National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for industrial plants includes

  1. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  2. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  3. Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of...

  4. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010

  5. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  6. Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

    2005-07-06

    Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

  7. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Self-certification of power plants in acordance with Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.).

  8. Mineral industries of Australia, Canada, and Oceania (including a discussion of Antarctica's mineral resources). Mineral perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, C.L.; Lyday, T.Q.; Newman, H.H.

    1985-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines report gives the mineral industry highlights of two of the world's major mineral producing countries, Australia and Canada, and seven Pacific island nations or territories--Fiji, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Republic of Nauru, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. The mineral resources of Antarctica are also discussed. Because of the size of the Australian and Canadian mineral industries, summary reviews are presented for each of the States, Provinces, or Territories. The most current information available from all nations is given on major minerals or mineral-commodity production, share of world production, and reserves. Reported also are significant mining companies, locations and capacities of their main facilities, and their share of domestic production. Other information is provided on mineral-related trade with the United States, government mineral policy, energy production-consumption and trade, the mining industry labor force, and prospects for the mineral industry. Maps show the locations of selected mineral deposits, oilfields and gasfields, mines, and processing facilities including iron and steel plants, nonferrous smelters and refineries, and cement plants, as well as infrastructure pertinent to the mineral industry.

  9. Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended ...

  10. Three Better Plants Partners Recognized at Industrial Energy Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference | Department of Energy Three Better Plants Partners Recognized at Industrial Energy Technology Conference Three Better Plants Partners Recognized at Industrial Energy Technology Conference June 30, 2016 - 4:20pm Addthis Jay_Wrobel_1.jpg Two Better Plants Challenge partners, Celanese Corporation and Eastman Chemical Company, and a Better Plants Program partner, The Dow Chemical Company, were recognized at the 2016 Industrial Energy Technology Conference (IETC) for their energy

  11. Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

  12. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  13. Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration

  14. Decision-maker's guide to wood fuel for small industrial energy users. Final report. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, M. P.; O'Grady, M. J.

    1980-02-01

    The technology and economics of various wood energy systems available to the small industrial and commercial energy user are considered. This book is designed to help a plant manager, engineer, or others in a decision-making role to become more familiar with wood fuel systems and make informed decisions about switching to wood as a fuel. The following subjects are discussed: wood combustion, pelletized wood, fuel storage, fuel handling and preparation, combustion equipment, retrofitting fossil-fueled boilers, cogeneration, pollution abatement, and economic considerations of wood fuel use. (MHR)

  15. DOE PLANT-WIDE ENERGY ASSESSMENT RESULTS RELATED TO THE U. S. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi, Len Bishop

    2006-01-05

    Forty-nine plant-wide energy efficiency assessments have been undertaken under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Industrial Technologies Program. Plant-wide assessments are comprehensive, systematic investigations of plant energy efficiency, including plant utility systems and process operations. Assessments in industrial facilities have highlighted opportunities for implementing best practices in industrial energy management, including the adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies and process and equipment improvements. Total annual savings opportunities of $201 million have been identified from the 40 completed assessments. Many of the participating industrial plants have implemented efficiency-improvement projects and already have realized total cost savings of more than $81 million annually. This paper provides an overview of the assessment efforts undertaken and presents a summary of the major energy and cost savings identified to date. The paper also discusses specific results from assessments conducted at four plants in the automotive manufacturing operations and supporting industries. These particular assessments were conducted at facilities that produce engine castings, plastic films used for glass laminates, forged components, and at a body spray painting plant.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of a possible CO{sub 2}-laser plant included in a heat engine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisio, G.; Rubatto, G.

    1998-07-01

    In these last years, several plants have been realized in some industrialized countries to recover pressure exergy from various fluids. That has been done by means of suitable turbines in particular for blast-furnace top gas and natural gas. Various papers have examined the topic, considering pros and cons. High-power CO{sub 2}-lasers are being more and more widely used for welding, drilling and cutting in machine shops. In the near future different kinds of metal surface treatments will probably become routine practice with laser units. The industries benefiting most from high power lasers will be: the automotive industry, shipbuilding, the offshore industry, the aerospace industry, the nuclear and the chemical processing industries. Both degradation and cooling problems may be alleviated by allowing the gas to flow through the laser tube and by reducing its pressure outside this tube. Thus, a thermodynamic analysis on high-power CO{sub 2}-lasers with particular reference to a possible energy recovery is justified. In previous papers the critical examination of the concept of efficiency has led one of the present authors to the definition of an operational domain in which the process can be achieved. This domain is confined by regions of no entropy production (upper limit) and no useful effects (lower limit). On the basis of these concepts and of what has been done for pressure exergy recovery from other fluids, exergy investigations and an analysis of losses are performed for a cyclic process including a high performance CO2 laser. Thermodynamic analysis of flow processes in a CO{sub 2}-laser plant shows that the inclusion of a turbine in this plant allows us to recover the most part of the exergy necessary for the compressor; in addition, the water consumption for the refrigeration in the heat exchanger is reduced.

  17. Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

    2006-07-31

    Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

  18. Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

    2013-10-01

    Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

  19. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  20. Construction of Industrial Electron Beam Plant for Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, B.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.; Choi, J.; Ahn, S.; Makarov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2004-10-06

    A pilot plant for treating 1,000 m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant, and it gave rise to elaborate the optimal technology of the electron beam treatment of wastewater with increased reliability at instant changes in the composition of wastewater. Installation of the e-beam pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, appreciable to reduction of chemical reagent consumption, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000 m3/day, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Korean Government.

  1. Adapting ORAP to wind plants : industry value and functional requirements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Strategic Power Systems (SPS) was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to assess the feasibility of adapting their ORAP (Operational Reliability Analysis Program) tool for deployment to the wind industry. ORAP for Wind is proposed for use as the primary data source for the CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) database which will be maintained by Sandia to enable reliability analysis of US wind fleet operations. The report primarily addresses the functional requirements of the wind-based system. The SPS ORAP reliability monitoring system has been used successfully for over twenty years to collect RAM (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability) and operations data for benchmarking and analysis of gas and steam turbine performance. This report documents the requirements to adapt the ORAP system for the wind industry. It specifies which existing ORAP design features should be retained, as well as key new requirements for wind. The latter includes alignment with existing and emerging wind industry standards (IEEE 762, ISO 3977 and IEC 61400). There is also a comprehensive list of thirty critical-to-quality (CTQ) functional requirements which must be considered and addressed to establish the optimum design for wind.

  2. Three Better Plants Partners Recognized at Industrial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    JayWrobel1.jpg Two Better Plants Challenge partners, Celanese Corporation and Eastman Chemical Company, and a Better Plants Program partner, The Dow Chemical Company, were ...

  3. Conduct an In-Plant Pumping System Survey; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 * September 2005 Conduct an In-Plant Pumping System Survey In the United States, more ... BestPractices emphasizes plant systems, where significant efficiency improvements and ...

  4. Preventive techniques of pollution control, the reliability and safety in core sectors including thermal power plant installations and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, J.K.

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports on a study of pollution control techniques, thermal power plant reliability and safety, and economics. Included are some illustrative examples dealing with pollution control. Topics include environmental planning, prevention strategy, pesticide use, food pollution, soil pollution, water pollution, thermal power plant emissions, and pollution control equipment.

  5. Industrial Plant Services Australia Pty Ltd IPS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New South Wales, Australia Zip: 2099 Sector: Services Product: Australian Subsidiary of Man Ferrostaal. The company sells and services equipment and plants for the ferrous,...

  6. Determine the Cost of Compressed Air for Your Plant; Industrial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and load duty cycle. * Use a systems approach while operating and maintaining a compressed air system. * Adopt a plant-wide compressed air management policy to cut costs and ...

  7. Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

    1992-07-01

    Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

  8. HTR-100 industrial nuclear power plant for generation of heat and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.; Kohl, W.

    1987-11-01

    Based on their proven high-temperature reactor (HTR) with pebble-bed core, Brown, Boveri and Cie/Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau have developed an HTR-100 plant that combines favorable capital costs and high availability. Due to the high HTR-specific standards and passive safety features, this plant is especially well suited for siting near the end user. The safety concept permits further operation of the plant or decay heat removal via the operational heat sinks in the event of maloperation and design basis accidents having a higher probability of occurrence. In the event of hypothetical accidents, the decay heat is removed from the reactor pressure vessel by radiation, conduction, and convection to a concrete cooling system operating in natural convection. As an example of the new HTR-100 plant concept, a twin-block plant design for extraction of industrial steam is presented.

