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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

3

Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling in industrial facilities has traditionally been performed by mechanical vapor compression units. While it remains the standard, recent concerns with the rising cost of electricity and environmental legislation restricting or outlawing CFC refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect evaporative, desiccant, and absorption cooling. Cooling effectiveness, operating cost and investment are also presented. Data for this evaluation was collected from clients served by Georgia Tech's Industrial Energy Extension Service, a state-sponsored energy conservation assistance program.

Brown, M.; Moore, D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

5

Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

6

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Senior care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying This document...

7

Practical Procedures for Auditing Industrial Boiler Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial boiler plants are an area of opportunity in virtually every industry to save energy and reduce costs by using relatively simple, inexpensive auditing procedures. An energy audit consists of inspection, measurement, analysis, and the preparation of recommendations. A complete boiler plant program will consider each individual boiler, boiler room auxiliary equipment, steam distribution and return systems, and steam end use equipment. This paper summarizes the practical procedures, techniques, and instrumentation which Nabisco uses in its boiler plant energy conservation program.

O'Neil, J. P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Electricity Policy Coordination and...

9

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

10

Plant-Wide Assessment Report for Shaw Industries, Plant #78; Aiken, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plant-wide energy assessment sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy was conducted at Shaw Industries Group, plant #78 in Aiken, SC. The assessment team consisted of Georgia Tech faculty from the Energy & Environmental Management Center and Shaw personnel from plant #78 and the corporate energy group. The purpose of this assessment was to uncover as many opportunities for saving energy usage and costs using techniques that have been established as best practices in the energy engineering field. In addition, these findings are to be shared with similar plants in Shaw Industries Group to multiply the lessons learned. The findings from this assessment are included in this report.

Michael Brown PE, CEM; Matt Soderlund; Bill Meffert PE; Paolo Baldisserotto; Jerry Zolkowski PE, CEM

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

11

Bidding for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a 'Million Dollar Plant' Increase Welfare?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a ‘Million Dollar Plant’for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a ‘Million Dollar Plant’fundamentally, this approach does not offer a framework for

Moretti, Enrico

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Industrial Assessments and Why Your Plant Should Have One  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "in-depth" assessment of a plant site and its facilities, services and manufacturing operations can help you make your plant cleaner, more productive and more energy efficient. This paper discusses the components of a successful assessment, what you can expect, and how you can benefit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Assessment Center Program, its track record and its approach, are described in some detail -including the criteria for receiving an assessment through the Program. The authors also identify and describe other good sources of industrial assessment assistance- such as utilities, state offices, trade and professional associations and local engineering schools. Also described are ways to use your in-house staff and, if you are a multi-plant company, peer reviews to conduct assessments. To further help you with the assessment process, a variety of tools and programs that you can easily access are described. The paper also provides information on a range of related resources including: programs which focus on specific technologies like motors or steam/compressed air; databases with specific assessment recommendations by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code that you can access; self assessment workbooks and manuals; programs which offer grants (on a competitive basis) for new demonstrations of clean industrial technologies; software programs; guidelines, and more.

Glaser, C. J.; Demetrops, J. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy Conservation Through Improved Industrial Ventilation in Small and Medium-Sized Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses energy conservation projects in the area of industrial ventilation that have been recommended by the Texas A&M University Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADQ to small and medium-sized industries in Texas. The projects recommended include reducing blower operating time/speed and static pressure for dust collectors, installing radiation shield on ovens, and using outside air for cooling. The projects were recommended to different kinds of industries including wood fabrication, frozen food, primary metals, plastics and insulation products. These projects are predicted to save up to 8% of the plants' utility bills with average simple payback periods of less than three years. Projects that involved blowers (fans) speed/operation time reduction resulted in most savings.

Saman, N. F.; Nutter, D. W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Electrical energy monitoring in an industrial plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents an investigation into the actual electrical energy and demand use of a large metal fabrication facility located in Houston, Texas. Plant selection and the monitoring system are covered. The influence of a low power factor on energy consumption and demand is covered, including installation of correction and the effect of increasing the power factor on demand and energy consumption block sizes. The installation of capacitance correction has increased the low power factor of this facility from the low 60% range to the mid-to-high 70% range. A method has been developed to predict savings based on precorrection monitored data in the event the exact amount of capacitance installed is unknown. Savings for the month of February, 1994, are found to be $1327.56. This method can be used as a diagnostic tool to determine the amount of active capacitance. In this plant, that amount was found to be 315 KVAC, which correlates reasonably well with the amount active in the plant. The monitoring installation is described, and other uses (besides that dealing with power factor correction) are covered. Those uses include monitoring plant and equipment performance and productivity, and savings due to missed opportunities for equipment turn off.

Dorhofer, Frank Joseph

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Nuclear dual-purpose plants for industrial energy  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to extensive application of nuclear power to industrial heat is the difference between the relatively small energy requirements of individual industrial plants and the large thermal capacity of current power reactors. A practical way of overcoming this obstacle would be to operate a centrally located dual-purpose power plant that would furnish process steam to a cluster of industrial plants, in addition to generating electrical power. The present study indicates that even relatively remote industrial plants could be served by the power plant, since it might be possible to convey steam economically as much as ten miles or more. A survey of five major industries indicates a major potential market for industrial steam from large nuclear power stations.

Klepper, O.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cost-Effective Industrial Boiler Plant Efficiency Advancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas and electricity are expensive to the extent that annual fuel and power costs can approach the initial cost of an industrial boiler plant. Within this context, this paper examines several cost-effective efficiency advancements that were implemented during a recently completed boiler plant replacement project at a large semiconductor manufacturing complex. The "new" boiler plant began service in November, 1996 and consists of four 75,000 lb/hr water-tube boilers burning natural gas and producing 210 psig saturated steam for heating and humidification. Efficiency advancements include: 1) Reheating of cleanroom make-up air with heat extracted during precooling. 2) Preheating of combustion air with heat extracted from boiler flue gas. 3) Preheating of boiler feedwater with heat extracted from the exhaust of a nearby gas turbine. 4) Variable speed operation of boiler feedwater pumps and forced-draft fans. 5) Preheating of boiler make-up water with heat extracted from boiler blow-down. These efficiency advancements should prove of interest to industrial energy users faced with replacement of aging, inefficient boiler plants, rising fuel and power prices, and increasing pressures to reduce operating costs in order to enhance competitiveness.

Fiorino, D. P.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Task III, Demonstration plant safety, industrial hygiene, and major disaster plan (Deliverable No. 35)  

SciTech Connect

This Health and Safety Plan has been adopted by the IFG Demonstration Plant managed by Memphis Light, Gas and Water at Memphis, Tennessee. The plan encompasses the following areas of concern: Safety Plan Administration, Industrial Health, Industrial Safety, First Aid, Fire Protection (including fire prevention and control), and Control of Safety Related Losses. The primary objective of this plan is to achieve adequate control of all potentially hazardous activities to assure the health and safety of all employees and eliminate lost work time to both the employees and the company. The second objective is to achieve compliance with all Federal, state and local laws, regulations and codes. Some thirty specific safe practice instruction items are included.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Decision-maker's guide to wood fuel for small industrial energy users. Final report. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology and economics of various wood energy systems available to the small industrial and commercial energy user are considered. This book is designed to help a plant manager, engineer, or others in a decision-making role to become more familiar with wood fuel systems and make informed decisions about switching to wood as a fuel. The following subjects are discussed: wood combustion, pelletized wood, fuel storage, fuel handling and preparation, combustion equipment, retrofitting fossil-fueled boilers, cogeneration, pollution abatement, and economic considerations of wood fuel use. (MHR)

Levi, M. P.; O'Grady, M. J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tavistock Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tavistock Facility Tavistock Facility Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P. 284 Hope Street RR#2 Tavistock, Ontario, N0B 2R0, Canada The Tavistock facility was built in 1972 as a cheddar cheese plant for a local co-op. Following its co-op years, this facility was owned by McCain (1983-1999), Dairyland (1999-2001) and Saputo. In 2001, Saputo acquired the Tavistock facility as part of its Dairyland acquisition and expansion in Canadian provinces. The plant has expanded significantly in the last 15 years, and now includes a large cheese cutting-and-wrapping department, as well as a whey drying department. Since 1999, the town of Tavistock has been known for hosting the annual World Crokinole Championship. The Tavistock facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012, in one

22

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers' Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers' Guide Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

23

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

24

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for more than 60 years. 3M Cumberland achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant reached 25% energy reduction per pound of product within three...

25

Tools for Assessing Building Energy Use in Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation will cover a brief history of building energy measures savings potential for industrial plants and briefly characterize building energy measures and their savings identified over approximately the past 15 years in energy audits. The nature and extent of building energy assessment tools will then be profiled, and the beneficial use of an appropriate subset of these tools for assessing energy savings in buildings at industrial plants will be described. Possible future tools that may be useful will also be mentioned.

Martin, M.; MacDonald, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Industrial Plant Objectives and Cogeneration System Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a cogeneration system requires a definition of plant management's objectives in addition to process energy demands. And, these objectives may not be compatible with options that will yield the most attractive rate of return. This paper will review cogeneration system application criteria and illustrate how plant objectives can influence the cogeneration system selection.

Kovacik, J. M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for cement manufacturing plants.  

SciTech Connect

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing the plant performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing plants can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the cement manufacturing industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for assembly plants that produce a variety of products, including Portland cement and other specialty cement products, in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for cement manufacturing plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G.; Decision and Information Sciences

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants » Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance

30

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.), provides that no new baseload electric powerplant may be constructed or operated without the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel as a primary energy source. In order to meet the requirement of coal capability, the owner or operator of such facilities proposing to use natural gas or petroleum as its primary energy source shall certify, pursuant to FUA section 201(d), and Section 501.60(a)(2) of DOE's regulations to the Secretary of Energy prior to construction, or prior to operation as a base load powerplant, that such powerplant has the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel.

31

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

32

DOE PLANT-WIDE ENERGY ASSESSMENT RESULTS RELATED TO THE U. S. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Forty-nine plant-wide energy efficiency assessments have been undertaken under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Industrial Technologies Program. Plant-wide assessments are comprehensive, systematic investigations of plant energy efficiency, including plant utility systems and process operations. Assessments in industrial facilities have highlighted opportunities for implementing best practices in industrial energy management, including the adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies and process and equipment improvements. Total annual savings opportunities of $201 million have been identified from the 40 completed assessments. Many of the participating industrial plants have implemented efficiency-improvement projects and already have realized total cost savings of more than $81 million annually. This paper provides an overview of the assessment efforts undertaken and presents a summary of the major energy and cost savings identified to date. The paper also discusses specific results from assessments conducted at four plants in the automotive manufacturing operations and supporting industries. These particular assessments were conducted at facilities that produce engine castings, plastic films used for glass laminates, forged components, and at a body spray painting plant.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi, Len Bishop

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

33

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

34

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction Large-Scale Industrial Carbon Capture, Storage Plant Begins Construction August 24, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Construction activities have begun at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demonstrate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) demonstration project funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to move into the construction phase. Led by the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM), a member of DOE's Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, the Illinois-ICCS project is designed to sequester approximately 2,500 metric tons of carbon dioxide

35

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

36

Jump-Start Your Plant's Energy Savings with Quick PEP, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Quick Plant Energy Profiler (Quick PEP) can help industrial plants identify energy use and find ways to save money and energy.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

38

Plant Energy Profiler Tool for the Chemicals Industry (ChemPEP Tool), Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program ChemPEP Tool can help chemical plants assess their plant-wide energy consumption.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Options for Removing Multiple Pollutants Including CO2 at Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical review of the fuel changes and technology options for existing coal-fired power plants in response to potential new requirements for increasingly stringent multi-pollutant air emissions reductions, possibly including carbon dioxide (CO2). Preliminary costing of the major options is included. A database of the U.S. coal-fired power plants has been developed for further, more specific analyses.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Productivity Improvement for Fossil Steam Power Plants: Industry Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Productivity Improvement Handbook for Fossil Steam Plants," now in its third edition, has included many descriptions of successfully applied advanced techniques and products. In the last few years, an increasingly diverse set of plant case studies have been described in some detail on the website of the Productivity Improvement User Group. This report assembles more than sixty of these case studies on subjects spanning the power plant from the boiler and the steam turbine, through plant auxiliaries ...

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra , Lige Sun , Ignacio E. Grossmann December 24, 2012 Abstract Combined heat and power companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

43

NREL Bioprocessing Pilot Plant: Available for Industrial Use  

SciTech Connect

Microbial bioprocessing can produce a myriad of valuable products. If you are an industry needing small- or large-scale trials to test or advance a bioprocessing technology, National Bioenergy Center (NBC) facilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, may allow you to use world-class systems and expertise without the expense of building your own pilot plant.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Motor Energy Saving Opportunities in an Industrial Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial plants have enormous energy saving opportunities with electric motors. Improving motor efficiency is a conventional wisdom to save energy. Re-engineering affords far greater savings opportunities than motor efficiency improvement. Motor energy saving techniques and basics are discussed. A case study is presented where 63% motor energy savings were realized.

Kumar, B.; Elwell, A.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Industrial Power Plant Management System - An Engineering Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on energy studies in over 70 plants in the forest products industry, experience has shown that, in addition to process improvements, the most important energy conservation measures in mill power departments are: - Load shedding and fuel allocation in such a manner that economically optimum conditions are achieved, taking into account purchased power supply. - Upgrading instrumentation for more accurate information and closer monitoring of plant operation. To achieve the maximum savings from these measures, a computerized energy management system is often required. This is because the optimum load allocation and best operating point must be determined through continuous energy balance calculations as the demand situation changes. The paper discusses the systems engineering approach to the design of a computerized energy management system. It is based on practical experience focusing on a tailored solution for any industrial power plant, resulting in a concept which is technically and economically feasible.

Aarnio, S. E.; Tarvainen, H. J.; Tinnis, V.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.

Boyd, G. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; USEPA

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Benchmarking Variable Cost Performance in an Industrial Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most perplexing problems for industrial power plants committed to improving competitiveness is measuring variable cost performance over time. Because variable costs like fuel and electricity represent the overwhelming majority of power plant expenses, it is imperative to develop and deploy a tool that can help plants benchmark operating performance. This paper introduces a benchmarking methodology designed to meet this need. The "Energy Conversion Index" (ECI) ratios the "value" of utilities exported from the power plant to the actual cost of the fuel and electricity required to produce them, generating a single number or "index." Variable cost performance is benchmarked by comparing the index from one period of time to the index of another comparable period of time. Savings (or costs) attributable to excellent (or poor) performance can easily be calculated by using the former period's index to project the current period's cost.

Kane, J. F.; Bailey, W. F.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry  

SciTech Connect

Today’s online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRI’s Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M Corporation M Corporation 1640 Western Avenue Cumberland, WI 54829 The original 3M building was constructed by the city of Cumberland in 1950 and leased to 3M. In 1953 there was an addition, and in 1960 3M purchased the property and buildings from the city and over the years there were a number of expansions. The roots of the plant are primarily in sandpaper converting operations, however, over the years the plant has evolved and diversified into other core business such as floor pads, lapping films, microfinishing films, and superabrasives. 3M is a proud member of the Cumberland community for more than 60 years. 3M Cumberland achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant reached 25% energy reduction per pound of product within three years

50

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry  

SciTech Connect

The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.

Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N.; Olson, G.K.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Beach Douglas Center Long Beach Douglas Center The Boeing Company 4000 Lakewood Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90808 The Boeing Long Beach Douglas Center campus hosts a wide array of activities supporting the development of commercial airplanes including: Airplane Programs Engineering, Product Support Engineering, Modification Services, Spares, and Continental Data Graphics. This site achieved the Challenge for Industry in 2010, 2011 and 2012. Achieving the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry has been a key factor in Boeing's 'four walls' strategy to reduce energy usage and waste along with reducing the environmental footprint of its operations. The energy savings was achieved by upgrading air-conditioning, lighting and energy-management systems,

53

Construction of Industrial Electron Beam Plant for Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot plant for treating 1,000 m3/day of dyeing wastewater with e-beam has been constructed and operated since 1998 in Daegu, Korea together with the biological treatment facility. The wastewater from various stages of the existing purification process has been treated with electron beam in this plant, and it gave rise to elaborate the optimal technology of the electron beam treatment of wastewater with increased reliability at instant changes in the composition of wastewater. Installation of the e-beam pilot plant resulted in decolorizing and destructive oxidation of organic impurities in wastewater, appreciable to reduction of chemical reagent consumption, in reduction of the treatment time, and in increase in flow rate limit of existing facilities by 30-40%. Industrial plant for treating 10,000 m3/day, based upon the pilot experimental result, is under construction and will be finished by 2005. This project is supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Korean Government.

Han, B.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.; Choi, J.; Ahn, S.; Makarov, I.E.; Ponomarev, A.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Challenges for Plant Nutrition Management from the Fertilizer Industry's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007/08.International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA),International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), Paris,

Maene, Luc M; Olegario, Angela B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Targeting of Potential Industrial Cogeneration at the Plant Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the Air Force's facility energy management program including how industry can help the Air Force meet its facility energy objectives. Background information on energy use and energy conservation efforts are presented to give the reader an understanding of the magnitude of energy used by the Air Force and how greater efficiency of use is being approached. This paper describes the Air Force's facility energy management program including how industry can help the Air Force meet its facility energy objectives. Background information on energy use and energy conservation efforts are presented to give the reader an understanding of the magnitude of energy used by the Air Force and how greater efficiency of use is being approached.

Toy, M. P.; Brown, H. L.; Hamel, B. B.; Hedman, B. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants were recently encountered which offered the potential for full storage. The first plant, a textile weaving operation, has over 5,000 tons of installed chiller capacity used for strict control of temperature and humidity. Measurements of peak load indicated the units were less than 50 percent loaded. Because of the excess chiller capacity, summer demand can be met by operating the units fully loaded during off-peak hours and storing unneeded chilled water in a storage tank for daytime usage. The second plant is a single shift poultry processing operation that uses large amounts of ice to preserve the product during shipping. In this case, ice making during off-peak times for use during production was analyzed. Despite the fact that both options offered significant savings, the paybacks were higher than acceptable due to the significant investment required. While the projects are not economically feasible at the present time, the analysis verifies the technical feasibility of thermal storage. Future changes in electricity cost could make the concept more attractive economically.

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency Advanced Manufacturing Office October 9, 2012 Andre de Fontaine Katrina Pielli 2 Today * Better Buildings, Better Plants Overview - Better Buildings, Better Plants Program - Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge * Looking Ahead to 2013 - In-Plant Trainings - Enhanced energy intensity baselining and tracking tool - New communication materials * Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power - DOE Activities in Support of Executive Order * Regional Industrial Energy Efficiency & Combined Heat and Power Dialogue Meetings * Better Buildings, Better Plants * "CHP as a Clean Energy Resource" new report

58

Jump-Start Your Plant's Energy Savings with Quick PEP, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Quick Plant Energy Profiler (Quick PEP) can help industrial plants identify energy use and find ways to save money and energy.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Adapting ORAP to wind plants : industry value and functional requirements.  

