W. Ahn a͒ Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA D. Craig, b͒ G. Fiksel, and D. J. Den Hartog Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA J. K. Anderson Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA M. G.

  4. Industrial market for sulfur dioxide emission-control systems. Final report. [Forecasting to 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Under the postulated EIA medium world oil price scenario, in which oil prices are projected to rise at a real rate of 2.2% per year, coal will represent from 78 to 91% of MFBI fuel consumption by the year 2000, up from the present 16%. This increase would occur even in the absence of FUA, because the cost of coal is substantially lower than the cost of oil or gas. Much of this market will develop in the relatively near to intermediate term (before 1990). Annual installations will be much lower (by about 40%) after that period, reflecting a lower overall steam demand growth rate and the fact that much of the discretionary conversion of gas and oil boilers to coal will have been completed. About 22% of the sales will be for discretionary conversion of oil and gas boilers still having some useful life; the rest will be for nondiscretionary expansion or replacement of worn-out boilers. Under the postulated cost and performance estimates for the competing coal-burning technologies, we expect that AFB combustors and lime spray dryer FGD systems will dominate the market, with 42% of the market in our base case scenario. If the attitudes of the industrial decision-makers are factored into the analyses, particularly their aversion to FGD systems with wet wastes, the AFB and lime spray dryer technologies will capture as much as 73% of the coal-burning market. Costs for the various flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies were projected to be sufficiently close that the selection of one over another will depend on site-specific factors such as the availability of waste disposal facilities, the demonstrated reliability of the particular systems, and the vendor's reputation.

  5. Fine-scale ecological and genetic population structure of two whitefish (Coregoninae) species in the vicinity of industrial thermal emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graham, Carly F.; Eberts, Rebecca L.; Morgan, Thomas D.; Boreham, Douglas R.; Lance, Stacey L.; Manzon, Richard G.; Martino, Jessica A.; Rogers, Sean M.; Wilson, Joanna Y.; Somers, Christopher M.; et al

    2016-01-25

    Thermal pollution from industrial processes can have negative impacts on the spawning and development of cold-water fish. Point sources of thermal effluent may need to be managed to avoid affecting discrete populations. Correspondingly, we examined fine-scale ecological and genetic population structure of two whitefish species (Coregonus clupeaformis and Prosopium cylindraceum) on Lake Huron, Canada, in the immediate vicinity of thermal effluent from nuclear power generation. Niche metrics using δ13C and δ15N stable isotopes showed high levels of overlap (48.6 to 94.5%) in resource use by adult fish captured in areas affected by thermal effluent compared to nearby reference locations. Isotopicmore » niche size, a metric of resource use diversity, was 1.3- to 2.8-fold higher than reference values in some thermally affected areas, indicative of fish mixing. Microsatellite analyses of genetic population structure (Fst, STRUCTURE and DAPC) indicated that fish captured at all locations in the vicinity of the power plant were part of a larger population extending beyond the study area. In concert, ecological and genetic markers do not support the presence of an evolutionarily significant unit in the vicinity of the power plant. Furthermore, future research should focus on the potential impacts of thermal emissions on development and recruitment.« less

  6. Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel...

  7. Development and testing of a PEM SO2-depolarized electrolyzer and an operating method that prevents sulfur accumulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steimke, John L.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Colon-Mercado, Hector R.; Gorensek, Maximilian B.

    2015-09-02

    The hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle is being developed as a technology to generate hydrogen by splitting water, using heat and electrical power from a nuclear or solar power plant. A key component is the SO2-depolarized electrolysis (SDE) cell, which reacts SO2 and water to form hydrogen and sulfuric acid. SDE could also be used in once-through operation to consume SO2 and generate hydrogen and sulfuric acid for sale. A proton exchange membrane (PEM) SDE cell based on a PEM fuel cell design was fabricated and tested. Measured cell potential as a function of anolyte pressure and flow rate, sulfuric acidmore » concentration, and cell temperature are presented for this cell. Sulfur accumulation was observed inside the cell, which could have been a serious impediment to further development. A method to prevent sulfur formation was subsequently developed. As a result, this was made possible by a testing facility that allowed unattended operation for extended periods.« less

  8. The last decade of global anthropogenic sulfur dioxide: 2000-2011 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimont, Z.; Smith, Steven J.; Cofala, Janusz

    2013-01-09

    Evolution of global and regional anthropogenic SO2 emissions in the last decade has been estimated through a bottom-up calculation for recent years. After a strong increase in emissions that peaked about 2006, we estimate a declining trend continuing until 2011. However, there is a strong spatial variability with North America and Europe continuing to reduce emissions with an increasing role of Asia and international shipping. China remains a key contributor but the introduction of stricter emission limits followed by an ambitious program of installing flue gas desulfurization on power plants resulted in significant decline in emissions from energy sector and stabilization of Chinese SO2 emissions. Comparable mitigation strategies are not yet present in several other Asian countries and industrial sectors in general, while emissions from international shipping are expected to start declining soon following agreed reduction of sulfur content of fuel oil. Estimated trends in global SO2 emissions are within the range of RCP projections and uncertainty calculated for the year 2005.

  9. Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Stephanie Battles Stephanie.Battles@eia.doe.gov (Phone: (202) 586-7237) FAX: 202-586-0018 URL: http:www.eia.govemeuefficiencycarbonemissionschemicals.html Contact Us File...

  10. Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Phillip

    2014-11-01

    Air Products is carrying out a scope of work under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 “Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Low-cost and Low-emission Gasification and Other Industrial Applications.” The Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) includes a Task 4f in which a Decision Point shall be reached, necessitating a review of Tasks 2-5 with an emphasis on Task 4f. This Topical Report constitutes the Decision Point Application pertaining to Task 4f. The SOPO under DOE Award No. DE-FE0012065 is aimed at furthering the development of the Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) Oxygen production process toward a demonstration scale facility known as the Oxygen Development Facility (ODF). It is anticipated that the completion of the current SOPO will advance the technology significantly along a pathway towards enabling the design and construction of the ODF. Development progress on several fronts is critical before an ODF project can commence; this Topical Report serves as an early update on the progress in critical development areas. Progress was made under all tasks, including Materials Development, Ceramic Processing Development, Engineering Development, and Performance Testing. Under Task 4f, Air Products carried out a cost and performance study in which several process design and cost parameters were varied and assessed with a process model and budgetary costing exercise. The results show that the major variables include ceramic module reliability, ITM operating temperature, module production yield, and heat addition strategy. High-temperature compact heat exchangers are shown to contribute significant cost benefits, while directly firing into the feed stream to an ITM are even a mild improvement on the high-temperature recuperation approach. Based on the findings to-date, Air Products recommends no changes to the content or emphasis in the current SOPO and recommends its completion prior to another formal assessment of these factors.

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) Hazardous Waste Incineration Facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Data Used in Characterizing Emissions; Incinerator Stack Emissions; Fugitive Emissions; Uncertainty in Emissions Characterization; and References.

  12. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, William; Sathaye, Jayant; Masanet, Eric; Xu, Tengfang

    2012-05-15

    China’s annual crude steel production in 2010 was 638.7 Mt accounting for nearly half of the world’s annual crude steel production in the same year. Around 461 TWh of electricity and 14,872 PJ of fuel were consumed to produce this quantity of steel in 2010. We identified and analyzed 23 energy efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the processes in the iron and steel industry. The Conservation Supply Curve (CSC) used in this study is an analytical tool that captures both the engineering and the economic perspectives of energy conservation. Using a bottom-up electricity CSC model, the cumulative cost-effective electricity savings potential for the Chinese iron and steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh, and the total technical electricity saving potential is 416 TWh. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective electricity savings is 139 Mt CO2 and the CO2 emission reduction associated with technical electricity saving potential is 237 Mt CO2. The FCSC model for the iron and steel industry shows cumulative cost-effective fuel savings potential of 11,999 PJ, and the total technical fuel saving potential is 12,139. The CO2 emissions reduction associated with cost-effective and technical fuel savings is 1,191 Mt CO2 and 1,205 Mt CO2, respectively. In addition, a sensitivity analysis with respect to the discount rate used is conducted to assess the effect of changes in this parameter on the results. The result of this study gives a comprehensive and easy to understand perspective to the Chinese iron and steel industry and policy makers about the energy efficiency potential and its associated cost.

  13. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The free, web-based calculator aims to estimate the impact of NOx, SO2 and CO2 emissions on smart grid infrastructure investments, taking into account specific context and project ...

  14. Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110 26 239 140 1,095 50 NA NA 50

  15. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Emission Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  16. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of NO x and SO 2 in the United States ... Lowest Achievable Emission Rate LEA low excess air LNB ... NESCAUM Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use ...

  17. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13

  18. Biological Air Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Air quality standards are becoming more stringent for the U.S. wood products industry. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) (including methanol,...

  19. Emissions Quantification Tool | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The free, web-based calculator aims to estimate the impact of NOx, SO2 and CO2 emissions on smart grid infrastructure investments, taking into account specific context and project ...

  20. Reversible uptake of COS, CS2 and SO2; Ionic liquids with O-alkylxanthate, O-alkylthiocarbonate, and O-alkylsulfite anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heldebrant, David J.; Yonker, Clement R.; Jessop, Philip G.; Phan, Lam

    2009-08-14

    Further development of CO2 binding organic liquids to capture and release carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide and sulfur dioxide. This paper investigates a brand new class of ionic liquids which have potential as chemical sensors for acid gas capture. Applications to flue gas scrubbing are discussed with an emphasis on capture and release of COS, CS2 and SO2 with amidine and guanidine bases with alcohols. Formal spectroscopic characterization is presented.

  1. Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contact: Stephanie Battles Stephanie.Battles@eia.doe.gov (Phone: (202) 586-7237) FAX: 202-586-0018 Contact Us URL: http:www.eia.govemeuefficiencycarbonemissionspetroleum...

  2. Low-emission vortex combustion of biomass and fossil fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finker, F.Z.; Kubischkin, I.B.; Akhmedov, D.B.

    1995-11-01

    The article introduces the results of development and industrial experience of low-emission vortex combustion technology (LEVC) of biomass and fossil fuel in industrial and utility boilers in Russian timber and paper industries and Polish power plants. The LEVC technology is based on aerodynamics method of multiple circulation of gases and fuel in the furnaces. LEVC technology accumulates the advantages of conventional and fluidized bed combustion technology. Existing boilers could be easily retrofitted for the application of LEVC technology without requiring major investment. The repowering of boiler with LEVC was the result the reduction NOx emission to the level 170g/GJ without installation additional flue gas cleaning equipment and it gave the opportunity for an injection of sulfur sorbent in the furnace. The authors discussed Russian-Polish experiment on utility boiler retrofitted with the application of LEVC. As the result the efficiency of the boiler increased in 2%. The reduction of the emission is: NOx-40%, SO2-17%.

  3. Observation of b2 symmetry vibrational levels of the SO2C 1B2 state: Vibrational level staggering, Coriolis interactions, and rotation-vibration constants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Saladrigas, Catherine A.; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here, the C 1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. However, low-lying levels with odd quanta of antisymmetric stretch (b2 vibrational symmetry) have not previously been observed because transitions into these levels from the zero-point level of the X~ state are vibronically forbidden. We use IR-UV double resonance to observe the b2 vibrational levels of the C state below 1600 cm–1 of vibrational excitation. This enables a direct characterization of the vibrational level staggering that results from the double-minimum potential. In addition, itmore » allows us to deperturb the strong c-axis Coriolis interactions between levels of a1 and b2 vibrational symmetry, and to determine accurately the vibrational dependence of the rotational constants in the distorted C electronic state.« less

  4. The rotation-vibration structure of the SO2 C1B2 state explained by a new internal coordinate force field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Jun; Park, G. Barratt; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    A new quartic force field for the SO2 C~1B2 state has been derived, based on high resolution data from S16O2 and S18O2. Included are eight b2 symmetry vibrational levels of S16O2 reported in the first paper of this series [G. B. Park, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 144311 (2016)]. Many of the experimental observables not included in the fit, such as the Franck-Condon intensities and the Coriolis-perturbed effective C rotational constants of highly anharmonic C~ state vibrational levels, are well reproduced using our force field. Because the two stretching modes of the C~ state are strongly coupled via Fermi-133more » interaction, the vibrational structure of the C state is analyzed in a Fermi-system basis set, constructed explicitly in this work via partial diagonalization of the vibrational Hamiltonian. The physical significance of the Fermi-system basis is discussed in terms of semiclassical dynamics, based on study of Fermi-resonance systems by Kellman and coworkers [M. E. Kellman and L. Xiao, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 5821 (1990)]. By diagonalizing the vibrational Hamiltonian in the Fermi-system basis, the vibrational characters of all vibrational levels can be determined unambiguously. It is shown that the bending mode cannot be treated separately from the coupled stretching modes, particularly at vibrational energies of more than 2000 cm–1. Based on our force field, the structure of the Coriolis interactions in the C~ state of SO2 is also discussed. As a result, we identify the origin of the alternating patterns in the effective C rotational constants of levels in the vibrational progressions of the symmetry-breaking mode, νβ (which correlates with the antisymmetric stretching mode in our assignment scheme).« less

  5. State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  6. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  7. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel Disclosure: Virginia’s 1999 electric industry restructuring law requires the state's electricity providers to disclose -- "to the extent feasible" -- fuel mix and emissions data regarding...

  8. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2009-11-02

    Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result

  10. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of an O2-Enriched Furnace System for Reduced CO2 and NOx Emissions For the Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward W. Grandmaison; David J. Poirier; Eric Boyd

    2003-01-20

    An oxygen-enriched furnace system for reduced CO2 and NOx emission has been developed. The furnace geometry, with a sidewall-mounted burner, was similar to configurations commonly encountered in a steel reheat furnace. The effect of stack oxygen concentration, oxygen enrichment level and air infiltration on fuel savings/CO2 reduction, NOx emissions and scale formation were investigated. The firing rate required to maintain the furnace temperature at 1100 C decreased linearly with increasing oxygen enrichment. At full oxygen enrichment a reduction of 40-45% in the firing rate was required to maintain furnace temperature. NOx emissions were relatively constant at oxygen enrichment levels below 60% and decreased concentration at all oxygen enrichment levels. Air infiltration also had an effect on NOx levels leading to emissions similar to those observed with no air infiltration but with similar stack oxygen concentrations. At high oxygen enrichment levels, there was a larger variation in the refractory surface-temperature on the roof and blind sidewall of the furnace. Scale habit, intactness, adhesion and oxidation rates were examined for five grades of steel over a range of stack oxygen concentrations and oxygen enrichment levels at 1100 degree C. The steel grade had the largest effect on scaling properties examined in this work. The stack oxygen concentration and the oxygen enrichment level had much smaller effects on the scaling properties.

  11. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  12. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Major Sources: Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Boilers; Guidance for Calculating Efficiency Credits Resulting from Implementation of Energy Conservation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Daryl; Papar, Riyaz; Wright, Dr. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for developing a consistent approach to documenting efficiency credits generated from energy conservation measures in the Implementation Plan for boilers covered by the Boiler MACT rule (i.e., subpart DDDDD of CFR part 63). This document divides Boiler System conservation opportunities into four functional areas: 1) the boiler itself, 2) the condensate recovery system, 3) the distribution system, and 4) the end uses of the steam. This document provides technical information for documenting emissions credits proposed in the Implementation Plan for functional areas 2) though 4). This document does not include efficiency improvements related to the Boiler tune-ups.

