Sample records for industrial hot water

  1. Solar Hot Water Heater Industry in Barbados

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,SmartEnergyEnergy ResourceSolar Hot

  2. Solar Hot Water Heater Industry in Barbados | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmart Meters and|WaterEnergyFieldHot

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  5. Modern hot water district heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Barnes, M.H.; Kadrmas, C.; Nyman, H.O.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of district heating in Europe is drastically different from that in the United States. The development of district heating in northern and eastern Europe started in the early 1950s. Hot water rather than steam was used as the transport medium and the systems have proven to be more economical. Recently, the northern European concept has been introduced into two US cities - St. Paul and Willmar, Minnesota. The hot water project in St. Paul started construction and operation in the summer and fall of 1983, respectively. The entire first phase of the St. Paul project will take two summers to construct and will connect approximately 80 buildings for a total of 150 MW(t). The system spans the entire St. Paul business district and includes privately owned offices and retail buildings, city and county government buildings, hospitals, the state Capitol complex, and several industrial customers. The City of Willmar, Minnesota, replaced an old steam system with a modern hot water system in the summer of 1982. The first phase of the hot water system was constructed in the central business district. The system serves a peak thermal load of about 10 MW(t) and includes about 12,000 ft of network. The Willmar system completed the second stage of development in the fall of 1983. These two new systems demonstrate the benefits of the low-temperature hot water district heating technology. The systems are economical to build, have high reliability, and have low maintenance and operating cost.

  6. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  7. Green Systems Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar panels not enough Generates heat energy Captures heat from generator and transfers it to water Stores Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1

  8. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  9. Stratification in hot water tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratification in a domestic hot water tank, used to increase system performance by enabling the solar collectors to operate under marginal conditions, is discussed. Data taken in a 120 gallon tank indicate that stratification can be achieved without any special baffling in the tank. (MJF)

  10. Solar Works in Seattle: Domestic Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seattle's residential solar hot water workshop. Content also covers general solar resource assessment, siting, and financial incentives.

  11. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage water heaters (rated input of greater than 75,000 Btu/hr), list Recovery Efficiency (RE), Thermal; and Pipe insulation for steam hydronic heating systems or hot water systems >15 psi, meets the requirements with Multiple Dwelling Units (required for prescriptive) TO COMPLY - ALL BOXES MUST BE CHECKED All hot water

  12. Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of solar hot water (SHW) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply SHW within the Federal sector.

  13. Monitoring SERC Technologies ó Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A webinar by National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyst Eliza Hotchkiss on Solar Hot Water systems and how to properly monitor their installation.

  14. Are we putting in hot water?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    Are we putting our fish in hot water? Global warming and the world's fisheries ∑ Hot, hungry, and gasping for air ∑ Shrinking fish and fewer babies? ∑ Global warming puts fish on the run ∑ Warm water ∑ Howmucharefishworth? ∑ Which fish are feeling the heat? ∑ How will fisheries change? ∑ 2įC is too much! ∑ What needs

  15. Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Water Resources and Technologies Solar Hot Water Resources and Technologies Photo of a standalone solar hot water system standing in front of a clothesline with a backdrop of...

  16. Hot Water DJ: Saving Energy by Pre-mixing Hot Water Md Anindya Prodhan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    Hot Water DJ: Saving Energy by Pre-mixing Hot Water Md Anindya Prodhan Department of Computer University of Virginia whitehouse@virginia.edu Abstract After space heating and cooling, water heating consumption. Current water heating systems waste up to 20% of their energy due to poor insulation in pipes

  17. Disaggregating Hot Water Use and Predicting Hot Water Waste in Five Test Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, H.; Wade, J.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is important to make the equipment (or 'plant') in a residential hot water system more efficient, the hot water distribution system also affects overall system performance and energy use. Energy wasted in heating water that is not used is estimated to be on the order of 10 to 30 percent of total domestic hot water (DHW) energy use. This field monitoring project installed temperature sensors on the distribution piping (on trunks and near fixtures) and programmed a data logger to collect data at 5 second intervals whenever there was a hot water draw. This data was used to assign hot water draws to specific end uses in the home as well as to determine the portion of each hot water that was deemed useful (i.e., above a temperature threshold at the fixture). Five houses near Syracuse NY were monitored. Overall, the procedures to assign water draws to each end use were able to successfully assign about 50% of the water draws, but these assigned draws accounted for about 95% of the total hot water use in each home. The amount of hot water deemed as useful ranged from low of 75% at one house to a high of 91% in another. At three of the houses, new water heaters and distribution improvements were implemented during the monitoring period and the impact of these improvements on hot water use and delivery efficiency were evaluated.