SciTech Connect

Strategic Power Systems (SPS) was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to assess the feasibility of adapting their ORAP (Operational Reliability Analysis Program) tool for deployment to the wind industry. ORAP for Wind is proposed for use as the primary data source for the CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) database which will be maintained by Sandia to enable reliability analysis of US wind fleet operations. The report primarily addresses the functional requirements of the wind-based system. The SPS ORAP reliability monitoring system has been used successfully for over twenty years to collect RAM (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability) and operations data for benchmarking and analysis of gas and steam turbine performance. This report documents the requirements to adapt the ORAP system for the wind industry. It specifies which existing ORAP design features should be retained, as well as key new requirements for wind. The latter includes alignment with existing and emerging wind industry standards (IEEE 762, ISO 3977 and IEC 61400). There is also a comprehensive list of thirty critical-to-quality (CTQ) functional requirements which must be considered and addressed to establish the optimum design for wind.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Annual progress report, January-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program is to demonstrate the feasibility of converting agglomerating and high sulfur coal to clean fuel gas and utilizing this gas in a commercial application. Specific objectives are to conduct process analysis, design, construction, testing, operation and evaluation of a plant based on the U-Gas process for converting coal to industrial fuel gas. Phase I of the MLGW Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program started in September, 1977. In the first quarter of 1978, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was started, together with environmental monitoring activities and technical support work at the U-Gas pilot plant. After a series of successful pilot plant runs during the October 1978-March 1979 period, design work on the Demonstration Plant commenced. With the exception of Task I - Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant, the majority of all other efforts were completed in 1979. These tasks are listed.

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Suzhou Facility BD Medical No.5 Baiyu Road Suzhou Industrial Park Jiangsu P.R. China In 1995 BD became the second...

63

Industrial/manufacturing resources | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial/manufacturing resources Industrial/manufacturing resources Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

64

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry has been a key factor in Boeing's 'four walls' strategy to reduce energy usage and waste along with reducing the environmental footprint of its operations....

65

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Canaan Facility BD Medical Route 7 and Grace Way Canaan, CT 06018 The BD Medical facility in Canaan, Connecticut...

66

[Your Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

67

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Trois-Rivieres Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

foundry established in 1738. This city was also known as the pulp and paper industry capital of the world from the late 1920s until the early 1960s. The Trois-Rivires...

69

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry 3M Fairmont 710 North State Street Fairmont, MN 56031 In September 1946, 3M started Abrasive Converting operations in...

70

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Columbus Facility BD Medical 1852 10th Avenue, Columbus, NE 68601 In 1949, BD began operations in Columbus, Nebraska with...

71

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Juncos Facility BD Medical Road 31, KM 24.3 Juncos, Puerto Rico 00777 BD began operations in Puerto Rico in 1957 when the...

72

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Stockton C4I Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 1051 Sperry Road Stockton, CA 95206 The Stockton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant opened in 1957. Until 1987, the plant made asbestos and cement pipe, and by 1972 the plant made the conversion to PVC pipe in a wide range of sizes and uses. Recent upgrades have added HTPE and corrugated manufacturing capacity. The Stockton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in September 2010. This plant achieved a 12.6% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from empowering employees at Green Team meetings to look for and implement energy conservation and environmental responsibility improvements, initially focused on repairing air leaks from the

73

Further Findings Concerning Electrical Energy Monitoring in an Industrial Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University has monitored the real-time electrical energy consumption, demand, and power factor of a large metal fabrication plant in Houston, Texas for twelve months. Monthly reports that present the data in a format that plant personnel find useful are discussed. These reports allow plant personnel to see how power factor correction in conjunction with production retrofits have reduced utility bills despite production capacity increases. The reports have also been useful in detecting maintenance problems and monitoring productivity. A method that allows the calculation of power factor correction savings after correction is discussed. This method requires some power factor versus demand history prior to correction, and is used to determine what the demand would have been if the correction equipment had not been installed, even if the real demand of the plant changes. Major plant electrical modifications and their impact on a monitoring system are also discussed. Such modifications increase the potential for technical problems with the monitoring equipment and result in hard-to-find problems. A future step to be examined is one that uses visual or audible warning devices in the plant to control demand. At least one plant has adopted this idea in the form of warning lights that inform employees to shut down unnecessary equipment. This concept appears to be potentially beneficial to all plants which have some type of demand monitoring device on-site.

Lewis, D. R.; Dorhofer, F. J.; Heffington, W. M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Trois-Rivieres Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trois-Rivières Facility Trois-Rivières Facility Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P. 700 Radisson Street Trois-Rivières, Québec, G9A 2E1, Canada The Trois-Rivières facility was initially built in 1919 as fluid milk plant for Crèmerie des Trois-Rivières (CTR). Over the years, it has diversified its production and included products such as ice cream, butter, fluid milk beverages and juices. In 1997, Saputo acquired CTR and its Trois-Rivières facility as part of its expansion in eastern Canada. Trois-Rivières is Canada's oldest industrial city, with its first foundry established in 1738. This city was also known as the pulp and paper industry capital of the world from the late 1920s until the early 1960s. The Trois-Rivières facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012, in

75

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suzhou Facility Suzhou Facility BD Medical No.5 Baiyu Road Suzhou Industrial Park Jiangsu P.R. China In 1995 BD became the second multinational company to open a manufacturing facility in Suzhou Industrial Park. The BD Medical facility in Suzhou currently employs approximately 1,100 associates and produces catheters, infusion products, anesthesia kits and other medical devices. BD is a leading global medical technology company that manufactures and sells medical devices, instrument systems and reagents. The Suzhou facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012. The facility reduced its energy intensity by 22.2% in two years, avoiding greenhouse gas emissions in the amount of 1,192 metric tons of CO 2 e. Energy achievements were accomplished through

76

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect including estimates for reduced CO/sub 2/ emissions technologies  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. The option concerns a ''hydrogen economy'' based on coal. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. This process produces a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and either mainly or only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Should the greenhouse effect be found to be a myth in the future, the carbon would be taken out of storage and utilized as a clean fuel, the impurities having been previously removed. This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. Total capital cost estimates have been made to replace all conventional coal burning power plants in the US with technologies that eliminate emissions of CO/sub 2/. These include removal, recovery and disposal of CO/sub 2/, nuclear, solar, photovoltaics, biomass, and HYDROCARB. 12 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Include in Column B cost of all composition produced by plant. Include in Column C cost of all operations not involving printing (Col. A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

occupied (whether Government-owned or rented), utilities, etc. (14.5 cents per month per square foot. Amount spent for rental of equipment Total cost (Use col.A total from this line to compute cost per 1 units produced in plant this fiscal quarter Total units produced in plant this fiscal year Cost per 1

US Army Corps of Engineers

78

PepsiCo Indianapolis Hotfil Plant Profile Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PepsiCo Indianapolis Hotfill Plant 5858 Decatur Boulevard Indianapolis, IN 46241 The Indianapolis Hotfill Plant is part of PepsiCo, and manufactures Gatorade, Propel, Sobe, and Lipton products. The Indianapolis Hotfill Plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in July 2010. This plant achieved a 10.0% reduction from baseline energy intensity in one year. The site accomplished these energy savings through: improving startup/shutdown procedures, implementing a compressed air leak management program, reducing system steam pressure, and eliminating unneeded chilling capacity. Overall, the 10% reduction in energy intensity at the Indianapolis Hotfill Plant resulted in a savings of an estimated $455M. For more information contact:

79

Solar production of industrial process steam at Ore-Ida frozen-fried-potato plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TRW is designing a system for the demonstration of the Solar Production of Industrial Process Steam. Included, besides the Conceptual Design, is an Environmental Impact Assessment and a System Safety Analysis report. The system as proposed and conceptualized consists of an array of 9520 square feet of parabolic trough concentrating solar energy collectors which generate pressurized hot water. The pressurized water is allowed to flash to steam at 300 psi (417/sup 0/F) and fed directly into the high pressure steam lines of the Ore-Ida Foods, Inc., processing plant in Ontario, Oregon. Steam is normally generated in the factory by fossil-fired boilers and is used by means of a steam-to-oil heat exchanger for the process of frying potatoes in their frozen food processing line. The high pressure steam is also cascaded down to 125 psi for use in other food processing operations. This solar system will generate 2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr during peak periods of insolation. Steam requirements in the plant for frying potatoes are: 43 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr at 300 psi and 52 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr at the lower temperatures and pressures. The Ontario plant operates on a 24 hr/day schedule six days a week during the potato processing campaigns and five days a week for the remainder of the year. The seventh day and sixth day, respectively, use steam for cleanup operations. An analysis of the steam generated, based on available annual insolation data and energy utilized in the plant, is included.

Cherne, J.M.; Gelb, G.H.; Pinkerton, J.D.; Paige, S.F.

1978-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Motor Management Guide Supporting Plant License Renewal Including Environmental Qualification Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute’s Large Electric Motor Users Group Information Working Group, which includes motor engineers, motor specialist consultants, and vendors. Environmental qualification (EQ) program owners were also involved in the development of this report. This report addresses the most important elements of a sound motor management program to support an informed decision on motor preservation and motor life extension. Motor life extensions of ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimal Sequencing of Central Refrigeration Equipment in an Industrial Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model was developed to find a viable solution to the problem of selecting the optimal sequence of refrigeration equipment (chillers, cooling towers, pumps) to operate in a Central Utility Plant. The optimal equipment sequence is that sequence which has the lowest energy cost to operate at a given plant cooling load and outside air wet bulb temperature. and satisfies all the constraints associated with the refrigeration system. Selection of the optimal equipment sequence is very difficult given the complexity of the refrigeration system and the dynamic nature of the plant cooling load. As a solution a computer program was developed to generate optimal equipment sequences to operate for combinations of a wide range of plant cooling loads and outside air wet bulb temperatures. Analysis of the solution identified the need for a retrofit project to remove "vital" constraints in order to improve the refrigeration system's performance. The solution to the problem was then incorporated in the operating procedures for the Central Utility Plant.

Fiorino, D. P.; Priest, J. W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lanka’s opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optimum Heat Power Cycles for Process Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric power cogeneration is compared with direct mechanical drives emphasizing the technical aspects having the greatest impact on energy economics. Both steam and gas turbine applications are discussed and practical methods of developing existing systems for maximum effectiveness are explained. Specific plant cases are cited as examples of major dollar savings opportunities.

Waterland, A. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant JM Eagle 10807 U.S. 59 Road Wharton, TX 77488 The Wharton Plastic Pipe Manufacturing Plant, located on an old cattle field, opened in 1985 by first manufacturing PVC pipe. The manufacturing of injection molding was added in 1988, corrugated pipe was added in 2009, and corrugated fittings were added in 2011. There are expectations for the plant to expand into manufacturing PE pipe fittings in the future. The Wharton plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge for Industry came principally from an energy conservation program that focused on not operating equipment other than that needed for current production,

85

The DOE s In-Plant Training (INPLT) Model to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector  

SciTech Connect

In-Plant Training (INPLT) is a new model for developing energy efficiency expertise within the US manufacturing companies participating in the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program-a nationwide initiative to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity in 10 years. INPLTs are designed to fill a market niche by providing hands on training in a real world manufacturing plant environment. Through INPLTs, participants from multiple manufacturing plants, supply chains, utilities, and other external stakeholders learn how to conduct energy assessments, use energy analysis tools to analyze energy saving opportunities, develop energy management systems, and implement energy savings projects. Typical INPLT events are led by DOE-certified Energy Experts and range from 2-4 days. Topics discussed include: identification of cross-cutting or system specific opportunities; introduction to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems; and energy project implementation and replication. This model is flexible, and can be tailored to suit the needs of specific industries. The INPLTs are a significant departure from the traditional single plant energy assessment model previously employed by DOE. INPLTs shift the focus from the concept of a single-plant s energy profile to a broader focus on training and capacity building among multiple industrial participants. The objective is to enable trainees to identify, quantify, implement and replicate future energy saving projects without continued external assistance. This paper discusses the INPLT model and highlights some of the initial outcomes from the successfully delivered INPLTs and the overall impact in terms of numbers of plants/participants trained, impacted energy footprints, and potential replication of identified opportunities.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; De Fontaine, Mr. Andre [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program; Schoeneborn, Fred C [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study  

SciTech Connect

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canaan Facility Canaan Facility BD Medical Route 7 and Grace Way Canaan, CT 06018 The BD Medical facility in Canaan, Connecticut manufactures disposable hypodermic syringes and specialty products for the medical field. In 1961, BD began manufacturing the first wave of disposable plastic syringes in Canaan, an innovation that would soon transform BD by replacing traditional glass syringes to ensure more sterile conditions. The original 25,000-sq-ft building housed just eight associates. One year after operations began, BD purchased a 77-acre tract of land and broke ground for the construction of a 55,000-sq-ft state-of-the-art plant. Since then, BD has expanded the Canaan facility eight times, and it now employs more than 350 associates. BD is a leading global medical technology company that manufactures and sells

88

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reducing the Anaerobic Digestion Model N1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 for its application to an industrial wastewater treatment plant treating 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 2 Abstract The Anaerobic Digestion Model N°1 (ADM1., 2005). Anaerobic digestion process involves many interactions between species that may not all have

92

Optimal Scheduling of Industrial Combined Heat and Power Plants under Time-sensitive Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) plants are widely used in industrial applications. In the aftermath of the recession, many of the associated production processes are under-utilized, which challenges the competitiveness of chemical companies. However, under-utilization can be a chance for tighter interaction with the power grid, which is in transition to the so-called smart grid, if the CHP plant can dynamically react to time-sensitive electricity prices. In this paper, we describe a generalized mode model on a component basis that addresses the operational optimization of industrial CHP plants. The mode formulation tracks the state of each plant component in a detailed manner and can account for different operating modes, e.g. fuel-switching for boilers and supplementary firing for gas turbines, and transitional behavior. Transitional behavior such as warm and cold start-ups, shutdowns and pre-computed start-up trajectories is modeled with modes as well. The feasible region of operation for each component is described based on input-output relationships that are thermodynamically sound, such as the Willans line for steam turbines. Furthermore, we emphasize the use of mathematically efficient logic constraints that allow solving the large-scale models fast. We provide an industrial case study and study the impact of different scenarios for under-utilization. 1

Sumit Mitra; Ignacioe. Grossmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Role of gas and steam turbines to reduce industrial plant energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Data are given to help industry select the economic fuel and economic mix of steam and gas turbines for energy-conservation measures and costs. Utilities and industrials can no longer rely on a firm supply of natural gas to fuel their boilers and turbines. The effect various liquid fuels have on gas turbine maintenance and availability is summarized. Process heat requirements per unit of power, process steam pressure, and the type of fuel will be factors in evaluating the proper mix of steam and gas turbines. The plant requirements for heat, and the availability of a reliable source of electric power will influence the amount of power (hp and kW) that can be economically generated by the industrial. (auth)

Wilson, W.B.; Hefner, W.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

97

Control requirements for cogen and microgen plants in a deregulated electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

The deregulation of the electricity production and distribution industry provides opportunities and concerns to the end-users as well as to the electricity producing companies. The end-user objective is to get a reliable source of electrical energy at the lowest rate possible. On the other hand, the primary objective of the three providing companies--generation, transmission, and local distribution--is to profit while satisfying their customers' needs. These three companies may compete for the same customer, and new competitors may enter the arena. The existing technology of the cogeneration plant and the emergence of the microgenerating plant will be used by all the providers and by the end-users to achieve their objectives. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of operation of the microgenerating plant, to identify the requirements of each interested player, and to introduce control strategies.

Shavit, G.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry--defined in this Energy Guide as facilities engaged in the canning, freezing, and drying or dehydrating of fruits and vegetables--consumes over $800 million worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement isan important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures applicable to fruit and vegetable processing plants are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in fruit and vegetable processing facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. Given the importance of water in fruit and vegetable processing, a summary of basic, proven measures for improving plant-level water efficiency are also provided. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. fruit and vegetable processing industry reduce energy and water consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--as well as on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Masanet, Eric; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Graus, Wina; Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

100

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. , 2006.Note: Biomass energy included Source: Price et al. (2006).

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Industrial Plant for Flue Gas Treatment with High Power Electron Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion leads to acidic pollutants, like SO2, NOx, HCl emission. Different control technologies are proposed however, the most popular method is combination of wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) and SCR (selective catalytic reduction). First, using lime or limestone slurry leads to SO2 capture, and gypsum is a product. The second process where ammonia is used as reagent and nitrogen oxides are reduced over catalyst surface to gaseous nitrogen removes NOx. New advanced method using electron accelerators for simultaneous SO2 and NOx removal has been developed in Japan, the USA, Germany and Poland. Both pollutants are removed with high efficiency and byproduct can be applied as fertilizer. Two industrial plants have been already constructed. One in China and second in Poland, third one is under construction in Japan. Information on the Polish plant is presented in the paper. Plant has been constructed at Power Station Pomorzany, Szczecin (Dolna Odra Electropower Stations Group) and treats flue gases from two Benson boilers 60 MWe and 100 MWth each. Flow rate of the flue gas stream is equal to 270 000 Nm3/h. Four transformer accelerators, 700 keV electron energy and 260 kW beam power each were applied. With its 1.05 MW total beam power installed it is a biggest radiation facility over the world, nowadays. Description of the plant and results obtained has been presented in the paper.

Chmielewski, Andrzej G. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); University of technology, faculty of Process and Chemical Engineering, Warsaw (Poland); Tyminski, Bogdan; Zimek, Zbigniew; Pawelec, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Licki, Janusz [Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk (Poland)

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy is the most important cost factor in the U.S petrochemical industry, defined in this guide as the chemical industry sectors producing large volume basic and intermediate organic chemicals as well as large volume plastics. The sector spent about $10 billion on fuels and electricity in 2004. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. petrochemical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the petrochemical industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the petrochemical and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. petrochemical industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures--and on their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Neelis, Maarten; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Improve Overall Plant Efficiency and Fuel Use, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program combined heat and power (CHP) tool can help identify energy savings in gas turbine-driven systems.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

107

Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 40. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 NAICS Code June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 311 Food Manufacturing 875 926 1,015 -13.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 26 17 19 35.8 313 Textile Mills 22 22 25 -13.9 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing 570 583

108

Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 35. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,256 2,561 1,864 4,817 4,343 10.9 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 38 50 48 88 95 -7.7 313 Textile Mills 31 29 21 60 59 2.2 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w

109

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy-conservation supply curve for the US iron and steel industryindustries include electricity savings. To prevent double counting with the energy supply

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of energy intensity indicators for Canadianvarious indicators to present energy intensity, including “energy intensity, which is a constructed indicator, making

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001b). Energy Efficiency Opportunity Guide in the LimeMilling Industry An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantAn ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Annotated compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications. [Includes about 400 abstracts and glossary  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a thorough compilation of the sources of information related to the usage of electricity in non-industrial applications, as available in the open literature and from the U.S. electrical power industry. The report's scope encompasses all aspects of: electric load management; end use; and the various methods of acquisition, analysis and implementation of electricity usage data. There are over 400 abstracts; 156 from the Load Research Committee of Association of Edison Illuminating Companies (LRC/AEIC) reports and 264 from the open literature. The abstracts over references containing over 12,000 pages plus about 2,500 references and 6,200 graphs and tables pertinent to electricity usage in non-industrial applications. In addition to the LRC/AEIC abstracts, this document identifies over 100 sources of directly relevant information (in contrast to general interest sources and material of secondary relevance).