  9. DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production

  12. Fuelwood procurement for an industrial power plant: a case study of Dow Corning's program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, A.G.; Sworden, P.G.; Bond, C.T.

    1984-08-01

    Dow Corning Corporation has developed effective procedures for meeting the fuelwood requirements of a 22.4 megawatt steam and electricity cogenerating power plant. The fuelwood procurement program of Dow Corning's Natural Resources Department involves special arrangements with private landowners, logging and hauling producers, and waste wood suppliers. The program's success is attributable to a favorable location, adequate allowance for advance planning, effective public relations, and flexible management. The program is significant because it demonstrates that industrial fuelwood requirements can be met and that improved production from nonindustrial private forests can be relied upon as a major source of fuelwood. 7 references, 7 figures.

  13. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  14. Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

    2009-03-01

    The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

  15. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  16. Improve Overall Plant Efficiency and Fuel Use, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program combined heat and power (CHP) tool can help identify energy savings in gas turbine-driven systems.

  17. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  18. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, MN. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 82.6-acre Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant (NIROP) site is a weapons system manufacturing facility in Fridley, Minnesota, which began operations in 1940. The site is a government-owned, contractor-operated, plant located just north of the FMC Corp. During the 1970s, paint sludge and chlorinated solvents were disposed of onsite in pits and trenches. In 1981, State investigations identified TCE in onsite water supply wells drawing from the Prairie DuChien/Jordan aquifer, and the wells were shut down. In 1983, EPA found drummed waste in the trenches or pits at the northern portion of the site, and as a result, during 1983 and 1984, the Navy authorized an installation restoration program, during which approximately 1,200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and 42 drums were excavated and landfilled offsite. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remediation of a shallow ground water operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylene.

  19. Compressed Air System Modifications Improve Efficiency at a Plastics Blow Molding Plant (Southeastern Container Plant): Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-06-18

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the plastics blow molding plant project.

  20. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  3. Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

    2005-03-31

    Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream

  4. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  5. Medium-Voltage Cables in Nuclear Plant Applications - State of Industry and Conditioning Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Braun

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 This report reviews the types of medium-voltage (MV) cables in use in nuclear power plants and the techniques that are currently available to assess the condition of MV cable systems. The project identified the types of cable systems in nuclear plants and their operating conditions and then assessed the aging and failure mechanisms of these cables and suitable diagnostic test techniques. In addition, ways to alleviate conditions that cause the most severe aging were identified.

  6. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants: Market Opportunities November 7, 2007 Denver, Colorado Paul Lemar Jr., President pll@rdcnet.com www.rdcnet.com www.distributed-generation.com CHP and Bioenergy for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants November 7, 2007 The Opportunity for Alternative CHP Fuels z High natural gas prices have decreased spark spreads and reduced CHP market potential z Increasing natural gas supply or reducing demand substantially is unlikely z Renewable portfolio

  7. Modeling plant-level industrial energy demand with the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, G.A.; Neifer, M.J.; Ross, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses Phase 1 of a project to help the US Department of Energy determine the applicability of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) database and the Longitudinal Research Database (LRD) for industrial modeling and analysis. Research was conducted at the US Bureau of the Census; disclosure of the MECS/LRD data used as a basis for this report was subject to the Bureau`s confidentiality restriction. The project is designed to examine the plant-level energy behavior of energy-intensive industries. In Phase 1, six industries at the four-digit standard industrial classification (SIC) level were studied. The utility of analyzing four-digit SIC samples at the plant level is mixed, but the plant-level structure of the MECS/LRD makes analyzing samples disaggregated below the four-digit level feasible, particularly when the MECS/LRD data are combined with trade association or other external data. When external data are used, the validity of using value of shipments as a measure of output for analyzing energy use can also be examined. Phase 1 results indicate that technical efficiency and the distribution of energy intensities vary significantly at the plant level. They also show that the six industries exhibit monopsony-like behavior; that is, energy prices vary significantly at the plant level, with lower prices being correlated with a higher level of energy consumption. Finally, they show to what degree selected energy-intensive products are manufactured outside their primary industry.

  8. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Director: Dr. Jie Chen (317) 274-5918 jchen3@iupui.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the IAC

  9. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Iowa State Director: Dr. Gregory M. Maxwell (515) 294-8645 gmaxwell@iastate.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the IAC program is that they work with

  10. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Michigan Director: Dr. Arvind Atreya (734) 647-4790 aatreya@engin.umich.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the IAC program is that they work with

  11. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Dayton Director: Dr. Kelly Kissock (937) 229-2852 kkissock@udayton.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the IAC program is that they work with other

  12. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    West Virginia University Director: Dr. B. Gopalakrishnan (304) 293-4607, 3709 Bhaskaran.Gopalakrishnan@ mail.wvu.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the

  13. Industrial Assessment Centers Identifying Energy Savings in Water and Wastewater Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Director: Dr. Chris Yuan (414) 229-5639 cyuan@uwm.edu DOE Headquarters Program Manager: John Smegal John.Smegal@ee.doe.gov Sustainable Water Utilities: Scott Hutchins Scott.Hutchins@hq.doe.gov DOE Industrial Assessment Centers Serving EPA Region 5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES March 2016 What Water Quality Professionals are Saying DOE Resources for Water Utilities One of the unique attributes of the IAC program is that they work

  14. Superior Energy Performance™ Opens Enrollment to All U.S. Industrial Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Superior Energy Performance™ (SEP) announces its new website—a valuable resource for manufacturers who want to prove their achievements in energy management and lower plant energy costs. SEP is a certification program applicable to facilities of all sizes in all manufacturing sectors. Built on the ISO 50001 energy management standard, SEP creates value by guiding companies to establish energy targets and then track, maintain, and verify sustained improvements in performance.

  15. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: CHP and Bioenergy Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Landfills and Wastewater Treatment Plants November 7, 2007 Denver, Colorado Paul Lemar Jr., President pll@rdcnet.com www.rdcnet.com www.distributed-generation.com Reciprocating Engines for ADG and LFG z Reciprocating engines are either Otto (spark ignition) or Diesel (compression ignition) cycle systems z Natural gas engines, as well as those powered by ADG or LFG, are typically spark ignition systems z Some dual fuel engines have been developed using ADG/LFG with a portion of diesel

  16. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-04-10

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  17. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  18. Framework for information technology integration in process plant and related industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beazley, W.G.; Chapman, J.B.

    1994-07-01

    Initially, the report presents a constraint framework that can identify all the root constraints and their associated activities for the engineering, construction, and operation of a petrochemical plant. Second, it demonstrates how the constraint framework leads to functional models of design that can be traced directly to the constraints they address. This avoids some of the problems in basing models on design tasks assigned within phases. Third, it demonstrates how external constraints do, in fact, influence design and how to analyze their influence. Fourth, it discusses some of the data that is produced to document that the constraints have been satisfied. It provides a list of some of the tools that support the creation and maintenance of these data sets. Last, it discusses the business case for 3D design and for digital Piping and Instrumentation Drawings (P ID) delivery.

  19. Compilation of RCRA closure plan conditions applicable to boilers and industrial furnaces at cement plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, A.N.

    1998-12-31

    A prudent approach to closure plan development will assist preparers of closure plans to ensure that a cement kiln BIF unit and associated Resources conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units are effectively closed in a manner that minimizes potential threats to human health and the environment, as well as facilitating closure in an economical and timely manner. Cement kilns burning hazardous waste-derived-fuel (HWDF) must comply with the general facility standards of Subpart G Closure and Post-Closure requirements of 40 CFR parts 264 or 265 in addition to the RCRA Part b permitting requirements of 40 CFR parts 270.13 and 270.22 (e) and (f). As a result, approved closure plans for BIF facilities (or individual BIF units) will contain general and site-specific permit conditions that will mandate numerous closure activities be conducted to successfully implement the partial or final closure of a permitted or interim status BIF unit or facility. Currently, a scarce amount of published information is available to the cement industry in the form of agency guidance documents that would assist facilities with BIF unit closures. A review of seven approved or implemented closure plans revealed significant differences between plans approved recently versus a few years ago as well as observed differences in acceptable closure criteria between EPA regions and various states agencies. The intent of this paper is to first familiarize readers with general closure plan requirements, followed by a detailed discussion of closure requirements that are pertinent to BIF unit facilities. Comparisons are presented to provide an overview of typical components of BIF unit closure plans.