  18. Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes This presentation is from the Building America...

  19. Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top Innovation Image of a pipe...

  20. The Chilled Water and Hot Water Building Differential Pressure Setpoint Calculation - Chilled Water and Hot Water Pump Speed Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Bruner, H., Jr.; Claridge, D.; Liu, C.; Deng, S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University College Station, TX ABSTRACT More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are being installed on the chilled water and hot water pumps on the TAMU campus. Those pump speeds are varied to maintain chilled water... and the rest 46 buildings are located on the west campus. More and more variable frequency devices (VFD) are installed on chilled water and hot water pumps. The variable speed pump has reduced the over-pressuring of water systems and reduced pump...

  1. Continuous Commissioning of a Central Chilled Water & Hot Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Batten, T.; Liu, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the campus loops and the building loops. Some optimization of the plant chiller 1 boiler operation is also necessary and beneficial. In general, through Continuous Commissioning, chilled water and hot water loop temperature differences will be improved...

  2. CC Retrofits and Optimal Controls for Hot Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, L.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Commissioning (CC) technologies, three old boilers (13.39 MMBH each) were replaced by three new boilers (1.675 MMBH each) and hot water pumps. Optimal controls for the hot water systems included optimal hot water temperature reset, hot water pump...

  3. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  4. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  5. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step in developing a realistic degradation term for tankless water heatersstep (water draw event) in the simulation. Instantaneous Gas Water Heater

  6. Hot Water Heating System Operation and Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Z.; Chen, H.; Wei, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an example of the reconstruction of a hot water heating system, this paper provides an analysis and comparison of the operations of hot water heating systems, including supply water temperature adjustment, flow adjustment during each...

  7. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

  8. Alternatives for reducing hot-water bills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennington, G.E.; Spewak, P.C.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two stage approach to reducing residential water heating bills is described. In Stage I, simple conservation measures were included to reduce the daily hot water energy consumption and the energy losses from the water tank. Once these savings are achieved, Stage II considers more costly options for further reducing the water heating bill. Four alternatives are considered in Stage II: gas water heaters; solar water heaters (two types); heat pump water heaters; and heat recovery from a heat pump or air conditioner. To account for variations within the MASEC region, information on water heating in Rapid City, Minneapolis, Chicago, Detroit, and Kansas City is presented in detail. Information on geography, major population centers, fuel prices, climate, and state solar incentives is covered. (MCW)

  9. Hot water bitumen extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rendall, J.S.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of extracting bitumen oils from tar-sands ore. It includes an initial conditioning step comprising crushing tar-sands ore to yield solid particles of a maximum size required by a log washer conditioner in a second conditioning step; a bitumen extraction step; a bitumen separation step; a solvent recovery step; a sand washing and water clarification step; and a sand solvent recovery step.

  10. Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters July 15, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts?...

  11. High temperature hot water distribution system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA0l-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: * Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. * Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  12. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monwhea Jeng

    2005-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more likely to burst than cold water pipes are also described.

  13. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  14. Tool for Generating Realistic Residential Hot Water Event Schedules...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Residential Hot Water Event Schedules: Preprint Presented at SimBuild 2010; New York, New York; August 1519, 2010 47685.pdf More Documents & Publications Model Simulating...

  15. Tool for Generating Realistic Residential Hot Water Event Schedules...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paper NRELCP-550-47685 August 2010 Tool for Generating Realistic Residential Hot Water Event Schedules Preprint Bob Hendron and Jay Burch National Renewable Energy...

  16. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R. H. Carpenter (Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy). 1981. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project,...