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Industrial Plant Certification Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Performance Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division June 2013 ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve the energy performance of their facilities and strengthen the effectiveness of their energy management program. Through ENERGY STAR, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers a number of forms of recognition, including certification for facility energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR certification for industrial plants recognizes individual manufacturing plants whose

116

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

117

U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program – Technology Delivery Plant-Wide Assessment at PPG Industries, Natrium, WV  

SciTech Connect

PPG and West Virginia University performed a plantwide energy assessment at the PPG’s Natrium, WV chemical plant, an energy-intensive manufacturing facility producing chlor-alkali and related products. Implementation of all the assessment recommendations contained in this report could reduce plant energy consumption by 8.7%, saving an estimated 10,023,192 kWh/yr in electricity, 6,113 MM Btu/yr in Natural Gas, 401,156 M lb/yr in steam and 23,494 tons/yr in coal and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 241 mm lb/yr. The total cost savings would amount to approximately $2.9 mm/yr. Projects being actively implemented will save $1.7 mm/yr; the remainder are undergoing more detailed engineering study.

Lester, Stephen R.; Wiethe, Jeff; Green, Russell; Guice, Christina; Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran; Turton, Richard

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

Resource Guide for Technology Transfer to the Pulp and Paper Industry: Part 4: Power Plant Maintenance and Repair  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to requests from EPRI's member utilities, EPRI's Pulp, Paper and Forest Products Office has developed a Resource Guide for technology products related to that industry. The Resource Guide contains an initial listing of technical reports, software, and products associated with power plant maintenance and repair as found in the EPRIWeb electronic database. These products are arranged to provide the reader with a quick evaluation of each item for applicability to the reader's specific needs.

2000-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 28. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 2,214 2,356 1,994 4,570 4,353 5.0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 48 37 53 85 90 -5.6 313 Textile Mills 31 29 22 59 63 -6.1 315 Apparel Manufacturing w w w w w w 321 Wood Product Manufacturing w w w w w w 322 Paper Manufacturing

120

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream, and therefore was an ideal model system for developing new separation equipment. Subsequent testing used both synthetic acid hydrolysate and corn stover derived weak acid hydrolysate (NREL produced). A two-phased approach was used for the research and development described in this project. The first level of study involved testing the new concepts at the bench level. The bench-scale evaluations provided fundamental understanding of the processes, building and testing small prototype systems, and determining the efficiency of the novel processes. The second level of study, macro-level, required building larger systems that directly simulated industrial operations and provided validation of performance to minimize financial risk during commercialization. The project goals and scope included: (1) Development of low-capital alternatives to conventional crop-based purification/separation processes; and (2) Development of each process to the point that transition to commercial operation is low risk. The project reporting period was January 2001 to December 2004. This included a one year extension of the project (without additional funding).

Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

ERDA LWR plant technology program: role of government/industry in improving LWR performance  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented under the following chapter headings: executive summary; LWR plant outages; LWR plant construction delays and cancellations; programs addressing plant outages, construction delays, and cancellations; need for additional programs to remedy continuing problems; criteria for government role in LWR commercialization; and the proposed government program.

1975-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Metal Fabrication Industry. 18 th National Industrial40-51. Pharmaceutical Industry Association of Puerto Rico (on Energy Efficiency in Industry. American Council for an

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plants: Industry Recommendations for Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries. Good initial and continued performance is vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Decontamination of industrial cyanide-containing water in a solar CPC pilot plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to improve the quality of wastewater effluent coming from an Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power station to meet with future environmental legislation. This study examined a homogeneous photocatalytic oxidation process using concentrated solar UV energy (UV/Fe(II)/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in a Solar Compound Parabolic Collector (CPC) pilot plant. The efficiency of the process was evaluated by analysis of the oxidation of cyanides and Total Organic Carbon (TOC). A factorial experimental design allowed the determination of the influences of operating variables (initial concentration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, oxalic acid and Fe(II) and pH) on the degradation kinetics. Temperature and UV-A solar power were also included in the Neural Network fittings. The pH was maintained at a value >9.5 during cyanide oxidation to avoid the formation of gaseous HCN and later lowered to enhance mineralization. Under the optimum conditions ([H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] = 2000 ppm, [Fe(II)] = 8 ppm, pH = 3.3 after cyanide oxidation, and [(COOH){sub 2}] = 60 ppm), it was possible to degrade 100% of the cyanides and up to 92% of Total Organic Carbon. (author)

Duran, A.; Monteagudo, J.M.; San Martin, I.; Aguirre, M. [Grupo IMAES, Department of Chemical Engineering, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela 3, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect

This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

DOE /NV

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mercury TMDLs - Significance to the Power Industry and Guidance for Individual Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated by EPRI to provide guidance for individual power plants faced with mercury total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and to assess the significance of establishing mercury TMDLs.

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Improving Existing Fossil-Fired Power Plants Volume 1: Highlights of Industry Discussions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project identified and evaluated ideas for improving both the capacity and capacity factor of existing fossil power plants through intensive interviews with experts at EPRI, universities, DOE, and vendors.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

130

Improving Existing Fossil-Fired Power Plants Volume 2: Details of Industry Discussions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project identified and evaluated ideas for improving both the capacity and capacity factor of existing fossil power plants through intensive interviews with experts at EPRI, universities, DOE, and vendors.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Thermal Efficiency Optimization for Industrial Power Plants Under Load Fluctuations Using Fuzzy Logic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The automation of the control to a power plant is indeed a challenge mainly because of the occurrences of random and unpredictable variations in output demands as well as because of highly non-linear behavior of the system itself. It is sometimes argued that the 'best' control for a power plant is the operators themselves. Experienced operators are capable of making decisions on the basis of incomplete and imprecise information. The extent to which these decisions are correct is a matter of speculation. Erroneous conclusions, established post facto, are chalked up to the learning process and in fact, contribute to the forming of a good, experienced control team. The need to automate the control process for a plant is even more acutely felt when considering the complexity of the plants themselves and the volume of data that would have to be processed before a control decision can be taken. Factored into this decision would also be several governing parameters such as costs, reliability, other constraints and their interdependency, as well as planned and unscheduled outages for maintenance and so on. In this paper, however, only one facet of a power plant operation is considered. It is intended to demonstrate that thermal efficiency may be improved by better techniques for automated control of throttle valves in the steam turbine of the plant. One of these options, fuzzy logic, is selected, and defended, as being the more effective than current approaches. A comparative analysis is conducted of control methods for plant operations followed by a brief overview of fuzzy control and its application to control of non-linear systems. A method of applying this 'new' computer-based technique to control of non-linear, somewhat erratic plants is presented and discussed.

Steffenhagan, W.; de Sam Lazaro, A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

training. Target Group: Industries in Wisconsin Format: OpenU.S. Glass Container Industry. International Glass Review,Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Rye Brook, New York.

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 nd National Industrial Energy Technology Conference18 th National Industrial Energy Technology Conferenceof Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET). (1993).

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), The Netherlands.second National Industrial Energy Technology ConferenceNational Industrial Energy Technology Conference. Houston,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with New Industrial Paint Drying and Baking Oven. Case studyovens, heaters, and heat exchangers. Target Group: Any industrial

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Nondestructive Evaluation: Balance-of-Plant Eddy Current Centralized Certification Program for the Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy current examination is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method that utilities use extensively to investigate the integrity of tubing found in balance-of-plant (BOP) heat exchangers. Data analysts performing the evaluation and interpretation of the results are normally certified as Level II or Level III through their employer8217s written and hands-on practical examinations. In order to be eligible for certification by examination, the candidate must fulfill certain educational and/or work-related e...

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

137

Photocatalytic degradation of oil industry hydrocarbons models at laboratory and at pilot-plant scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photodegradation/mineralization (TiO{sub 2}/UV Light) of the hydrocarbons: p-nitrophenol (PNP), naphthalene (NP) and dibenzothiophene (DBT) at three different reactors: batch bench reactor (BBR), tubular bench reactor (TBR) and tubular pilot-plant (TPP) were kinetically monitored at pH = 3, 6 and 10, and the results compared using normalized UV light exposition times. The results fit the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model; therefore, LH adsorption equilibrium constants (K) and apparent rate constants (k) are reported as well as the apparent pseudo-first-order rate constants, k{sub obs}{sup '} = kK/(1 + Kc{sub r}). The batch bench reactor is the most selective reactor toward compound and pH changes in which the reactivity order is: NP > DBT > PNP, however, the catalyst adsorption (K) order is: DBT > NP > PNP at the three pH used but NP has the highest k values. The tubular pilot-plant (TPP) is the most efficient of the three reactors tested. Compound and pH photodegradation/mineralization selectivity is partially lost at the pilot plant where DBT and NP reaches ca. 90% mineralization at the pH used, meanwhile, PNP reaches only 40%. The real time, in which these mineralization occur are: 180 min for PNP and 60 min for NP and DBT. The mineralization results at the TPP indicate that for the three compounds, the rate limiting step is the same as the degradation one. So that, there is not any stable intermediate that may accumulate during the photocatalytic treatment. (author)

Vargas, Ronald; Nunez, Oswaldo [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica Organica y Quimica Ambiental, Departamento de Procesos y Sistemas, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado Postal 89000, Caracas (Venezuela)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy with Raw Materials. Ceramic Industry, July: 13-15.A New Twist to Oxy-Fuel. Ceramic Industry: October: 42-46.in the Glass Industry. The American Ceramic Society Bulletin

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Blending mining and nuclear industries at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

At the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) traditional procedures for underground mining activities have been significantly altered in order to assure underground safety and project adherence to numerous regulatory requirements. Innovative techniques have been developed for WIPP underground procedures, mining equipment, and operating environments. The mining emphasis at WIPP is upon the quality of the excavation, not (as in conventional mines) on the production of ore. The WIPP is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) project that is located 30 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico, where the nation's first underground engineered nuclear repository is being constructed. The WIPP site was selected because of its location amidst a 607 meter thick salt bed, which provides a remarkably stable rock formation for the permanent storage of nuclear waste. The underground facility is located 655 meters below the earth's surface, in the Salado formation, which comprises two-hundred million year old halites with minor amounts of clay and anhydrites. When completed, the WIPP underground facility will consist of two components: approximately 81 square kilometers of experimental areas, and approximately 405 square kilometers of repository. 3 figs.

Walls, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for the Corn Wet Milling Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corn wet milling is the most energy intensive industry within the food and kindred products group (SIC 20), using 15 percent of the energy in the entire food industry. After corn, energy is the second largest operating cost for corn wet millers in the United States. A typical corn wet milling plant in the United States spends approximately $20 to $30 million per year on energy, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs and increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy-price volatility. This report shows energy efficiency opportunities available for wet corn millers. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure and production of the corn wet milling industry and the energy used in the milling and refining process. Specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The report draws upon the experiences of corn, wheat and other starch processing plants worldwide for energy efficiency measures. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the corn wet milling industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to different wet milling practices, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Ruth, Michael

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. industrial natural gas price, which might result in significant uncertainties. The fuel consumption

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Enhancing Cross-Correlation Analysis with Artificial Neural Networks for Nuclear Power Plant Feedwater Flow Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary cost-saving objectives of the power plant industry, including the nuclear industry, has long been the efficient operation of plant systems. Since the maximum operating thermal power of any nuclear plant is bounded by the specific licensing ... Keywords: flow measurement, neural networks, nuclear power plant

Davide Roverso; Da Ruan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STAR for Industry Energy Guides 52 include both process-s sector- wide energy efficiency guides provide informationfor Cement Making: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

Wiltsee, G.

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

145

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water. Aerotherm final report, 77-235. [Can washing in Campbell Soup plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Solar Industrial Process Hot Water Program are to design, test, and evaluate the application of solar energy to the generation and supply of industrial process hot water, and to provide an assessment of the economic and resource benefits to be gained. Other objectives are to stimulate and give impetus to the use of solar energy for supplying significant amounts of industrial process heat requirements. The plant selected for the design of a solar industrial process hot water system was the Campbell Soup facility in Sacramento, California. The total hot water demand for this plant varies between 500 and 800 gpm during regular production shifts, and hits a peak of over 1,000 gpm for approximately one hour during the cleanup shift. Most of the hot water is heated in the boiler room by a combination of waste heat recovery and low pressure (5 psi) steam-water heat exchangers. The hot water emerges from the boiler room at a temperature between 160/sup 0/F and 180/sup 0/F and is transported to the various process areas. Booster heaters in the process areas then use low pressure (5 psi) or medium pressure (20 psi) steam to raise the temperature of the water to the level required for each process. Hot water is used in several processes at the Campbell Soup plant, but the can washing process was selected to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar hot water system. A detailed design and economic analysis of the system is given. (WHK)

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the seasonal increases in natural gas prices in 2000 (JamesU.S. industrial natural gas price, which might result inaverage industrial natural gas price for 2002 of $4.02 per

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

EIA Electric Industry Data Collection  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Steam Production EIA Electric Industry Data Collection Residential Industrial ... Monthly data on cost and quality of fuels delivered to cost-of-service plants

149

ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper provides information on the output of the Detail Design and will reflect the progress of the design work.

Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

US prep plant census 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Industrial Energy Use Indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories for electricity and natural gas use in small and medium-sized plants in the U.S. Standard deviations often exceed the average EUI for an energy type, with coefficients of variation averaging 290% for 8,200 plants from all areas of the continental U.S. Data from milder climates appears more scattered than that from colder climates. For example, the ratio of the average of coefficient of variations for all industry types in warm versus cold regions of the U.S. generally is greater than unity. Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energy’s national Industrial Assessment Center database.

Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

EPRI Ergonomics Handbook for the Electric Power Industry: Ergonomic Interventions for Plant Operators and Mechanics in Fossil-Fueled Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Committee Research Program has provided ergonomic information to the electric energy industry workforce since 1999. This is the sixth EPRI ergonomics handbook; it specifically focuses on tasks performed by plant operators and mechanics working in fossil-fueled generating stations and also addresses some tasks performed by steam services technicians. Fossil-fueled generating station operational and mechanical work is physically strenuous and can expose workers...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 29. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date NAICS Code April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change 311 Food Manufacturing 51.17 49.59 50.96 50.35 50.94 -1.2 312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg. 111.56 115.95 113.47 113.49 117.55 -3.5 313 Textile Mills 115.95 118.96 127.41 117.40 128.07 -8.3 315 Apparel Manufacturing

154

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs. LawrenceRivers. (1997). Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps.CADDET). (1997b). Energy Savings with New Industrial Paint

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities, recommend energy efficiency actions, developM. Kushler (1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive and Steelthe ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Rye

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M. Kushler. (1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive andSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. AmericanCalifornia Institute of Energy Efficiency ( CIEE). (2000b).

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and M. Kushler. (1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive and22 nd National Industrial Energy Technology ConferenceJr. and G. P. Looby. (1996). Energy Conservation and Waste

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of renewable energy production facilities in theProduction at a Food Processing Facility. Office of Industrial Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glossary 93 Appendix A: Location of Major Glass Plants in the United States . 96 Appendix B: Basic Energy

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Greenline Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Place San Rafael, California Zip 94901 Product Small to medium scale biodiesel plants designer and producer. They also run a biodiesel plant in Vallejo,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plant Projects: Industry Recommendations for Storage, Construction, and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries and vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

162

Chinese Oil Plants Information System (COPIS): An on-line information store, query and management system for three chinese industrial oil plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researches on Cornus wilsoniana, Ricinus communis, and Symplocos paniculata have generated a large amount of data. In order to assist researchers to store and exchange data efficiently, an on-line interactive platform, called Chinese Oil Plants Information ... Keywords: Brower/Server structure, COPIS, Information system, Oil plant, Three-layer structure

Qian-Qian Liu; Li-Juan Jiang; Jin Han; Qiang Liu; Xiang Yin; Pei-Wang Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering (2005). Industrial Refrigeration Best Practicesdatabase/ Industrial Refrigeration Consortium (IRC) (2004a).Drive Opportunities in Industrial Refrigeration Systems:

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

High performance steam development. Final report, Phase No. 3: 1500{degree}F steam plant for industrial cogeneration prototype development tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a key part of DOE`s and industry`s R&D efforts to improve the efficiency, cost, and emissions of power generation, a prototype High Performance Steam System (HPSS) has been designed, built, and demonstrated. The world`s highest temperature ASME Section I coded power plant successfully completed over 100 hours of development tests at 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psig on a 56,000 pound per hour steam generator, control valve and topping turbine at an output power of 5500 hp. This development advances the HPSS to 400{degrees}F higher steam temperature than the current best technology being installed around the world. Higher cycle temperatures produce higher conversion efficiencies and since steam is used to produce the large majority of the world`s power, the authors expect HPSS developments will have a major impact on electric power production and cogeneration in the twenty-first century. Coal fueled steam plants now produce the majority of the United States electric power. Cogeneration and reduced costs and availability of natural gas have now made gas turbines using Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG`s) and combined cycles for cogeneration and power generation the lowest cost producer of electric power in the United States. These gas fueled combined cycles also have major benefits in reducing emissions while reducing the cost of electricity. Development of HPSS technology can significantly improve the efficiency of cogeneration, steam plants, and combined cycles. Figure 2 is a TS diagram that shows the HPSS has twice the energy available from each pound of steam when expanding from 1500{degrees}F and 1500 psia to 165 psia (150 psig, a common cogeneration process steam pressure). This report describes the prototype component and system design, and results of the 100-hour laboratory tests. The next phase of the program consists of building up the steam turbine into a generator set, and installing the power plant at an industrial site for extended operation.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 5.1 Energy Management Systems andof a strategic energy management system vary from plant toof the integrated energy management system discussed above,

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant from off-site power plants, gas companies, and fuel distributors. Energy then flows to either a central energy generation utility system or is distributed immediately for direct use. Energy is then processed using a variety of highly energy-intensive systems, including steam, process heating, and

167

Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented. The plants analyzed employ fluidized bed boilers for generation of steam for process and building/heating/cooling demands, in conjunction with electric power co-generation. Results of the analysis are presented, using life cycle costs and investment payback periods, pinpointing the areas, type and magnitude of costs which should be considered in the selection of combustors or systems. Capital and operating costs, and recognized technical and economic barriers are also presented and their effects indicated. Life cycle cost of each of the alternatives analyzed are compared and the expected payback periods for the different size FBC plants and for different annual average production levels are discussed.