  20. Process control monitoring systems, industrial plants, and process control monitoring methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skorpik, James R [Kennewick, WA; Gosselin, Stephen R [Richland, WA; Harris, Joe C [Kennewick, WA

    2010-09-07

    A system comprises a valve; a plurality of RFID sensor assemblies coupled to the valve to monitor a plurality of parameters associated with the valve; a control tag configured to wirelessly communicate with the respective tags that are coupled to the valve, the control tag being further configured to communicate with an RF reader; and an RF reader configured to selectively communicate with the control tag, the reader including an RF receiver. Other systems and methods are also provided.

  1. Introduction to IEEE 841-1994, IEEE standard for petroleum and chemical industry: Severe duty totally enclosed fan-cooled (TEFC) squirrel cage induction motors -- up to and including 500 hp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    IEEE 841, Recommended Practice for Chemical Industry Severe Duty Squirrel-Cage Induction Motors--600 V and Below, first issued in 1986, has been significantly revised and reissued as a Standard. The scope has been increased to include severe duty TEFC squirrel-cage induction motors with antifriction bearings in sizes up to and including 500 horsepower. Motor rated voltages of 2,300 V and 4,000 V have been added. Changes to the standard are reviewed in detail. Requirements are identified that improve motor reliability and increase motor life.

  2. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  3. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  4. US prep plant census 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2008-10-15

    Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

  5. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s June 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items mentioned in this article include: (1) a new fuel fabrication facility in South Korea, (2) use of mixed-oxide fuel in Belgium, (3) privatization of nuclear plants in Argentina, (4) startup of Ohi-4 in Japan, (5) purchase of uranium properties in Wyoming, and (6) formation of an international utilities forum.

  6. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-04-01

    Recent nuclear industry briefs are presented. These briefs include: Soviet Union to build Iran nuclear plant; Dension announces cuts in Elliot Lake production; Soviet environmental study delays Rostov startup; Cogema closes two mines; Namibian sanctions lifted by USA and Canada; US Energy and Kennecott restructors joint venture; Australians reelect Hawke; China to buy Soviet nuclear plant; Olympic Dam`s first sale of concentrates to USA; Uranevz buys one-third of Cogema`s Rabbit Lake operations; East and West Germany forming joint nuclear law; and Nova Scotia extends uranium exploration plan.

  7. High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

    1996-01-01

    As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

  8. Greenline Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industries Place: San Rafael, California Zip: 94901 Product: Small to medium scale biodiesel plants designer and producer. They also run a biodiesel plant in Vallejo,...

  9. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  10. Industry Economists

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industry Economists The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Industry Economist, whose work is associated with the performance of economic analyses using economic techniques. Responsibilities: Industry Economists perform or participate in one or more of the following

  11. EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant...

  12. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  13. Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99

  14. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Hewlett Packard Labs Gains Insights with Innovative ALS Research Tools Print Thursday, 05 May 2016 11:21 For the past eight years, Hewlett Packard Labs, the central research organization of Hewlett Packard Enterprise, has been using cutting-edge ALS techniques to advance some of their most promising technological research, including vanadium dioxide phase transitions and atomic movement during memristor operation. Summary Slide Read more... ALS, Molecular Foundry,

  15. The American nuclear power industry. A handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearman, W.A.; Starr, P.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the history and current organization of the American nuclear power industry. Part I focuses on development of the industry, including the number, capacity, and type of plants in commercial operation as well as those under construction. Part II examines the safety, environmental, antitrust, and licensing issues involved in the use of nuclear power. Part III presents case studies of selected plants, such as Three Mile Island and Seabrook, to illustrate some of the issues discussed. The book also contains a listing of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission libraries and a subject index.

  16. Energy Intensity Indicators: Industrial Source Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The industrial sector comprises manufacturing and other nonmanufacturing industries not included in transportation or services. Manufacturing includes 18 industry sectors, generally defined at the...

  17. Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Bell, Lisa S; Conchewski, Curtis A; Peters, Benjamin R; Pickett, Chris A; Richardson, Dave; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R

    2010-01-01

    Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

  18. Triangle biofuels Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Triangle biofuels Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Triangle biofuels Industries Place: Iowa Product: Biodiesel producer developing a 19mlpa plant in Johnston, IA....

  19. Save Energy Now for Maryland Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EmPOWER Maryland Energy Efficiency Act of 2008 sets the statewide goal of a 15% reduction in both electricity and peak demand by 2015. This policy initiative was motivated by several factors, which include, but are not limited to, electricity rate increases, a potential capacity shortage, and concerns about CO2 emissions and climate change. The goals set forth by the governor and state legislature correlated closely to DOE’s Better Buildings, Better Plants program goal of reducing energy intensity in the industrial sector 25% in 10 years. For the past several years, Maryland has participated in efforts to reduce energy consumption in the state. As part of these efforts, industrial customers are recognizing more and more the importance of energy efficiency. Maryland was clearly a suitable candidate to take part in activities related to industrial energy efficiency, and the Better Buildings, Better Plants approach is one of the most proven means for delivering results to industry.

  20. Caraustar Industries Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This plant-wide assessment case study is about commissioned energy assessments by the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program at two of Caraustar's recycled paperboard mills.

  1. 1994 Nuclear Industry Conference review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, T.J.

    1995-03-01

    The 1994 Nuclear Industry Conference, held in London United Kingdom, September 14--15, 1994, was the first serious nuclear energy conference to take place for more than 12 years. It had a challenging agenda, no less than whether the industry would sustain its role into the twenty-fist century. The conference focused on the world`s nuclear industry, which is in a crucial period of development, with few new reactors being built in Western Europe and none in the US. Attention in the industry is moving eastward to the troubled legacy of eastern Europe and to the dynamic new markets of the Far East. The immediate future of the reactor builders lies in these regions, for without new orders, the industry will decline. At the same time, the industry faces challenges at home. The end of the Cold War has brought a new appraisal of the fuel cycle, the ever-present dangers of proliferation, and the problems of long-term waste-disposal and decommissioning remain. New challenges include the role for nuclear energy as privatization of power utilities and liberalization of electricity markets takes place. Whether short-term market trends will dominate new orders for power plants or whether supply security considerations count was also discussed.

  2. Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program steam software tools can help industrial plants identify steam system improvements to save energy and money.

  3. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  4. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Community Connections: Your link to news and ... All Issues submit Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Recipients include Picuris ...

  5. Analysis of the Efficiency of the U.S. Ethanol Industry 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May

    2008-03-27

    In 2007, the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA) conducted a survey of US ethanol production plants to provide an assessment of the current US ethanol industry. The survey covers plant operations in both corn dry mills and wet mills. In particular, it includes plant type, ownership structure, capacity, feedstocks, production volumes, coproducts, process fuel and electricity usage, water consumption, and products transportation and distribution. This report includes a summary and analysis of these results.

  6. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  7. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  8. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  9. Photovoltaics industry profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  10. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  11. President's FY 2017 Budget Includes $878 Million for Fossil Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... are applicable to both coal and natural gas generation. ... pre-combustion CO2 capture and compression technologies for new and existing fossil fuel-fired power plants and industrial ...

  12. Compressed Air System Optimization Saves Energy and Improves Production at a Synthetic Textile Plant: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-05-17

    BestPractices technical case study gives an overview of a compressed air system improvement in a textile plant in South Carolina.

  13. Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2009-03-15

    The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Application of modeling and simulation to nuclear power plants, by Berry Gibson, IBM, and Rolf Gibbels, Dassault Systems; Steam generators with tight manufacturing procedures, by Ei Kadokami, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries; SG design based on operational experience and R and D, by Jun Tang, Babcock and Wilcox Canada; Confident to deliver reliable performance, by Bruce Bevilacqua, Westinghouse Nuclear; An evolutionary plant design, by Martin Parece, AREVA NP, Inc.; and, Designed for optimum production, by Danny Roderick, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy. Industry Innovation articles include: Controlling alloy 600 degradation, by John Wilson, Exelon Nuclear Corporation; Condensate polishing innovation, by Lewis Crone, Dominion Millstone Power Station; Reducing deposits in steam generators, by the Electric Power Research Institute; and, Minimizing Radiological effluent releases, by the Electric Power Research Institute. The plant profile article is titled 2008 - a year of 'firsts' for AmerenUE's Callaway plant, by Rick Eastman, AmerenUE.

  14. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  15. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  16. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn

    2010-10-07

    Various studies in different countries have shown that significant energy-efficiency improvement opportunities exist in the industrial sector, many of which are cost-effective. These energy-efficiency options include both cross-cutting as well as sector-specific measures. However, industrial plants are not always aware of energy-efficiency improvement potentials. Conducting an energy audit is one of the first steps in identifying these potentials. Even so, many plants do not have the capacity to conduct an effective energy audit. In some countries, government policies and programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency. However, usually only limited technical and financial resources for improving energy efficiency are available, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Information on energy auditing and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to industrial plants. This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and measuring energy use, analyzing energy bills, benchmarking, analyzing energy use patterns, identifying energy-efficiency opportunities, conducting cost-benefit analysis, preparing energy audit reports, and undertaking post-audit activities. The purpose of this guidebook is to assist energy auditors and engineers in the plant to conduct a well-structured and effective energy audit.