  13. Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US ...

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

    2009-02-02

    Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

  15. Industry Information Practices and the Failure to Remember

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Information Resources » Industries & Technologies Industries & Technologies The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) emphasizes innovative technologies to increase manufacturing agility and open new markets. AMO also maintains a range of projects, analyses, protocols, and strategies to reduce industrial energy intensity and carbon emissions in specific industries and technology areas: Industries Aluminum Chemicals Forest Products Glass Metal Casting Mining Other Industries Petroleum

  16. Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products. ... in private cost-share - will seek to use CO2 emissions from industrial sources to create ...

  17. Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-08-01

    The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

  18. RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L; Martin, Michaela A; Gemmer, Bob; Scheihing, Paul; Quinn, James

    2007-09-01

    --those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of

  19. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MATERIALS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DIAGRAMS; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GASIFICATION; GREAT LAKES REGION; HALOGENS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; METALS; ...

  20. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The facility has been used for more than a decade by a virtual Who's Who of the semiconductor industry to simulate the potential failures posed by cosmic-ray-induced neutrons upon miniature electronic devices, such as chips that help control aircraft or complex integrated circuits in automobiles. Industrial User Information The Neutron and Nuclear Science (WNR) Facility welcomes proposals for beam time experiments from industry users. Proprietary and non-proprietary industrial

  1. Waste combustion in boilers and industrial furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This set of conference papers deals with the combustion of hazardous wastes in boilers and industrial furnaces. The majority of the papers pertain specifically to cement industry kiln incinerators and focus on environmental issues. In particular, stack emission requirements currently enforced or under consideration by the U.S. EPA are emphasized. The papers were drawn from seven areas: (1) proposed Maximum Achievable Control Technology rule, (2) trial burn planning and experience, (3) management and beneficial use of materials, (4) inorganic emissions and continuous emission monitoring, (5) organic emissions, (6) boiler and industrial furnace operations, and (7) risk assessment and communication.

  2. SO2 REMOVAL WITH COAL SCRUBBING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eung Ha Cho; Hari Prashanth Sundaram; Aubrey L. Miller

    2001-07-01

    This project is based on an effective removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gas with coal as the scrubbing medium instead of lime, which is used in the conventional FGD processes. A laboratory study proves that coal scrubbing is an innovative technology that can be implemented into a commercial process in place of the conventional lime scrubbing flue gas desulfurization process. SO{sub 2} was removed from a gas stream using an apparatus, which consisted of a 1-liter stirred reactor immersed in a thermostated oil bath. The reactor contained 60 g of 35-65 mesh coal in 600 ml of water. The apparatus also had 2 bubblers connected to the outlet of the reactor, each containing 1500 ml of 1 molar NaOH solution. The flow rate of the gas was 30 ml/sec, temperature was varied from 21 C to 73 C. Oxygen concentration ranged from 3 to 20% while SO{sub 2} concentration, from 500 to 2000 ppm. SO{sub 2} recovery was determined by analyzing SO{sub 2} concentration in the liquid samples taken from the bubblers. The samples taken from the reactor were analyzed for iron concentrations, which were then used to calculate fractions of coal pyrite leached. It was found that SO{sub 2} removal was highly temperature sensitive, giving 13.1% recovery at 21 C and 99.2% recovery at 73 C after 4 hours. The removal of SO{sub 2} was accomplished by the catalysis of iron that was produced by leaching of coal pyrite with combination of SO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This leaching reaction was found to be controlled by chemical reaction with apparent activation energy of 11.6 kcal/mole. SO{sub 2} removal increased with increasing O{sub 2} concentration up to 10% and leveled off upon further increase. The effect of SO{sub 2} concentration on its removal was minimal.

  3. Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contact: Stephanie Battles Stephanie.Battles@eia.doe.gov (Phone: (202) 586-7237) FAX: 202-586-0018 Contact Us URL: http:www.eia.govemeuefficiencycarbonemissionssteel...

  4. Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contact: Stephanie Battles Stephanie.Battles@eia.doe.gov (Phone: (202) 586-7237) FAX: 202-586-0018 Contact Us URL: http:www.eia.govemeuefficiencycarbonemissionsstone...

  5. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. October 15, 2012 Outfall from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center cooling towers Intermittent flow of discharged water from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center eventually reaches perennial segment of Sandia Canyon during storm events (Outfall 03A199). Contact Environmental Communication & Public

  6. Industry Economists

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industry Economists The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Industry Economist, whose work is associated with the performance of economic analyses using economic techniques. Responsibilities: Industry Economists perform or participate in one or more of the following

  7. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  8. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users - Media Publications and Information The Invisible Neutron Threat Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices Nuclear Science Research at the LANSCE-WNR...

  9. Probe into Gaseous Pollution and Assessment of Air Quality Benefit under Sector Dependent Emission Control Strategies over Megacities in Yangtze River Delta, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xinyi; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Li, Juan; Huang, Kan; Zhuang, G.; Zhou, Ying

    2013-11-01

    emission control scenarios suggested significant air quality improvements from emission reduction: 90% of SO2 emission removed from power plant in YRD would be able to reduce more than 85% of SO2 pollution, 85% NOx emission reduction from power plant would reduce more than 60% of NO2 pollution, in terms of reducing the number of days exceeding daily air quality standard. NOx emission reduction from transportation and industry were also found to effectively reduce NO2 pollution but less efficient than emission control from power plants. We also found that multi-pollutants emission control including both NOx and VOC would be a better strategy than independent NOx control over YRD which is China’s 12th Five-Year-Plan (from 2011 to 2015), because O3 pollution would be increased as a side effect of NOx control and counteract NO2 pollution reduction benefit.

  10. Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel cell and biogas industries perspectives. Presented by Mike Hicks, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

  11. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Hewlett Packard Labs Gains Insights with Innovative ALS Research Tools Print Thursday, 05 May 2016 11:21 For the past eight years, Hewlett Packard Labs, the central research organization of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, has been using cutting-edge ALS techniques to advance some of their most promising technological research, including vanadium dioxide phase transitions and atomic movement during memristor operation. Summary Slide Read more... ALS, Molecular Foundry,

  12. Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act)

  13. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  14. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  15. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  16. Commercial / Industrial Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial & Industrial Lighting Efficiency Program The Commercial & Industrial...

  17. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Estimating the Impact (Energy, ...

  18. EPA Climate Leaders Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Simplified GHG Emissions Calculator (SGEC) AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse...

  19. Pulsed Corona Plasma Technology for Treating VOC Emissions from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from Pulp Mills Under the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies Forest Products program ... plasma technology for control of the vent emissions from HVLC Brownstock Washers. ...

  20. The origin of unequal bond lengths in the C1B2 state of SO2: Signatures of high-lying potential energy surface crossings in the low-lying vibrational structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, G. Barratt; Jiang, Jun; Field, Robert W.

    2016-04-14

    Here the C1B2 state of SO2 has a double-minimum potential in the antisymmetric stretch coordinate, such that the minimum energy geometry has nonequivalent SO bond lengths. The asymmetry in the potential energy surface is expressed as a staggering in the energy levels of the v'3 progression. We have recently made the first observation of low-lying levels with odd quanta of v'3, which allows us--in the current work--to characterize the origins of the level staggering. Our work demonstrates the usefulness of low-lying vibrational level structure, where the character of the wavefunctions can be relatively easily understood, to extract information about dynamicallymore » important potential energy surface crossings that occur at much higher energy. The measured staggering pattern is consistent with a vibronic coupling model for the double-minimum, which involves direct coupling to the bound 2 1A1 state and indirect coupling with the repulsive 3 1A1 state. The degree of staggering in the v'3 levels increases with quanta of bending excitation, which is consistent with the approach along the C state potential energy surface to a conical intersection with the 2 1A1 surface at a bond angle of ~145°.« less

  1. State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2006 (Update) (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    In May 2005, the Environmental Protection Agency published two final rules aimed at reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. The Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) requires 28 states and the District of Columbia to reduce emissions of SO2 and/or NOx. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) requires the states to reduce emissions of mercury from new and existing coal-fired plants.

  2. Application of holographic neural networks for flue gas emissions prediction in the Burnaby incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Dockrill, P.; Clements, B.

    1997-12-31

    This article describes the development of a parametric prediction system (PPS) for various emission species at the Burnaby incinerator. The continuous emissions monitoring system at the Burnaby incinerator is shared between three boilers and therefore actual results are only available 5 minutes out of every 15 minutes. The PPS was developed to fill in data for the 10 minutes when the Continuous Emission Monitor (CEM) is measuring the other boilers. It bases its prediction on the last few actual readings taken and parametrically predicts CO, SO2 and NOx. The Burnaby Incinerator is located in the commercial/industrial area of South Burnaby, British Columbia. It consists of three separate lines, each burning ten tonnes of garbage per hour and producing about three tonnes of steam for every tonne of garbage burned. The air pollution control system first cools the combustion products with water injection and then scrubs them with very fine hydrated lime. Carbon is added to the lime to enhance the scrubbing of the combustion products. The CEM monitors the levels of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide and opacity. In 1996, an expert system was installed on one of boilers at the Burnaby Incinerator plant to determine if it could improve the plant=s operations and reduce overall emission. As part of the expert system, the PPS was developed. Holographic Neural Technology (HNeT), developed by AND Corporation of Toronto, Ontario, is a novel neural network technology using complex numbers in its architecture. Compared to the traditional neural networks, HNeT has some significant advantage. It is more resilient against converging on local minima; is faster training and executing; less prone to over fitting; and, in most cases, has significantly lower error. Selection of independent variabs, training set preparation, testing neural nets and other related issue will be discussed.

  3. Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing

  4. Final Report for project titled "New fluoroionomer electrolytes with high conductivity and low SO2 crossover for use in electrolyzers being developed for hydrogen production from nuclear power plants"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis W. Smith; Stephen Creager

    2012-09-13

    Thermochemical water splitting cycles, using the heat of nuclear power plants, offer an alternate highly efficient route for the production of hydrogen. Among the many possible thermochemical cycles for the hydrogen production, the sulfur-based cycles lead the competition in overall energy efficiency. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce hydrogen. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) selected the fuel cell MEA design concept for the SDE in the HyS process since the MEA concept provides a much smaller cell footprint than conventional parallel plate technology. The electrolyzer oxidizes sulfur dioxide to form sulfuric acid at the anode and reduces protons to form hydrogen at the cathode. The overall electrochemical cell reaction consists of the production of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}. There is a significant need to provide the membrane materials that exhibit reduced sulfur dioxide transport characteristics without sacrificing other important properties such as high ionic conductivity and excellent chemical stability in highly concentrated sulfuric acid solutions saturated with sulfur dioxide. As an alternative membrane, sulfonated Perfluorocyclobutyl aromatic ether polymer (sPFCB) were expected to posses low SO2 permeability due to their stiff backbones as well as high proton conductivity, improved mechanical properties. The major accomplishments of this project were the synthesis, characterizations, and optimizations of suitable electrolyzers for good SDE performance and higher chemical stability against sulfuric acid. SDE performance results of developed sPFCB polyelectrolytes have shown that these membranes exhibit good chemical stability against H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}.

  5. Industrial Technologies Program - A Clean, Secure Energy Future via Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) leads the national effort to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the largest energy-using sector of the U.S. economy. ITP drives energy efficiency improvements and carbon dioxide reductions throughout the manufacturing supply chain, helping develop and deploy innovative technologies that transform the way industry uses energy.

  6. Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Sources into Useful Products | Department of Energy Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products Secretary Chu Announces Six Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions from Industrial Sources into Useful Products July 22, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today the selections of six projects that aim to find ways of converting captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial

  7. Industrial Carbon Management Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Read the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, July 2015 (845.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, Spring 2014 IAC Factsheet

    Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers

  8. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  9. QTR Webinar: Chapter 8 - Industry and Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Chapter 8 - Industry and Manufacturing QTR Webinar: Chapter 8 - Industry and Manufacturing Background The U.S. industrial sector accounts for approximately one-third of the overall energy consumption and associated carbon emissions in the U.S. About four-fifths of end-use industrial energy is consumed by the manufacturing sub-sector, which produces goods ranging from fundamental commodities to sophisticated final-use products. Many of these products have a significant energy and carbon

  10. Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry Plastic Bags Might Kickstart the Carbon Capture Industry May 6, 2016 - 5:46pm Addthis This GIF shows how CO2 emissions vary across the United States. Each bar represents a 50x50 kilometer grid. Bar height is proportional to total CO2 emissions and bar color represents the type of CO2 emissions. Red bars represent proportionately more CO2 emissions from electricity generation (coal, gas and oil). Green bars represent CO2

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  13. Partnerships For Industry - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115.jpg Partnerships For Industry Connect With JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP Connect with JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP partnerships for industry JCAP has established an Industrial Partnership Program. For more information on Industrial Partnership Program or to learn more about other modes of industrial interactions with JCAP, please contact: California Institute of Technology Office of

  14. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  15. Software solutions for emission monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFriez, H.; Schillinger, S.; Seraji, H.

    1996-12-31

    Industry and state and federal environmental regulatory agencies are becoming ever more conciliatory due to the high cost of implementing the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) for the operation of Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS). In many cases the modifications do nothing to reduce emissions or even to measure the pollution, but simply let the source owner or operator and the permitting authority agree on a monitoring method and/or program. The EPA methods and standards developed under the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) have proven to be extremely costly and burdensome. Now, the USEPA and state agencies are making efforts to assure that emissions data has a strong technical basis to demonstrate compliance with regulations such as Title V.

  16. The industrial ecology of steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  17. Semiconductor technology for reducing emissions and increasing efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffin, B.; Frank, R.

    1997-12-31

    The cooperation and support of all industries are required to significantly impact a worldwide reduction in gaseous emissions that may contribute to climate change. Each industry also is striving to more efficiently utilize the resources that it consumes since this is both conservation for good citizenship and an intelligent approach to business. The semiconductor industry is also extremely concerned with these issues. However, semiconductor manufacturer`s products provide solutions for reduced emissions and increased efficiency in their industry, other industries and areas that can realize significant improvements through control technology. This paper will focus on semiconductor technologies of digital control, power switching and sensing to improve efficiency and reduce emissions in automotive, industrial, and office/home applications. 10 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  19. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  20. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  1. Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case....

  2. LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd (formerly LG Industrial Systems) Place: Anyang,...

  3. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Methane Emissions 3.1. Total emissions The major sources of U.S. methane emissions are energy production, distribution, and use; agriculture; and waste management (Figure 17). U.S. methane emissions in 2009 totaled 731 MMTCO2e, 0.9 percent higher than the 2008 total of 724 MMTCO2e (Table 17). Methane emissions declined steadily from 1990 to 2001, as emissions from coal mining and landfills fell, then rose from 2002 to 2009 as a result of moderate increases in emissions related to energy,

  4. Emissions trading - time to get serious

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitelli, A.