Mesko, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber reservoir for industrial processing purposes at Valley Nitrogen Producers Inc. , El Centro agricultural chemical plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber KGRA for industrial processing purposes at the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc. El Centro, California agricultural chemical plant was investigated. The analysis proceeds through the preliminary economics to determine the restraints imposed by geothermal modification size on internal rates of return, and through the energy utilization evaluation to determine the best method for substituting geothermal energy for existing fossil fuel energy. Finally, several geothermal utilization schemes were analyzed for detailed cost-benefit evaluation. An economically viable plan for implementing geothermal energy in the VNP Plant was identified and the final conclusions and recommendations were made based on these detailed cost-benefit analyses. Costs associated with geothermal energy production and implementation were formulated utilizing a modified Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories' ''GEOCOST'' program.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006). Teaming Up To Save Energy US EPA, Washington DC (losses Total primary energy Source: U.S. Census (2004), U.S.plant’s total energy demand (U.S. DOE 2002a). Grinding. Most

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s September 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific iems discussed include: (1) merger of Urangesellschaft and Interuran, (2) cessation of uranium mining in Bulgaria, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Tokai-2, (4) MRS in Wyoming, (5) low-level waste facilities at Perry, (6) closure of Trojan, (7) restart of Kozloduy-6, (8) agreements between Cogema and Minatom, (9) planning for a large nuclear power plant in Japan moves forward, (10) order of a new reactor at Civaux, (11) relicensing of Yankee Rowe, (12) operation of Bradwell-2, and (13) high-level waste management in Japan.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s August 2992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items discussed include: (1) non-proliferation in Argentina and Brazil, (2) a joint-venture uranium leaching project in the USA, (3) life extension for Yankee Rowe, (4) contracts for nuclear plants in the Republic of Korea, (5) cleanup of Wismut, (6) record operation of Three Mile Island-1, Oconee-1, and Cook-1, (7) closure of Kozloduy units, (8) China`s ascension to the non-proliferation treaty, and (9) a centrifuge enrichment facility in Japan.

NONE

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Management in Industry. Centre for the Analysis andEnergy Efficiency. Canadian Industry Program for Energyefficiency lighting in Industry and Commercial Buildings.

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY An ENERGY STAR Resource Guidedrinking water supply industry to reduce energy consumptionenergy is used in the public drinking water supply industry.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel and electricity supplied to the industries are based onof all electricity in the chemical industry is consumed byuse of electricity in the total chemical industry and the

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on electricity and fuels, respectively, by industry sub-end use of electricity in the industry is refrigeration,purchasers of electricity in the industry are the frozen

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management in the Flemish Steel Industry: the Arcelor Gentfor the iron and steel industry. Parekh, P. (2000).in the Canadian Steel Industry, Ottawa, Canada: CANMET.

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Bog Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

179

Industrial Development Projects (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes municipalities and counties to issue bonds or interest coupons to finance industrial projects, including energy generation facilities.

180

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Demonstrated Energy Technologies ( CADDET). (1987).second National Industrial Energy Technology Conferencesecond National Industrial Energy Technology Conference

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with New Industrial Paint Drying and Baking Oven. Case studyovens, heaters, and heat exchangers. Target Group: Any industrial

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry - An ENERGY STAR® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

779E 779E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers Ernst Worrell, Paul Blinde, Maarten Neelis, Eliane Blomen, and Eric Masanet Environmental Energy Technologies Division Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 2010 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

183

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

185

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

186

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 2005 price for industrial electricity averaged 7.62the average industrial price for electricity rose from 4.91in industrial natural gas and electricity prices in the

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of IndustrialSeptember 4, 2010. ) U.S. DOE EERE. Industrial Technologies25, 2011. ) U.S. DOE EERE. 2002. United States Industrial

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities, recommend energy efficiency actions, developSummer Study on Energy efficiency in Industry. AmericanACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, ACEEE,

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Kushler. (c. 1997). Energy Efficiency in Automotive andSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Americanof Industrial Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in its Fairfax Assembly Plant in Kansas City. The chips weres Fairfax Assembly Plant in Kansas City, Kansas implemented

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta Earthquake: Effects on Selected Power and Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnitude 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake created moderate to strong ground shaking over an area of more than 5000 km(2), including the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay cities and centers of population and industry surrounding Monterey Bay. This report summarizes the effects of the earthquake on a large inventory of structures and equipment installations relevant to the electric power industry, including thermal-electric power plants, substations, nonpower utility operations, and industrial sites.

1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Results of Continuous Load Cell Monitoring Field Trial for UF6 Withdrawals at an Operating Industrial Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous load cell monitoring (CLCM) has been implemented and tested for use as a safeguards tool during a 2009 field trial in an operating UF6 transfer facility. The transfer facility is part of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio, operated by the United States Enrichment Corporation. During the field trial, two process scales for UF{sub 6} cylinders were continuously monitored for a 6-month period as cylinders were being filled. The collected CLCM data were used in testing an event processor serving as a filter for highlighting measurements representing significant operational activities that are important in verifying declared operations. The collection of CLCM data, coupled with rules-based event processing, can provide inspectors with knowledge of a facility's feed and withdrawal activities occurring between site visits. Such process knowledge promises to enhance the effectiveness of safeguards by enabling inspectors to quantitatively compare declared activities directly with process measurements. Selected results of the field trial and event processing will be presented in the context of their value to an independent inspector and a facility operator.

Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL; Conchewski, Curtis A [ORNL; Peters, Benjamin R [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

194

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Paper n Other Industries, Electricity Conservation s65% of electricity consumed by industry is used by motorof the main industries include electricity savings. q

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Boost Process Heating Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) can help industrial plants indentify opportunities to save energy.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Tools to Boost Steam System Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program steam software tools can help industrial plants identify steam system improvements to save energy and money.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Exhibitor: SAINT GOBAIN INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS NORTON ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAINT GOBAIN INDUSTRIAL CERAMICS NORTON PRIMARY METALS ... Norton refractory products for the copper industry include shaft furnace liners, bricks, ...

198

Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry  

SciTech Connect

The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Climate VISION: Resources and Links - Plant Assessments  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plant Assessments Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Program—most companies realize a minimum of $1 million in annual energy savings after just one assessment. Plants are selected through a competitive solicitation process, and agree to a minimum 50% cost-share for implementing the assessment. An industry-defined team conducts an on-site analysis of total energy use and identifies opportunities to save energy in your overall operations and in motor, steam, compressed air, and process heating systems. The recommendations could include implementing emerging technologies that would be particularly effective in your operation. These emerging technologies, although on the forefront of industrial manufacturing, are successful and commercially

200

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Plant energy auditing | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation Plant energy auditing Industrial...

202

Industrial and Commercial Heat Pump Applications in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy crisis of 1973 accelerated the development of large-scale heat pumps in the United States. Since that time, the commercial, institutional, and industrial applications of heat pumps for waste heat recovery have expanded. This paper reviews the trends in heat pump cycle developments and discusses both the closed vapor compression cycle and refrigerants most commonly used and the open-cycle mechanical vapor compression heat pumps. Waste heat sources, heat loads served by heat pumps--and typical applications using heat pumps for large-scale space heating, domestic water heating, and industrial process water heating-- are discussed. Typical installations include commercial applications in hotels, high-rise apartments and condominiums, and office buildings. Institutional installations discussed include hospitals, universities, wastewater treatment plants, and airport terminals. Industrial applications largely center on food processing industries, feedwater heating, metal fabricating, and other industries. Reference is also made to other applications and alternative energy sources now gaining acceptance, including groundwater/geothermal water.

Niess, R. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Proceedings of the eighteenth mid-Atlantic industrial waste conference on toxic and hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the management of hazardous materials. Topics considered at the conference included underground storage tanks, underground industrial waste tank releases, regulations, cost estimation, metal leaching, spent oil shales, siting power plant ash disposal areas, phosphorous removal by a coal media filter, and waste water characterization and treatment for the coal slurry pipeline industry.

Boardman, G.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. (2001). Optimize energy efficiency of HRSG. HydrocarbonS.K. (1997). Conserve Energy in Distillation. Chemicalreduces ethylene plant’s energy needs. Oil and gas journal,

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

winter 2001 spike in natural gas prices across the Unitedthe average industrial natural gas price was even higher in2002 U.S. industrial natural gas price of $5.13 per MBtu was

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electrical safety in industrial plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electrical engineers and electricians are aware that the principal danger from electricity is that of electrocution, but few really understand just how minute a quantity of electric energy is required for electrocution. Actually, the current drawn ...

Ralph H. Lee

1971-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Industrial Retrofits are Possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario is the industrial heartland of Canada and more than 80% of its energy comes from Canadian sources with the remainder from the neighbouring U.S. states. Because of the ever increasing demand for energy relating to increased economic activity, the provincial government's major energy priority is efficiency. In April of 1987, the provincial government initiated a program to assist industrial energy users to reduce their energy usage. This program was designed to concentrate on an in-depth analysis of the complete operations of industrial plants with the analyses being performed by specialist, private sector, engineering consultants. The program is in 3 phases providing an Ontario industrial plant with an Energy Analysis, a Feasibility Analysis Grant and a Project Engineering Design Grant. In this presentation, the author will outline the results of the program to date and will attempt to share with the audience the individual case experiences. Since the program's start, the Ontario Ministry of Energy has completed over 320 energy analyses of industrial plants which had combined energy bills of over $420 million. The potential annual energy savings identified were over $40 million or 9.51%. Electricity and natural gas are the major fuels used by Ontario industries and our surveys to date have shown savings of 6% in electricity and 11% in natural gas. Over the first two years of the program, individual plants have or are intending to implement more than half of the energy analysis recommendations.

Stobart, E. W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Bayou Cogeneration Plant- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bayou Cogeneration Plant is a prime example of the high fuel efficiency and consequent energy savings an industrial company can realize from cogeneration. A joint venture of Big Three Industries, Inc., and General Electric Company, this $100 million power plant became operational late last year and produces approximately 1.4 million lb/hr of process steam and 300 MW of electricity. As the turnkey supplier, General Electric was responsible for the entire project from cycle engineering through start up and is currently operating and maintaining the plant. This paper describes the factors which led Big Three Industries to build a cogeneration power plant and the route selected for project implementation. Also included is a brief profile of project implementation, highlighting the responsibilities of the turnkey supplier and specific steps taken to compress the project into a 20-month schedule, resulting in significant cost savings and enabling Big Three to realize cogeneration benefits as early as possible.

Bray, M. E.; Mellor, R.; Bollinger, J. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

215

Feasibility analysis using natural source cooling the IDC plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of Energy-saving technologies in current telecommunication industry, the paper analyzed the Energy-saving renovation of air conditioning in IDC Plant in Langfang. The technologies including introducing fresh air directly and air ... Keywords: IDC plant, economic analysis, energy-saving renovation, feasibility analysis, plate heat exchanger

Wang Jinggang; Kang Ligai; Du Meixia; Zhao Jin; Gao Xiaoxia

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam consumption at ExxonMobil chemical plant. FebruaryLBNL), Frank Roberto (ExxonMobil), Art Royals (Sunoco), FredGeneration System at ExxonMobil Gas Plant. January 2002.

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant’s energy needs. Oil and gas journal, 10 February 1992.of distillation units. Oil and Gas Journal, 21 June, 1999.the Netherlands (in Dutch). Oil and Gas Journal (2005). 2005

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for WaterIndustry. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects. (A Primer

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second National Industrial Energy Technology ConferenceDissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies, projectof Demonstrated Energy Technologies. Project JP-1990-022,

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the chemical and refinery industries. Energy Researchand by petroleum refineries from the fluid catalyticproduction of propylene at refineries. In the first quarter

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accessed August 31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency &Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of Industrial Technologies.2010. ) Alliance to Save Energy, 2002, pp. 96-97. Available

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry natural gas consumption in 2002 (U.S. DOE 2005a).natural gas consumption, in physical units, of the four U.S.

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Distribution..plant. The purpose of steam distribution is simple: to getcorrosion in the steam distribution system. Distribution -

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a significant source of wasted energy. A typical plant thatalong with its (wasted) heat energy (Ford, 2002). Ford plans

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry banner Industry banner Neutron scattering research has applications in practically every field, and neutron research at ORNL is leading to productive partnerships with the industrial and business communities. We welcome proposals for all types of research, including those involving proprietary work. Recent studies have led to discoveries with potential applications in fields such as medicine, energy, and various metals technologies. For more information, please see our recent research highlights. Research Collaborations Industry-Driven Research Benefits Plastics Manufacturing Corning uses VULCAN to test limits of ceramic material for car emission controls, filtration devices Neutrons Probe Inner Workings of Batteries Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match

226

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to...

227

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...

228

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Improve Compressed Air System Performance with AIRMaster+, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program AIRMaster+ software tool can help industrial plants optimize compressed air system efficiency.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Intertape Richmond C4I Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richmond Plant Richmond Plant Intertape Polymer Group 2000 Enterprise Drive Richmond, KY 40475 The Intertape Polymer Richmond Plant was constructed in 1994 and became operational in 1995. This facility produces a variety or retail and industrial pressure sensitive tapes such as: reinforced filament, BOPP carton sealing, MOPP strapping, and masking tapes, to name a few. Products manufactured at this location serve a wide variety of markets including housing, industrial packaging, and retail. The Intertape Polymer Richmond Plant achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant realized a 23.4% decrease in its energy intensity in one year of its baseline. This far exceeded the corporate goal of reducing energy intensity by 10 percent within 5 years.

231

The industrial Center at Mississippi State University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

b.K. Hodge; Mary C. Emplaincourt

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

audits in an energy management system helps to guaranteemodule in the energy management system of a plant inoptimum. New energy management systems that use artificial

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Gustine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant reached 12% reduction in energy intensity within two years of its baseline. The Gustine Plant achieved the...

234

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the work of EPA and the automobile manufacturing industry to develop an Energy Performance Indicator (EPI) for assembly plants. These types of plants are defined as those that...

235

DOE Seeks Industry Participation for Engineering Services to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Participation for Engineering Services to Design Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Industry Participation for Engineering Services to Design Next Generation Nuclear Plant...

236

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry. Brussels: IISI. The best practice coke plant isa modern coke plant using standard technology, includingspeed drives on motors and fans. Coke dry quenching saves an

Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

238

Work Management Guidelines for Fossil Power Plant Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides overview guidance for implementing or improving the work management process at fossil power plants. The concepts in this report are based on best practices from many power plants at various utilities. Also, recent operations and maintenance assessments revealed that work management processes were in various stages of implementation and not at the generally accepted industry standards. Problems noted during recent assessments included lack of coordination among plant organizations, la...

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Productivity Improvement for Fossil Steam Power Plants, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assembles case studies on productivity improvement taken from the webside of Productivity Improvement Expert Reviews (PIER) on subjects spanning the power plant from the boiler to the steam turbine, and including the plant auxiliaries and the environmental control equipment. These studies have been critically assessed by technical experts who have discussed the improvements with the power plant staff and judged their potential for future use in the fossil industry. This 2009 report also looks...

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Industry, ACEEE, Washington DC, USA. Jones, T. (2001).Economy, Berkeley, CA/Washington, DC, USA. McPherson, G. ,Efficient Economy, Washington, DC, USA. Neelis, M.L. , M.

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing - Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plant Assessments Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Program—most companies realize a minimum of $1 million in annual energy savings after just one assessment. Plants are selected through a competitive solicitation process, and agree to a minimum 50% cost-share for implementing the assessment. An industry-defined team conducts an on-site analysis of total energy use and identifies opportunities to save energy in your overall operations and in motor, steam, compressed air, and process heating systems. The recommendations could include implementing emerging technologies that would be particularly effective in your operation. These emerging technologies, although on the forefront of industrial manufacturing, are successful and commercially

242

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Turning industry visions into reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure outlines the activities of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in the Department of Energy. OIT activities are aimed at industry adoption of energy-efficient, pollution-reducing technologies and include research and development on advanced technologies, financing, technical assistance, information dissemination, education, and bringing together industry groups, universities, National Laboratories, states, and environmentalists. OIT`s core initiative is to facilitate partnerships within seven materials and process industries: aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metalcasting, petroleum refining, and steel industries.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Technologies and Policies to Improve Energy Efficiency in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Refineries: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy andGlass Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantAssembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Price, Lynn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy’s Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR plant certification ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry See who has taken the Challenge See who has achieved the Challenge See who is promoting the Challenge ENERGY...

247

Developing Alternative Industrial Materials from Mining Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Developing Alternative Industrial Materials from Mining Waste ... Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash with ...

248

Energy Opportunities in the Aluminum Processing Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As carbon management has grown in importance and project payback becomes ... overall energy within a plant and within the aluminum processing industry.

249

Rotem Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

research, development, construction & consultation of major solar energy projects: solar power plants and solar powered desalination study. References Rotem Industries Ltd1...

250

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Industrial...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to electric...

251

Cutting Industrial Solar System Costs in Half  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there are technical, social, environmental and institutional barriers to the widespread use of solar systems, the principle barrier is economic. For commercial and industrial firms to turn to this alternate energy source, the first cost must be sharply reduced so that the annual savings that are achievable will provide an attractive return on the incremental investment. This paper discusses one proven method of combining the energy efficiency of high temperature industrial heat pumps with solar collectors that result in an installed first cost that approximates one half of that of conventional solar systems. This technology is now available for producing up to 220 F hot water for industrial process heat, space heating, and service hot water heating. The basic principles of the technology are reviewed, including the typical operating characteristics of the industrial heat pumps and the solar collectors, plus the generic application schematics comparing this approach with conventional solar collector only systems. Several case histories are reviewed, including an industrial plant, townhouse project, and hospital. Not only is a lower first cost demonstrated, but the combination uses small solar arrays, ideal where roof area is limited, and use less expensive solar collectors.

Niess, R. C.; Weinstein, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

253

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

254

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to help industrial facilities find the right fit for their own ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

256

Control Scheme Modifications Increase Efficiency of Steam Generation System at ExxonMobil Gas Plant. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Chemicals BestPractices Project Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study highlights control scheme modifications made to the steam system at ExxonMobil's Mary Ann Gas Plant in Mobile, Alabama, which improved steam flow efficiency and reduced energy costs.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Upgrade of Compressed Air Control System Reduces Energy Costs at Michelin Tire Plant. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Project Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study highlights the upgraded compressed air system at a Michelin tire manufacturing plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The controls upgrade project enabled multiple compressor operation without blow-off, and significantly reduced energy costs.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Teaming Up to Save Energy guide (U.S. EPA 2006), which isis used throughout this Energy Guide for consistency. With aAn ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used to pre-heat fresh water intake of the same plant byreporting reductions in water intake of up to 50% (Polleyto heat the polished water intake of the de-aerator in the

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

264

INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State University’s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IAC’s efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

ASFAW BEYENE

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

266

Solar industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Industrial Energy Audit Training for Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field of engineering energy conservation has witnessed an explosion of concern and activity during the last three years throughout the United States. In Texas, such activities have been enhanced by comprehensive industrial energy auditor training programs that were conceived and initiated under the guidance of the Texas Industrial Commission. One such program, begun with Texas A&M and expanded throughout the state, has continued to provide a high level of engineering and scientific training in the field of energy conservation to practicing personnel in the field. Attendees in the past have included consultants, engineers in industry, plant managers, utility engineering service representatives, and government representatives concerned with energy conservation. Numerous energy programs are conducted throughout Texas and the United States by a variety of organizations. This paper presents the activities and feedback obtained from a 45-hour industrial auditor training program that follows the guidelines originally developed by a statewide advisory board under the auspices of the Texas Industrial Commission. This 5-day intensive engineering level training program has been conducted regularly since its beginning in 1978. The program has been conducted by the Texas Society of Energy Auditors for a number of years and has resulted in positive feedback from the attendees.