  17. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  18. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  19. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and monitoring at the water heater and hot water end uses.water at the trunk (water heater) and twigs (individual end-and outlet of the water heater and several hot water end-

  20. Tool for Generating Realistic Residential Hot Water Event Schedules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, B.; Burch, J.; Barker, G.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The installed energy savings for advanced residential hot water systems can depend greatly on detailed occupant use patterns. Quantifying these patterns is essential for analyzing measures such as tankless water heaters, solar hot water systems with demand-side heat exchangers, distribution system improvements, and recirculation loops. This paper describes the development of an advanced spreadsheet tool that can generate a series of year-long hot water event schedules consistent with realistic probability distributions of start time, duration and flow rate variability, clustering, fixture assignment, vacation periods, and seasonality. This paper also presents the application of the hot water event schedules in the context of an integral-collector-storage solar water heating system in a moderate climate.

  1. Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Water Quality Permit Program (Stormwater - Industrial Activities) Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Water Quality...

  2. Hot Spot Conditions during Cavitation in Water Yuri T. Didenko,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Hot Spot Conditions during Cavitation in Water Yuri T. Didenko, William B. McNamara III-13 the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    II: How to Get it Right DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right Watch the video or view the presentation slides below Zero Energy Ready Homes...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution I -- What's At Stake Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text version of the...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Efficient Hot Water Distribution II -- How to Get it Right Webinar (Text Version) Below is the text...

  6. STATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Certified Water Heater §111, §113 (a) Water Heater Efficiency §113 (b) Service Water Heating Installation/A" in the column next to the measure. 2: For each water heater, pool heat and domestic water loop (or groupsSTATE OF CALIFORNIA AIR, WATER SIDE SYSTEM, SERVICE HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C

  7. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Jim; Melody, Moya

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    There is significant variation in hot water use and draw patterns among households. This report describes typical hot water use patterns in single-family residences in North America. We found that daily hot water use is highly variable both among residences and within the same residence. We compared the results of our analysis of the field data to the conditions and draw patterns established in the current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) test procedure for residential water heaters. The results show a higher number of smaller draws at lower flow rates than used in the test procedure. The data from which the draw patterns were developed were obtained from 12 separate field studies. This report describes the ways in which we managed, cleaned, and analyzed the data and the results of our data analysis. After preparing the data, we used the complete data set to analyze inlet and outlet water temperatures. Then we divided the data into three clusters reflecting house configurations that demonstrated small, medium, or large median daily hot water use. We developed the three clusters partly to reflect efforts of the ASHRAE standard project committee (SPC) 118.2 to revise the test procedure for residential water heaters to incorporate a range of draw patterns. ASHRAE SPC 118.2 has identified the need to separately evaluate at least three, and perhaps as many as five, different water heater capacities. We analyzed the daily hot water use data within each cluster in terms of volume and number of hot water draws. The daily draw patterns in each cluster were characterized using distributions for volume of draws, duration of draws, time since previous draw, and flow rates.

  8. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Brian K.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides a methodology to estimate unmetered industrial water use for evaporative cooling systems, steam generating boiler systems, batch process applications, and wash systems. For each category standard mathematical relationships are summarized and provided in a single resource to assist Federal agencies in developing an initial estimate of their industrial water use. The approach incorporates industry norms, general rules of thumb, and industry survey information to provide methodologies for each section.

  9. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  10. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaporative system for water and beverage refrigeration in hot countries A Saleh1 and MA Al-Nimr2 1 Abstract: The present study proposes an evaporative refrigerating system used to keep water or other are found to be consistent with the available literature data. Keywords: evaporative refrigeration, heat

  12. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    attached CEC F-Chart) # of Collectors in System Collector Size Solar Tank Volume (gallons) ß150(j)1B piping shall be insulated. ß150(j)4: Solar water-heating system and/or/collectors are certifiedSTATE OF CALIFORNIA SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS (SDHW) CEC- CF-6R-MECH-02 (Revised 08

  13. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  14. CPS Energy- Solar Hot Water Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of a larger program designed to reduce electricity demand within its service territory, CPS Energy now offers rebates for solar water heaters to its customers. In general, any CPS Energy...

  15. High temperature hot water systems: A primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govan, F.A. [NMD and Associates, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental principles of high temperature water (HTW) system technology and its advantages for thermal energy distribution are presented. Misconceptions of this technology are also addressed. The paper describes design principles, applications, HTW properties, HTW system advantages, selecting the engineer, load diversification, design temperatures, system pressurization, pump considerations, constant vs. VS pumps, HTW generator types, and burners and controls.