    2007-11-15

    The Kyoto Protocol's five year compliance period begins in 2008. Industrialized nations around the world have pledged to cut carbon emissions, but the job seems to get harder, not easier, as 2008 approaches. Can market mechanisms make the crucial difference? The article discloses recent initiatives and developments worldwide. It concludes that it is clear that the market is maintaining its central role in fighting climate change and that bringing emissions trading to developing countries and to the US can only reinforce that role.

  5. Table 4. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation"...

  6. Table 3. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportat...

  7. Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in the Cement Sector |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    similar analyses of the iron and steel, electric power, and aluminum industries in China, Brazil and Mexico." References "CCAP-Mexico-NAMA on Reducing GHG Emissions in...

  8. Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 | Department of Energy Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999 The purpose of this 1999 paper is to estimate the remaining CHP potential in the chemicals and pulp/paper industries by capacity size, and estimate energy savings and

  9. Users from Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, and/or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial

  10. Industrial Facility Combustion Energy Use

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McMillan, Colin

    2016-08-01

    Facility-level industrial combustion energy use is calculated from greenhouse gas emissions data reported by large emitters (>25,000 metric tons CO2e per year) under the U.S. EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP, https://www.epa.gov/ghgreporting). The calculation applies EPA default emissions factors to reported fuel use by fuel type. Additional facility information is included with calculated combustion energy values, such as industry type (six-digit NAICS code), location (lat, long, zip code, county, and state), combustion unit type, and combustion unit name. Further identification of combustion energy use is provided by calculating energy end use (e.g., conventional boiler use, co-generation/CHP use, process heating, other facility support) by manufacturing NAICS code. Manufacturing facilities are matched by their NAICS code and reported fuel type with the proportion of combustion fuel energy for each end use category identified in the 2010 Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS, http://www.eia.gov/consumption/manufacturing/data/2010/). MECS data are adjusted to account for data that were withheld or whose end use was unspecified following the procedure described in Fox, Don B., Daniel Sutter, and Jefferson W. Tester. 2011. The Thermal Spectrum of Low-Temperature Energy Use in the United States, NY: Cornell Energy Institute.

  11. Save Energy Now for Maryland Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EmPOWER Maryland Energy Efficiency Act of 2008 sets the statewide goal of a 15% reduction in both electricity and peak demand by 2015. This policy initiative was motivated by several factors, which include, but are not limited to, electricity rate increases, a potential capacity shortage, and concerns about CO2 emissions and climate change. The goals set forth by the governor and state legislature correlated closely to DOE’s Better Buildings, Better Plants program goal of reducing energy intensity in the industrial sector 25% in 10 years. For the past several years, Maryland has participated in efforts to reduce energy consumption in the state. As part of these efforts, industrial customers are recognizing more and more the importance of energy efficiency. Maryland was clearly a suitable candidate to take part in activities related to industrial energy efficiency, and the Better Buildings, Better Plants approach is one of the most proven means for delivering results to industry.

  12. Reducing VOC Press Emission from OSB Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gary D. McGinnis; Laura S. WIlliams; Amy E. Monte; Jagdish Rughani: Brett A. Niemi; Thomas M. Flicker

    2001-12-31

    Current regulations require industry to meet air emission standards with regard to particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and other gases. One of many industries that will be affected by the new regulations is the wood composites industry. This industry generates VOCs, HAPs, and particulates mainly during the drying and pressing of wood. Current air treatment technologies for the industry are expensive to install and operate. As regulations become more stringent, treatment technologies will need to become more efficient and cost effective. The overall objective of this study is to evaluate the use of process conditions and chemical additives to reduce VOC/HAPs in air emitted from presses and dryers during the production of oriented strand board.

  13. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  14. Title V Semi-Annual Emissions Report for Permit P100R1 July 1, 2011 - December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whetham, Walter

    2012-03-15

    Reports of actual emissions from permitted sources in Section 2.0 shall be submitted on a 6 month basis. Reports shall not include emissions from insignificant activities. Emission estimates of criteria pollutants NOx, CO, SO2, PM and VOCs shall not include fugitive emissions. Emission estimates of HAPs shall include fugitive emissions. The reports shall include a comparison of actual emissions that occurred during the reporting period with the facility-wide allowable emission limits specified in Section 2.11 of this permit. The report required by Condition 4.1 shall be submitted within 90 days from the end of the reporting period. The semiannual report required by Condition 4.2 shall be submitted within 45 days from the end of the reporting period. The reporting periods are January 1st to June 30th and July 1st to December 31st. This condition is pursuant to 20.2.70.302.E.1 NMAC.

  15. Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Price, Lynn

    2008-03-01

    The industrial sector consumes nearly 40% of annual global primary energy use and is responsible for a similar share of global energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Many studies and actual experience indicate that there is considerable potential to reduce the amount of energy used to manufacture most commodities, concurrently reducing CO2 emissions. With the support of strong policies and programs, energy-efficient technologies and measures can be implemented that will reduce global CO2 emissions. A number of countries, including the Netherlands, the UK, and China, have experience implementing aggressive programs to improve energy efficiency and reduce related CO2 emissions from industry. Even so, there is no silver bullet and all options must be pursued if greenhouse gas emissions are to be constrained to the level required to avoid significant negative impacts from global climate change.

  16. EERE INDUSTRY DAY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On September 23-24, 2015 the inaugural EERE Industry Day was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to foster relationships and encourage dialog among researchers, industry representatives, and U.S. Department of Energy representatives.

  17. New trends in industrial energy efficiency in the Mexico iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozawa, Leticia; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Sheinbaum, Claudia

    1999-07-31

    Energy use in the Mexican industrial sector experienced important changes in the last decade related to changes in the Mexican economy. In previous studies, we have shown that a real change in energy-intensity was the most important factor in the overall decline of energy use and CO2 emissions in the Mexican industrial sector. Real changes in energy intensity were explained by different factors, depending on the industrial sub-sector. In this paper, we analyze the factors that influenced energy use in the Mexican iron and steel industry, the largest energy consuming and energy-intensive industry in the country. To understand the trends in this industry we used a decomposition analysis based on physical indicators to decompose the changes in intra-sectoral structural changes and efficiency improvements. Also, we use a structure-efficiency analysis for international comparisons, considering industrial structure and the best available technology. In 1995, Mexican iron and steel industry consumed 17.7 percent of the industrial energy consumption. Between 1970 and 1995, the steel production has increased with an annual growth rate of 4.7 percent, while the specific energy consumption (SEC) has decreased from 28.4 to 23.8 GJ/tonne of crude steel. This reduction was due to energy efficiency improvements (disappearance of the open hearth production, increase of the share of the continuous casting) and to structural changes as well (increase of the share of scrap input in the steelmaking).

  18. Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

  19. Industrial Strength Pipes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-23

    Industrial Strength Pipes (ISP) is a toolkit for construction pipeline applications using the UNIX pipe and filter model.

  20. Mirant: Summary of Monitored SO2 Concentrations During Periods...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Mirant Potomac, ...

  1. SO2-Resistant Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80-120 C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that...

  2. Sulfide catalysts for reducing SO2 to elemental sulfur

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Yun; Yu, Qiquan; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2001-01-01

    A highly efficient sulfide catalyst for reducing sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur, which maximizes the selectivity of elemental sulfur over byproducts and has a high conversion efficiency. Various feed stream contaminants, such as water vapor are well tolerated. Additionally, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, or hydrogen sulfides can be employed as the reducing gases while maintaining high conversion efficiency. This allows a much wider range of uses and higher level of feed stream contaminants than prior art catalysts.

  3. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  4. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  5. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility *

  6. Industrial Dojo Program Fosters Industrial Internet Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAN RAMON, CA-May 11, 2015-GE Software (NYSE: GE) today announced its 'Industrial Dojo,' ... The Cloud Foundry Dojo program allows software developers to immerse themselves in open ...

  7. DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, (NESHAPs - Radioactive Air) meeting provides an opportunity for federal and state regulators, Department of Energy employees and contractors, standards developers, and industry representatives to work together

  8. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussion about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. It is part of a suite of publications offered by the Department of Energy to improve steam system performance.

  9. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  10. Table 7. Electric power industry emissions estimates, 1990 through...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "Petroleum",132,19,20,33,44,304,209,245,138,865,789,2220,1292,1947,1239,2061,2025,1831,2105,1837,2546,2773,3270,2157,2836 "Total",4276,4722,4981,3928,4187...

  11. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  12. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. Diesel Emission Control Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reviews regulatory requirements and technology approaches for diesel emission control for heavy and light duty applications

  14. Industry Research for Pipeline Systems Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Council International, Inc. DOE Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop -Industry Research for Pipeline Systems Panel Mike Whelan Director, Research Operations November 12, 2014 2 www.prci.org Pipeline Research Council Int'l. Overview  Founded in 1952 - Current Membership  39 Pipelines, over 350,000 miles of transmission pipe * Natural Gas and Hazardous Liquids Pipelines * 27 members are North American based - Remainder: Europe, Brazil, China,

  15. Coal industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

  16. Making Industry Part of the Climate Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann; Jackson, Roderick K; Cox, Matthew; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deitchman, Benjamin H

    2011-06-01

    Improving the energy efficiency of industry is essential for maintaining the viability of domestic manufacturing, especially in a world economy where production is shifting to low-cost, less regulated developing countries. Numerous studies have shown the potential for significant cost-effective energy-savings in U.S. industries, but the realization of this potential is hindered by regulatory, information, workforce, and financial obstacles. This report evaluates seven federal policy options aimed at improving the energy efficiency of industry, grounded in an understanding of industrial decision-making and the barriers to efficiency improvements. Detailed analysis employs the Georgia Institute of Technology's version of the National Energy Modeling System and spreadsheet calculations, generating a series of benefit/cost metrics spanning private and public costs and energy bill savings, as well as air pollution benefits and the social cost of carbon. Two of the policies would address regulatory hurdles (Output-Based Emissions Standards and a federal Energy Portfolio Standard with Combined Heat and Power); three would help to fill information gaps and workforce training needs (the Superior Energy Performance program, Implementation Support Services, and a Small Firm Energy Management program); and two would tackle financial barriers (Tax Lien Financing and Energy-Efficient Industrial Motor Rebates). The social benefit-cost ratios of these policies appear to be highly favorable based on a range of plausible assumptions. Each of the seven policy options has an appropriate federal role, broad applicability across industries, utilizes readily available technologies, and all are administratively feasible.

  17. Uranium industry annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    This report provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, federal and state agencies, the uranium and utility industries, and the public. It utilizes data from the mandatory ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858; historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and by the Grand Junction (Colorado) Project Office of the Idaho Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE); and other data from federal agencies that preceded the DOE. The data provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's annual activities and include some information about industry plans and commitments over the next several years. Where these data are presented in aggregate form, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific data while still conveying an accurate and complete statistical representation of the industry data.

  18. Systems and Industry Analyses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems and industry analyses Go to the NETL Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technology & Cost/Performance Studies NETL Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies provide invaluable information, and help to ensure that the technologies being developed are the best ones to develop. System studies are often used to compare competing technologies, determine the best way to integrate a technology with other technologies, and predict

  19. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

  20. Presentations for Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Learn energy-saving strategies from leading manufacturing companies and energy experts. The presentations are organized below by topic area. In addition, industrial energy managers, utilities, and...

  1. Appendix C - Industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-12-20

    This report describes the results, calculations, and assumptions underlying the GPRA 2004 Quality Metrics results for all Planning Units within the Office of Industrial Technologies.

  2. Window Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2000-04-01

    The Window Industry Technology Roadmap looks at the trends in window design and installation in 2000 and projects trends for the future.

  3. Baytown Industrial Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-06-01

    This is a combined heat and power (CHP) project profile on an 830 MW combined-cycle CHP application at Baytown Industrial Park in Baytown, Texas.

  4. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  5. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  6. Keystone coal industry manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The 1994 Keystone Coal Industry Manual is presented. Keystone has served as the one industry reference authority for the many diverse organizations concerned with the supply and utilization of coal in the USA and Canada. Through the continuing efforts of coal producers, buyers, users, sellers, and equipment designers and manufacturers, the coal industry supplies an abundant and economical fuel that is indispensable in meeting the expanding energy needs of North America. The manual is divided into the following sections: coal sales companies, coal export, transportation of coal, consumer directories, coal associations and groups, consulting and financial firms, buyers guide, industry statistics and ownership, coal preparation, coal mine directory, and coal seams.

  7. Sustainable Nanomaterials Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Perspective U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Manufacturing Office Sustainable ... Uses renewable resources grown with sustainable forestry practices Encourages ...

  8. Industrial Green | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Green Industrial Green Industrial Green - This giant bag may not look green, but it keeps a potent greenhouse gas from being released into the atmosphere. It's part of a system at the Free-Electron Laser that retains sulfur hexafluoride gas when it isn't being used in the FEL's gun test stand. The concept received a 2011 Virginia Governor's Environmental Excellence Program Gold Award. Industrial Green On behalf of work done by Kevin Jordan, a senior engineer in the Free-Electron Laser

  9. Users from Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, andor...

  10. Industries & Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Chemicals Forest Products Glass Metal Casting Mining Other Industries Petroleum ... Information & Communications Technology Data Centers Materials for Industrial Use ...

  11. Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program handbook connects industry with the various energy efficiency resources available in the midwest.

  12. The methanol industry`s missed opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests.

  13. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA

  14. Geothermal industry assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  15. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. Brief introduction of GEF efficient industrial boiler project in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijian, T.

    1996-12-31

    The present situation of installed industrial boilers, their efficiency and environmental impact are assessed. And the factors contribute to the low efficiency and serious pollution are summarized. Based on WB-assisted GEF project, {open_quotes}Efficient Industrial Boiler Project{close_quotes} aimed at CO{sub 2} mitigation in China, a series of effective measures to bring the GHG emission under control are addressed, in technology, system performance, and operation management aspects.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  19. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory ...

  20. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  1. Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

  2. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  3. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 CASL Industry Council Meeting March 26-27, 2013 - Cranberry Township, PA Minutes The sixth meeting of the Industry Council (IC) for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was held on March 26-27, 2013 at Westinghouse in Cranberry Township, PA. The first day of the Industry Council was chaired by John Gaertner and the second day was chaired by Heather Feldman. The meeting attendees and their affiliations are listed on Attachment 1 to these minutes. Attendance was

  4. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Council Meeting 4 - 5 November 2015 Meeting Minutes The autumn 2015 meeting of the Industry Council (IC) for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was held on 4 - 5 November 2015 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN. The first day of meeting was a joint meeting of the CASL Industry and Science Councils and was held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility at ORNL. An independent IC meeting was held the morning of the second

  5. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  6. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  7. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  8. Future Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Wigley, Tom M.