Russell, B. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Session: Wind industry project development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

270

Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) can help petroleum refining and chemical plants improve energy efficiency.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Plant critical concept  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

273

Formaldehyde-exposure characterization in garment-manufacturing plants: a composite summary of three in-depth industrial-hygiene surveys  

SciTech Connect

The extent of exposure to formaldehyde was investigated at three garment manufacturing facilities using fabrics pretreated with a formaldehyde-based resin system. Two of the facilities (in Georgia) operated on a two-shift basis with approximately 1000 and 500 workers; one facility (in Pennsylvania) operated on a one-shift basis and had approximately 600 workers. The facilities cut and sewed men's dress shirts from treated fabric. Measured exposures to formaldehyde, respirable dust, and organic cleaning solvent vapors were all below the applicable American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values and Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits.

Elliott, L.J.; Stayner, L.T.; Blade, L.M.; Halperin, W.; Keenlyside, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

The dynamics of supply chains in the automotive industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis looks at how supply chains in the automotive industry operate from the perspective of the manufacturers. The study includes the industry structure, the top players in the industry, factors that drive the industry, ...

Braese, Niklas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Industrial Process Surveillance System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W (Glendale Heights, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Mott, Jack E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Industrial process surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring an industrial process and/or industrial data source. The system includes generating time varying data from industrial data sources, processing the data to obtain time correlation of the data, determining the range of data, determining learned states of normal operation and using these states to generate expected values, comparing the expected values to current actual values to identify a current state of the process closest to a learned, normal state; generating a set of modeled data, and processing the modeled data to identify a data pattern and generating an alarm upon detecting a deviation from normalcy. 96 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.; Singer, R.M.; Mott, J.E.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

Industrial cogeneration optimization program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recover heat from processes and transfer heat to the processprocess chemistry including kinetics and heat transfer. SomeProcess Integration .60   9.1 Heat Transfer –

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Korean Roadmap to OTEC Industrialization [ International OTEC Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or power plant discharge 6,500MW/Tidal barrage 1,000MW/Tidal current 6,500MW/Wave power 600MW+?/OTE C 4 #12 OTEC plant · LdT OTEC plant for cooling power plant · HdT OTEC plant sourced by multi;R&D and Industrialization Needs for OTEC ~0.2MW OTEC plant 1MW OTEC plant 5~20MW OTEC Plant 50~100MW

283

High Technology and Industrial Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor clean room Semiconductor clean room High Technology and Industrial Systems EETD's research on high technology buildings and industrial systems is aimed at reducing energy consumed by the industrial sector in manufacturing facilities, including high technology industries such as data centers, cleanrooms in the such industries as electronics and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and laboratories, improving the competitiveness of U.S. industry. Contacts William Tschudi WFTschudi@lbl.gov (510) 495-2417 Aimee McKane ATMcKane@lbl.gov (518) 782-7002 Links High-Performance Buildings for High-Tech Industries Industrial Energy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

284

The European nuclear power industry: Restructuring for combined strength and worldwide leadership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European nuclear power industry is being restructured from an industry drawn along national lines to a European-wide industry. This, in part, reflects growth of the European Economic Community, but it also reflects changes in the international nuclear power industry. The objectives of the participants, beyond better integration of the nuclear industry in Western Europe, are to (1) obtain European leadership of the worldwide commercial nuclear power industry, (2) improve medium- and long-term safety of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (FSU) power reactors, and (3) reduce domestic concerns about nuclear power. The activities to achieve these goals include (1) formation of Nuclear Power International (a joint venture of the German and French nuclear power plant vendors for design and construction of nuclear power plants), (2) formation of a utility group to forge agreement throughout Europe on what the requirements are for the next generation of nuclear power plants, and (3) agreement by regulators in multiple European countries to harmonize regulations. This is to be achieved before the end of the decade. These changes would allow a single design of nuclear power plant to be built anywhere in Europe. The creation of European-wide rules (utility requirements, engineering standards, and national regulations) would create strong economic and political forces for other European countries (Eastern Europe and FSU) to meet these standards.

Forsberg, C.W.; Norman, R.E.; Reich, W.J.; Hill, L.J.

1993-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

285

GAO report sabotages LPG industry  

SciTech Connect

A massive report by the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) on the liquefied energy gases (LEG), which include LPG and LNG, covers the possible hazards and recommends that facilities either be located in rural areas or, if in urban areas, be operated according to nuclear plant standards. One section concerns the ability of storage tanks to withstand earthquakes, floods, winds, and tornadoes. Another section treats transportation recommendations to eliminate as far as possible all opportunities for injury or destruction due to tank car or tank truck accidents. A discussion of the GAO report, only a portion of which has been released, sees the far-ranging recommendations as a threat to the LPG industry; notes that a great deal of information pertinent to the industry is presented in pointing out the problems, but finds that the GAO seems to have encountered considerable difficulty in finding practical solutions to the problems, e.g., in finding suitable sites for LPG terminals so that all such terminals can be in non-urban areas by 1980.

Roberts, B.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Market development directory for solar industrial process heat systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this directory is to provide a basis for market development activities through a location listing of key trade associations, trade periodicals, and key firms for three target groups. Potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers were identified as the prime targets for market development activities. The bulk of the directory is a listing of these two groups. The third group, solar IPH equipment manufacturers, was included to provide an information source for potential industrial users and potential IPH system designers. Trade associates and their publications are listed for selected four-digit Standard Industrial Code (SIC) industries. Since industries requiring relatively lower temperature process heat probably will comprise most of the near-term market for solar IPH systems, the 80 SIC's included in this chapter have process temperature requirements less than 350/sup 0/F. Some key statistics and a location list of the largest plants (according to number of employees) in each state are included for 15 of the 80 SIC's. Architectural/engineering and consulting firms are listed which are known to have solar experience. Professional associated and periodicals to which information on solar IPH sytstems may be directed also are included. Solar equipment manufacturers and their associations are listed. The listing is based on the SERI Solar Energy Information Data Base (SEIDB).

None

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Solarex Solar Power Industrial Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solarex Corporation has designed, built and operated an industrial facility which is totally powered by a Solarex solar electric power system. The solar power system, energy-conserving building and manufacturing operations were treated as a total system for optimizing the entire design. Many special features were included to ensure that highly reliable operations could be achieved without requiring electric utility back-up. The facility was built as both an operating plant for Solarex and as a demonstration of the possibility of solar powered industrial plants. The facility has been in operation since October 1982. During this period the solar power system has operated reliably with only two incidents of short losses of power while the local electric utility has experienced more than seven incidences of power loss for a significant amount of total downtime. This paper presents summaries for the design and operational features of the solar powered facility and the potential for other solar powered plants in the U.S. and abroad.

Macomber, H. L.; Bumb, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jun Wang Physicist, Industrial Program Coordinator Phone: 344-2661 Email: junwang@bnl.gov Jun Wang is an Industrial Program Coordinator in the Photon Science Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory. She is working closely with industrial researchers as well as beamline staff to identify and explore new opportunities in industrial applications using synchrotron radiation. She has been leading the industrial research program including consultation, collaboration and outreach to the industrial user groups. Before joining BNL in 2008, Jun Wang was a Lead Scientist for a high-resolution high throughput powder diffraction program at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). As a Physicist at BNL, her research focuses on materials structure determination and evolution. Her expertise covers wide range x-ray techniques such as thin film x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, powder diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering, protein solution scattering and protein crystallography, as well as x-ray imaging. Currently she is the project leader of a multi-million dollar project on transmission x-ray microscopy recently funded by the U.S. DOE and the spokesperson for this new imaging beamline at the NSLS. She has also been collaborating with universities and industries for several projects on energy research at the NSLS.

289

Corrosion in Fossil and Alternative Fuel Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...coal-fired steam, industrial gas turbine, and combined-cycle power plants. The most common and widely used is the pulverized-coal-fired steam power plant. Because of the complex and corrosive environments in which power plants operate, corrosion has been a serious problem, with a significant impact on...

290

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

training and tools for efficiency programs and resource management;management program, but its duties also can include delivering training,management program for buildings. The document discusses management (goals, planning, energy accounting); teamwork (staffing, training,

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an industrial energy efficiency benchmarking study to identify facility specific, cost-effective best practices and technologies. Such a study could help develop a common understanding of opportunities for energy efficiency improvements and provide additional information to improve the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The EPA's initial benchmarking efforts will focus on industrial power facilities. The key industries of interest include the most energy intensive industries, such as chemical, pulp and paper, and iron and steel manufacturing.

Hartley, Z.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electric Utility Industry Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Utility Industry Update Electric Utility Industry Update Steve Kiesner Director, National Customer Markets Edison Electric Institute FUPWG Spring 2012 April 12, 2012 Edison Electric Institute ï‚› Investor-Owned Electric Companies ï‚› Membership includes ï‚› 200 US companies, ï‚› More than 65 international affiliates and ï‚› 170 associates ï‚› US members ï‚› Serve more than 95% of the ultimate customers in the investor-owned segment of the industry and ï‚› Nearly 70% of all electric utility ultimate customers, and ï‚› Our mission focuses on advocating public policy; expanding market opportunities; and providing strategic business information Agenda ï‚›Significant Industry Trends ï‚›Utility Infrastructure Investments ï‚›Generation and Fuel Landscape

293

The Analysis and Development of Large Industrial Steam Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemicals, petroleum, pulp and paper, and many other industries depend heavily on extensive complex steam systems for thermal and mechanical energy delivery. Steam's versatility and desirable characteristics as both a heat transfer medium and a working fluid has fostered and perpetuated this dependency throughout industrial history. Many large process operations, however, have not developed their steam systems to keep pace with rapidly changing energy economics. As a result, the use of steam on industrial plants seldom approaches the optimum levels of first or second law efficiency. At each of many industrial complexes today, tens of millions of energy dollars per year are literally wasted. This paper describes some case histories comparing actual and optimum steam system configurations, and operational concepts. Highly effective steam system analytical techniques developed and used by the author are discussed. These include "energy level" mass balancing; the "three-branch" thermodynamic system; and powerful sophisticated digital computer steam system models. These latter are really "working models" on which development options can be tried and actively evaluated for economic and technical feasibility. The principal of steam as a plant-wide integrating energy system is explained and demonstrated with examples. These show how a properly structured and effectively operated steam system can increase operational flexibility and facilitate the practical implementation of many energy conservation opportunities in process and plant service areas.

Waterland, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reduce Natural Gas Use in Your Industrial Steam Systems: Ten Timely Tips  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program brochure provides 10 timely tips to help industrial manufacturing plants save money and reduce natural gas use in their steam systems.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: Aligning Management, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the plant has sustainable energy management systems inneeded to create sustainable energy efficiency in industry.industry’s approach to sustainable energy efficiency that

McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Central receiver power plant: an environmental, ecological, and socioeconomic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical details of the central receiver design are reviewed. Socio-economic questions are considered including: market penetration, air industrial sector model, demands on industry, employment, effluents associated with manufacture of components, strains due to intensive construction, water requirements, and land requirements. The ecological effects in the vicinity of the central receiver plant site are dealt with, with emphasis on effects on land surface, mammals, and reptiles and amphibians. Climatological considerations are reviewed including: desert types, effects of surface albedo modification, effects of aerosols, effects on evaporation rates, the heliostat canopy, effects on turbulent transfer rates, effects on the wind profile, a model of convection about a central receiver plant, and a global scenario. Drawings of heliostat and plant design are included in appendices. (MHR)

Davison, M.; Grether, D.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; Minnesota Natural Gas Prices ...

298

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial cooling remains one of the largest potential areas for electrical energy savings in industrial plants today. This is in spite of a relatively small amount of attention paid to it by energy auditors and rebate program designers. US DOE tool suites, for example, have long focused on combustion related systems and motor systems with a focus on pumps and compressors. A chilled water tool designed by UMass was available for some time but is no longer being supported by its designers or included in the government tool website. Even with the focus on motor systems, auditing programs like the DOE's Industrial Assessment Center program show dramatically less energy savings for electrical based systems than fossil fueled ones. This paper demonstrates the large amount of increased saving from a critical review of plant chilled water systems with both hardware and operational improvements. After showing several reasons why cooling systems are often ignored during plant energy surveys (their complexity, lack of data on operations etc.), three specific upgrades are considered which have become more reliable and cost effective in the recent past. These include chiller changeouts, right sizing of systems with load matching, and floating head pressures as a retrofit. Considerations of free cooling and improved cooling tower operations are shown as additional "big hitters”. It is made clear that with appropriate measurements and an understanding of the cooling system, significant savings can be obtained with reasonable paybacks and low risk.

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are conducting combined energy and waste assessments for small and medium-size manufacturers. The Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center is field manager for the western region of the Industrial Assessment Center program. These case studies present results from three assessments of manufacturing plants in the metal fabrication industry. Primary processing operations include machining, painting, plating, and assembly. Energy conservation opportunities chiefly involved motor systems, compressed air systems, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Typically, pollution prevention opportunities involved the painting lines. For each of the three plants studied, processes are described; the specific energy conserving and waste-reducing measures are identified; the energy savings and waste reductions are quantified; and financial analyses are presented, including cost savings and paybacks. In addition, actual implementation results reported by the manufacturers are provided.

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Synfuels industry opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Presentations made at the seminar are included in this volume. The present state in the development of synthetic fuels and the creation of the Synthetic Fuels Corporation are discussed by representatives of federal agencies and private industry. Separate abstracts of individual items were prepared for inclusion in the Energy Data Base and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. (DMC)

Hill, R.F.; Boardman, E.B.; Heavner, M.L. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

SciTech Connect

As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Rich

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Does Nuclear Insurance Protect Us or the Industry? | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the nuclear power industry has never been a hot issue for Nevadans because we have no nuclear power plants in the state. But with the prospect of the nuclear power industry's...

304

Meaningful Energy Efficiency Performance Metrics for the Process Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective energy performance benchmarking should include a consideration of production rate, product specifications, feedstock mix, and process type, in addition to thermodynamics and economics. Unfortunately, there is no accepted industry standard for developing Energy Efficiency (EE) performance metrics for the chemical process industries, and published literature on the subject is extremely sparse. This paper will present a comprehensive system of EPIs as applied in a complex multi-product multi-plant organization in the oil and gas industry. Four categories of EPIs are recommended: • By equipment • By process unit • By product • By business unit. It will be shown how each type of EPI fulfills a specific business objective in the organization. Successes and failures are described, and recommendations are provided. The principles and practices outlined in this paper are generally applicable, and will hopefully lead to a standard methodology for EE performance reporting.

Kumana, J. D.; Sidhwa, N. R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last ...

306

Strategies for an evolving generation industry  

SciTech Connect

This article deals with the changing structure of the power generation industry to include nonutility generation resources. The topics discussed include the permanence of nonutility generation as a power source, the evolving industry, and the strategies for an evolving industry. The emphasis is on developing sound, sophisticated purchasing procedures to fully benefit from this new generation resource.

Kee, E.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

307

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

308

Improve Motor System Efficiency with MotorMaster+, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program MotorMaster+ software tool aids industrial plants with finding energy-efficient motor replacement options and managing motor systems.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

IRP and the electricity industry of the future: Workshop results  

SciTech Connect

During the next several years, the U.S. electricity industry is likely to change dramatically. Instead of an industry dominated by vertically integrated companies that are regulated primarily by state public utility commissions, we may see an industry with many more participants and less regulation. These new participants may include independent power producers, entities that dispatch and control power plants on a real-time basis, entities that build and maintain transmission networks, entities that build and maintain distribution systems and also sell electricity and related to services to some retail customers, and a variety of other organizations that sell electricity and other services to retail customers. Because markets are intended to be the primary determinant of success, the role of state and federal regulators might be less than it has been in the past. During the past decade, utilities and state regulators have developed new ways to meet customer energy-service needs, called integrated resource planning (IRP). IRP provides substantial societal benefits through the consideration and acquisition of a broad array of resources, including renewables and demand-side management (DSM) programs as well as traditional power plants-, explicit consideration of the environmental effects of electricity production and transmission; public participation in utility planning; and attention to the uncertainties associated with different resources, future demands for electricity, and other factors. IRP might evolve in different ways as the electricity industry is restructured (Table S-I). To explore these issues, we ran a Workshop on IRP and the Electricity Industry of the Future in July 1994. This report presents the wisdom and experience of the 30 workshop participants. To focus discussions, we created three scenarios to represent a few of the many ways that the electricity industry might develop.

Tonn, B.; Hirst, E.; Bauer, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

OIT Wireless Telemetry for Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for advanced wireless technology has been identified in the National Research Council publication (1) ''Manufacturing Process Controls for the Industries of the Future as a Critical Technology for the Future''. The deployment challenges to be overcome in order for wireless to be a viable option include: (1) eliminating interference (assuring reliable communications); (2) easing the deployment of intelligent, wireless sensors; (3) developing reliable networks (robust architectures); (4) developing remote power (long-lasting and reliable); and (5) developing standardized communication protocols. This project demonstrated the feasibility of robust wireless sensor networks that could meet these requirements for the harsh environments common to the DOE/OIT Industries of the Future. It resulted in a wireless test bed that was demonstrated in a paper mill and a steel plant. The test bed illustrated key protocols and components that would be required in a real-life, wireless network. The technologies for low power connectivity developed and demonstrated at the plant eased fears that the radios would interfere with existing control equipment. The same direct sequence, spread spectrum (DSSS) technology that helped assure the reliability of the connection also demonstrated that wireless communication was feasible in these plants without boosting the transmitted power to dangerous levels. Our experience and research have indicated that two key parameters are of ultimate importance: (1) reliability and (2) inter-system compatibility. Reliability is the key to immediate acceptance among industrial users. The importance cannot be overstated, because users will not tolerate an unreliable information network. A longer term issue that is at least as important as the reliability of a single system is the inter-system compatibility between these wireless sensor networks and other wireless systems that are part of our industries. In the long run, the ability of wireless sensor networks to operate cooperatively in an environment that includes wireless LANs, wireless headsets, RF heating, wireless crane controls and many other users of the electromagnetic spectrum will probably be the most important issue we can address. A network of units (Figure 1) has been developed that demonstrates the feasibility of direct-sequence spread spectrum wireless sensor networking for industrial environments. The hardware consists of a group of reprogrammable transceivers that can act as sensor nodes or network nodes or both. These units and the team that built them are the heart of a test bed development system that has been used successfully in demonstrations at various industrial sites. As previously reported, these units have been successfully tested at a paper mill. More recently, these units were utilized in a permanent installation at a steel mill. Both of these applications demonstrated the ease with which a new network could be installed, and the reality that DSSS units can operate successfully in plants where narrow band transmitters had previously caused interference with plant operations.