  17. Improve Compressed Air System Performance with AIRMaster+, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program AIRMaster+ software tool can help industrial plants optimize compressed air system efficiency.

  18. Hyundai Heavy Industries Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    goods such as switchgears, circuit breakers, and constructs industrial plants such as nuclear and environmental plants. Coordinates: 35.566811, 129.351395 Show Map Loading...

  19. DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the first industrial plants in ... These newly certified plants participated in the Superior Energy Performance program's ...

  20. Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants Development of Low Cost Industrially Scalable PCM Capsules for Thermal Energy Storage in CSP Plants This presentation was delivered at ...

  1. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The facility has been used for more than a decade by a virtual Who's Who of the semiconductor industry to simulate the potential failures posed by cosmic-ray-induced neutrons upon miniature electronic devices, such as chips that help control aircraft or complex integrated circuits in automobiles. Industrial User Information The Neutron and Nuclear Science (WNR) Facility welcomes proposals for beam time experiments from industry users. Proprietary and non-proprietary industrial

  2. Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu Commercial Sector 11<//td> 1989 711,212 202,091 600,653 – –

  3. Ford Cleveland: Inside-Out Analysis Identifies Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities at Metal Casting Plant; Industrial Technologies Program Metal Casting BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01

    The Ford Cleveland Casting Plant used results from its plant-wide energy efficiency assessment to identify 16 energy- and cost-saving projects. These projects addressed combustion, compressed air, water, steam, motor drive, and lighting systems. When implemented, the projects should save a total of$3.28 million per year. In addition, two long-term projects were identified that together would represent another$9.5 million in cost savings.

  4. INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

    2010-05-28

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

  5. Better Plants Program Progress Update: Fall 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is a national partnership initiative that ... 200 billion each year to power their plants. 1 The industrial sector has the ...

  6. The methanol industry`s missed opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests.

  7. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  8. Natural gas in the energy industry of the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttica, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides a gas industry perspective on the impacts of restructuring the natural gas and electric industries. The four main implications discussed are: (1) market trends, (2) strategic positioning, (3) significant market implications, and (4) issues for the future. Market trends discussed include transitioning rate of return to market competition and regulatory impacts. Significant market implications for gas-fired generation identified include limited new generation investment, extension of existing plants, and an opportunity for distributed power generation. 12 tabs.

  9. Compressed Air Storage Strategies; Industrial Technologies Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review the plant's compressed air demand patterns to determine whether storage would be benefcial. * Examine the ...

  10. PRAJ Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    molasses based distillery technology, plant and equipment for alcohol, fuel ethanol and beer production. References: PRAJ Industries Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  11. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  12. Better Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Leading manufacturers and industrial-scale energy-using organizations demonstrate their commitment to improving energy performance by signing a voluntary pledge to reduce their energy intensity by 25% over a ten year period. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings, Better Plants Program is an important partnership which consists of approximately 150 industrial companies, representing about 2,300 facilities and close to 11% of the total U.S. manufacturing energy footprint as well as several water and wastewater treatment organizations.

  13. Uranium industry annual, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-29

    This report provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, federal and state agencies, the uranium and utility industries, and the public. It utilizes data from the mandatory ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey,'' Form EIA-858; historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and by the Grand Junction (Colorado) Project Office of the Idaho Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE); and other data from federal agencies that preceded the DOE. The data provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's annual activities and include some information about industry plans and commitments over the next several years. Where these data are presented in aggregate form, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific data while still conveying an accurate and complete statistical representation of the industry data.

  14. Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis

    2004-06-15

    This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

  15. Solar industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumsdaine, E.

    1981-04-01

    The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

  16. Pinellas Plant annual site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Inc., and the US Department of Energy are committed to successfully administering a high-quality Environmental, Safety and Health Program at the Pinellas Plant in Pinellas County, Florida. Part of this commitment includes accurately documenting and communicating to the Pinellas Plant stakeholders the results of the Pinellas Plant`s environmental compliance and monitoring activities. The Annual Site Environmental Report presents a comprehensive summary of the results of the Environmental Monitoring, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs at the Pinellas Plant for 1995. This report also includes the plant`s performance in the areas of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and standards and identifies major Environmental, Safety and Health Program initiatives and accomplishments for 1995. As a result of the end of the Department of Energy`s Defense Programs mission (weapons production) on September 30, 1994, considerable changes at the Pinellas Plant are occurring. The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management is now the landlord of the Pinellas Plant to facilitate the plant`s new mission of transition to alternate use in support of economic development and safe shutdown. The Department of Energy sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council in March 1995, and it is leasing back a portion of the plant through September 1997, to complete the safe shutdown and transition activities.

  17. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. October 15, 2012 Outfall from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center cooling towers Intermittent flow of discharged water from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center eventually reaches perennial segment of Sandia Canyon during storm events (Outfall 03A199). Contact Environmental Communication & Public

  18. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users - Media Publications and Information The Invisible Neutron Threat Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices Nuclear Science Research at the LANSCE-WNR...

  19. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  20. Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) can help petroleum refining and chemical plants improve energy efficiency.

  1. Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 13,517 3,896 9,920 102 27,435 145 10,305 10,450 – 37,885 1990 14,670 5,406 15,515 118 35,709 387 10,193 10,580 – 46,289 1991 15,967 3,684 20,809 118 40,578 169 8,980 9,149 1 49,728 1992

  2. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  3. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  4. Session: Wind industry project development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

  5. Directory of Tennessee's forest industries 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A directory of primary and secondary forest industries is presented. Firm names and addresses are listed by county in alphabetical order. The following information is listed for each industry: type of plant, production and employee size class, products manufactured, and equipment. For the primary industries, the major species of trees used are listed. (MHR)

  6. HTGR Industrial Application Functional and Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. E. Demick

    2010-08-01

    This document specifies the functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the conceptual design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to a typical industrial facility. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers over the preceding three years to identify the energy needs of industrial processes for which the HTGR technology is technically and economically viable. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a conceptual design of the plant that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  7. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of E. I. Dupont de Nemours and Company, Inc. , Chocolate Bayou Plant, Alvin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajen, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    A walkthrough survey of EI duPont deNemours and Company, Incorporated, Alvin, Texas was conducted in November, 1984. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene monomer manufacturing process and the potential for exposure. The facility manufactured a crude product stream containing 1,3-butadiene as a coproduct of its ethylene process. The crude was refined to a 99.5% 1,3-butadiene product. The refining process occurred in a closed system, tightly maintained for economic, fire, and health-hazard reasons. The product was transferred by way of a pipeline to storage spheres for later transport off site. The facility used an open-loop cylinder (bomb) technique for quality control sampling. All pumps were equipped with single mechanical seals, which were in the process of being replaced by tandem seals. Since 1962, the facility had experienced process changes and three changes of ownership. Because of these changes, records from previous owners of industrial hygiene monitoring were not available. Job titles identified as having potential exposure were processors, wage employee supervisors, production engineers, and laboratory technicians. The author concludes that a closed-loop manual quality-control sampling system should be installed to reduce exposure from this source.

  8. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

    1998-06-09

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

  9. Industrial Process Surveillance System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    2001-01-30

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  10. Industrial process surveillance system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gross, Kenneth C.; Wegerich, Stephan W.; Singer, Ralph M.; Mott, Jack E.

    1998-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

  11. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  12. Economic analysis of small-scale fuel alcohol plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, J.J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    To plan Department of Energy support programs, it is essential to understand the fundamental economics of both the large industrial size plants and the small on-farm size alcohol plants. EG and G Idaho, Inc., has designed a 25 gallon per hour anhydrous ethanol plant for the Department of Energy's Alcohol Fuels Office. This is a state-of-the-art reference plant, which will demonstrate the cost and performance of currently available equipment. The objective of this report is to examine the economics of the EG and G small-scale alcohol plant design and to determine the conditions under which a farm plant is a financially sound investment. The reference EG and G Small-Scale Plant is estimated to cost $400,000. Given the baseline conditions defined in this report, it is calculated that this plant will provide an annual after-tax of return on equity of 15%, with alcohol selling at $1.62 per gallon. It is concluded that this plant is an excellent investment in today's market, where 200 proof ethanol sells for between $1.80 and $2.00 per gallon. The baseline conditions which have a significant effect on the economics include plant design parameters, cost estimates, financial assumptions and economic forecasts. Uncertainty associated with operational variables will be eliminated when EG and G's reference plant begins operation in the fall of 1980. Plant operation will verify alcohol yield per bushel of corn, labor costs, maintenance costs, plant availability and by-product value.