    2005-12-01

    The importance of sulfur dioxide emissions for climate change is now established, although substantial uncertainties remain. This paper presents projections for future sulfur dioxide emissions using the MiniCAM integrated assessment model. A new income-based parameterization for future sulfur dioxide emissions controls is developed based on purchasing power parity (PPP) income estimates and historical trends related to the implementation of sulfur emissions limitations. This parameterization is then used to produce sulfur dioxide emissions trajectories for the set of scenarios developed for the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). We use the SRES methodology to produce harmonized SRES scenarios using the latest version of the MiniCAM model. The implications, and requirements, for IA modeling of sulfur dioxide emissions are discussed. We find that sulfur emissions eventually decline over the next century under a wide set of assumptions. These emission reductions result from a combination of emission controls, the adoption of advanced electric technologies, and a shift away from the direct end use of coal with increasing income levels. Only under a scenario where incomes in developing regions increase slowly do global emission levels remain at close to present levels over the next century. Under a climate policy that limits emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide emissions fall in a relatively narrow range. In all cases, the relative climatic effect of sulfur dioxide emissions decreases dramatically to a point where sulfur dioxide is only a minor component of climate forcing by the end of the century. Ecological effects of sulfur dioxide, however, could be significant in some developing regions for many decades to come.

  9. Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

    2004-01-25

    A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

  10. A comparison of normal and worst case cement plant emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodford, J.; Gossman, D.; Johnson, N.

    1996-12-31

    Lone Star Industries, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Missouri conducted a trial burn in October, 1995. Two metals emissions test days were conducted. One of the test days was a worst case metals spiking day and one of the test days was a normal emissions day. This paper examines and compares the emissions from these two test days. Much has been made of metals emissions from hazardous waste burning cement kilns, but for the most part, this has been due to the worst case metals emissions data that became available from the 1992 BIF compliance testing performed and reported by 24 cement plants. By comparison, very little data exists on normal cement kiln emissions. This paper provides one comparison.

  11. Caraustar Industries Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This plant-wide assessment case study is about commissioned energy assessments by the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program at two of Caraustar's recycled paperboard mills.

  12. Presentations for Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Industrial energy managers, utilities, and energy management professionals can find online trainings and information dissemination at no-cost. AMO has provided these energy-saving strategies from leading manufacturing companies and energy experts through several different presentation series.

  13. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  14. Steel Industry Profile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The steel industry is critical to the U.S. economy. Steel is the material of choice for many elements of manufacturing, construction, transportation, and various consumer products. Traditionally...

  15. Macro Industrial Working Group

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 22 Industrial Team Washington DC, September 29, 2014 Macro Team: Kay Smith (lead) (202) 586-1132 | kay.smith@eia.gov Vipin Arora (202) 586-1048 | vipin.arora@eia.gov Russell ...

  16. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  17. Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency Report to Congress June 2015 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy | June 2015 Message from the Assistant Secretary The industrial sector has shown steady progress in improving energy efficiency over the past few decades and energy efficiency improvements are expected to continue. Studies suggest, however, that there is potential to accelerate the rate of adopting energy efficient technologies and practices that

  18. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Sandina Ponte, a member of the University of Missouri's Industrial Assessment Center, inspects equipment at a manufacturing facility during an energy audit. | Photo courtesy of University of Missouri IAC. Sandina Ponte, a member of the University of Missouri's Industrial Assessment Center, inspects equipment at a manufacturing facility during an energy audit. | Photo courtesy of University of Missouri IAC. Cassie Mills Communications Associate in the Advanced

  19. CASL Industry Council Members:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASL Industry Council Members: We are looking forward to hosting you at the upcoming CASL Industry Council Meeting on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 through Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the following location: ALOFT Greenville Downtown Converge Conference Room 5 North Laurens Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-297-6100 Meeting Contact: Lorie Fox (865) 548-5178 Lodging: ALOFT Greenville Downtown: http://www.aloftgreenvilledowntown.com/ Hotel Information * Check-in time: 4 PM * Checkout time: 12 PM * Fast

  20. China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Morrow, Bill; Price, Lynn

    2011-01-14

    After over two decades of staggering economic growth and soaring energy demand, China has started taking serious actions to reduce its economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short and medium-term intensity reduction targets, renewable generation targets and various supporting policies and programs. In better understanding how further policies and actions can be taken to shape China's future energy and emissions trajectory, it is important to first identify where the largest opportunities for efficiency gains and emission reduction lie from sectoral and end-use perspectives. Besides contextualizing China's progress towards reaching the highest possible efficiency levels through the adoption of the most advanced technologies from a bottom-up perspective, the actual economic costs and benefits of adopting efficiency measures are also assessed in this study. This study presents two modeling methodologies that evaluate both the technical and economic potential of raising China's efficiency levels to the technical maximum across sectors and the subsequent carbon and energy emission implications through 2030. The technical savings potential by efficiency measure and remaining gap for improvements are identified by comparing a reference scenario in which China continues the current pace of with a Max Tech scenario in which the highest technically feasible efficiencies and advanced technologies are adopted irrespective of costs. In addition, from an economic perspective, a cost analysis of selected measures in the key industries of cement and iron and steel help quantify the actual costs and benefits of achieving the highest efficiency levels through the development of cost of conserved energy curves for the sectors. The results of this study show that total annual energy savings potential of over one billion tonne of coal equivalent exists beyond the expected reference pathway under Max Tech pathway in 2030. CO2 emissions will also peak earlier under Max Tech

  1. Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

    2005-07-06

    Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

  2. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Community Connections: Your link to news and ... All Issues submit Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Recipients include Picuris ...

  3. Eolica Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eolica Industrial Place: Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01020-901 Sector: Wind energy Product: Brazil based wind turbine steel...

  4. Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill Jumpstarting the carbon capture industry: Science on the Hill Carbon capture, utilization, and storage can provide a...

  5. Agile Biomanufacturing Industry Listening Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A consortium of nine national laboratories is holding the Agile Biomanufacturing Industry Listening Workshop on March 15, 2016 in Berkeley, California, to increase understanding of industry needs...

  6. Guardian Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guardian Industries Place: Auburn Hills, MI Website: www.guardian.com References: Results of NREL Testing (Glass Magazine)1 Guardian...

  7. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  8. Secondary Emission Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, David Roberts

    2015-03-24

    This report describes R&D on a new type of calorimeter using secondary emission to measure the energy of radiation, particularly high energy particles.

  9. Energy conservation and technological change as factors in climate change - a pulp and paper industry example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koleff, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Pulp and Paper Industry in the United States is one of this country`s most energy intensive industries with energy generally being the second or third largest direct operating expense in mill budgets. As such, the industry has long had an effective energy conservation program and has recorded impressive reductions in energy use. It is also one of the two most capital intensive industries in the United States and has a long capital investment cycle, which can be estimated by various techniques at between 20 and 30 years. This paper discusses the estimated impact of the industry`s energy conservation achievements on long term emission reductions of greenhouse gases and will show how technological changes within the industry have impacted past emission reductions and the prospects for continued progress through emerging technologies. The importance to the global competitiveness of the industry of implementing technological change designed to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases within the industry`s normal investment cycle will also be reviewed.

  10. Commercial industry on the horizon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belcher, J.

    2000-01-01

    About 5,000 Tcf of stranded gas reserves exist worldwide--gas that is not economically feasible to recover and move to market through pipelines. For oil producers, this is problematic for a number of reasons. What do you do with associated gas when environmental regulations worldwide are banning flaring due to concerns over greenhouse gas emissions? Reinjection is costly and may not be the best solution in every reservoir. While many producers have enormous gas reserves, they are of no value if that gas is just sitting in the ground with no potential markets at hand. How can you monetize these reserves? A potential solution to the problem of stranded gas reserves is GTL processing. This process takes methane and converts it to synthesis gas, uses the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process to convert the synthesis gas to syncrude, and upgrades the syncrude to various hydrocarbon chains to produce a variety of refined products. Three recent developments favor commercial GTL development: environmental regulations are creating a premium for ultraclean fuels; new technology is lowering the capital costs and operating costs of GTL development; and world oil prices have risen above $20/bbl. Therefore, the oil and gas industry is taking a serious look at commercialization of GTL.

  11. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial ...

  12. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in...

  13. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  14. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  15. Particulate emission abatement for Krakow boiler houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wysk, R.

    1995-12-31

    Among the many strategies for improving air quality in Krakow, one possible method is to adapt new and improved emission control technology. This project focuses on such a strategy. In order to reduce dust emissions from coal-fueled boilers, a new device called a Core Separator has been introduced in several boiler house applications. This advanced technology has been successfully demonstrated in Poland and several commercial units are now in operation. Particulate emissions from the Core Separator are typically 3 to 5 times lower than those from the best cyclone collectors. It can easily meet the new standard for dust emissions which will be in effect in Poland after 1997. The Core Separator is a completely inertial collector and is based on a unique recirculation method. It can effectively remove dust particles below 10 microns in diameter, the so-called PM-10 emissions. Its performance approaches that of fabric filters, but without the attendant cost and maintenance. It is well-suited to the industrial size boilers located in Krakow. Core Separators are now being marketed and sold by EcoInstal, one of the leading environmental firms in Poland, through a cooperative agreement with LSR Technologies.

  16. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  17. Assessment of the Incentives, Disincentives, and Alternatives for Steel Industry CO2 Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul T. Leuchte; DR. John Stubbles; Professor Fruehan

    2002-04-16

    This report presents the results of the third element of a trilogy of studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies on the consumption of energy and the emissions of carbon dioxide in the U.S. steel industry

  18. UAIEE and Industrial Assessment Centers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    55-62011| Industrial Assessment Centers * Started in 1976 * Currently 26 Centers across the US * Almost...

  19. Emissions credit trading: A new revenue stream for refiners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, J.; Hirshfeld, D.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes several innovations in the fossil fuels and automotive/petroleum industries which have been improved or invented as a result of the necessity to comply with Clean Air Act regulations. Such innovations as boiler modifications, usage of low-sulfur coal, improved combustion, pre-combustion cleaning of coal, reformulated gasolines, and oxygenated fuels have all contributed to reductions in air pollution emissions from fossil fuel-powered plants and automotive emissions. Market alternatives for reducing the impacts of the usage of fossil fuels and automotive emissions on the ozone layer are also described.

  20. Industry Partners Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  1. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  2. Petroleum industry in Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farideh, A.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the oil industry in Iran from the early discovery of oil nearly two hundred years ago in Mazandaran (north part) to the development of a giant modern industry in the twentieth century. Chapter I presents a brief historical setting to introduce the reader to the importance of oil in Iran. It focuses on the economic implications of the early oil concessions in the period 1901 to 1951. Chapter II discusses the nationalization of the Iranian oil industry and creation of NIOC in 1951 and the international political and economic implication of these activities. Chapter III explains the activities of NIOC in Iran. Exploration and drilling, production, exports, refineries, natural gas, petrochemicals and internal distributions are studied. Chapter IV discusses the role of the development planning of Iran. A brief presentation of the First Development Plan through the Fifth Development Plan is given. Sources and uses of funds by plan organization during these Five Plans is studied. The Iran and Iraq War is also studied briefly, but the uncertainty of its resolution prevents any close analysis of its impact on the Iranian oil industry. One conclusion, however, is certain; oil has been a vital resource in Iran's past and it will remain the lifetime of its economic development in the future.

  3. Energy-Efficiency and Air-Pollutant Emissions-Reduction Opportunities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Energy-Efficiency and Air-Pollutant Emissions-Reduction Opportunities for the Ammonia Industry in China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy-Efficien...

  4. Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research to help find ways of converting into useful products CO2 captured from emissions of power plants and industrial facilities will be conducted by six projects announced today by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Black carbon emissions in the United Kingdom during the past four decades: An empirical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novakov, T.; Hansen, J.E.

    2004-04-22

    We use data from a unique 40-year record of 150 urban and rural stations in the ''Black Smoke and SO2 Network'' in Great Britain to infer information about sources of atmospheric black carbon (BC). The data show a rapid decline of ambient atmospheric BC between 1962 and the early 1990s that exceeds the decline in official estimates of BC emissions based only on amount of fuel use and mostly fixed emission factors. This provides empirical confirmation of the existence and large impact of a time-dependent ''technology factor'' that must multiply the rate of fossil fuel use. Current ambient BC amounts in Great Britain comparable to those in western and central Europe, with diesel engines being the principal present source. From comparison of BC and SO2 data we infer that current BC emission inventories understate true emissions in the U.K. by about a factor of two. The results imply that there is the potential for improved technology to achieve large reduction of global ambient BC. There is a need for comparable monitoring of BC in other countries.

  6. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  7. Emission Abatement System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  8. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  9. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  10. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s June 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items mentioned in this article include: (1) a new fuel fabrication facility in South Korea, (2) use of mixed-oxide fuel in Belgium, (3) privatization of nuclear plants in Argentina, (4) startup of Ohi-4 in Japan, (5) purchase of uranium properties in Wyoming, and (6) formation of an international utilities forum.

  11. Fermilab | Resources | Industrial Partnerships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Leadership and Organization Leadership Organizational chart Committees and Councils Photo and Video Gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Related Links DOE FRA UChicago URA Newsroom Spotlight Press releases Fact sheets and brochures symmetry Interactions.org Photo and video archive Resources for ... Employees Researchers, postdocs and graduate students Job seekers Neighbors Industry K-12 students,

  12. wave energy industry research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industry research - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  13. Natural Gas Industrial Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  14. Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology Developments Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology Developments Significant improvements in ...

  15. Career Map: Industrial Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Engineer Career Map: Industrial Engineer Two industrial engineers analyze data on a computer. Industrial Engineer Position Title Industrial Engineer Alternate Title(s) Production Engineer, Process Engineer, Manufacturing Engineer, Industrial Production Manager Education & Training Level Advanced, Bachelors required, prefer graduate degree Education & Training Level Description Industrial engineers should have a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering. Employers also value

  16. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    emissions relative to petroleum. * DOE is interested in ... key role in helping the United States meet its continually ... the Average of U.S. Refineries Lower Life Cycle GHG ...

  17. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  18. National Emission Standards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in-growth of Rn from the decay of Th in thorium 222 230 wastes would not exceed the ... RADON EMISSIONS FROM U AND Th SOURCES 238 232 In the past, material from Mound Applied ...

  19. Global warming impact on the cement and aggregates industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, J. . Geopolymer Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    CO[sub 2] related energy taxes are focusing essentially on fuel consumption, not on actual CO[sub 2] emission measured at the chimneys. Ordinary Portland cement, used in the aggregates and industries, results from the calcination of limestone and silica. The production of 1 ton of cement directly generates 0.55 tons of chemical-CO[sub 2] and requires the combustion of carbon-fuel to yield an additional 0.40 tons of CO[sub 2]. The 1987 1 billion metric tons world production of cement accounted for 1 billion metric tons of CO[sub 2], i.e., 5% of the 1987 world CO[sub 2] emission. A world-wide freeze of CO[sub 2] emission at the 1990 level as recommended by international institutions, is incompatible with the extremely high cement development needs of less industrialized countries. Present cement production growth ranges from 5% to 16% and suggests that in 25 years from now, world cement CO[sub 2] emissions could equal 3,500 million tons. Eco-taxes when applied would have a spectacular impact on traditional Portland cement based aggregates industries. Taxation based only on fuel consumption would lead to a cement price increase of 20%, whereas taxation based on actual CO[sub 2] emission would multiply cement price by 1.5 to 2. A 25--30% minor reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions may be achieved through the blending of Portland cement with replacement materials such as coal-fly ash and iron blast furnace slag.