Manges, WW

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pinellas Plant Annual Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a comprehensive summary of the results of the Environmental Monitoring, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs at the Pinellas Plant, in Pinellas County, Florida for 1994. This report also includes the plant`s performance in the areas of compliance with applicable regulatory requirements and standards and identifies major Environmental, Safety and Health Program initiatives and accomplishments for 1994. As a result of the end of Department of Energy Defense Programs mission production on September 30, 1994, considerable changes at the Pinellas Plant occurred. These changes, which included transitioning the plant toward alternate use in support of economic development and safe shutdown, both increased and heightened Environmental, Safety and Health responsibilities. In December 1994, the Department of Energy announced it had reached an agreement to sell the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council in March 1995. The plant is being leased back by the Department of Energy through September 1997 to complete safe shutdown, reconfiguration, transfer of equipment to other Department of Energy production facilities, and transition to commercial ventures. Permit modifications and transfers will be completed during 1995 to reflect the new ownership by the Pinellas County Industry Council and to include new tenants as needed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Impact of Electricity Deregulation on Industrial Assessment Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores many of the changes in typical industrial assessment recommendations, which have resulted from deregulation of the electric and gas industries. While anticipating that energy efficiency would almost always be a good idea, changes in rate structures and indeed the very nature of how energy is purchased can put some energy efficiency technologies outside of normal economically acceptable ranges. A major focus will be changes in and the elimination of time-of-use rates for electricity. An entire generation of DSM'ers (people working in "Demand-Side Management") worked under the principle that there was economic benefit to load leveling. Time-of-use rates are changing throughout the country and in many cases disappearing. Bulk purchase of electricity has even resulted in cases where, with minimum consumption requirements, industrial plants need to find ways to increase their electrical use to avoid penalties. Energy storage devices including thermal energy storage must be re-examined in terms of this new paradigm. There are applications where they are advisable, but for different reasons then demand management. Another area of particular interest is fuel selection, multiply fuel capability, and contracting. An industrial assessment at two neighboring plants can result in entirely different recommendations based on how energy is purchased and billed. In many cases, an industrial plant may be better off spending resources on energy purchasing agents as opposed to anything like an energy efficiency project. Onsite generation of power and the changing rationales for its adoption has also experienced big changes. Energy security is becoming a strong motivation for industrial plants, options are increased, and third party funding is also starting to appear. Intermediate solutions like gas driven compressors bring these two areas together and leave industrial clients with more options but often more confusion than ever before. Finally, the paper discusses some of the new challenges facing an industrial assessment team in terms of information gathering. It is becoming necessary to examine many possible energy purchase options and each has ramifications on energy efficiency projects. Use of the Internet, computer tools and other information sources is presented.

Kasten, D. J.; Muller, M. R.; Pavlovic, F.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

315

An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the study, Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration in Pennsylvania, performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Pennsylvania Governor's Energy Council. The study could well be the most comprehensive statewide evaluation of industrial cogeneration yet conducted. Although a multitude of estimates of cogeneration potential have surfaced in recent years, this study examined cogeneration opportunities in much greater detail for the following factors: 1. Sales of cogenerated electricity to all major utilities were valued using the estimated PURPA rates based on the Public Utility Commission rules. The demonstrated effects of the wide variation of expected PURPA utility purchase rates on industry-specific economical cogeneration potential further underscores the significance of these rates; 2. Industrial energy consumption (including the use of feedstocks and internally generated fuels) reflected the most accurate data available at both the state and national levels; 3. Pennsylvania-specific forecasts of industrial growth for each major manufacturing industry were incorporated; 4. Forecasts of fuel and electricity price changes were also state-specific rather than national or regional; 5. Discounted cash flow economic analyses were performed for cases in which existing combustion systems both did and did not require replacement as well as for expansions of existing industrial plants and new plants for the years 1985, 1990, and 2000; 6. Emerging technologies such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed and applied to determine likely levels of market penetration; 7. Sensitivity of cogeneration feasibility with respect to alternative; 8. Ownership and financing arrangements (such as utility and third party ownership) as well as changes in forecasts of PURPA and retail electricity rates, fuel prices, industrial growth rates, and cogeneration technology capital costs and operating characteristics were examined; 9. To more accurately assess the potential for additional cogeneration development, a detailed survey was conducted identifying all existing cogenerators in Pennsylvania; 10. Case study economic analyses were performed for 30 companies to further illustrate cogeneration feasibility; and 11. Barriers to and opportunities for greater industrial cogeneration were identified and a booklet to market cogeneration to industry was developed.

Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Classical approaches to predicting industrial noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting operational noise levels is an essential part of designing an industrial facility. Community noise levels are usually predicted for environmental assessment and licensing. In?plant noise levels are predicted

Frank H. Brittain

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants This special report presents an analysis of natural gas processing plants in the United States as of 2009 and highlights characteristics of this segment of the industry. The purpose of the paper is to examine the role of natural gas processing plants in the natural gas supply chain and to provide an overview and summary of processing plant characteristics in the United States, such as locations, capacities, and operations. Key Findings There were 493 operational natural gas processing plants in the United States with a combined operating capacity of 77 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. Overall, operating capacity increased about 12 percent between 2004 and 2009, not including the processing capacity in Alaska1. At the same time, the number of all processing plants in the lower 48 States decreased

318

Preliminary assessment of the modular block power plant concept  

SciTech Connect

Adding capacity to coal-fired plants in small increments of an overall integrated program may be the solution to the 10-year lead time required for the construction of a new plant. A preliminary study evaluates the technical and economic feasibility of a modular natural gas and coal-fired combined-cycle power plant which can be installed in three distinct phases. The plant sizes are suitable for large industrial and utility applications. The Modular Block Power Plant (MBPP) concept offers the advantages of phase construction, lower capital cost, lower cost electricity, lower air emissions, lower water requirements, and reduced solid waste discharge. Other advantages include part load availability, reduced coal inventory requirements, and easier plant siting. 11 figures, 4 tables.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow inside an Industrial Boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Industrial boilers that produce steam or electric power represent a large capital investment as well as a crucial facility for overall plant operations. In real… (more)

Saripalli, Raja

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Failure Analysis in Oil & Gas Industry - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Failure Analysis and Prevention: Failure Analysis in Oil & Gas Industry ... Failure Analysis Case Studies from Refinery and Petrochemical Pilot Plants: Benjamin ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Bainbridge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 47 million inshell pounds of peanuts. The Bainbridge facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant reached 16% reduction in energy...

322

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

323

Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rolf Butters Rolf Butters Industrial Technologies Program Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources Webinar - June 11, 2009 Michael MacDonald Agenda  Introduction to Industrial Buildings Opportunity and Tools  EERE Funding, Opportunities, and Resources  Next Steps 6/11/2009 2 Facilities Energy  ITP has been working for a couple years now to develop tools to address facilities energy use, present in most plants, and about 8% of total sector energy use  First tool is a Score Card, implemented both as a stand- alone Excel file and for QuickPEP - Score Card has to be simple, so is approximate - But it can be a very important tool for scoping facilities energy use at a plant  Second tool is an adaptation of the BCHP Screening Tool, originally developed by the Distributed Energy program but

324

Geothermal resource utilization: paper and cane sugar industries. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was made as a specific contribution to an overall report by the United States in the area of industrial utilization of geothermal resources. This is part of an overall study in non-electrical uses of geothermal resources for a sub-committee of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. This study was restricted to the geopressured zone along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast. Also, it was limited to utilizing the thermal energy of this ''geoenergy'' resource for process use in the Pulp and Paper Industry and Cane Sugar Industry. For the selected industries and resource area, this report sets forth energy requirements; identifies specific plant and sites; includes diagrams of main processes used; describes process and equipment modifications required; describes energy recovery systems; sets forth waste disposal schemes and problems; and establishes the economics involved. The scope of work included considerable data collection, analysis and documentation. Detailed technical work was done concerning existing processes and modifications to effectively utilize geothermal energy. A brief survey was made of other industries to determine which of these has a high potential for utilizing geothermal energy.

Hornburg, C.D.; Morin, O.J.

1975-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

US Energy Service Company Industry: History and Business Models...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Business Models US Energy Service Company Industry: History and Business Models Information about the history of US Energy Service Company including industry history,...

326

Lewis County PUD - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lighting, as well as industrial process upgrades, on a case-by-case basis. Eligible industrial processes upgrades include premium efficiency motors (as part of a larger...

327

Biofuel Industries Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Group LLC Industries Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuel Industries Group LLC Place Adrian, Michigan Zip 49221 Product Biofuel Industries Group, LLC owns and operates the NextDiesel biodiesel plant in Adrian, Michigan. References Biofuel Industries Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Biofuel Industries Group LLC is a company located in Adrian, Michigan . References ↑ "Biofuel Industries Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Biofuel_Industries_Group_LLC&oldid=342814" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

328

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

329

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Industry Interactive Procurement System Procurement System (IIPS) (IIPS) Douglas Baptist, Project Manager Information Management Systems Division US Department of Energy IIPS Functions Issue synopses, solicitations and related documents via the Internet Receive and Respond to Solicitation Specific Questions Receive proposal, bid or application information electronically Provide access to proposal information to authorized personnel through a web browser Conduct negotiations or obtain clarifications Issue award documents IIPS Security Security Plan in place and approved by DOE's Chief Information Officer System security tested by DOE's Computer Incident Advisory Capability team Security measures include: - Encryption on the IIPS server

330

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

ET Industries, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ET Industries, Inc. ET Industries, Inc. (showerheads) Issued: May 24, 2013 BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 ) ) ) ) ) Case Number: 2012-SE-2902 AMENDED NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION 1 Manufacturers (including importers) are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal water conservation standards. See 10 C.F.R. §§ 429.5, 429.102; 42 U.S.C. §§ 6291(10), 6302. On April 3, 2012, DOE tested one unit of the "ThunderHead" showerhead basic model ("basic model TH-1 " 2 ), which ET Industries, Inc. ("ET") imported into the United States. On April 24, 2012, DOE completed testing of three additional units of basic model TH-1, also imported into

332

(Great Plains Coal Gasification project): Quarterly environmental, safety, medical, and industrial hygiene report, fourth quarter 1986  

SciTech Connect

Contents of this quarterly report include: (1) environmental monitoring program; (2) supplemental environmental program; (3) quality assurance/quality control activities; (4) schedule of activities for next reporting period; (5) safety; (6) medical services; and (7) industrial hygiene. The environmental monitoring program covers: permitting activities; ambient monitoring; plant discharge monitoring; pollution control unit emissions; surface mining and reclamation; environmental incident summary; and regulatory environmental inspections. Supplemental environmental program includes: performance survey; toxicity screening study; data base management system; epidemiology; and contingency program.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for cement making. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and PlantSteel Industry. An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant1997. Cutting your energy costs-A guide for the textile

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

335

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. concrete industry is the main consumer of U.S.-produced cement. The manufacturing of ready mixed concrete accounts for more than 75% of the U.S. concrete production following the manufacturing of precast concrete and masonry units. The most significant expenditure is the cost of materials accounting for more than 50% of total concrete production costs - cement only accounts for nearly 24%. In 2009, energy costs of the U.S. concrete industry were over $610 million. Hence, energy efficiency improvements along with efficient use of materials without negatively affecting product quality and yield, especially in times of increased fuel and material costs, can significantly reduce production costs and increase competitiveness. The Energy Guide starts with an overview of the U.S. concrete industry’s structure and energy use, a description of the various manufacturing processes, and identification of the major energy consuming areas in the different industry segments. This is followed by a description of general and process related energy- and cost-efficiency measures applicable to the concrete industry. Specific energy and cost savings and a typical payback period are included based on literature and case studies, when available. The Energy Guide intends to provide information on cost reduction opportunities to energy and plant managers in the U.S. concrete industry. Every cost saving opportunity should be assessed carefully prior to implementation in individual plants, as the economics and the potential energy and material savings may differ.

Kermeli, Katerina; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Research Projects in Industrial Technology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

339

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Application of solar energy to the supply of industrial process hot water: preliminary design and performance report. Volume I. Technical report. Aerotherm report TR-76-219. [For can washing at Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and performance of a solar hot water system for can washing at the Campbell Soup Plant in Sacramento, California, are presented. The collector field is located on the roof of the finished products warehouse of the Campbell Soup Sacramento plant. Water is supplied from a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) supply line which is located directly below an existing roof access hatch. A supply pipe will be brought up through that hatch. The water flow will then be split into two manifold lines which supply the dual rows of flat plate collectors. The preheated water from the flat plates is then passed into six sets of parallel connected concentrators. Each set consist of eight 1.83 x 3.05 m (6 x 10 foot) modules connected in series. The water from these units is gathered in a 3.8 cm (1/sup 1///sub 2/ in.) insulated pipe which transports it to the storage tank. This pipe will be attached to an existing pipe run until it reaches the can washing building. From there the pipe will follow the can washing building around to the storage tank. The storage tank is a 75,200 1 (20,000 gal) steel tank which is coated internally with a USDA approved phenolic liner. The outside of the tank is insulated. A 2.2 kw (3 hp) motor is used to pump the stored water for the tank into the can washing line. Detail drawings and descriptions of the collector field, installation, piping, controls, data acquisition equipment, and roof structure are included. Furthermore, a program schedule with equipment and manpower costs for successfully completing Phase II of this contract is included. Also included is an organization chart of the Phase II program personnel. (WHK)

None

1976-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Assessing Energy Use in Your Plant  

SciTech Connect

This DOE Industrial Technologies Program fact sheet describes ITP resources and software that industrial plants can use for energy assessments that result in greater energy efficiency and lower costs.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Professional Engineers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

345

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

346

State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

348

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Plastic Magen Industry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plastic products with a lifetime guarantee, including the Heliocol and Sunstar-brand solar water heating systems. References Plastic Magen Industry1 LinkedIn Connections...

353

Argumentation-based framework for industrial wastewater discharges management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daily operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in unitary sewer systems of industrialized areas is of special concern. Severe problems can occur due to the characteristics of incoming flow. In order to avoid decision that leads to hazardous ... Keywords: Agents, Argumentation, Industrial discharge management, River basin management, Urban wastewater system, Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)

M. Aulinas; P. Tolchinsky; C. Turon; M. Poch; U. Cortés

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant August 26, 2010 - 4:45pm Addthis Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Joshua DeLung Chemetall supplies materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles $28.4 million in Recovery Act funding going toward geothermal plant Plant expected to produce 4 MW of electrical power, employ 25 full-time workers Chemetall produces lithium carbonate to customers in a wide range of industries, including for batteries used in electric vehicles, and now the

355

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Commercial plant feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the viability of any Liquids from Coal (LFC) commercial venture, TEK-KOL and its partner, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), have put together a technical and economic feasibility study for a commercial-size LFC Plant located at Zeigler Coal Holding Company`s North Rochelle Mine site. This resulting document, the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Plant: Commercial Plant Feasibility Study, includes basic plant design, capital estimates, market assessment for coproducts, operating cost assessments, and overall financial evaluation for a generic Powder River Basin based plant. This document and format closely resembles a typical Phase II study as assembled by the TEK-KOL Partnership to evaluate potential sites for LFC commercial facilities around the world.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often they simply do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, a program was developed to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings allowable through energy management techniques. The program is entitled 'Oklahoma Industrial Energy; Management Program' and is located at Oklahoma State University. This paper describes past, on-going, and proposed activities of this Program and assesses their impact. Included are industrial energy management conferences, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being offered.

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen August 14, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis Projects Led by Electric Transportation Applications and GE Global Research WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it intends to fund approximately $1.4 million (subject to negotiation) for two projects to partner with industry to study the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen at existing commercial nuclear power plants. Teams selected by DOE for funding will be headed by Electric Transportation Applications and GE Global Research. Both teams include DOE national laboratories and nuclear utility companies as partners.

358

DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen August 14, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis Projects Led by Electric Transportation Applications and GE Global Research WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it intends to fund approximately $1.4 million (subject to negotiation) for two projects to partner with industry to study the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen at existing commercial nuclear power plants. Teams selected by DOE for funding will be headed by Electric Transportation Applications and GE Global Research. Both teams include DOE national laboratories and nuclear utility companies as partners.

359

Intertape Polymer Corp. Award Recipient for the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Intertape Polymer Corp. 2200 North McRoy Drive Carbondale, IL 62901 The Intertape Polymer plant was constructed in 1994. This facility produces a variety of high performance and industrial pressure sensitive tapes such as: electrical, reinforced filament, aluminum foil, double sided, glass cloth, and polyester film. Products manufactured at this location serve a wide variety of markets including electrical, automotive, housing, HVAC and aerospace. Intertape Polymer achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. The Carbondale facility realized a 29.1% decrease in its energy intensity in one year of its baseline. Intertape accomplished the Challenge through an increase in product volumes, using ultrasonic testers to aggressively manage steam and

360

AVLIS industrial access program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

Not Available

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Plant Engineering: Users Guide for the Development of Life Cycle Management Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides direction for the user in the development, implementation, and maintenance of life cycle management plans (LCMPs).  The guide includes an appendix containing a template that users can employ in the development of their plant-specific LCMPs.BackgroundEPRI report TR-106109, Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide, was issued in November 1998. Since the publication of that report, the industry has gained much ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

362

Productivity Improvement for Fossil Steam Power Plants 2005: One Hundred Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Productivity Improvement Handbook for Fossil Steam Plants" (EPRI report 1006315), now in its third edition, has included many descriptions of advanced techniques and products successfully applied and tested. Many of these were described in the 2003 publication "Productivity Improvement for Fossil Steam Plants: Industry Case Studies" (1009239). Since 2001, more than one hundred productivity improvement case studies have been described in some detail on the website of the Productivity Improvement User...

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A new day for energy in America; Committed to success more than ever, by Andy White, GE--Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Competitive technology for decades, by Steve Tritch, Westinghouse Electric Company; Pioneers of positive community relationship, by Exelon Nuclear; A robust design for 60-years, by Ray Ganthner, Areva; Aiming at no evacuation plants, by Kumiaki Moriya, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd.; and, Desalination and hydrogen economy, by Dr. I. Khamis, International Atomic Energy Agency. Industry innovation articles in this issue are: Reactor vessel closure head project, by Jeff LeClair, Prairie Island Nuclear Generating Plant; and Submersible remote-operated vehicle, by Michael S. Rose, Entergy's Fitzpatrick Nuclear Station.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Assessment of plant-derived hydrocarbons. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of hydrocarbon producing plants are evaluated as possible sources of rubber, liquid fuels, and industrial lubricants. The plants considered are Euphorbia lathyris or gopher plant, milkweeds, guayule, rabbit brush, jojoba, and meadow foam. (ACR)

McFadden, K.; Nelson, S.H.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Industrial Energy Procurement Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rates are going down and services are improving! Or are they? As opportunities to directly contract for energy expand from the larger industrials to include mid-market companies, existing energy supply and service contracts will be renegotiated and new ones developed. Many of these mid-level industrial customers typically lack in-house expertise on energy procurement, yet their operations use significant amounts of energy. This paper looks at some of the issues involved in the main terms of a procurement contract, as well as issues in contract formation and termination. Finally the paper reviews some of the recent energy aggregation and outsourcing deals to highlight some that worked and some that didn't.

Thompson, P.; Cooney, K.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

REGULATING HAWAII'S PETROLEUM INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was prepared in response to House Resolution No. 174, H.D. 2, which was adopted during the Regular Session of 1995. The Resolution requested the Legislative Reference Bureau to conduct a study to obtain the views of selected state agencies and representatives of Hawaii's petroleum industry in order to assist the Legislature in formulating policies that protect the interests of Hawaii's gasoline consumers. The Resolution sought information and the views of survey participants on a broad range of proposals to regulate Hawaii's petroleum industry. This study reviews each of these proposals in terms of their value to consumers, and explores both regulatory policy options and alternatives to regulation available to state lawmakers. The Bureau extends its sincere appreciation to all those whose participation and cooperation made this study possible. A list of contact persons, including the names of survey participants and others who helped to contribute to this study, is contained in Appendix B.