  16. A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Residential Hot Water Heaters. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceelectricity savings because gas hot water heaters are moreprevalent than electric water heaters in California. Bathing

  17. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Solar Hot Water-Ready Checklist DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program encourages, but does not require,...

  19. Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

  20. Direct Use for Building Heat and Hot Water Presentation Slides and Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on direct use for building heat and hot water.

  1. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    end use point, at the water heater in one second intervalsand monitoring at the water heater and hot water end uses.of water at the trunk (water heater) and twigs (individual

  2. Overheating in Hot Water- and Steam-Heated Multifamily Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Varshney, K.; Henderson, H.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apartment temperature data have been collected from the archives of companies that provide energy management systems (EMS) to multifamily buildings in the Northeast U.S. The data have been analyzed from more than 100 apartments in eighteen buildings where EMS systems were already installed to quantify the degree of overheating. This research attempts to answer the question, 'What is the magnitude of apartment overheating in multifamily buildings with central hot water or steam heat?' This report provides valuable information to researchers, utility program managers and building owners interested in controlling heating energy waste and improving resident comfort. Apartment temperature data were analyzed for deviation from a 70 degrees F desired setpoint and for variation by heating system type, apartment floor level and ambient conditions. The data shows that overheating is significant in these multifamily buildings with both hot water and steam heating systems.

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance.† Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems Ė affecting energy use , water...

  4. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I: What's at Stake

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance.† Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems Ė affecting energy use , water...

  5. Design of a high temperature hot water central heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaumont, E.L.; Johnson, R.C.; Weaver, J.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the conceptual design of a central heating system at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The resource considered for this heating system design was hot dry rock geothermal energy. Design criteria were developed to ensure reliability of energy supply, to provide flexibility for adaptation to multiple energy resources, to make optimum use of existing equipment and to minimize reinvestment cost. A variable temperature peaking high temperature water system was selected for this purpose.

  6. Design manual for high temperature hot water and steam systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cofield, R.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents aspects of high temperature hot water and steam generating systems. It covers all the calculations that must be made for sizing and then selecting the equipment that will make up an energy system. The author provides essential information on loan analysis, types of fuel, storage requirements, handling facilities, waste disposal, HVAC needs, and back-up systems. Also included are the calculations needed for determining the size of compressors, air pollution devices, fans, filters, and other supplementary equipment.

  7. Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, J.L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  8. Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| DepartmentReduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings

  9. Thermodynamics -2 An industrial plant produces a waste stream of hot compressed air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Thermodynamics - 2 An industrial plant produces a waste stream of hot compressed air: Pressure P, produce the maximum work predicted in (b). Show all turbines, heat exchangers, heat engines, etc. Also show all mass, work, and heat transfers within the system and between the system and the environment

  10. Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

  11. Opportunities for utility involvement with solar domestic hot water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, N.; Christensen, C. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Barrett, L. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar water heating is one of a number of options that can be considered under utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. Utilities perceive a range of potential benefits for solar water heating in terms of customer service, energy conservation, load management, environmental enhancement, and public relations. The solar industry may benefit from utility marketing efforts, economies of scale, added credibility, financing options, and long-term maintenance arrangements. This paper covers three topics: (1) the energy and demand impacts of solar water heating on utility load profiles based on the results of four studies in the literature, (2) the results of workshops sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify key issues faced by utilities in considering residential solar water heating as a DSM option, (3) several current or planned utility programs to promote solar water heating. 7 refs.

  12. Targeted removal of ant colonies in ecological experiments, using hot water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . An automobile heater fan powered from a 12-v battery provided a draft. Dual bilge pumps pumped water from a large tank through a long coil of copper tubing within the kiln to produce 4 to 5 l. of hot water perTargeted removal of ant colonies in ecological experiments, using hot water Walter R. Tschinkela

  13. INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-01 Domestic Hot Water (DHW) (Page 1 of 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage water heaters (rated input of greater than 75,000 Btu/hr), list Recovery Efficiency (RE), Thermal; and Pipe insulation for steam hydronic heating systems or hot water systems >15 psi, meets the requirements Dwelling Units (required for prescriptive) TO COMPLY - ALL BOXES MUST BE CHECKED All hot water piping

  14. Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates T Othman KG Johnson, DW, Australia Hot climates require an accelerated water loss to allowed for thermoregulation (Rai et al, 1979, Trop Anim Hlth Prod, 11, 51-56). The water losses associated with locomotion should be greater

  15. Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Pattern Of Shallow Ground Water Flow At Mount Princeton Hot Springs,...