  20. Industrial Dojo Program Fosters Industrial Internet Development | GE Global

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Launches Cloud Foundry 'Industrial Dojo,' Contributes to Open Source to Foster Continued Development of the Industrial Internet Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Launches Cloud Foundry 'Industrial Dojo,' Contributes to Open Source to Foster Continued Development of the Industrial Internet

  1. Cadmium emissions from primary lead and primary copper smelting: Phase 1. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    Descriptions of these industries and associated air-pollution control equipment are presented. Cadmium-emission estimates for all U.S. plants in these two source categories and health risks from exposure to these emissions from each plant are discussed.

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. Combustion and Emissions Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion and Emissions Modeling This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background Modern transportation engines are designed to use the available fuel resources efficiently and minimize harmful emissions. Optimization of these designs is based on a wealth of practical design, construction and operating experiences, and use of modern testing facilities and sophisticated analyses of the combustion

  4. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels--Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 1 Summary, July 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    The Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control project is a government/industry collaborative project to identify the optimal combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emission standards for the 2004-2010 time period. This summary describes the results of the first phase of the lubricants study investigating the impact on lubricant formulation on engine-out emissions.

  5. Industry strengths open new services opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heller, K.

    1993-03-10

    The environmental service industry is in a state of transition in which innovative technologies are increasingly playing a critical role. These changes play to the strengths of the chemical industry, and several firms are effectively growing environmental businesses. At the same time, chemical companies, which are among the largest buyers of environmental services, are making decisions that reflect the changes. Du Pont, for example, has decided to rethink its involvement with the controversial Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. Initially expecting a shortage of incineration capacity, Du Pont had signed a contract - along with BASF and Chemical Waste Management - for a share of capacity at the 60,000-tons/year WTI unit. A number of chemical firms are leveraging their strengths. Air Products and Chemicals (Allentown, PA), for one, has partnerships in the waste-to-energy and flue-gas desulfurization businesses. The company runs cogeneration plants that can burn a combination of coal and natural gas to make both steam and electricity. Air Products assorted businesses can be strong at different times, says Hinman. The flue-gas desulfurization business, for example, was active during the first phase of enforcement of the 1990 Clean Air Act requirements for lower sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) emissions.

  6. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  7. Emissions trading comes of age as a strategic tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pospisil, R.

    1996-03-01

    Trading of emissions credits has quickly evolved from a curiosity to a viable compliance strategy for electric utilities and power-generating industrial firms. A sure sign that emissions trading has matured is the entry of power marketers onto the scene; in bundling pollution allowances with their electricity offerings, they are making their product more attractive - and stealing a page from the coal companies` strategy book to boot. Although most current activity involves credits for sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) trading is under way in certain areas as well, although NO{sub x} markets are local and thus slower to develop. However, utilities see economic development potential in this area; some are providing NO{sub x} credits to their industrial customers to help them comply with environmental regulations - and to retain their loyalty when deregulation affords them a choice of electricity suppliers. This paper briefly discusses the issues related to emissions trading.

  8. Regulation of Emissions from Stationary Diesel Engines (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    On July 11, 2006, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued regulations covering emissions from stationary diesel engines New Source Performance Standards that limit emissions of NOx, particulate matter, SO2, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons to the same levels required for nonroad diesel engines. The regulation affects new, modified, and reconstructed diesel engines. Beginning with model year 2007, engine manufacturers must specify that new engines less than 3,000 horsepower meet the same emissions standard as nonroad diesel engines. For engines greater than 3,000 horsepower, the standard will be fully effective in 2011. Stationary diesel engine fuel will also be subject to the same standard as nonroad diesel engine fuel, which reduces the sulfur content of the fuel to 500 parts per million by mid-2007 and 15 parts per million by mid-2010.

  9. Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01

    This revised ITP tip sheet on deaerators in industrial steam systems provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  10. Reid Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reid Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Reid Industries Address: PO Box 503 Place: San Francisco, CA Zip: 94104 Phone Number: 415-947-1050 Coordinates: 37.7923058,...

  11. Industrial Process Heating - Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Process Heating - Technology Assessment 1 2 Contents 3 4 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 5 1.1. Industrial Process Heating Overview ............................................................................................ 2 6 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................. 6 7 2.1. Status

  12. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  13. Emissions with butane/propane blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This article reports on various aspects of exhaust emissions from a light-duty car converted to operate on liquefied petroleum gas and equipped with an electrically heated catalyst. Butane and butane/propane blends have recently received attention as potentially useful alternative fuels. Butane has a road octane number of 92, a high blending vapor pressure, and has been used to upgrade octane levels of gasoline blends and improve winter cold starts. Due to reformulated gasoline requirements for fuel vapor pressure, however, industry has had to remove increasing amounts of butane form the gasoline pool. Paradoxically, butane is one of the cleanest burning components of gasoline.

  14. Enviromech Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Enviromech Industries Place: Thousands Palms, California Zip: 92276 Product: Alternative fuel system design and integration company. References: Enviromech...

  15. Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interactive Industry Interactive Procurement System Procurement System (IIPS) (IIPS) Douglas Baptist, Project Manager Information Management Systems Division US Department of ...

  16. CEMI Industrial Efficiency (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video.  

  17. Industry outreach a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surek, D.; Sen, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Outreach Project was initiated in October 1994 with the objective of developing a multi-year plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for targeted outreach activities for stakeholders in industry and the general public. This status report summarizes the work on industry outreach that has been completed since the inception of the project in October 1994. A three-pronged approach was taken to ascertain issues related to industry outreach. First, there was a review of on-going and past industry outreach activities at DOE and NHA. Next, a series of meetings with industry decision makers was arranged to get a better understanding of industry interests and concerns, and to discuss how DOE and industry could work collaboratively to develop hydrogen energy systems. Third, a workshop is scheduled where representatives from industry, DOE and other federal agencies can identify issues that would enhance partnering between the federal government and industry in the development of hydrogen energy systems. At this tiny, the review of on-going and past activities has been completed. Industry interviews are in progress and a majority of meetings have been held. Analysis of the information gained is in progress. The preliminary analysis of this information indicates that for appropriate near-term demonstration-type projects, the level of interest for collaboration between DOE and industry is high. The data also identifies issues industry is concerned with which impact the commercialization of hydrogen energy systems.

  18. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-04-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Soviet Union to build Iran nuclear plant; Dension announces cuts in Elliot Lake production; Soviet environmental study delays Rostov startup; Cogema closes two mines; Namibian sanctions lifted by USA and Canada; US Energy and Kennecott restructors joint venture; Australians reelect Hawke; China to buy Soviet nuclear plant; Olympic Dam`s first sale of concentrates to USA; Uranevz buys one-third of Cogema`s Rabbit Lake operations; East and West Germany forming joint nuclear law; and Nova Scotia extends uranium exploration plan.

  19. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting 12-13 April 2016 Meeting Minutes Page | 1 The spring 2016 meeting of the Industry Council (IC) for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was held on April 12-13, 2016 at the Aloft Hotel in Greenville, South Carolina and was led by the CASL IC Chairman Scott Thomas of Duke Energy and the new CASL IC Executive Director Erik Mader from the EPRI Fuel Reliability Program. The meeting location and logistics were excellent and the group profusely thanked Lorie

  20. Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Investments | Department of Energy Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments Emissions Tool Estimates the Impact of Emissions on Smart Grid Infrastructure Investments July 28, 2016 - 2:59pm Addthis In the face of extreme weather events, states, utilities, and other companies are increasingly seeking ways to boost resiliency while reducing their carbon footprint. The Emissions Quantification Tool (EQT), which was conceived of and

  1. Electric Power Industry--Chap6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and carbon dioxide (CO2). Coal-fired generating units produce more SO2 and NOx than other fossil-fuel units for two reasons. First, because coal generally contains more sulfur than...

  2. Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 2: Appendixes A--S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLuchi, M.A. |

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the appendices to the report on Emission of Greenhouse Gases from the Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, and other greenhouse gases are discussed. Sources of emission including vehicles, natural gas operations, oil production, coal mines, and power plants are covered. The various energy industries are examined in terms of greenhouse gas production and emissions. Those industries include electricity generation, transport of goods via trains, trucks, ships and pipelines, coal, natural gas and natural gas liquids, petroleum, nuclear energy, and biofuels.

  3. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R

    1991-09-01

    In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

  4. Regulatory risks paralyzing power industry while demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maize, K.; Peltier, R.

    2008-01-15

    2008 will be the year the US generation industry grapples with CO{sub 2} emission. Project developers are suddenly coal-shy, mostly flirting with new nuclear plants waiting impatiently in line for equipment manufacturers to catch up with the demand for wind turbines, and finding gas more attractive again. With no proven greenhouse gas sequestration technology on the horizon, utilities will be playing it safe with energy-efficiency ploys rather than rushing to contract for much-needed new generation.

  5. The CAIR vacatur raises uncertainty in the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Weiss; John Kinsman

    2008-12-15

    On 11 July 2008, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia issued a unanimous decision vacating the entire Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) and the associated federal implementation plan. The upset of this program to reduce power plant sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in the eastern United States was a great surprise, creating operational and planning turmoil in the industry. 4 refs.

  6. Federal laboratory nondestructive testing research and development applicable to industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.A.; Moore, N.L.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents the results of a survey of nondestructive testing (NDT) and related sensor technology research and development (R and D) at selected federal laboratories. Objective was to identify and characterize NDT activities that could be applied to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in US manufacturing. Numerous federally supported R and D programs were identified in areas such as acoustic emissions, eddy current, radiography, computer tomography and ultrasonics. A Preliminary Findings Report was sent to industry representatives, which generated considerable interest.

  7. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John C. Wagner

    2004-03-31

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  8. NOx Emission Reduction by Oscillating combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Institute of Gas Technology

    2004-01-30

    High-temperature, natural gas-fired furnaces, especially those fired with preheated air, produce large quantities of NO{sub x} per ton of material processed. Regulations on emissions from industrial furnaces are becoming increasingly more stringent. In addition, competition is forcing operators to make their furnaces more productive and/or efficient. Switching from preheated air to industrial oxygen can increase efficiency and reduce NO{sub x}, but oxygen is significantly more costly than air and may not be compatible with the material being heated. What was needed, and what was developed during this project, is a technology that reduces NO{sub x} emissions while increasing furnace efficiency for both air- and oxy-fired furnaces. Oscillating combustion is a retrofit technology that involves the forced oscillation of the fuel flow rate to a furnace. These oscillations create successive, fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones within the furnace. Heat transfer from the flame to the load increases due to the more luminous fuel-rich zones, a longer overall flame length, and the breakup of the thermal boundary layer. The increased heat transfer shortens heat up times, thereby increasing furnace productivity, and reduces the heat going up the stack, thereby increasing efficiency. The fuel-rich and fuel-lean zones also produce substantially less NO{sub x} than firing at a constant excess air level. The longer flames and higher heat transfer rate reduces overall peak flame temperature and thus reduces additional NO{sub x} formation from the eventual mixing of the zones and burnout of combustibles from the rich zones. This project involved the development of hardware to implement oscillating combustion on an industrial scale, the laboratory testing of oscillating combustion on various types of industrial burners, and the field testing of oscillating combustion on several types of industrial furnace. Before laboratory testing began, a market study was conducted, based on the

  9. Biofuel Industries Group LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biofuel Industries Group LLC Place: Adrian, Michigan Zip: 49221 Product: Biofuel Industries Group, LLC owns and operates the...

  10. Energy Intensity Indicators: Industrial Source Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The industrial sector comprises manufacturing and other nonmanufacturing industries not included in transportation or services. Manufacturing includes 18 industry sectors, generally defined at the...

  11. Assessment of Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applicatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applications, June 2001 Assessment of Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applications, June 2001 U.S. industrial facilities ...

  12. Industrial Assessment Centers Update, March 2015 | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Read the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- March 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, March 2015 More Documents & Publications Industrial Assessment...

  13. MRL Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MRL Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: MRL Industries Inc Place: Sonora, California Zip: 95370 Sector: Solar Product: MRL Industries is a US company committed to...

  14. Advanced Biofuels Industry Roundtable - List of Participants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Industry Roundtable - List of Participants Advanced Biofuels Industry Roundtable - List of Participants List of Participants from the May 18 Advanced Biofuels Industry ...

  15. Meehan s Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Meehan s Industrial Jump to: navigation, search Name: Meehan's Industrial Place: Milton, Ontario, Canada Zip: L9T 5C1 Product: Meehan's Industrial is a manufacturer, project...

  16. Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

  17. Ternion Bio Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ternion Bio Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ternion Bio Industries Name: Ternion Bio Industries Address: 1060 Minnesota Ave., Suite 6 Place: San Jose, California Zip:...

  18. Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation Place: Taipei, Taiwan Product: Lien Hwa Industrial Corporation is an agricultural,...

  19. Equity Industrial Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equity Industrial Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Equity Industrial Partners Facility Equity Industrial Partners Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility...

  20. TG Agro Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TG Agro Industrial Jump to: navigation, search Name: TG Agro Industrial Place: Brazil Product: Maranhao-based ethanol producer. References: TG Agro Industrial1 This article is a...

  1. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  2. The necessity for a practical approach to address organic emissions from cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonley, C.; Schreiber, B.; Kellerman, S.; Kellett, C.

    1998-12-31

    There is an inherent difficulty in monitoring organic emissions from hazardous waste combustion in the cement process. Data gathered by the EPA and the industry indicate that organic emissions at the main stack of cement kilns are principally from process characteristics and/or the desorption of organic constituents contained in the raw materials. Organic emissions are primarily based on the facility design and origin of the raw materials. One would generally conclude that organic emissions from fuels are essentially non-existent. To understand alternatives for monitoring organic emissions, this paper reviews some of the historical background behind the issue and reviews trends of characteristic organic emissions data. Based on this discussion and review, some approaches are presented to address organic emissions testing and monitoring when utilizing hazardous waste fuel in a cement kiln.

  3. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-11-15

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

  4. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  5. Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  7. Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Waste processing and pollution in the chemical and petrochemical industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and equipment used for pollution control in the chemical and petrochemical industries. Topics include emissions investigations, recycling and materials recovery studies, and standards for specific industries. Sources, site hazard evaluations, and the toxicity of specific chemicals are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Industrial Hygiene | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hygiene Ames Laboratory's Industrial Hygiene (IH) Program is dedicated to providing employees a workplace free from or protected against recognized hazards that could potentially cause illness or injury. The basic principles of industrial hygiene are applied: Anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of workplace hazards. The industrial hygienist participates on Readiness Review committees to assist in anticipation and recognition of chemical, physical, biological, or ergonomic hazards.

  10. DMI Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (NASDAQ: OTTR), is a diversified heavy steel manufacturer with a primary concentration on wind tower fabrication. References: DMI Industries1 This article is a stub....

  11. Greenline Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Place: San Rafael, California Zip: 94901 Product: Small to medium scale biodiesel plants designer and producer. They also run a biodiesel plant in Vallejo,...

  12. Jax Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jax Industries Place: Hillsboro, Oregon Product: Developer of recharge systems for CZ process silicon ingot growers, some of which produce PV silicon feedstock. Coordinates:...