  13. Industry Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel cell and biogas industries perspectives. Presented by Mike Hicks, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the NREL/DOE Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop held June 11-13, 2012, in Golden, Colorado.

  14. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  15. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S.

  16. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 108 101 101 100 100 Coal - - - - - Petroleum 108 101 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  17. Safety aspects of gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium enrichment by gas centrifuge is a commercially proven, viable technology. Gas centrifuge enrichment plant operations pose hazards that are also found in other industries as well as unique hazards as a result of processing and handling uranium hexafluoride and the handling of enriched uranium. Hazards also found in other industries included those posed by the use of high-speed rotating equipment and equipment handling by use of heavy-duty cranes. Hazards from high-speed rotating equipment are associated with the operation of the gas centrifuges themselves and with the operation of the uranium hexafluoride compressors in the tail withdrawal system. These and related hazards are discussed. It is included that commercial gas centrifuge enrichment plants have been designed to operate safely.

  18. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  19. Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant

  20. The industrial ecology of steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  1. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-12-22

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  2. Market development directory for solar industrial process heat systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this directory is to provide a basis for market development activities through a location listing of key trade associations, trade periodicals, and key firms for three target groups. Potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers were identified as the prime targets for market development activities. The bulk of the directory is a listing of these two groups. The third group, solar IPH equipment manufacturers, was included to provide an information source for potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers. Trade associates and their publications are listed for selected four-digit Standard Industrial Code (SIC) industries. Since industries requiring relatively lower temperature process heat probably will comprise most of the near-term market for solar IPH systems, the 80 SIC's included in this chapter have process temperature requirements less than 350/sup 0/F. Some key statistics and a location list of the largest plants (according to number of employees) in each state are included for 15 of the 80 SIC's. Architectural/engineering and consulting firms are listed which are known to have solar experience. Professional associated and periodicals to which information on solar IPH sytstems may be directed also are included. Solar equipment manufacturers and their associations are listed. The listing is based on the SERI Solar Energy Information Data Base (SEIDB).

  3. Better Buildings, Better Plants:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings, Better Plants: AMO Technical Assistance Overview Andre de Fontaine This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | Advanced Manufacturing Office Better Buildings, Better Plants Overview  Better Buildings, Better Plants is a national, voluntary industrial energy efficiency leadership initiative.  It is a key component of the President's Better Buildings Initiative, which seeks to improve the energy efficiency of

  4. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  5. Commercial / Industrial Lighting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Commercial Program Development Commercial Current Promotions Industrial Federal Agriculture Commercial & Industrial Lighting Efficiency Program The Commercial & Industrial...

  6. Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant A pilot-scale conversion plant for researchers, industry partners, and stakeholders to test a variety of biochemical conversion processes and ...

  7. Pinellas Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report presents a comprehensive summary of the results of the Environmental Monitoring, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs at the Pinellas Plant, in Pinellas County, Florida for 1994. This report also includes the plant`s performance in the areas of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and standards and identifies major Environmental, Safety and Health Program initiatives and accomplishments for 1994. As a result of the end of Department of Energy Defense Programs mission production on September 30, 1994, considerable changes at the Pinellas Plant occurred. These changes, which included transitioning the plant toward alternate use in support of economic development and safe shutdown, both increased and heightened Environmental, Safety and Health responsibilities. In December 1994, the Department of Energy announced it had reached an agreement to sell the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council in March 1995. The plant is being leased back by the Department of Energy through September 1997 to complete safe shutdown, reconfiguration, transfer of equipment to other Department of Energy production facilities, and transition to commercial ventures. Permit modifications and transfers will be completed during 1995 to reflect the new ownership by the Pinellas County Industry Council and to include new tenants as needed.

  8. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the principles of industrial energy conservation and energy conservation applications, with emphasis on the energy-intensive industries. Topics covered include energy consumption, alternative energy sources, elements of energy audits, economic investment analysis, management of energy conservation programs, boilers and fired heaters, steam and condensate systems, classification and fouling of heat exchangers, heat transfer augmentation, waste heat sources, heat recovery equipment, properties and characteristics of insulation, energy conservation in industrial buildings, cogeneration, power circuit components and energy conversion devices, electrical energy conservation. A review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, as well as examples, problems, and case studies from specific industries are included.

  9. Automatic control in petroleum, petrochemical and desalination industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotob, S.

    1986-01-01

    This is the second IFAC workshop on the subject of Automatic Control in Oil and Desalination Industries. Presentations and discussions underscored the priorities of oil and desalination industries in getting better overall quality, improved energy use, lower cost, and better safety and security. These factors will take on added importance to oil exporting nations that have been hit recently by large oil price declines, which are forcing them to improve the efficiency of their industries and rationalize all new capital expenditures. Papers presented at the workshop included reviews of theoretical developments in control and research in modelling, optimization, instrumentation and control. They included the latest developments in applications of control systems to petroleum, petrochemical and desalination industries such as refineries, multi-stage flash desalination, chemical reactors, and bioreactors. The papers covered the latest in the applications of adaptive control, robust control, decentralized control, bilinear control, measurement techniques, plant optimization and maintenance, and artificial intelligence. Several case studies on modernization of refineries and controls and its economics were included. Two panel discussions, on new projects at the Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) and needs for control systems were held. Participation in the workshop came from the oil industry and academic institutions.

  10. Industry Partners Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

  11. MHK technology developments include current

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology developments include current energy conversion (CEC) devices, for example, hydrokinetic turbines that extract power from water currents (riverine, tidal, and ocean) and wave energy conversion (WEC) devices that extract power from wave motion. Sandia's MHK research leverages decades of experience in engineering, design, and analysis of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high- performance computing (HPC), advanced materials and coatings, nondestructive

  12. Improve Motor System Efficiency with MotorMaster+, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01

    This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program MotorMaster+ software tool aids industrial plants with finding energy-efficient motor replacement options and managing motor systems.

  13. OIT Wireless Telemetry for Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manges, WW

    2002-09-03

    The need for advanced wireless technology has been identified in the National Research Council publication (1) ''Manufacturing Process Controls for the Industries of the Future as a Critical Technology for the Future''. The deployment challenges to be overcome in order for wireless to be a viable option include: (1) eliminating interference (assuring reliable communications); (2) easing the deployment of intelligent, wireless sensors; (3) developing reliable networks (robust architectures); (4) developing remote power (long-lasting and reliable); and (5) developing standardized communication protocols. This project demonstrated the feasibility of robust wireless sensor networks that could meet these requirements for the harsh environments common to the DOE/OIT Industries of the Future. It resulted in a wireless test bed that was demonstrated in a paper mill and a steel plant. The test bed illustrated key protocols and components that would be required in a real-life, wireless network. The technologies for low power connectivity developed and demonstrated at the plant eased fears that the radios would interfere with existing control equipment. The same direct sequence, spread spectrum (DSSS) technology that helped assure the reliability of the connection also demonstrated that wireless communication was feasible in these plants without boosting the transmitted power to dangerous levels. Our experience and research have indicated that two key parameters are of ultimate importance: (1) reliability and (2) inter-system compatibility. Reliability is the key to immediate acceptance among industrial users. The importance cannot be overstated, because users will not tolerate an unreliable information network. A longer term issue that is at least as important as the reliability of a single system is the inter-system compatibility between these wireless sensor networks and other wireless systems that are part of our industries. In the long run, the ability of wireless sensor

  14. DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear ...

  15. Save (More) Energy Now with Intelligent Industrial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet outlines a variety of tools to reduce energy use in industrial facilities and improve plant-wide performance.

  16. Energy Department's Distributed Wind Industry Update: A WINDExchange...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department's Distributed Wind Industry Update: A WINDExchange Webinar September 28, 2016 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT Compared with traditional, centralized power plants, ...

  17. Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturers get free energy, waste, and productivity assessments and students get hands-on experience in the plants. According to these participants, Industrial Assessment Centers benefit everyone involved.

  18. ITP Glass: Glass Industry of the Future: Energy and Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Glass plants remove air pollutants through the use of aqueous media, filters, and precipitators. Air pollution control technologies used in the glass industry commonly transfer ...