Mark J. Rosen; Wendell K. Kimura

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) Background The ICMI project is part of a larger program called Carbon Capture Simulation and Storage Initiative (C2S2I). The C2S2I has a goal of expanding the DOE's focus on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) for advanced coal power systems and other applications, including the use of petroleum coke as a feedstock for the industrial sector. The American Recovery and Re-Investment Act (ARRA)-funded

369

Industrial Wastes as a Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of scarce supplies and rising costs for traditional industrial fuels such as natural gas and fuel oil, a large amount of technical data has been collected and published to encourage their efficient use. This same data is readily available for coal since it was at one time a major industrial fuel and is still used extensively for electric power generation. However, combustion data for other fuels such as wood and solid materials typically generated as industrial wastes can only be found in widely scattered and more obscure sources. Therefore, this information is not always easily accessible to operating personnel at plants where these type fuels are being utilized. The resulting lack of proper information many times leads to poor fuel utilization because of less than optimum combustion efficiencies. Operational and maintenance problems may also be caused by a misunderstanding of combustion characteristics.

Richardson, G.; Hendrix, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese cement and iron/steel industry is underway. http://data required for the steel industry included total primaryrepresentatives of the steel industry, the government, and

Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Industrial Steam Power Cycles Final End-Use Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final end uses of steam include two major classifications: those uses that condense the steam against heat transfer surfaces to provide heat to an item of process or service equipment; and those that require a mass flow of steam for stripping, dilution, a reaction ingredient, etc. These classifications are termed 'Btu' loads or 'Pound' loads. Some final end uses of steam are actually a combination of the two. The classification of steam loads is extremely important to the overall economics of the industrial plant steam system. These economic effects are explained in detail as they impact on both the thermal efficiency and the heat power cycle efficiency of an industrial system. The use of a powerful steam system mass and energy modeling program called MESA (Modular Energy System Analyzer, The MESA Company) in identifying and accurately evaluating these effects is described.

Waterland, A. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy conservation in the textile industry: 10 case histories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are ten case studies of energy conserving technologies that have been implemented by the textile industry. For each case is given: the name and location of the plant and an employee contact, description of products, energy consumption and costs in years before and after the energy conserving technology was implemented, energy savings since the energy conserving technology was implemented, description of investment decision-making process, and description of any institutional and environmental considerations. Measures included are: tandem preparation line, dyebath reuse, bump-and-run (dyebath temperature drifts for the last 85% of the hold time), foam finishing, wastewater heat recovery, wastewater chlorination and reuse, oven exhaust air counterflow, boiler economizer, wood-fired boiler, and solar industrial process heat. Several other energy conserving technologies that were not studied are briefly summarized. (LEW)

Not Available

373

Using DOE Industrial Energy Audit Data for Utility Program Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center Program has offered no-cost energy conservation audits to industrial plants since 1976. The EADC program has maintained a database of detailed plant and audit information since 1980. In 1992, DOE and Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BG&E) agreed to conduct a joint demonstration project in which the EADC database would be used to assist BG&E in planning demand-side management (DSM) programs for its industrial customers. BG&E identified a variety of useful applications of the database including: estimating conservation potential, identifying conservation measures for inclusion in programs, target marketing of industries, projecting DSM program impacts, and focusing implementation efforts. Over the course of the project, BG&E identified a variety of strengths and limitations associated with the database when used for utility planning. To encourage the use of the data by other utilities and interested parties, DOE is preparing an EADC database package for general distribution in April 1993.

Glaser, C. J.; Packard, C. P.; Parfomak, P.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Competing in an increasingly global industry, U.S. chemical facilities have intensified their efforts to improve energy utilization. Increases in energy efficiency can offset age, scale, or other disadvantages of a chemical plant when compared with its in

Betczynski, M. T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

VPI Corporation: Industrial Energy Assessment Helps Manufacturer Start Saving $7,000 in Less Than a Year  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at VPI Coporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. pulp and paper industry consumes over $7 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pulp and paper industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This paper provides a brief overview of the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry energy efficiency guidebook (a.k.a. the"Energy Guide") for pulp and paper manufacturers. The Energy Guide discusses a wide range of energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Also provided is a discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pulp and paper industry along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Many energy efficiency measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in pulp and paper mills and related industries worldwide. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. pulp and paper industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

Kramer, Klaas Jan; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Conditional sterility in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides methods, recombinant DNA molecules, recombinant host cells containing the DNA molecules, and transgenic plant cells, plant tissue and plants which contain and express at least one antisense or interference RNA specific for a thiamine biosynthetic coding sequence or a thiamine binding protein or a thiamine-degrading protein, wherein the RNA or thiamine binding protein is expressed under the regulatory control of a transcription regulatory sequence which directs expression in male and/or female reproductive tissue. These transgenic plants are conditionally sterile; i.e., they are fertile only in the presence of exogenous thiamine. Such plants are especially appropriate for use in the seed industry or in the environment, for example, for use in revegetation of contaminated soils or phytoremediation, especially when those transgenic plants also contain and express one or more chimeric genes which confer resistance to contaminants.

Meagher, Richard B. (Athens, GA); McKinney, Elizabeth (Athens, GA); Kim, Tehryung (Taejeon, KR)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for sound energy management is no longer worthy of debate. Action is necessary and much is being done by U.S. industry. Unfortunately, however, the majority of the work is being done by the few large energy intensive industries throughout the country. The average small to medium sized company has yet to undertake a dedicated program. The reasons are numerous, but often it is simply because of a lack of knowledge of techniques or the amount of savings possible. Recognizing this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program" and is housed at Oklahoma State University. The program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy through the State Energy Conservation Plan. This paper describes the program offerings, impact to date and plans for the future. The program offerings basically include: 1. A series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy Audit booklets including instructions and forms. 4. Technical aid on a limited basis. 5. A series of laboratory type experiments involving power factor, solar energy, boiler combustion improvement and other energy related projects. 6. Fact sheet publication as the need develops. Plans for the future include expansion of the program to small businesses in general through the Energy Extension Service and more technical aid to participating industries, The basic plan involving the services above shall remain intact. The program has been very successful to date. The results are directly transferable to other states and the program directors are willing to share information.

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optimization of Industrial Refrigeration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computer program designed to optimize the size of an evaporative condenser in a two-stage industrial refrigeration plant was created. The program sizes both the high-stage and low-stage compressors and an evaporative condenser. Once the initial system is sized, a year long plant simulation is performed resulting in electric energy consumption profile and an exergy destruction profile for each component and for the system. The program uses actual regional hourly outside dry bulb and wet bulb temperatures for both sizing and simulation. An exergoeconomic optimization uses the results of the simulation combined with component and energy costs to optimize the condenser size such that both plant costs and energy losses are minimized.

Flack, P. J.; Sharp, M. K.; Case, M. E.; Gregory, R. W.; Case, P. L.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

SciTech Connect

The January 1992 Industry Briefs includes brief articles on: (1) the startup of Chinese and Indian nuclear units, (2) agreements between China and Pakistan for the construction of a nuclear unit, (3) international safeguards agreements, (4) restart of a nuclear unit in Armenia, (5) closure of a German nuclear waste site, (6) restructuring of the Hungarian state-owned utility MVMT, (7) requests for bids for Wolsong Units 3 and 4, (8) signing of the European Energy charter, (9) continued operation of the MAGNOX reactors, and (10) changing Canadian requirements on uranium.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The changing battery industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and technological assessment of the electrical battery industry, highlighting major trends. Among those systems considered are lithium-based, sodium-sulfur nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, zinc-chloride, conductive polymer, and redox cells. Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and manganese dioxide-based batteries and direct solar power and fuel cells are discussed in relation to these new techniques. New applications, including electric vehicles, solar power storage, utility load leveling, portable appliances, computer power and memory backup, and medical implants are discussed. Predictions and development scenarios for the next twenty years are provided for the U.S. market.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Manpower Assessment of the Geothermal Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors were asked to estimate the net employment gains in the geothermal industry from 1980 to 1985 and 1990. Method was by survey. Response rates were high, so the estimates here likely reflect industry knowledge and outlooks at the start of the most active construction decade of the U.S. geothermal industry. An untitled table following Table IV-1 is of great interest because it breaks out employment requirement estimates for different phases/aspects of project development, i.e., exploration and resource assessment, exploratory drilling, production drilling, power plant construction, feed system (field piping) construction, field operation and maintenance, power plant operation and maintenance, and transmission line construction. Estimates like these are rare in the U.S. geothermal literature. While these estimates are dated, they comprise an historical economic baseline from which improvements in labor use in the geothermal industry might be constructed. (DJE 2005)

None

1979-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

384

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Construction Industry Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in one of our country's most vital industries. ... An industry-led program to disseminate practical ... fire-proofing materials, connections, and steel trusses; ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Export.gov - By Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By Industry By Industry Print | E-mail Page Export Information By Industry Export.gov offers a wide range of current industry and trade information to help exporters of U.S goods and services find the information they need to compete successfully in overseas markets. Four Essential Resources 1. Export Assistance. The U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service is the trade promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce's International Trade Administration. Commercial Service trade professionals in more than100 U.S. cities and in nearly 80 countries help U.S. companies to start exporting or increase sales to new global markets. Commercial Service services include: Market Intelligence , Trade Counseling , Business Matchmaking, and more. 2. Trade Data & Analysis. Trade data can help companies identify the best

387

HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability  

SciTech Connect

The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

McDonald, C.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archive of Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Industrial Applications of Renewable Resources ...

390

Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources Carbon Capture and Storage from Industrial Sources In 2009, the industrial sector accounted for slightly more than one-quarter of total U.S. carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of 5,405 million metric tons from energy consumption, according to data from DOE's Energy Information Administration. In a major step forward in the fight to reduce CO2 emissions from industrial plants, DOE has allocated Recovery Act funds to more than 25 projects that capture and sequester CO2 emissions from industrial sources - such as cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, paper mills, and manufacturing facilities - into underground formations. Large-Scale Projects Three projects are aimed at testing large-scale industrial carbon capture

392

New baseload power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a tabulation of the results of this magazines survey of current plans for new baseload power plants. The table lists the unit name, capacity, fuel, engineering firm, constructor, suppliers for steam generator, turbine generator and flue gas desulfurization equipment, date due on-line, and any non-utility participants. The table includes fossil-fuel plants, nuclear plants, geothermal, biomass and hydroelectric plants.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ENERGY STAR plant certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» ENERGY STAR plant certification » ENERGY STAR plant certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award

394

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

New Concepts in Hardware and Processes to Conserve Oil and Gas in Industrial Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broad program to identify and evaluate new types of hardware and processes to conserve oil and gas in chemical plants and petroleum refineries has been completed. During the course of this program, which was sponsored by the Office of Industrial Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne interacted with 130 industrial companies to help define and evaluate appropriate areas of technology. The initial step was to assemble a master list of technologies that promised to conserve oil and gas. These technologies were then screened on the basis of quantity of energy saved, capital and operating costs, industry attitude, market potential, and special barriers to implementation such as environmental issues and other special types of problems. One approach used to determine industry attitudes on technologies was to poll several key energy-conservation groups. These included the Gulf Coast Energy Society, Golden Triangle Energy Society, CMA Energy Committee, and the Energy Conservation Committee of the American Petroleum Institute. This paper will summarize some of the results of this program in terms of the following areas of technology: Energy-efficient methods of separation ; Alternative fuels and feed stocks ; Recovery of low-level heat; Advanced Concepts Although the above technologies were identified and evaluated in terms of their application specifically to chemical plants and petroleum refineries, they have the potential of conserving oil and gas across a broad spectrum of industrial processes.

Humphrey, J. L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Bates solar industrial process steam application environmental impact assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is planned to install 34,440 square feet of linear parabolic trough solar collectors at a new corrugator plant for making corrugated boxes. The system is to operate in parallel with a fossil fuel boiler. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the solar energy system on the existing environment and to determine whether or not a more detailed environmental impact statement is needed. The environmental assessment is based on actual operational data obtained on the collector, fluid, and heat transport system. A description of the design of the solar energy system and its application is given. Also included is a discussion of the location of the new plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and of the surrounding environment. Environmental impacts are discussed in detail, and alternatives to the solar industrial process steam retrofit application are offered. It is concluded that the overall benefits from the solar industrial process heat system outweigh any negative environmental factors. Benefits include reduced fossil fuel demand, with attending reductions in air pollutants. The selection of a stable heat transfer fluid with low toxicity and biodegradable qualities minimizes environmental damage due to fluid spills, personal exposure, and degradation byproducts. The collector is found to be aesthetically attractive with minimal hazards due to glare. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Deregulation-restructuring: Evidence for individual industries  

SciTech Connect

Several studies have measured the effects of regulation on a particular industry. These studies range widely in sophistication, from simple observation (comparison) of pre-transformation and post-transformation actual industry performance to econometric analysis that attempt to separate the effects of deregulation from other factors in explaining changes in an industry`s performance. The major problem with observation studies is that they are unable to measure the effect of one particular event, such as deregulation, on an industry`s performance. For example, at the same time that the United Kingdom privatized its electric power industry, it also radically restructured the industry to encourage competition and instituted a price-cap mechanism to regulate the prices of transmission, distribution, and bundled retail services. Subsequent to these changes in 1991, real prices for most UK electricity customers have fallen. It is not certain however, which of these factors was most important or even contributed to the decline in price. In any event, one must be cautious in interpreting the results of studies that attempt to measure the effect of deregulation per se for a specific industry. This report highlights major outcomes for five industries undergoing deregulation or major regulatory and restructuring reforms. These include the natural gas, transportation, UK electric power, financial, and telecommunications industries. Particular attention was given to the historical development of events in the telecommunications industry.

Costello, K.W.; Graniere, R.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

400

Climate VISION: Industry Associations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Aluminum Aluminum Association (Coordinating aluminum industry Climate VISION activities) The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum products, as well as suppliers to the industry. The Association provides leadership to the industry through its programs and services which aim to enhance aluminum's position in a world of proliferating materials, increase its use as the "material of choice," remove impediments to its fullest use, and assist in achieving the industry's environmental, societal, and economic objectives. Automobile Manufacturers Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Coordinating automobile industry Climate VISION activities) The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cooperative effort for industrial energy data collection (IEDC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The expanding research effort in recent years in industrial energy use has created a need for detailed data on specific industrial processes. To meet this need and eliminate multiple contacts with individual plants, a cooperative effort to collect and centralize industrial energy-use data has been organized by several solar research organizations. To date, a centralized list has been produced of industrial plants and trade associations that have been contracted, and a data format has been created for use by all organizations interested in participating in this effort.

Green, H.J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

MISR -- Solar and steam for industry  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the MISR project is to assist industry in developing viable Solar Energy Systems which have high reliability and low cost because they do not require custom engineering and installation for each industrial site. The collector field, piping and steam generation equipment are pre-engineered to be suitable for a wide range of industrial steam applications. The approach of the MISR project is twofold: to develop line-focus industrial solar thermal energy systems which, like conventional packaged steam boilers, are based on the modular concept; and to install and operate a number (10 or less) of these systems at existing industrial plants, supplementing steam produced by conventional boilers. The project is briefly described.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

The resource and energy outlook for the ferroalloys industry  

SciTech Connect

The production of ferroalloys in the United States is on a toboggan slide to oblivion as a domestic industry. Basically, the problem is the ever-increasing flood of imports that have, in the first nine months of this year, captured over fifty percent of the market and, in many cases, at prices well below domestic costs. Production costs are influenced heavily by power and raw material costs. For certain products, power costs have risen to over 40 percent and raw materials to over 20% of total costs. On other less power intensive products, raw material costs are 40% and power costs 20% of total costs. An estimated average for the industry today would put power costs at about 35% and raw materials at about 25% of plant costs for production. Other production costs include labor, supplies and maintenance. Power costs include sizable amounts of energy expended for pollution control and not just industrial control costs but also the costs incurred in power generation as reflected in the power rates.

Watson, G.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices ; U.S. Natural Gas Prices ...

405

Two case studies of the application of solar energy for industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Case studies of industrial process heat (IPH) have been performed by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) on selected plants in metal processing, oil production, beverage container manufacturing, commercial laundering, paint (resin manufacturing), and food industries. For each plant, the application of solar energy to processes requiring hot water, hot air, or steam was examined, after energy conservation measures were included. A life-cycle economic analysis was performed for the solar system compared to the conventional energy system. The studies of the oil production facility (oil/water separation process) indicate that it could economically employ a solar hot water system immediately. The studies of solar energy applied to the beverage container process (solar air preheat system with partial recycle of oven exhaust gases) indicate a 7.5-yr payback period, based on a solar system installation in 1985.

Hooker, D. W.; West, R. E.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

407

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

408

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could greatly impact the energy purchases of U.S. firms. Depending on how energy suppliers react, this change could represent a threat or an opportunity.

Stapley, C. E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy efficient industrialized housing research program  

SciTech Connect

This is the second volume of a two volume report on energy efficient industrialized housing. Volume II contains support documentation for Volume I. The following items are included: individual trip reports; software bibliography; industry contacts in the US, Denmark, and Japan; Cost comparison of industrialized housing in the US and Denmark; draft of the final report on the systems analysis for Fleetwood Mobile Home Manufacturers. (SM)

Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; Mc Donald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, T. (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pharmaceutical Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy andPharmaceutical Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy andAn ENERGY STAR ® Guide for Energy and Plant Managers.

Galitsky, Christina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

413

Ceramics for ATS industrial turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US DOE and most US manufacturers of stationary gas turbines are participating in a major national effort to develop advanced turbine systems (ATS). The ATS program will achieve ultrahigh efficiencies, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness compared with current combustion turbine systems. A major factor in the improved efficiencies of simple cycle ATS gas turbines will be higher operating efficiencies than curren engines. These temperatures strain the limits of metallic alloy and flow-path cooling technologies. Ceramics materials offer a potential alterative to cooled turbine alloys for ATS turbines due to higher melting points than metallics. This paper evaluates ceramics technology and plant economic issues for ATS industrial turbine systems. A program with the objective of demonstrating first-stage ceramic vanes in a commerical industrial turbine is also described.

Wenglarz, R.; Ali, S. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Layne, A. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Industry-Utility Collaborative Efforts to Address Environmental Concerns- Dispatching for Localized NOx Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental pressures are causing many companies to rethink how they do business. Like many other areas of the country, the Gulf Coast petrochemical corridors, including those served by Gulf States Utilities, are classified as non attainment for ozone. Some people believe this classification leads to a bad environmental image. Such an image stifles further economic development and forces existing industries to renovate or close. Sixty four industrial plants located near Baton Rouge were ordered by the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality to submit both short-term plans, which will be enforced this summer, and long- term plans to reduce ozone precursors. This paper describes a collaborative approach industry and the utility can use to help meet these objectives. The approach involves dispatching NOx-producing equipment (e.g., boilers and gas turbines) to achieve minimum NOx production during ozone alert periods and purchasing supplemental power under a special tariff to replace any loss in self-generated power.