  13. Industrial Feedstock Flexibility Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozokwelu, Dickson; Margolis, Nancy; Justiniano, Mauricio; Monfort, Joe; Brueske, Sabine; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-08-01

    This report (PDF 649 KB) summarizes the results of the 2009 Industrial Feedstock Flexibility Workshop, which took place in Atlanta, GA on August 19-20, 2009.

  14. Commercial & Industrial Renewable Energy Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) offers grant funding for renewable energy projects installed at commercial, industrial, public, non-profit, municipal or school facilities, or ...

  15. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the principles of industrial energy conservation and energy conservation applications, with emphasis on the energy-intensive industries. Topics covered include energy consumption, alternative energy sources, elements of energy audits, economic investment analysis, management of energy conservation programs, boilers and fired heaters, steam and condensate systems, classification and fouling of heat exchangers, heat transfer augmentation, waste heat sources, heat recovery equipment, properties and characteristics of insulation, energy conservation in industrial buildings, cogeneration, power circuit components and energy conversion devices, electrical energy conservation. A review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, as well as examples, problems, and case studies from specific industries are included.

  16. Deaerators in Industrial Steam Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet on deaerators provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  17. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency A Study Pursuant to Section 7 of the American Energy Manufacturing Technical Corrections Act June 2015 Blank Page iii Statutory Requirement ...

  18. Collaborating with Industry for Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-03-01

    This is a brochure describing Laboratory Coordinating Council's network of labs and facilities to promote partnership between industry and national laboratories.

  19. AEO2014: Preliminary Industrial Output

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Elizabeth Sendich, Analyst, and Kay Smith, Team Leader Macroeconomic Analysis Team ... Macro-Industrial Working Group, Sendich & Smith, 92613 DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE ...

  20. Advanced Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies Program) Advanced Manufacturing Office (Formerly Industrial Technologies Program) Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  1. ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and ...

  2. ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and...

  3. Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings Development of Industrially Viable Battery Electrode Coatings Development of ...

  4. Southeast Electronic Book of Industrial Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program handbook connects industry with the various energy efficiency resources available in the midwest.

  5. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  6. China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industry Complete Engineering Corporation CMCEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: China National Machinery Industry Complete Engineering Corporation (CMCEC) Place: Beijing,...

  7. Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment Recommendations Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment ...

  8. Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation Kinfra...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation Kinfra Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kerala Industrial Infrastructure Development Corporation (Kinfra) Place:...

  9. Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

  10. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  11. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  12. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  13. Energy Conservation Projects to Benefit the Railroad Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford Mirman; Promod Vohra

    2009-12-31

    The Energy Conservation Projects to benefit the railroad industry using the Norfolk Southern Company as a model for the railroad industry has five unique tasks which are in areas of importance within the rail industry, and specifically in the area of energy conservation. The NIU Engineering and Technology research team looked at five significant areas in which research and development work can provide unique solutions to the railroad industry in energy the conservation. (1) Alternate Fuels - An examination of various blends of bio-based diesel fuels for the railroad industry, using Norfolk Southern as a model for the industry. The team determined that bio-diesel fuel is a suitable alternative to using straight diesel fuel, however, the cost and availability across the country varies to a great extent. (2) Utilization of fuel cells for locomotive power systems - While the application of the fuel cell has been successfully demonstrated in the passenger car, this is a very advanced topic for the railroad industry. There are many safety and power issues that the research team examined. (3) Thermal and emission reduction for current large scale diesel engines - The current locomotive system generates large amount of heat through engine cooling and heat dissipation when the traction motors are used to decelerate the train. The research team evaluated thermal management systems to efficiently deal with large thermal loads developed by the operating engines. (4) Use of Composite and Exotic Replacement Materials - Research team redesigned various components using new materials, coatings, and processes to provide the needed protection. Through design, analysis, and testing, new parts that can withstand the hostile environments were developed. (5) Tribology Applications - Identification of tribology issues in the Railroad industry which play a significant role in the improvement of energy usage. Research team analyzed and developed solutions which resulted in friction

  14. Power plant emissions reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  15. Particulate and Gaseous Emissions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Gaseous Emissions - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  16. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Iyer, Maithili; McNeil, Michael; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Roy, Joyashree; Roy, Moumita; Chowdhury, Shreya Roy

    2011-04-15

    This report analyzed the potential for increasing energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the non-residential building and the industrial sectors in India. The first two sections describe the research and analysis supporting the establishment of baseline energy consumption using a bottom up approach for the non residential sector and for the industry sector respectively. The third section covers the explanation of a modeling framework where GHG emissions are projected according to a baseline scenario and alternative scenarios that account for the implementation of cleaner technology.

  17. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  18. AVLIS industrial access program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

  19. Industrial Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies » Technology Marketing Summaries Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Marketing Summaries (356) Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories

  20. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a study of the technical, economic and management principles of effective energy use. The authors report on: energy consumption, conservation, and resources. They present an analysis of thermal-fluid systems. Energy conservation in combustion systems. Heat exchangers, heat recovery, energy conservation in industrial buildings, and industrial cogeneration are discussed.

  1. GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GHG Emissions GBTL Workshop GHG Emissions EERE Presentation of Greenhouse Gas EmissionsResource Potential gbtlworkshopghgemissions.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Vehicle Emissions on ...

  3. Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Some International Comparisons

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Presents energy use and carbon emissions patterns in a world context. The report contrasts trends in economically developed and developing areas of the world since 1970, presents a disaggregated view of the "Group of Seven" (G7) key industrialized countries (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and examines sectoral energy use patterns within each of the G7 countries.

  4. 330 kWe Packaged CHP System with Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plahn, Paul; Keene, Kevin; Pendray, John

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a flexible, 330 kWe packaged Combined Heat and Power (CHP) system that can be deployed to commercial and light industrial applications at a lower total cost of ownership than current CHP solutions. The project resulted in a CHP system that is easy to use and inexpensive to install, offering world class customer support, while providing a low-emissions, higher-efficiency internal combustion engine for a CHP system of this size.

  5. State Regulations on Airborne Emissions: Update Through 2007 (Update) (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    States are moving forward with implementation plans for the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR). The program, promulgated by the EPA in March 2005, is a cap-and-trade system designed to reduce emissions of SO2 and NOx. States originally had until March 2007 to submit implementation plans, but the deadline has been extended by another year. CAIR covers 28 eastern states and the District of Columbia. States have the option to participate in the cap-and trade plan or devise their own plans, which can be more stringent than the federal requirements. To date, no state has indicated an intent to form NOx and SO2 programs with emissions limits stricter than those in CAIR, and it is expected that all states will participate in the Environmental Protection Agency administered cap-and-trade program. CAIR remains on schedule for implementation, and Annual Energy Outlook 2008 includes CAIR by assuming that all required states will meet only the federal requirement and will trade credits.

  6. Final Technical Report HFC Concrete: A Low-­‐Energy, Carbon-­Dioxide-­Negative Solution for reducing Industrial Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Larry McCandlish, Principal Investigator; Dr. Richard Riman, Co-Principal Investigator

    2012-05-14

    Solidia/CCSM received funding for further research and development of its Low Temperature Solidification Process (LTS), which is used to create hydrate-free concrete (HFC). LTS/HFC is a technology/materials platform that offers wide applicability in the built infrastructure. Most importantly, it provides a means of making concrete without Portland cement. Cement and concrete production is a major consumer of energy and source of industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The primary goal of this project was to develop and commercialize a novel material, HFC, which by replacing traditional concrete and cement, reduces both energy use and GHG emissions in the built infrastructure. Traditional concrete uses Portland Cement (PC) as a binder. PC production involves calcination of limestone at {approx}1450 C, which releases significant amounts of CO{sub 2} gas to the atmosphere and consumes a large amount of energy due to the high temperature required. In contrast, HFC is a carbonate-based hydrate-free concrete (HFC) that consumes CO{sub 2} gas in its production. HFC is made by reaction of silicate minerals with CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 100 C, more than an order-of-magnitude below the temperature required to make PC. Because of this significant difference in temperature, it is estimated that we will be able to reduce energy use in the cement and concrete industry by up to 30 trillion Btu by 2020. Because of the insulating properties of HFC, we believe we will also be able to significantly reduce energy use in the Building sector, though the extent of this saving is not yet quantified. It is estimated that production of a tonne of PC-based concrete requires about 6.2 million Btu of energy and produces over 1 tonne of CO{sub 2} emissions (Choate, 2003). These can be reduced to 1.9 million Btu and 0.025 tonnes of CO{sub 2} emissions per tonne of HFC (with overall CO{sub 2}-negativity possible by increasing carbonation yield). In this way, by replacing PC

  7. Misrepresentation of the IPCC CO2 emission scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Martin; Edmonds, James A.; Emori, S.; Grubler, Arnulf; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Joos, Fortunat; Kainuma, M.; Keeling, Ralph; Kram, Tom; Manning, Andrew; Meinhausen, Malte; Moss, Richard H.; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Riahi, Keywan; Rose, Steven K.; Smith, Steven J.; Swart, Robert; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2010-06-01

    Estimates of recent fossil fuel CO2 emissions have been compared with the IPCC SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios) emission scenarios that had been developed for analysis of future climate change, impacts and mitigation. In some cases this comparison uses averages across subgroups of SRES scenarios and for one category of greenhouse gases (industrial sources of CO2). That approach can be misleading and cause confusion as it is inconsistent with many of the papers on future climate change projections that are based on a specific subset of closely scrutinized SRES scenarios, known as illustrative marker scenarios. Here, we show that comparison between recent estimates of fossil fuel emissions trends and the SRES illustrative marker scenarios leads to the conclusion that recent trends are not outside the SRES range. Furthermore, the recent economic downturn appears to have brought actual emission back toward the middle of the SRES illustrative marker scenarios. We also note that SRES emission scenarios are designed to reflect potential alternative long-term trends in a world without climate policy intervention and the trend in the resulting climate change is not sensitive to short-term fluctuations.

  8. The feasibility of effluent trading in the energy industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    In January 1996, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a policy statement endorsing effluent trading in watersheds, hoping to spur additional interest in the subject. The policy describes five types of effluent trades - point source/point source, point source/nonpoint source, pretreatment, intraplant, and nonpoint source/nonpoint source. This report evaluates the feasibility of effluent trading for facilities in the oil and gas industry (exploration and production, refining, and distribution and marketing segments), electric power industry, and the coal industry (mines and preparation plants). Nonpoint source/nonpoint source trades are not considered since the energy industry facilities evaluated here are all point sources. EPA has administered emission trading programs in its air quality program for many years. Programs for offsets, bubbles, banking, and netting are supported by federal regulations, and the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments provide a statutory basis for trading programs to control ozone and acid rain. Different programs have had varying degrees of success, but few have come close to meeting their expectations. Few trading programs have been established under the Clean Water Act (CWA). One intraplant trading program was established by EPA in its effluent limitation guidelines (ELGs) for the iron and steel industry. The other existing effluent trading programs were established by state or local governments and have had minimal success.

  9. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  10. Industrial Scale Energy Systems Integration; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, Mark

    2015-07-28

    The industrial sector consumes 25% of the total energy in the U.S. and produces 18% of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Energy Systems Integration (ESI) opportunities can reduce those values and increase the profitability of that sector. This presentation outlines several options. Combined heat and power (CHP) is an option that is available today for many applications. In some cases, it can be extended to trigeneration by adding absorbtion cooling. Demand response is another option in use by the industrial sector - in 2012, industry provided 47% of demand response capacity. A longer term option that combines the benefits of CHP with those of demand response is hybrid energy systems (HESs). Two possible HESs are described and development implications discussed. extended to trigeneration by adding absorbtion cooling. Demand response is another option in use by the industrial sector - in 2012, industry provided 47% of demand response capacity. A longer term option that combines the benefits of CHP with those of demand response is hybrid energy systems (HESs). Two possible HESs are described and development implications discussed.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  12. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  13. Mining Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-07-01

    The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) relies on analytical studies to identify large energy reduction opportunities in energy-intensive industries and uses these results to guide its R&D portfolio. The energy bandwidth illustrates the total energy-saving opportunity that exists in the industry if the current processes are improved by implementing more energy-efficient practices and by using advanced technologies. This bandwidth analysis report was conducted to assist the ITP Mining R&D program in identifying energy-saving opportunities in coal, metals, and mineral mining. These opportunities were analyzed in key mining processes of blasting, dewatering, drilling, digging, ventilation, materials handling, crushing, grinding, and separations.

  14. Research on impacts of population-related factors on carbon emissions in Beijing from 1984 to 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yayun; Zhao, Tao; Wang, Yanan Shi, Zhaohui

    2015-11-15

    Carbon emissions related to population factors have aroused great attention around the world. A multitude of literature mainly focused on single demographic impacts on environmental issues at the national level, and comprehensive studies concerning population-related factors at a city level are rare. This paper employed STIRPAT (Stochastic Impacts by Regression on Population, Affluence and Technology) model incorporating PLS (Partial least squares) regression method to examine the influence of population-related factors on carbon emissions in Beijing from 1984 to 2012. Empirically results manifest that urbanization is the paramount driver. Changes in population age structure have significantly positive impacts on carbon emissions, and shrinking young population, continuous expansion of working age population and aging population will keep on increasing environmental pressures. Meanwhile, shrinking household size and expanding floating population boost the discharge of carbon emissions. Besides, per capita consumption is an important contributor of carbon emissions, while industry energy intensity is the main inhibitory factor. Based upon these findings and the specific circumstances of Beijing, policies such as promoting clean and renewable energy, improving population quality and advocating low carbon lifestyles should be enhanced to achieve targeted emissions reductions. - Highlights: • We employed the STIRPAT model to identify population-related factors of carbon emissions in Beijing. • Urbanization is the paramount driver of carbon emissions. • Changes in population age structure exert significantly positive impacts on carbon emissions. • Shrinking household size, expanding floating population and improving consumption level increase carbon emissions. • Industry energy intensity decreases carbon emissions.

  15. Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Measurement and Characterization of Unregulated Emissions from Advanced Technologies...

  16. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  17. Zero emission coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

    2000-08-01

    We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

  18. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  19. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  20. Industrial Hygienist/Health Physicist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position wil l serve as an Industrial Hygienist/Health Physicist in the Operations and Oversight Division, providing technical oversight of the Oak Ridge National...

  1. Learning in Emerging Energy Industries

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-10-16

    This software is a learning model excerpted from the BSM that can be used to examine effects of different learning rates and different techno-economics on industry evolution.

  2. Industrial Plans for AEO2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 10 Industrial Team Washington DC, July 30, 2013 Macro Team: Kay Smith (202) 586-1132 | kay.smith@eia.gov Vipin Arora (202) 586-1048 | vipin.arora@eia.gov Russell Tarver ...