  19. Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study summarizing CleanTech Partners and Focus on Energy's success in deploying "shovel ready" energy-efficiency technologies at nine industrial plants in Wisconsin

  20. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  1. Aluminum industry applications for OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.S.; Leshaw, D.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Sprouse, A.M.; Thiagarajan, V.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the program is to study the integration issues which must be resolved to realize the market potential of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power for the aluminum industry. The study established, as a baseline, an OTEC plant with an electrical output of 100 MWe which would power an aluminum reduction plant. The reduction plant would have a nominal annual output of about 60,000 metric tons of aluminum metal. Three modes of operation were studied, viz: 1. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant moored offshore supplying energy by cable. 2. A reduction plant on shore and a floating OTEC power plant at sea supplying energy by means of an ''energy bridge.'' 3. A floating reduction plant on the same platform as the OTEC power plant. For the floating OTEC/aluminum plantship, three reduction processes were examined. 1. The conventional Hall process with prebaked anodes. 2. The drained cathode Hall cell process. 3. The aluminum chloride reduction process.

  2. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  3. IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Participants include representatives from domestic or international manufacturing plants, corporations, research or educational institutions, state and local governments, and ...

  4. Industry Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing

  5. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  6. Economic and Technical Assessment of Wood Biomass Fuel Gasification for Industrial Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia M. Gribik; Ronald E. Mizia; Harry Gatley; Benjamin Phillips

    2007-09-01

    This project addresses both the technical and economic feasibility of replacing industrial gas in lime kilns with synthesis gas from the gasification of hog fuel. The technical assessment includes a materials evaluation, processing equipment needs, and suitability of the heat content of the synthesis gas as a replacement for industrial gas. The economic assessment includes estimations for capital, construction, operating, maintenance, and management costs for the reference plant. To perform these assessments, detailed models of the gasification and lime kiln processes were developed using Aspen Plus. The material and energy balance outputs from the Aspen Plus model were used as inputs to both the material and economic evaluations.

  7. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  8. Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

  9. Agricultural, industrial and municipal waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    It is right that consideration of the environment is of prime importance when agricultural and industrial processes are being developed. This book compiles the papers presented at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers conference. The contents include: The use of wastes for land reclamation and restoration; landfill, an environmentally acceptable method of waste disposal and an economic source of energy; control of leachate from waste disposal landfill sites using bentonite; landfill gas migration from operational landfill sites, monitoring and prevention; monitoring of emissions from hazardous waste incineration; hazardous wastes management in Hong Kong, a summary of a report and recommendations; the techniques and problems of chemical analysis of waste waters and leachate from waste tips; a small scale waste burning combustor; energy recovery from municipal waste by incineration; anaerobic treatment of industrial waste; a review of developments in the acid hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes; reduction of slag deposits by magnesium hydroxide injection; integrated rural energy centres (for agriculture-based economies); resource recovery; straw as a fuel in the UK; the computer as a tool for predicting the financial implications of future municipal waste disposal and recycling projects; solid wastes as a cement kiln fuel; monitoring and control of landfill gas; the utilization of waste derived fuels; the economics of energy recovery from municipal and industrial wastes; the development and construction of a municipal waste reclamation plant by a local authority.

  10. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  11. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field ...

  12. Assessment of plant-derived hydrocarbons. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFadden, K.; Nelson, S.H.

    1981-09-30

    A number of hydrocarbon producing plants are evaluated as possible sources of rubber, liquid fuels, and industrial lubricants. The plants considered are Euphorbia lathyris or gopher plant, milkweeds, guayule, rabbit brush, jojoba, and meadow foam. (ACR)

  13. Fatigue monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Shah, V.N.

    1995-04-01

    This paper summarizes fatigue monitoring methods and surveys their application in the nuclear power industry. The paper is based on a review of the technical literature. Two main reasons for fatigue monitoring are more frequent occurrence of some transients than that assumed in the fatigue design analysis and the discovery of stressors that were not included in the fatigue design analysis but may cause significant fatigue damage at some locations. One fatigue monitoring method involves use of plant operating data and procedures to update the fatigue usage. Another method involves monitoring of plant operating parameters using existing, or if needed, supplementary plant instrumentation for online computation of fatigue usage. Use of fatigue monitoring has better defined the operational transients. Most operational transients have been found less severe and fewer in numbers than anticipated in the design fatigue analysis. Use of fatigue monitoring has assisted in quantifying newly discovered stressors and has helped in detecting the presence of thermal stratification of unsuspected locations.

  14. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2007-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A new day for energy in America; Committed to success more than ever, by Andy White, GE--Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Competitive technology for decades, by Steve Tritch, Westinghouse Electric Company; Pioneers of positive community relationship, by Exelon Nuclear; A robust design for 60-years, by Ray Ganthner, Areva; Aiming at no evacuation plants, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd.; and, Desalination and hydrogen economy, by Dr. I. Khamis, International Atomic Energy Agency. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Reactor vessel closure head project, by Jeff LeClair, Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant; and Submersible remote-operated vehicle, by Michael S. Rose, Entergy's Fitzpatrick Nuclear Station.

  15. Conditional sterility in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meagher, Richard B.; McKinney, Elizabeth; Kim, Tehryung

    2010-02-23

    The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

  16. Gasification Plant Databases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Databases Welcome to the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory's Gasification Plant Databases Within these databases you will find current publicly available information on proposed projects and projects undergoing construction and initial operation within the United States and worldwide. Currently operating projects are excluded. The data have been compiled here to keep the public informed of the technologies and investments in major industrial coal

  17. On the utilization of coking plant surface runoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evzel'man, I.B.; Kagasov, V.M.; Maiskii, S.V.; Pimenov, I.V.; Rod'kin, S.P.; Ushakov, E.B.

    1983-01-01

    Surface runoff from the industrial sites of coking plants in the East and Center of the USSR is usually diverted into a storm sewer in a mixture with the conditionally pure water. General data on the contamination of this mixture (industrial stormwater) and the snow cover at a number of coking plants in this region are tabulated. Our data on the quality of industrial stormwater show that schemes for utilization of surface runoff must include pretreatment to remove suspended matter and oils. For example, the oil concentration in melt water is 2-10 times greater than the concentration in industrial phenol-containing effluent (2). When the biochemical facilities receive surface runoff containing up to 40 g/l suspended solids, which occurs in periods of snowmelt, without treatment to remove these solids, there are difficulties with the discharge of tar from the secondary sedimenters of the biochemical treatment plant. An analysis of the literature materials (3-9) showed that the maximum allowable concentration of suspended solids in make-up water for the closed-cycle heat exchange water cooling system should apparently not exceed 25 mg/l. The level of this parameter in the make-up water of these systems at coke plants requires correction.

  18. Maintaining a competitive geothermal industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zodiaco, V.P.

    1996-04-10

    I come to this geothermal business with over 30 years of experience in the power generation industry. I have earned my spurs (so to speak) in the electric utility, nuclear power, coal and the gas-fired cogeneration power businesses. I have been employed by Oxbow Power for the past seven years and for the past 18 months I have been based in Reno and responsible for the operation, maintenance and management of Oxbow`s domestic power projects which include three geothermal and two gas-fired facilities. The Oxbow Power Group (consisting principally of Oxbow Power Corporation, Oxbow Geothermal Corporation, Oxbow Power of Beowawe, Oxbow Power International and Oxbow Power Services, Inc.) is based in West Palm Beach, Florida, and has regional offices in Reno, Hong Kong and Manila to support on-line geothermal projects in Nevada, other domestic power projects and a geothermal plant under construction in the Philippines. Oxbow Power employs approximately 30 professionals in the development and management of power projects and over 100 supervisors and technicians in the operation and maintenance of power facilities. Current ownership in independent power projects total 340 MW in the United States and 47 MW under construction in the Philippines. Oxbow is currently negotiating additional projects in several Asian and Central American countries.

  19. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  20. Industrial Carbon Management Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Read the Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Update -- July 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, July 2015 (845.58 KB) More Documents & Publications Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers Quarterly Update, Spring 2014 IAC Factsheet

    Industrial Assessment Centers Update, Fall 2015 Industrial Assessment Centers

  1. Plants & Animals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. February 2, 2015 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on Los Alamos National Laboratory land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from

  2. Lewis County PUD- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lewis County PUD offers rebates for commercial and industrial lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades, on a case-by-case basis. Eligible industrial processes upgrades include premium...

  3. AVLIS industrial access program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

  4. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  5. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  6. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research projects often involve highly collaborative partnerships between Sandia, industry, and academia to respond quickly with impactful results. Reference Model Project Sandia ...