Hamilton, D. E.; Helmick, R. W.; Lambert, W. J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Plant immune systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant immune systems Plant immune systems Name: stephanie Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Do plants have an immune system? How does it work? Are plants able to "fight off" infections such as Dutch Elm disease? Replies: In the broadest sense, an immune system is any method an organism has protect itself from succeeding to another organism's efforts to undermine its health and integrity. In this sense, yes, plants have immune systems. Plants do NOT have "active" immune systems, like humans, including macrophages, lymls, antibodies, complements, interferon, etc., which help us ward off infection. Rather, plants have "passive" mechanisms of protection. For instance, the waxy secretion of some plants (cuticle) functions to help hold in moisture and keep out microorganisms. Plants can also secrete irritating juices that prevent insects and animals from eating it. The thick bark of woody plants is another example of a defensive adaptation, that protects the more delicate tissues inside. The chemical secretions of some plants are downright poisonous to many organisms, which greatly enhance the chances of survival for the plant. Fruits of plants contain large amounts of vitamin C and bioflavonoids, compounds which have been shown in the lab to be anti-bacterial and antiviral. So in these ways, plants can improve their chances of survival. Hundreds of viruses and bacteria attack plants each year, and the cost to agriculture is enormous. I would venture to guess that once an organism establishes an infection in a plant, the plant will not be able to "fight" it. However, exposure to the sun's UV light may help control an infection, possibly even defeat it, but the plant does not have any inherent "active" way to fight the infection

416

Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

418

Industrial Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy although, freight costs, favorable exchange rates and high capacity utilization will encourage future industrial investment. Industry will eventually enter a new period of major investment. Future industrial investment will be an opportunity to influence the energy efficiency of these facilities for generations to come. Program managers must begin engaging industrial customers now, in order to exploit this unprecedented opportunity to change future energy use patterns. This paper reviews recent market trends and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?

Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Technologies for Plant Operations and Maintenance Support: A Plan for Technology Development and Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic performance support systems (EPSSs) have important potential for increasing the efficiency and quality of operations and maintenance (O&M) work. This report cites a series of rapidly evolving technologies for possible application in nuclear power plants, including technologies that can assist in the shrinking workforce problem for the nuclear power industry. Also included is a futuristic scenario of a maintenance technician using several of these new technologies to perform daily tasks efficie...

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Industrial Wireless Sensors: A User's Perspective on the Impact of Standards on Wide-spread Deployment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of wireless sensing technologies in industrial instrumentation will undoubtedly become more important in the years ahead. . Deployment of such instrumentation in an industrial setting with its heightened security and robustness criteria hinges on user acceptance of verified performance as well as meeting cost requirements. Today, industrial users face many choices when specifying a wireless sensor network, including radio performance, battery life, interoperability, security, and standards compliance. The potential market for industrial wireless sensors is literally millions of wireless instruments and it is imperative that accurate information for applying the technology to real-world applications be available to the end-user so that they can make informed deployment decisions. The majority of industrial wireless automation designs now being deployed or being considered for deployment are based on three different standards . The HART Communications Foundation s WirelessHART (IEC 62591), the International Society of Automation s ISA100.11a, and the offering from the Industrial Wireless Alliance of China known as WIA-PA (IEC 62601). Aside from these industrial automation standards, users must also be cognizant of the underlying wireless network standards IEEE 802.11, IEEE 802.15.4, and IEEE 802.15.3a and their interactions with the three principal industrial automation protocols mentioned previously. The crucial questions being asked by end users revolve around sensor network performance, interoperability, reliability, and security. This paper will discuss potential wireless sensor applications in power plants, barriers to the acceptance of wireless technology, concerns related to standards, and provide an end user prospective on the issues affecting wide-spread deployment of wireless sensors. Finally, the authors conclude with a discussion of a recommended path forward including how standards organizations can better facilitate end user decision making and how end users can locate and use objective information for decision making.

Taft, Cyrus W. [Taft Engineering, Inc.; Manges, Wayne W [ORNL; Sorge, John N [Southern Company Services, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program  

SciTech Connect

Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Improving Energy Efficiency at U.S. Plastics Manufacturing Plants: Summary Report and Case Studies  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Programs BestPractices report based on a comprehensive plant assessment project with ITP's Industrial Assessment Center, The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., and several of its member companies.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Guide to natural gas cogeneration. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

Guide to natural gas cogeneration is the most extensive reference ever written on the engineering and economic aspects of gas fired cogeneration systems. Forty-one chapters cover equipment considerations and applications for gas engines, gas turbines, stem engines, electrical switchgear, and packaged systems. The text is thoroughly illustrated with case studies for both commercial and industrial applications of all sizes, as well as for packaged systems for restaurants and hospitals. A special chapter illustrates market opportunities and keys to successful development. Separate abstracts of most chapters and several appendices have been prepared.

Hay, N.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Status of the LNG industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A status report on the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry after 22 years of international trade compares developments during 1984-1985 for the major exporting and importing countries. Japan, the leading consumer, imports over 72% of the world production, while Europe imports 27% and the US 1%. There are 10 baseload liquefaction plants with a collective capacity of about 230 million m/sup 3//streamday. Japan has 85% of the world's LNG storage facilities because its geology is not suitable for underground storage. Utilities are looking to LNG for peakshaving, but it will be necessary to time projects so that production and demand will develop a reliable trade climate. 3 tables.

Anderson, P.J.

1986-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (8220the Handbook8221) addresses the relevant aspects of at-reactor spent (or used) nuclear fuel (SNF) storage in the United States. With the prospect of SNF being stored at reactor sites for the foreseeable future, it is expected that all U.S. nuclear power plants will have to implement at-reactor dry storage by 2025 or shortly thereafter. The Handbook provides a broad overview of recent developments for storing SNF at U.S. reactor sites, focusing primarily on at...

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Industry Survey of Radioactive Material Control Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workers and materials entering and exiting the radiation control areas (RCAs) of nuclear power plants are carefully monitored for radioactivity. This report documents a survey developed to evaluate the range of instrumentation and practices used by the industry for performing such measurements.

2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

427

Energy Conservation in China North Industries Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an overview of the energy conservation in China North Industries Corporation. It shows how the corporation improves energy efficiencies and how it changes constitution of fuel--converting oil consumption to coal. Energy management organization, energy balance in plants and several specific techniques such as Heat pipe application, Coal oil mixture, Coal water slurry are also mentioned in this paper.

You, W. T.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Principles of biotechnological treatment of industrial wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review includes current information on biodegradation processes of pollutants, digestor biocenosis and bioadditives, sludge production, measurement of pollution, and advances regarding biotechnological treatment of a series of specific industrial effluents. It was foreseen in 1980 that biotechnology would foster the creation of new industries with low energy requirements. This is because the growth of microorganisms provides a renewable source of energy.

Roig, M.G.; Martin Rodriguez, M.J.M.; Cachaza, J.M. (Univ. de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica); Mendoza Sanchez, L. (C/Sol Oriente, Salamanca (Spain). Estudios y Proyectos); Kennedy, J.F. (Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Research Lab. for the Chemistry of Bioactive Carbohydrates and Proteins)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Brownfields in China : how Cities recycle industrial land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since around 2000, China has been experiencing a major shift in its industrial bases. Many cities have been relocating polluting and energy-intensive plants from urban areas to the less-developed periphery. In the summer ...

Li, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. The plant achieved a 15.5% reduction in energy intensity in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the Challenge...

431

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Butner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. This plant achieved a 22.7% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the...

432

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Hastings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in June 2010. This plant achieved a 14.2% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the...

433

Award Recipient of ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry JM Eagle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in September 2010. This plant achieved a 12.6% energy intensity reduction in the first year following its baseline. The success of achieving the...

434

and Industry Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the long-run dynamic implications of market-based regulation of carbon dioxide emissions in the US Portland cement industry. We consider several alternative policy designs, including mechanisms that use production subsidies to partially offset compliance costs and border tax adjustments to penalize emissions associated with foreign imports. Our results highlight two general countervailing market distortions. First, following Buchanan (1969), reductions in product market surplus and allocative inefficiencies due to market power in the domestic cement market counteract the social benefits of carbon abatement. Second, tradeexposure to unregulated foreign competitors leads to emissions “leakage ” which offsets domestic emissions reductions. Taken together, these forces result in social welfare losses under policy regimes that fully internalize the emissions externality. In contrast, market-based policies that incorporate design features to mitigate the exercise of market power and emissions leakage can deliver welfare gains. 1

Meredith Fowlie; Mar Reguant; Stephen P. Ryan; Meredith Fowlie; Mar Reguant; Stephen P. Ryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Low Temperature Waste Energy Recovery at Chemical Plants and Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies to economically recover low-temperature waste energy in chemical plants and refineries are the holy grail of industrial energy efficiency. Low temperature waste energy streams were defined by the Texas Industries of the Future Chemical and Refining Sectors Advisory Committee as streams with a temperature below 400 degrees F. Their waste energy streams were also characterized as to state, flow rate, heat content, source and temperature. These criteria were then used to identify potential candidates of waste heat recovery technologies that might have an application in these industries. Four technologies that met the criteria of the Advisory Committee included: organic rankine cycle (ORC), absorption refrigeration and chilling, Kalina cycle, and fuel cell technologies. This paper characterizes each of these technologies, technical specifications, limitations, potential costs/ payback and commercialization status as was discussed in the Technology Forum held in Houston, TX in May 2012 (TXIOF 2012).

Ferland, K.; papar, R.; Quinn, J.; Kumar, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

437

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Oportunities for the Concrete Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 5.5). Industrial refrigeration systems are anotherindustrial electricity consumer and are used in many plant systems, such as HVAC, compressed air, refrigeration

Kermeli, Katerina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Smart Grid Technologies for Efficiency Improvement of Integrated Industrial Electric System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this research is to identify the need of Smart Grid Technologies in communication between industrial plants with co-generation capability and the… (more)

Balani, Spandana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Locational analysis for the aluminum industry  

SciTech Connect

A locational analysis for the aluminum industry suggests that its locational pattern is probably even more clear-cut than that of the steel industry. Because the smelting of alumina into aluminum requires a very large amount of electric power, aluminum has become an industry highly oriented to cheap-power locations. A quick analysis, taking into account present technological and economic conditions, reveals that the potential advantages of the minimum-transport-cost location for an aluminum plant are clearly outweighed by the large power cost savings accruing from locating the plant at a cheap-power location. This holds true even with a fairly small differential in power rates between the two locations.

Isard, W.; Parcels, L.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the energy savings, costs, and carbon dioxide emissions reductions associated with implementation of a number of technologies and measures applicable to the cement industry. The technologies and measures include both state-of-the-art measures that are currently in use in cement enterprises worldwide as well as advanced measures that are either only in limited use or are near commercialization. This report focuses mainly on retrofit measures using commercially available technologies, but many of these technologies are applicable for new plants as well. Where possible, for each technology or measure, costs and energy savings per tonne of cement produced are estimated and then carbon dioxide emissions reductions are calculated based on the fuels used at the process step to which the technology or measure is applied. The analysis of cement kiln energy-efficiency opportunities is divided into technologies and measures that are applicable to the different stages of production and various kiln types used in China: raw materials (and fuel) preparation; clinker making (applicable to all kilns, rotary kilns only, vertical shaft kilns only); and finish grinding; as well as plant wide measures and product and feedstock changes that will reduce energy consumption for clinker making. Table 1 lists all measures in this report by process to which they apply, including plant wide measures and product or feedstock changes. Tables 2 through 8 provide the following information for each technology: fuel and electricity savings per tonne of cement; annual operating and capital costs per tonne of cement or estimated payback period; and, carbon dioxide emissions reductions for each measure applied to the production of cement. This information was originally collected for a report on the U.S. cement industry (Worrell and Galitsky, 2004) and a report on opportunities for China's cement kilns (Price and Galitsky, in press). The information provided in this report is based on publicly-available reports, journal articles, and case studies from applications of technologies around the world.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

442

Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy...

443

Process Energy Audit for Large Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the author's approach to energy audits of large industries. Five large industrial segments, with energy intensive processes have been selected as examples. Items include: 1) the general methodology of conducting comprehensive industrial energy audit, 2) how one can identify energy efficiency opportunities, and 3) illustrate a few case study examples of energy conservation measures implemented in some of the industries, and 4) the importance of quality assurance/quality control in an energy audit. I will restrict this discussion to only electrical energy audit.

Chari, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tom Rogers Director, Industrial Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tom Rogers, rogerstc@ornl.gov 865-241-2149 Tom Rogers, rogerstc@ornl.gov 865-241-2149 Tom Rogers Director, Industrial Partnerships and Economic Development Tom Rogers was named Director of Industrial Partnerships and Economic Development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in June, 2008. His responsibilities include directing engagements with industrial partners, forging new ORNL entrepreneurial support efforts, and leading a number of strategic initiatives such as the Carbon Fiber Composites Cluster and development of the Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park. Prior to joining ORNL, Tom was the founding President and CEO of Technology 2020, a national award-winning public-private partnership focused on a building a robust regional entrepreneurial support system. Tom has also served as the Executive Director of the Tennessee Technology

445

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Copper Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...These products are sold to a wide variety of industrial users. Certain mill productsâ??chiefly wire, cable, and most

447

NIST Industry Day 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at www.fedbizopps.gov. Search NIST-AMD-INDUSTRY-DAY-2012 in the Quick Search engine. Deadline for registration ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

America's Booming Wind Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharing key findings from two new Energy Department reports that highlight the record growth of America's wind industry.

449

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation and lets industry pick winning technologies. TheTransforming the Oil Industry intothe Energy Industry BY DANIEL SPERLING AND SONIA YEH A C C E

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

From Industry Protection to Industry Promotion: IT Policy in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazilian banking automation industry. Science, TechnologyBrazilian liberalisation of the IT industry on technologicalWorking paper. Computer Industry Almanac, Inc. (1999).

Botelho, Antonio Jose Junqueira; Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Tigre, Paulo Bastos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Energy efficient industrialized housing research program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy-saving lighting systems. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Artificial lighting accounts for 20% of electrical energy, 7.6% of total energy, and 3.8% of total fuel in the US. Because conserving lighting energy can reduce operating costs as well as save energy, this book explores several practical ways to do that. The book first describes the complete range of light sources and their accessories, then goes on to cover photometric reports, techniques of lighting design, fluorescent luminaires, industrial lighting systems, manual and automatic lighting controls, the impact of air-conditioning on lighting systems, and exterior lighting. A glossary of lighting terminology, conversion tables, and recommended illumination levels appear in the appendix. The book is designed for students and practicity lighting engineers and designers. 56 references, 169 figures, 45 tables. (DCK)

Sorcar, P.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program are to assist Texas industry in using energy more efficiently through seminars, workshops, technical information exchange and other supportive programs with the goal of conserving at least 283.81 trillion BTU's of industrial energy in 1980. As the primary consumer of Texas' energy (54% of total, industry is a major focal point of the state's energy conservation effort. Although industry's overall record of energy conservation is good, such a large consumer must receive serious attention in any plan aimed at improving the overall efficiency of energy use in the state. The Texas Industrial Commission has been designated lead agency of the industrial conservation effort, and as such, created the Energy Utilization Department in the Fall of 1977. The multi-faceted department has established programs to accomplish its mission including: The Energy Search Center, an information access point for Texas manufacturers; a series of technical workshops and seminars; an annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference; the coordination of a university program for the training of industrial energy auditors; and organizational assistance in the establishment of regional energy conservation groups. Although manufacturers are encouraged to utilize the programs, they are designed primarily for small or medium-sized industries and low-technology operations where the employment of an energy specialist is economically impractical.

Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Robotics And Radiation Hardening In The Nuclear Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................... xii 1 - OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY.....................1 Fuel Fabrication .............................................................................................................. 1 Reactor System Operation............................................................................................... 2 Spent Fuel Handling and Storage In the Power Plant ..................................................... 4 Spent Fuel Disassembly and Waste Processing.............................................................. 4 Waste Handling and Storage. .......................................................................................... 5 Decontamination and Decommissioning. ....................................................................... 6 2 - USE OF ROBOTIC SYSTEMS IN THE NUCLEAR INDUSTRY ..............................9 Need for Robotics Sy...

Laurent P. Houssay; Professor James; S. Tulenko; Dr. G. Ronald Dalton; James L. Kurtz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Studies of a small PWR for onsite industrial power  

SciTech Connect

Information on the use of a 300 to 400 MW(t) PWR type reactor for industrial applications is presented concerning the potential market, reliability considerations, reactor plant description, construction techniques, comparison between nuclear and fossil-fired process steam costs, alternative fossil-fired steam supplies, and industrial application.

Klepper, O.H.; Smith, W.R.

1977-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

Industrial Energy Management Tool 1.0 Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designed for use by utility sales and marketing representatives as well as industrial plant personnel, the Industrial Energy Management Tool 1.0 is a simple online tool that can help users prioritize energy efficiency measures. The tool provides an initial assessment of the percentage potential energy savings and, in a few cases, the costs effectiveness in $/kWh of energy saving measures. Three industries are covered in version 1.0 of the tool: Food processing (fruits & vegetables) Pharmaceuticals Plasti...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

458

Electrical Energy Conservation and Load Management - An Industrial User's Viewpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation of electrical energy and load management can reduce industry's electric bills, conserves natural resources and reduces the need for new generating plants. In recent years, industry has implemented extensive conservation programs. Some load management has been implemented already. Additional load management is possible; however, optimizing it will require close industry and electric utility company cooperation to develop new incentives and rate structures to make it economically attractive. The limitations of existing rate structures and needed improvements are presented.

Jackson, C. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

PepsiCo Indianapolis Hotfil Plant Profile Award Recipient of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry in July 2010. This plant achieved a 10.0% reduction from baseline energy intensity in one year. The site accomplished these energy savings through:...

460

Recommended guidelines for solid fuel use in cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulverized solid fuel use at cement plants in North America is universal and includes bituminous and sub-bituminous coal, petroleum coke, and any combination of these materials. Provided are guidelines for the safe use of pulverized solid fuel systems in cement plants, including discussion of the National Fire Protection Association and FM Global fire and explosion prevention standards. Addressed are fire and explosion hazards related to solid fuel use in the cement industry, fuel handling and fuel system descriptions, engineering design theory, kiln system operations, electrical equipment, instrumentation and safety interlock issues, maintenance and training, and a brief review of code issues. New technology on fire and explosion prevention including deflagration venting is also presented.

Young, G.L.; Jayaraman, H.; Tseng, H. (and others)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial plants include" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant has been part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) nuclear weapons complex since the plant opened in 1957. In March 1995, the DOE sold the Pinellas Plant to the Pinellas County Industry Council (PCIC). DOE has leased back a large portion of the plant site to facilitate transition to alternate use and safe shutdown. The current mission is to achieve a safe transition of the facility from defense production and prepare the site for alternative uses as a community resource for economic development. Toward that effort, the Pinellas Plant Environmental Baseline Report (EBR) discusses the current and past environmental conditions of the plant site. Information for the EBR is obtained from plant records. Historical process and chemical usage information for each area is reviewed during area characterizations.

Not Available

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

463

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

465

Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accessed May 25, 2004) Industry Summary. 1992 (est. ).11 May 2004) Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado Pageor (800) LUNG-USA. Tobacco Industry Involvement in Colorado

Landman, BA, Anne; Bialick, Peter

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

For Industry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D accelerates battery technology | More news Home | Connect with ORNL | For Industry For Industry | For Industry SHARE There are a few different way of "working" with...

467

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Print Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

468

Power Plant Tolling: Profits at the Point of Convergence?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant tolling is a new concept for the electric power industry that appears to be increasingly used by power plant operators. This report describes how tolling is implemented and the rapid changes occurring in such transactions.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

469

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

470

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

471

PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive...

472

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local gove