  3. Fact #917: March 21, 2016 Work Truck Daily Idle Time by Industry - Dataset

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 7: March 21, 2016 Work Truck Daily Idle Time by Industry - Dataset Fact #917: March 21, 2016 Work Truck Daily Idle Time by Industry - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Work Truck Daily Idle Time by Industry fotw#917_web.xlsx (15.85 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #916: March 14, 2016 Fuel Savings/Emissions Reduction was the Top Reason Cited by Truck Fleet Management for Adopting Idle Reduction Technologies - Dataset Fact #833: August 11, 2014 Fuel Economy

  4. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

  5. Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01

    The era of publicly mandated GHG emissions restrictions inthe United States has begun with recent legislation in California andseven northeastern states. Commercial and industrial buildings canimprove the carbon-efficiency of end-use energy consumption by installingtechnologies such as on-site cogeneration of electricity and useful heatin combined heat and power systems, thermally-activated cooling, solarelectric and thermal equipment, and energy storage -- collectively termeddistributed energy resources (DER). This research examines a collectionof buildings in California, the Northeast, and the southern United Statesto demonstrate the effects of regional characteristics such as the carbonintensity of central electricity grid, the climate-driven demand forspace heating and cooling, and the availability of solar insolation. Theresults illustrate that the magnitude of a realistic carbon tax ($100/tC)is too small to incent significant carbon-reducing effects oneconomically optimal DER adoption. In large part, this is because costreduction and carbon reduction objectives are roughly aligned, even inthe absence of a carbon tax.

  6. Industrial Plans for AEO2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    30, 2013 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Industrial team plans for AEO2014 Overview -- AEO2014 * Process flow status & updates * Other model updates * Major data updates * CHP updates 2 Industrial Team Washington DC, July 30, 2013 WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Process flow models * General: - Replace energy consumption based on

  7. Working with SRNL - AMC - Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry The dynamic, long-term relationships that would emerge from this laboratory, industry, and academic collaborative would generate new concepts and approaches that not only "spin in" modern manufacturing methods that support DOE mission success but also "spin out" new innovations to support overall chemical and manufacturing competitiveness within the United States. Technology and innovation are being driven by the need to work smarter to reduce risk. The Advanced

  8. CMMS in the Wind Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10617P Unlimited_Release Printed January 2013 CMMS in the Wind Industry Dennis Belanger MRG, Vice President Doug Hart MRG Consultant Bob Crull MRG Consultant Brian Maier MRG Consultant Management Resources Group, Inc. 27 Glen Road, Sandy Hook, CT 06482 Abstract Through a wide variety of activities and interactions, Sandia has observed limited adoption of electronic work orders in the wind industry. To explore some of the contributing factors for this limited adoption, the CREW team looked to

  9. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Recipients include Picuris Pueblo and Rio Arriba County February 1, 2015 A new community mural on the Hunter Ford facility in Española celebrates the building's planned revitalization and the future location of the Northern New Mexico Food Hub. A new

  10. 1994 Nuclear Industry Conference review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The 1994 Nuclear Industry Conference, held in London United Kingdom, September 14--15, 1994, was the first serious nuclear energy conference to take place for more than 12 years. It had a challenging agenda, no less than whether the industry would sustain its role into the twenty-fist century. The conference focused on the world`s nuclear industry, which is in a crucial period of development, with few new reactors being built in Western Europe and none in the US. Attention in the industry is moving eastward to the troubled legacy of eastern Europe and to the dynamic new markets of the Far East. The immediate future of the reactor builders lies in these regions, for without new orders, the industry will decline. At the same time, the industry faces challenges at home. The end of the Cold War has brought a new appraisal of the fuel cycle, the ever-present dangers of proliferation, and the problems of long-term waste-disposal and decommissioning remain. New challenges include the role for nuclear energy as privatization of power utilities and liberalization of electricity markets takes place. Whether short-term market trends will dominate new orders for power plants or whether supply security considerations count was also discussed.

  11. Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Flexible CHP System with Low NOx, CO and VOC Emissions Introduction A combined heat and power (CHP) system can be a financially attractive energy option for many industrial and commercial facilities. This is particularly the case in areas of the country with high electricity rates. However, regions with air quality concerns often have strict limits on criteria pollutants, such as nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and

  12. Low-Emissions Burner Technology using Biomass-Derived Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-01

    The University of Alabama will develop fuel-flexible, low-emissions burner technology for the metal processing industry that is capable of using biomass-derived liquid fuels, such as glycerin or fatty acids, as a substitute for natural gas. By replacing a fossil fuel with biomass fuels, this new burner will enable a reduction in energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and an increase in fuel flexibility.

  13. Market Report for the Industrial Sector, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sastri, Bhima; Brueske, Sabine; de los Reyes, Pamela; Jamison, Keith; Justiniano, Mauricio; Margolis, Nancy; Monfort, Joe; Raghunathan, Anand; Sabouni, Ridah

    2009-07-01

    This report provides an overview of trends in industrial-sector energy use. It focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors and several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry.

  14. IMPACTS. Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-08-02

    The Impacts report summarizes benefits resulting from ITP-sponsored technologies, including energy savings, waste reduction, increased productivity, and lowered emissions. It also provides an overview of the activities of the Industrial Assessment Centers, BestPractices Program, and Combined Heat and Power efforts.

  15. Source category survey: secondary copper smelting and refining industry. Final report Oct 79-Jan 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, M.K.; Shobe, F.D.

    1980-05-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the secondary copper smelting and refining industry to determine the probable impact of the development of new source performance standards under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. The surveyed industry processes copper scrap to produce pure copper or copper alloy, other than brass and bronze. Secondary copper foundries, which melt and cast high-quality copper scrap without refining it, are excluded. Primary copper smelters and refiners, which produce copper from ore, are also excluded, although they also process copper scrap. Process, emissions, and economic data were gathered by literature searches, contacts with representatives of the industry, trade associations, federal government agencies, and state and local air pollution control agencies, and visits to two plants. The industry's production processes, actual and allowable air emissions, and emission control systems are described. State and local emission regulations are compared. Production and capacity are projected to 1989 and the impact of new source performance standards is assessed.

  16. Strategies for development and CO2 abatement in China`s power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, R.

    1996-12-31

    Chinese Government has set a series sustainable energy development policies and strategies to alleviate atmospheric pollution and to mitigate the CO2 emission. Some major policies and measures that will be emphasized in China`s power industrial development will be addressed in this paper.

  17. Fuel Mix and Emissions Disclosure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity suppliers and electricity companies must also provide a fuel mix report to customers twice annually, within the June and December billing cycles. Emissions information must be disclos...

  18. ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A. Farthing

    2001-02-06

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Farthing; G. T. Amrhein; G. A. Kudlac; D. A. Yurchison; D. K. McDonald; M. G. Milobowski

    2001-03-31

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. This objective is being met by identifying ways to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (fabric filters), and wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.

  20. Biodiesel and Pollutant Emissions (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, R.; Williams, A.; Ireland, J.; Hayes, B.

    2006-09-28

    Presents the results from three methods of testing--engine, chassis, and PEM--for testing nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from B20.

  1. Fugitive Emissions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fugitive emissions refers to the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from pressurized ... substitutes for high-impact fugitive greenhouse gases (GHGs) among the DOE sites. ...

  2. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments Details about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in China. session_2_industry_track_price_en.pdf (1.27 MB) session_2_industry_track_price_cn.pdf (1.47 MB) More Documents & Publications UAIEE and Industrial Assessment Centers The Second US-China Energy Efficiency Forum: Energy Management Standards and Implementation Energy Efficiency Financing

  3. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekinen, A.; Tikkala, H.; Aksela, H.; Niskanen, J.

    2013-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  4. Acoustic emission: The first half century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drouillard, T.F.

    1994-08-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) is approaching the half century mark, having had its beginning in 1950 with the work of Joseph Kaiser. During the 1950s and 1960s researchers delved into the fundamentals of acoustic emission, developed instrumentation specifically for AE, and characterized the AE behavior of many materials. AE was starting to be recognized for its unique capabilities as an NDT method for monitoring dynamic processes. In the decade of the 1970s research activities became more coordinated and directed with the formation of the working groups, and its use as an NDT method continued to increase for industrial applications. In the 1980s the computer became a basic component for both instrumentation and data analysis, and today it has sparked a resurgence of opportunities for research and development. Today we are seeing a transition to waveform-based AE analysis and a shift in AE activities with more emphasis on applications than on research. From the beginning, we have been fortunate to have had so many dedicated savants with different fields of expertise contribute in a collective way to bring AE to a mature, fully developed technology and leave a legacy of knowledge recorded in its literature. AE literature has been a key indicator of the amount of activity, the proportion of research to application, the emphasis on what was of current interest, and the direction AE has taken. The following is a brief survey of the history of acoustic emission with emphasis on development of the infrastructure over the past half century.

  5. Industrial Utility Webinar: Public Power Open Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-10

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  6. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition ...

  7. Orion Bus Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bus Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Orion Bus Industries Place: Ontario, Canada Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type...

  8. Hebei Huazheng Industry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hebei Province, China Zip: 53500 Product: Hebei Huazheng Industry manufactures electrical semiconductor devices. References: Hebei Huazheng Industry1 This article is a stub. You...

  9. Goat Industries Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Goat Industries Fuels Place: Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom Zip: LL56 4PZ Product: Welsh manufacturer of biodiesel equipment that...

  10. Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name: Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place: New York, NY Information About...

  11. Sierra Pacific Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Inc Place: California Website: www.spi-ind.com Twitter: @SierraPacificIn Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesSierra-Pacific-Industries295910403780823 References:...

  12. Colorado Industrial Challenge and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program 2009 State Award Fact Sheet that offers details of the Colorado Industrial program.

  13. Analyzing Your Compressed Air System; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program For additional information on industrial energy efficiency measures, contact the EERE Information Center at 1-877-337-3463 or visit ...

  14. EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS EIS-0428: Mississippi Gasification, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility in Moss Point, MS ...

  15. Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process, and Materials R&D Industrial Activities at DOE: Efficiency, Manufacturing, Process, and Materials R&D Overview of ...

  16. Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Future Bottlenecks for Industrial Water Recycling. Authors: Brady, Patrick V....

  17. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009 ...

  18. Agro Industrial Taruma | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial Taruma Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agro Industrial Taruma Place: Sao Pedro do Turvo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 18940-000 Product: Brazil based ethanol producer...

  19. California Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Solar Energy Industries Association Place: Rio Vista, California Zip: 94571 Sector: Solar Product:...

  20. Passive Solar Industries Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Passive Solar Industries Council Jump to: navigation, search Name: Passive Solar Industries Council Place: Ashland, OR Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL...

  1. Integrated Biodiesel Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Integrated Biodiesel Industries Ltd Place: Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01418-200 Product: Sao Paulo-based biodiesel producer....

  2. Industrial Assistance and Projects Databases | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Project Profiles Database Arrow DOE's CHP Technical ... Industrial Assessment Centers Database Arrow Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) perform ...

  3. Sanyo Chemical Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sanyo Chemical Industries Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 103-0023 Product: String representation "Sanyo is a petr ... uction process." is...

  4. Toray Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Toray Industries Inc Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 103 8666 Sector: Carbon, Vehicles, Wind energy Product: String representation "A...

  5. Vikram Group of Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vikram Group of Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vikram Group of Industries Place: Kolkatta, West Bengal, India Zip: 700001 Product: Kolkata-based tea processing...

  6. South Jersey Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jersey Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: South Jersey Industries Place: Folsom, New Jersey Zip: 8037 Sector: Services Product: An energy services holding company....

  7. AgroIndustrial Capela | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgroIndustrial Capela Jump to: navigation, search Name: AgroIndustrial Capela Place: Capela, Sergipe, Brazil Product: Brazil based ethanol producer located in Sergipe, part of...

  8. Millennium Energy Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Place: Jordan Zip: 1182 Sector: Solar Product: Jordan-based solar energy firm focused in MENA region. References: Millennium Energy Industries1 This article is a...

  9. PAIS Industries Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PAIS Industries Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: PAIS Industries Group Sector: Solar Product: Plans to supply solar-grade silicon, conditional on an agreement with the Inner...

  10. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf (938.86 KB) ...

  11. Industrial Scale Energy Systems Integration (Presentation), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ESI) opportunities in industry o Combined heat and power o Trigeneration o Demand response o Integrated, hybrid energy systems 3 Energy Use in the Industrial Sector * 25% of ...

  12. Aditya Solar Power Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aditya Solar Power Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aditya Solar Power Industries Place: India Sector: Solar Product: Bangalore-based solar project developer....

  13. Industrial Technology Research Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Industrial Technology Research Institute Name: Industrial Technology Research Institute Address: Rm. 112, Bldg. 24,...

  14. Clean Technology Sustainable Industries Organization | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Industries Organization Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Technology & Sustainable Industries Organization Place: Royal Oak, Michigan Zip: 48073 Product: A...

  15. Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Industries Association Name: Solar Energy Industries Association Address: 575 7th Street NW 400 Place: Washington, DC Zip: 20004 Number of Employees: 11-50 Year...

  16. Industrial Utility Webinar: Financial Mechanisms and Incentives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-10

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  17. Green Energy Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Energy Industries Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  18. Oregon General Industrial Water Pollution Control Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    General Industrial Water Pollution Control Facilities Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon General Industrial Water Pollution...

  19. Angelantoni Industrie Spa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angelantoni Industrie Spa Jump to: navigation, search Name: Angelantoni Industrie Spa Place: Massa Martana, Italy Zip: 6056 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: String representation...

  20. Everbrite Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Everbrite Industries Inc. Place: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Zip: M1R 2T6 Sector: Solar Product: Everbrite Industries is an electrical contractor...

  1. Danish Wind Industry Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Danish Wind Industry Association Place: Copenhagen V, Denmark Zip: DK-1552 Sector: Wind energy Product: The Danish Wind Industry Association...

  2. Guardian Industries Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guardian Industries Corp Place: Auburn Hills, Michigan Zip: 48326-1714 Sector: Solar Product: Michigan-based firm that...

  3. Industrial Utility Webinar: Combined Heat and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-09

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  4. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption ...

  5. Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency Industrial Assessment Centers Help ... The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is part of the Department's Office of ...

  6. Triangle biofuels Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triangle biofuels Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triangle biofuels Industries Place: Iowa Product: Biodiesel producer developing a 19mlpa plant in Johnston, IA....

  7. Qualified Specialists in Industrial Assessment Tools | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Qualified Specialists in Industrial Assessment Tools Qualified Specialists in Industrial Assessment Tools Locate a DOE-trained Qualified Specialist in your area to identify ways to...

  8. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project Profile: Verizon Central Office Building ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Distributed Energy Program Project ...

  9. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January ...

  10. Phoenix Bio Industries LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bio Industries LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Phoenix Bio-Industries LLC Place: Goshen, California Zip: 93227 Product: Ethanol producer. Coordinates: 37.988525,...

  11. Canyon Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Canyon Industries Inc Place: Deming, Washington State Zip: 98244 Sector: Hydro Product: Canyon Hydro produces a range of small...

  12. Solventus Industrial SL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Solventus Industrial SL Place: Alczar de San Juan, Spain Zip: 13600 Product: Spanish project developer and engineering. References: Solventus Industrial SL1 This...

  13. Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Aftertreatment Research Prioritization: A CLEERS Industrial Survey Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & ...

  14. Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Oregon...

  15. Shanghai Aerospace Industrial General Corporation aka Shanghai...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial General Corporation aka Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shanghai Aerospace Industrial General Corporation (aka Shanghai...

  16. CRV industrial Ltda | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CRV industrial Ltda Jump to: navigation, search Name: CRV industrial Ltda Place: Carmo do Rio Verde, Goias, Brazil Sector: Biomass Product: Ethanol and biomass energy producer...