  7. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

  8. Mining Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These mined minerals include coal, metals such as iron, copper, or zinc, and industrial ... Furthermore, coal accounts for nearly 50% of electric power generated in the United ...

  9. Plastic Magen Industry | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    products with a lifetime guarantee, including the Heliocol and Sunstar-brand solar water heating systems. References: Plastic Magen Industry1 This article is a stub. You...

  10. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,743 1,754 1,754 1,754 1,754 Coal - - - - - ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  11. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,411 2,371 2,235 2,226 2,262 Coal 528 528 528 528 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  12. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 667 667 828 834 834 Coal 17 17 17 17 17 Petroleum 5 5 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  13. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 5,498 5,361 5,466 5,582 5,845 Coal 551 551 553 564 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  14. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,770 2,751 2,761 2,738 2,738 Coal 85 85 85 85 85 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  15. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 3,349 3,686 3,653 3,626 3,577 Coal 585 585 585 585 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  16. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,208 2,209 2,208 2,223 2,196 Coal 180 180 180 180 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  17. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 761,603 763,994 770,221 774,279 782,176 Coal 312,956 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  18. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,485 1,561 1,593 1,591 1,618 Coal 105 105 112 111 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  19. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,374 1,364 1,449 1,448 1,401 Coal 492 492 497 497 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  20. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 39,351 39,961 39,950 41,443 42,654 Coal 389 389 367 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  1. Partnerships For Industry - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115.jpg Partnerships For Industry Connect With JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP Connect with JCAP Contact Us Partnerships For Researchers Partnerships For Industry Visit JCAP partnerships for industry JCAP has established an Industrial Partnership Program. For more information on Industrial Partnership Program or to learn more about other modes of industrial interactions with JCAP, please contact: California Institute of Technology Office of

  2. An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

    2001-11-01

    This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

  3. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  4. US cement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisbet, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the cement and concrete industry, and provides data on energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. The potential impact of an energy tax on the industry is briefly assessed. Opportunities identified for reducing carbon dioxide emissions include improved energy efficiency, alternative fuels, and alternative materials. The key factor in determining CO{sub 2} emissions is the level of domestic production. The projected improvement in energy efficiency and the relatively slow growth in domestic shipments indicate that CO{sub 2} emissions in 2000 should be about 5% above the 1990 target. However, due to the cyclical nature of cement demand, emissions will probably be above target levels during peak demand and below target levels during demand troughs. 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Tuesday Webcasts for Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tuesday Webcasts for Industry Tuesday Webcasts for Industry Learn about AMO's software tools, technologies, partnership opportunities, and other resources by watching the Tuesday Webcasts for Industry. They are held on the first Tuesday of every month from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Eastern time and are presented by manufacturers, AMO staff, and industry experts. Register to participate in upcoming Tuesday webcasts by visiting the AMO Events Calendar or Training Calendar. Each entry includes the

  6. Assessment of Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applications,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2001 | Department of Energy Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applications, June 2001 Assessment of Replicable Innovative Industrial Cogeneration Applications, June 2001 U.S. industrial facilities utilize a wide array of thermal process equipment, including hot water heaters, thermal liquid heaters, ovens, furnaces, kilns, dryers, chillers, and boilers. This report provides a market assessment of innovative industrial distributed generation cogeneration systems that are less

  7. Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Accessing ASCR Facilities Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory & Experiement (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Industrial Users Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (CSGF) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Science Highlights Benefits of

  8. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.S.

    1991-07-01

    This report indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies. The report includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review, but does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. Part 1 of the report lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants or licensees and percentage ownership. Part 2 lists applicants or licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part 1 also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OLS).

  9. Going with the flow: Life cycle costing for industrial pumpingsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tutterow, Vestal; Hovstadius, Gunnar; McKane, Aimee

    2002-07-08

    Industries worldwide depend upon pumping systems for theirdaily operation. These systems account for nearly 20 percent of theworld's industrial electrical energy demand and range from 25-50 percentof the energy usage in certain industrial plant operations. Purchasedecisions for a pump and its related system components are typicallybased upon a low bid, rather than the cost to operate the system over itslifetime. Additionally, plant facilities personnel are typically focussedon maintaining existing pumping system reliability rather than optimizingthe systems for best energy efficiency. To ensure the lowest energy andmaintenance costs, equipment life, and other benefits, the systemcomponents must be carefully matched to each other, and remain sothroughout their working lives. Life Cycle Cost (LCC) analysis is a toolthat can help companies minimize costs and maximize energy efficiency formany types of systems, including pumping systems. Increasing industryawareness of the total cost of pumping system ownership through lifecycle cost analysis is a goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Thispaper will discuss what DOE and its industry partners are doing to createthis awareness. A guide book, Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCCAnalysis for Pumping Systems, developed by the Hydraulic Institute (HI)and Europump (two pump manufacturer trade associations) with DOEinvolvement, will be overviewed. This guide book is the result of thediligent efforts of many members of both associations, and has beenreviewed by a group of industrial end-users. The HI/Europump Guideprovides detailed guidance on the design and maintenance of pumpingsystems to minimize the cost of ownership, as well as LCC analysis. DOE,Hydraulic Institute, and other organizations' efforts to promote LCCanalysis, such as pump manufacturers adopting LCC analysis as a marketingstrategy, will be highlighted and a relevant case studyprovided.

  10. Industry Cluster Development Grant winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Industry Cluster Development Grant winners Recipients include Picuris Pueblo and Rio Arriba County February 1, 2015 A new community mural on the Hunter Ford facility in Española celebrates the building's planned revitalization and the future location of the Northern New Mexico Food Hub. A new

  11. Annual Technology Baseline (Including Supporting Data); NREL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solar PV; concentrating solar power; geothermal power; hydropower plants (upgrades to ... Data; Performance Data; LCOE; Wind; Geothermal; Concentrating Solar Power; Hydropower; ...

  12. District of Columbia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 806 806 790 790 790 Coal - - - - - Petroleum 806 806 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  13. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. pulp and paper industry consumes over $7 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pulp and paper industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This paper provides a brief overview of the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry energy efficiency guidebook (a.k.a. the"Energy Guide") for pulp and paper manufacturers. The Energy Guide discusses a wide range of energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Also provided is a discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pulp and paper industry along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Many energy efficiency measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in pulp and paper mills and related industries worldwide. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. pulp and paper industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  14. High Energy Utilization, Co-Generation Nuclear power Plants With Static Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel P.

    2002-07-01

    In addition to being cost effective, very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion could meet the needs and the energy mix in underdeveloped countries and remote communities, which may include electricity, residential and industrial space heating, seawater desalination, and/or high temperature process heat or steam for industrial uses. These plants are also an attractive option in naval, marine, and undersea applications, when the absence of a sound signature is highly desirable. An Analysis is performed of Gas Cooled Reactor (CGR) and Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (LMR), very small nuclear power plants with static energy conversion, using a combination of options. These include Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converters (AMTECs) and both single segment and segmented thermoelectric converters. The total energy utilization of these plants exceeds 88%. It includes the fraction of the reactor's thermal power converted into electricity and delivered to the Grid at 6.6 kVA and those used for residential and industrial space heating at {approx}370 K, seawater desalination at 400 K, and/or high temperature process heat or steam at {approx}850 K. In addition to its inherently high reliability, modularity, low maintenance and redundancy, static energy conversion used in the present study could deliver electricity to the Grid at a net efficiency of 29.5%. A LMR plant delivers 2-3 times the fraction of the reactor thermal power converted into electricity in a GCR plant, but could not provide for both seawater desalination and high temperature process heat/steam concurrently, which is possible in GCR plants. The fraction of the reactor's thermal power used for non-electrical power generation in a GCR plant is {approx} 10 - 15% higher than in a LMR plant. (authors)

  15. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct....

  16. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  17. Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Operational Status Plant Operational Status Page Content Shift 1 - Day The Pantex Plant is open for normal Day Shift operations. Plant personnel are to report as assigned. Personnel may call 477-3000, Option 1 for additional details. Shift 2 - Swing The Pantex Plant is open for normal Swing Shift operations. Plant personnel are to report as assigned. Personnel may call 477-3000, Option 1 for additional details. Shift 3 - Grave The Pantex Plant is open for normal Graveyard Shift operations.

  18. Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act)

  19. DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Certification | Department of Energy First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification December 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the first industrial plants in the country to be certified under the Superior Energy Performance program -- a new, market-based industrial energy efficiency program. The energy management certification program

  20. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naser, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  1. Industrial | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy consumption increases by only 19 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case....