  17. Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ennis Laundry...

  18. Individual Industrial WPFC Permit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Individual Industrial WPFC Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Individual Industrial WPFC Permit Published Publisher Not Provided,...

  19. Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Place: Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region,...

  20. Yusheng Industrial Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yusheng Industrial Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Yusheng Industrial Co., Ltd Place: Hunan Province, China Zip: 415000 Sector: Hydro Product: Hunan-based small hydro...

  1. Industrial Utility Webinar: Natural Gas Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-04-15

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  2. Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance logo Facilities seeking to use the ...

  3. Contribution to environmental impact of different uses of industrial districts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corti, A.; Carnevale, E.

    2000-05-01

    Industrial districts are highly characteristic of Italian industry structure, with energy implication due to both electrical and thermal energy demand. The present study represents an environmental methodology approach applied to an area in the Tuscany region characterized by the presence of a high net power output cogeneration plant connected to paper mill processes. The cogeneration unit is based on a innovative gas turbine characterized by low atmospheric environmental impact. Additional impact due to cogeneration plant installation was evaluated in comparison with pollutant concentration levels due to existent energy conversion processes, using atmospheric diffusional models. A comparison was also made with respect to pollutant concentration contribute due to ordinary road and highway traffic emissions existent in the area.

  4. Mitigation options for the industrial sector in Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelil, I.A.; El-Touny, S.; Korkor, H.

    1996-12-31

    Though its contribution to the global Greenhouse gases emission is relatively small, Egypt has signed and ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) and has been playing an active role in the international efforts to deal with such environmental challenges. Energy efficiency has been one of the main strategies that Egypt has adopted to improve environmental quality and enhance economic competitiveness. This paper highlights three initiatives currently underway to improve energy efficiency of the Egyptian industry. The first is a project that has been recently completed by OECP to assess potential GHG mitigation options available in Egypt`s oil refineries. The second initiative is an assessment of GHG mitigation potential in the Small and Medium size Enterprises (SME) in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The third one focuses on identifying demand side management options in some industrial electricity consumers in the same city.

  5. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    conservation. In this program, the salt metal interactions were studies and the emissions at laboratory scale at OSU were monitored. The goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding, based on first principles, of the pollutant formation that occurs when the salts are used in furnaces. This information will be used to control process parameters so that emissions are consistently below the required levels. The information obtained in these experiments will be used in industrial furnaces at aluminum plants and which will help in optimizing the process.

  6. Why industry demand-side management programs should be self-directed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritchett, T.; Moody, L. ); Brubaker, M. )

    1993-11-01

    U.S. industry believes in DSM. But it does not believe in the way DSM is being implemented, with its emphasis on mandatory utility surcharge/rebate programs. Self-directed industrial DSM programs would be better for industry - and for utilities as well. Industrial demand-side management, as it is currently practiced, relies heavily on command-and-control-style programs. The authors believe that all parties would benefit if utilities and state public service commissions encouraged the implementation of [open quotes]self-directed[close quotes] industrial DSM programs as an alternative to these mandatory surcharge/rebate-type programs. Here the authors outline industrial experience with existing demand-side management programs, and offer alternative approaches for DSM in large manufacturing facilities. Self-directed industrial programs have numerous advantages over mandatory utility-funded and sponsored DSM programs. Self-directed programs allow an industrial facility to use its own funds to meet its own specific goals, whether they are set on the basis of demand reduction, energy use reduction, spending levels for DSM and environmental activities, or some combination of these or other readily measurable criteria. This flexibility fosters a higher level of cost effectiveness, a more focused and effective approach for optimizing energy usage, larger emission reductions per dollar of expenditure, and more competitive industrial electric rates.

  7. Office of Industrial Technologies: Summary of program results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    Working in partnership with industry, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) is helping reduce industrial energy use, emissions, and waste while boosting productivity. Operating within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE), OIT conducts research, development, demonstration, and technology transfer efforts that are producing substantial, measurable benefits to industry. This document summarizes some of the impacts of OIT`s programs through 1997. OIT tracks energy savings as well as other benefits associated with the successfully commercialized technologies resulting from OIT-supported research partnerships. Specifically, a chart shows current and cumulative energy savings as well as cumulative reductions of various air pollutants including particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur oxides (SO{sub x}), and the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The bulk of the document consists of four appendices. Appendix 1 describes the technologies currently available commercially, along with their applications and benefits; Appendix 2 describes the OIT-supported emerging technologies that are likely to be commercialized within the next year or two; Appendix 3 describes OIT-sponsored technologies used in commercial applications in the past that are no longer tracked; and Appendix 4 describes the methodology used to assess and track OIT-supported technologies.

  8. QUANTIFICATION OF FUGITIVE REACTIVE ALKENE EMISSIONS FROM PETROCHEMICAL PLANTS WITH PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SENUM,G.I.; DIETZ,R.N.

    2004-06-30

    Recent studies demonstrate the impact of fugitive emissions of reactive alkenes on the atmospheric chemistry of the Houston Texas metropolitan area (1). Petrochemical plants located in and around the Houston area emit atmospheric alkenes, such as ethene, propene and 1,3-butadiene. The magnitude of emissions is a major uncertainty in assessing their effects. Even though the petrochemical industry reports that fugitive emissions of alkenes have been reduced to less than 0.1% of daily production, recent measurement data, obtained during the TexAQS 2000 experiment indicates that emissions are perhaps a factor of ten larger than estimated values. Industry figures for fugitive emissions are based on adding up estimated emission factors for every component in the plant to give a total estimated emission from the entire facility. The dramatic difference between estimated and measured rates indicates either that calculating emission fluxes by summing estimates for individual components is seriously flawed, possibly due to individual components leaking well beyond their estimated tolerances, that not all sources of emissions for a facility are being considered in emissions estimates, or that there are known sources of emissions that are not being reported. This experiment was designed to confirm estimates of reactive alkene emissions derived from analysis of the TexAQS 2000 data by releasing perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) at a known flux from a petrochemical plant and sampling both the perfluorocarbon tracer and reactive alkenes downwind using the Piper-Aztec research aircraft operated by Baylor University. PFTs have been extensively used to determine leaks in pipelines, air infiltration in buildings, and to characterize the transport and dispersion of air parcels in the atmosphere. Over 20 years of development by the Tracer Technology Center (TTC) has produced a range of analysis instruments, field samplers and PFT release equipment that have been successfully deployed in a

  9. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... that inject and store CO2 underground for the purposes ... production, underground coal mines, industrial ... The project focuses on reducing energy consumption in the ...

  10. Economical Recovery of By-products in the Mining Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, J.B.

    2001-12-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies, Mining Industry of the Future Program, works with the mining industry to further the industry's advances toward environmental and economic goals. Two of these goals are (1) responsible emission and by-product management and (2) low-cost and efficient production (DOE 1998). DOE formed an alliance with the National Mining Association (NMA) to strengthen the basis for research projects conducted to benefit the mining industry. NMA and industry representatives actively participate in this alliance by evaluating project proposals and by recommending research project selection to DOE. Similarly, the National Research Council (NRC) has recently and independently recommended research and technology development opportunities in the mining industry (NRC 2001). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Colorado School of Mines engineers conducted one such project for DOE regarding by -product recovery from mining process residue. The results of this project include this report on mining industry process residue and waste with opportunity for by-product recovery. The U.S. mineral processing industry produces over 30,000,000 metric tons per year of process residue and waste that may contain hazardous species as well as valuable by-products. This study evaluates the copper, lead, and zinc commodity sectors which generate between 23,300,000 and 24,000,000 metric tons per year. The distribution of residual elements in process residues and wastes varies over wide ranges* because of variations in the original ore content as it is extracted from the earth's crust. In the earth's crust, the elements of interest to mining fall into two general geochemical classifications, lithophiles and chalcophiles** (Cox 1997). Groups of elements are almost always present together in a given geochemical classification, but the relative amounts of each element are unique to a particular ore body. This paper generally describes

  11. Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-10-01

    ITP conducted a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, in major steelmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (PDF133 KB) also estimates steel industry energy use in the year 2010, and uses that value as a basis for comparison against the minimum requirements. This energy savings opportunity for 2010 will aid focus on longer term R&D.

  12. The chemical industry, by country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-03-01

    Beijing will be the site for the third ACHEMASIA, international petrochemical and chemical exhibition and conference, May 15--20, 1995. In preparation for this conference, Hydrocarbon Processing contacted executives of petrochemical/chemical industries and trade associations, seeking views on the state of the industry. The Asia-Pacific region is the center of new construction and expanded capacity and also a mixture of mature, developing and emerging petrochemical industries. Established countries must mold and grow with emerging economies as the newcomers access natural resources and develop their own petrochemical infrastructures. The following nation reports focus on product supply/demand trends, economic forecasts, new construction, etc. Space limitations prohibit publishing commentaries from all countries that have petrochemical/chemical capacity. Reports are published from the following countries: Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.

  13. COMPILATION OF REGIONAL TO GLOBAL INVENTORIES OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENKOVITZ,C.M.

    2002-11-01

    The mathematical modeling of the transport and transformation of trace species in the atmosphere is one of the scientific tools currently used to assess atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climatic conditions. From the scientific but also from the management perspectives accurate inventories of emissions of the trace species at the appropriate spatial, temporal, and species resolution are required. There are two general methodologies used to estimate regional to global emissions: bottom-up and top-down (also known as inverse modeling). Bottom-up methodologies to estimate industrial emissions are based on activity data, emission factors (amount of emissions per unit activity), and for some inventories additional parameters (such as sulfur content of fuels). Generally these emissions estimates must be given finer sectoral, spatial (usually gridded), temporal, and for some inventories species resolution. Temporal and spatial resolution are obtained via the use of surrogate information, such as population, land use, traffic counts, etc. which already exists in or can directly be converted to gridded form. Speciation factors have been and are being developed to speciate inventories of NO{sub x}, particulate matter, and hydrocarbons. Top-down (inverse modeling) methodologies directly invert air quality measurements in terms of poorly known but critical parameters to constrain the emissions needed to explain these measurements; values of these parameters are usually computed using atmospheric transport models. Currently there are several strong limitations of inverse modeling, but the continued evolution of top-down estimates will be facilitated by the development of denser monitoring networks and by the massive amounts of data from satellite observations.

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Perlack, R.D.; Prasad, A.M.G.; Ranney, J.W.; Waddle, D.B.

    1990-11-01

    Current and future carbon emissions from land-use change and energy consumption were analyzed for Sub-Saharan Africa. The energy sector analysis was based on UN energy data tapes while the land-use analysis was based on a spatially-explicit land-use model developed specifically for this project. The impacts of different energy and land-use strategies on future carbon emissions were considered. (A review of anthropogenic emissions of methane, nitrous oxides, and chlorofluorocarbons in Sub-Saharan Africa indicated that they were probably minor in both a global and a regional context. The study therefore was focused on emissions of carbon dioxide.) The land-use model predicts carbon emissions from land use change and the amount of carbon stored in vegetation (carbon inventory) on a yearly basis between 1985 and 2001. Emissions and inventory are modeled at 9000 regularly-spaced point locations in Sub-Saharan Africa using location-specific information on vegetation type, soils, climate and deforestation. Vegetation, soils, and climate information were derived from continental-scale maps while relative deforestation rates(% of forest land lost each year) were developed from country-specific forest and deforestation statistics (FAO Tropical Forest Resources Assessment for Africa, 1980). The carbon emissions under different land use strategies in Sub-Saharan Africa were analyzed by modifying deforestation rates and altering the amount of carbon stored under different land uses. The considered strategies were: preservation of existing forests, implementation of agroforestry, and establishment of industrial tree plantations. 82 refs., 16 figs., 25 tabs.

  15. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  16. Industry turns its attention south

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marhefka, D.

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries in the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. Significant foreign investment continues to elude Russia`s oil and gas industry, so the Caspian nations of Kazakhstan and Azerbaijan are picking up the slack, welcoming the flow of foreign capital to their energy projects. Separate evaluations are given for Russia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Moldova, Tajikstan, Uzbekistan, Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Serbia.

  17. Method for reducing CO2, CO, NOX, and SOx emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu; Li, Rongfu

    2002-01-01

    Industrial combustion facilities are integrated with greenhouse gas-solidifying fertilizer production reactions so that CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions can be converted prior to emission into carbonate-containing fertilizers, mainly NH.sub.4 HCO.sub.3 and/or (NH.sub.2).sub.2 CO, plus a small fraction of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3 and (NH.sub.4).sub.2 SO.sub.4. The invention enhances sequestration of CO.sub.2 into soil and the earth subsurface, reduces N0.sub.3.sup.- contamination of surface and groundwater, and stimulates photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere. The method for converting CO.sub.2, CO, NO.sub.x, and SO.sub.x emissions into fertilizers includes the step of collecting these materials from the emissions of industrial combustion facilities such as fossil fuel-powered energy sources and transporting the emissions to a reactor. In the reactor, the CO.sub.2, CO, N.sub.2, SO.sub.x, and/or NO.sub.x are converted into carbonate-containing fertilizers using H.sub.2, CH.sub.4, or NH.sub.3. The carbonate-containing fertilizers are then applied to soil and green plants to (1) sequester inorganic carbon into soil and subsoil earth layers by enhanced carbonation of groundwater and the earth minerals, (2) reduce the environmental problem of NO.sub.3.sup.- runoff by substituting for ammonium nitrate fertilizer, and (3) stimulate photosynthetic fixation of CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere by the fertilization effect of the carbonate-containing fertilizers.

  18. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  19. A guide to the emissions certification procedures for alternative fuel aftermarket conversions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Emissions certification is still relatively new to the aftermarket vehicle conversion industry. Many in the industry think that as soon as a vehicle is converted to operate on compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied petroleum gas (LFG), it automatically runs as clean as or cleaner than it did on the conventional fuel. However, recent studies have shown that aftermarket conversions may not always reduce emissions. To achieve emissions benefits, the conversion equipment must be designed and calibrated specifically for the engine and emissions control system on which it has been installed, and the installation and setup must be performed so as to not adversely affect the vehicle`s original emissions performance. The reason for certification, then, is to ensure that these criteria are met, that the vehicle continues to perform properly, and that it continues to satisfy all appropriate emissions standards throughout its useful life. The authors have prepared this guide to help equipment manufacturers, distributors, and installers understand the emissions certification process for aftermarket conversions. The guide gives an overview of the certification requirements established by the US EPA and by the state of California.

  20. Control of copper smelter fugitive emissions. Final report Mar 76-Oct 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devitt, T.W.

    1980-05-01

    This report deals with fugitive emissions from copper smelting and with related emission control measures. The study involved evaluation of the controls now used in the copper smelting industry and development of suggestions for alternative control devices and practices. A brief overview of copper smelting processes is followed by a more detailed analysis of the conventional processes identifying portions of the operating cycle that produce fugitive emissions. Emphasis is placed on Pierce-Smith Converting which is one of the major emission sources in copper smelting. Some alternate processes now in limited use in the U.S. are described including estimations of fugitive emissions from these conventional and alternative copper smelting processes. A specific report on the utilization of the Hoboken Converter is being prepared at the time of this report. The USEPA should be contacted if a copy of this report is desired.