  2. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  3. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  4. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  5. World first in high level waste vitrification - A review of French vitrification industrial achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brueziere, J.; Chauvin, E. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Piroux, J.C. [Joint Vitrification Laboratory - LCV, Marcoule, BP171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    AREVA has more than 30 years experience in operating industrial HLW (High Level radioactive Waste) vitrification facilities (AVM - Marcoule Vitrification Facility, R7 and T7 facilities). This vitrification technology was based on borosilicate glasses and induction-heating. AVM was the world's first industrial HLW vitrification facility to operate in-line with a reprocessing plant. The glass formulation was adapted to commercial Light Water Reactor fission products solutions, including alkaline liquid waste concentrates as well as platinoid-rich clarification fines. The R7 and T7 facilities were designed on the basis of the industrial experience acquired in the AVM facility. The AVM vitrification process was implemented at a larger scale in order to operate the R7 and T7 facilities in-line with the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants. After more than 30 years of operation, outstanding record of operation has been established by the R7 and T7 facilities. The industrial startup of the CCIM (Cold Crucible Induction Melter) technology with enhanced glass formulation was possible thanks to the close cooperation between CEA and AREVA. CCIM is a water-cooled induction melter in which the glass frit and the waste are melted by direct high frequency induction. This technology allows the handling of highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures which permits new glass compositions and a higher glass production capacity. The CCIM technology has been implemented successfully at La Hague plant.

  6. LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd formerly LG Industrial Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: LS Industrial Systems Co Ltd (formerly LG Industrial Systems) Place: Anyang,...

  7. Understanding the Challenges in the Transition from Film Radiography in the Nuclear Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Moran, Traci L.; Nove, Carol A.; Pardini, Allan F.

    2012-09-01

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) applications in the nuclear power industry using film radiography are shrinking due to the advent of modern digital imaging technologies and advances in alternative inspection methods that do not present an ionizing radiation hazard. Technologies that are used routinely in the medical industry for patient diagnosis are being adapted to industrial NDE applications including the detection and characterization of defects in welds. From the user perspective, non-film inspection techniques provide several advantages over film techniques. It is anticipated that the shift away from the application of film radiography in the nuclear power industry represents an irreversible trend. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has noted this trend in the U.S. nuclear power industry and will be working to ensure that the effectiveness and reliability of component inspections is not compromised by this transition. Currently, specific concerns are associated with 1) obtaining a fundamental understanding of how inspection effectiveness and reliability may be impacted by this transition and 2) ensuring training standards and qualifications remain compatible with modern industrial radiographic practice. This paper discusses recent trends in industrial radiography and assesses their advantages and disadvantages from the perspective of nuclear power plant component inspections.

  8. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    The list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of September 1, 1982. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses.

  9. Report on Water Use in the Industries of the Future: Mining Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavis, Jim

    2003-01-01

    The report on Water Use in the Industries of the Future features a chapter on the uses of water in the mining industry. This report includes a brief overview of the industry, its water use, associated energy costs, and water reuse practices.

  10. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

  11. Glass needs for a growing photovoltaics industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Keith; Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2014-10-18

    With the projected growth in photovoltaics, the demand for glass for the solar industry will far exceed the current supply, and thousands of new float-glass plants will have to be built to meet its needs over the next 20 years. Such expansion will provide an opportunity for the solar industry to obtain products better suited to their needs, such as low-iron glass and borosilicate glass at the lowest possible price. While there are no significant technological hurdles that would prevent the flat glass industry from meeting the solar industry’s projected needs, to do so will require advance planning and substantial investments.

  12. Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-06-01

    The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

  13. Informatics requirements for a restructured competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickle, S.; Marnay, C.; Olken, F.

    1996-08-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing a slow but nonetheless dramatic transformation. It is a transformation driven by technology, economics, and politics; one that will move the industry from its traditional mode of centralized system operations and regulated rates guaranteeing long-run cost recovery, to decentralized investment and operational decisionmaking and to customer access to true spot market prices. This transformation will revolutionize the technical, procedural, and informational requirements of the industry. A major milestone in this process occurred on December 20, 1995, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved its long-awaited electric utility industry restructuring decision. The decision directed the three major California investor-owned utilities to reorganize themselves by the beginning of 1998 into a supply pool, at the same time selling up to a half of their thermal generating plants. Generation will be bid into this pool and will be dispatched by an independent system operator. The dispatch could potentially involve bidders not only from California but from throughout western North America and include every conceivable generating technology and scale of operation. At the same time, large customers and aggregated customer groups will be able to contract independently for their supply and the utilities will be required to offer a real-time pricing tariff based on the pool price to all their customers, including residential. In related proceedings concerning competitive wholesale power markets, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recognized that real-time information flows between buyers and sellers are essential to efficient equitable market operation. The purpose of this meeting was to hold discussions on the information technologies that will be needed in the new, deregulated electric power industry.

  14. Owners of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  15. Owners of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.

    2000-01-12

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of November 1999. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  16. Confusion reigns over industrial stormwater regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, J.

    1993-01-01

    More than five years after Congress mandated controls for industrial and municipal stormwater discharges, many in the regulated community remain unclear about how the rules apply to them. The regulations' progress since the 1987 CWA amendments opened the door for their development often has been shaky and marked by setbacks. According to a federal appeals court decision issued last summer, that struggle is likely to continue. Although the original stormwater rules issued by EPA in November 1990 appeared to focus on heavy manufacturing facilities, as well as municipalities, the appellate court cleared a path that could draw light industrial plants and small construction sites within the regulations' domain. The rules in dispute bring under their umbrella any stormwater discharges associated with industrial activity to surface waters or municipal storm sewer systems. However, the regulations distinguish between facilities engaged in heavy industry and light, or enclosed industrial facilities, based on the probability that stormwater discharges will be contaminated and require regulation.

  17. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  18. Improving Energy Efficiency at U.S. Plastics Manufacturing Plants Summary Report and Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-25

    Industrial Technologies Program’s BestPractices report based on a comprehensive plant assessment project with ITP’s Industrial Assessment Center, The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., and several of its member companies.

  19. Users from Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, and/or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial

  20. Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

  1. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  2. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Series on the Seven Principal Characteristics of the Modern Grid [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer] In October 2007, Ken Silverstein (Energy Central) wrote an editorial, "Empowering Consumers" that hit a strong, kindred chord with the DOE/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Modern Grid Strategy team. Through subsequent discussions with Ken and Bill Opalka, Editor- In-Chief, Topics Centers, we decided it would be informative to the industry if the Modern Grid

  3. Leatherwood prep plant upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, R.W.; Jain, S.M.

    2007-06-15

    The Blue Diamond Coal Co. recently implemented major circuit modifications to the Leatherwood coal preparation plant (formerly known as the J.K. Cornett prep plant) in Slemp, KY, USA. The plant was originally built in the late 1980s, and then modified in 1999. The 2006 plant modifications included: two Krebs 33-inch heavy-media cyclones; five 10 x 20 ft single deck Conn-Weld Banana type vibrating screens; two 10 ft x 48 inch Eriez self-leveling magnetic separators; two Derrick Stacksizer high frequency screens; two CMI EBR-48 centrifugal dryers; Warman process pumps; and eight triple start MDL spiral concentrators. 2 figs.

  4. Analysis of the Efficiency of the U.S. Ethanol Industry 2007...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of the Efficiency of the U.S. Ethanol Industry 2007 Analysis of the Efficiency of the U.S. Ethanol Industry 2007 The survey covers plant operations in corn dry mills, wet ...

  5. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  6. Wind Power: Options for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-03-01

    This six-page brochure outlines ways for industry to integrate wind power, including assessing wind power, building wind farms, using a developer, capitalizing on technology, enhancing the corporate image, and preparing RFPs. Company examples and information resources are also provided.

  7. Eck Industries, Inc. Realizes Savings Through Smarter Lighting Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This case study discusses how Eck Industries pursued a lighting retrofit project that reduced its Manitowoc, Wisconsin, facility’s plant-wide electricity use, achieved annual operating savings, and provided higher quality lighting.

  8. Energy Smart Industrial: five years of enormous savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.5 million kWh a year. JD Hisey, the plant's continuous improvement manager, says Energy Smart Industrial did more than just cut Fitesa's energy costs. "The new equipment reduced...

  9. Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... CO2 from an industrial coal-fired source to produce biofuel and other high value co-products. ... Aggregates, Ltd. cement manufacturing plant in San Antonio, Texas. (DOE Share: ...

  10. Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H.

    2007-07-01

    Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.