  16. Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    methods Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Pattern of shallow ground water flow at Mount Princeton Hot Springs,...

  17. Identifying Water Savings in Industrial Operations†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-15-06-23.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1156 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-IE-15-06-23.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 IETC 2015 Abstract for ďWater...-06-23 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 ...

  18. New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is crucial to ensuring their status as global competitors. Currently, most industries treat water to meet standards for direct discharge to surface water. The process includes a...

  19. home power 114 / august & september 2006 in Solar Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    : Heliotrope Thermal DTT-84 Solar Collectors: Two Heliodyne Gobi 410, 4 x 10 ft. Cold Supply In Hot to House

  20. Applications of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters in Hot, Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, K. F.; Shedd, A. C.

    Heat pump water heaters can provide high-efficiency water heating and supplemental space cooling and dehumidification in commercial buildings throughout the United States. They are particularly attractive in hot, humid areas where cooling loads...

  1. "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park--Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    "Hot Water" in Lassen Volcanic National Park-- Fumaroles, Steaming Ground, and Boiling Mudpots U, ydrothermal (hot water) and steaming ground. These features are re- lated to active volcanism, the largest fumarole (steam and volcanic-gas vent) in the park. The temperature of the high-velocity steam

  2. Commissioning the Domestic Hot Water System on a Large University Campus: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Bensouda, N.; Claridge, D.; Bruner, H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was to investigate the causes of these problems and help determine how to best operate the system. It was found that reported problems of low flows, low temperatures and long hot water lag time resulted from reverse flows and no hot water circulation caused by: 1...

  3. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  4. Performance Evaluation of Hot Water Efficiency Plumbing System Using Thermal Valve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cha, K. S.; Park, M. S.; Seo, H. Y.

    hot water piping system, Thermo controlled valve, Circulation, Mixing water pipe, Recirculation water pipe INTRODUCTION Finding ways to conserve energy while heating a building?s water supply can be approached from a number of angles. Still...?s disadvantage is that so much water is wasted until the optimal tap temperature is reached.(6) We tried to solve this problem by developing a water-saving hot water plumbing system that utilizes a thermo-controlled valve. The goal was to not allow...

  5. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  6. Comparison of conventional and solar-water-heating products and industries report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noreen, D; LeChevalier, R; Choi, M; Morehouse, J

    1980-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    President Carter established a goal that would require installation of at least one million solar water heaters by 1985 and 20 million water-heating systems by the year 2000. The goals established require that the solar industry be sufficiently mature to provide cost-effective, reliable designs in the immediate future. The objective of this study was to provide the Department of Energy with quantified data that can be used to assess and redirect, if necessary, the program plans to assure compliance with the President's goals. Results deal with the product, the industry, the market, and the consumer. All issues are examined in the framework of the conventional-hot-water industry. Based on the results of this solar hot water assessment study, there is documented proof that the solar industry is blessed with over 20 good solar hot water systems. A total of eight generic types are currently being produced, but a majority of the systems being sold are included in only five generic types. The good systems are well-packaged for quality, performance and installation ease. These leading systems are sized and designed to fit the requirements of the consumer in every respect. This delivery end also suffers from a lack of understanding of the best methods for selling the product. At the supplier end, there are problems also, including: some design deficiencies, improper materials selection and, occasionally, the improper selection of components and subsystems. These, in total, are not serious problems in the better systems and will be resolved as this industry matures.

  7. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ). Conditions in Hot Creek can change very quickly. These fish--caught in a burst of high-temperature water" or intermittently spurting very hot, sediment-laden water as high as 6 feet (2 m) above the stream surface. At timesBoiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley

  8. Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Position in Mechanical Engineering Water Conservation in Industrial Processes University of Kansas The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Kansas is seeking applications in industrial processes. Exceptional candidates with outstanding qualifications could be considered

  9. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  10. ITP Mining: Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Use in Industries of the Future: Mining Industry 1 Contributed by: Jim Mavis CH2M HILL 777 108 th Ave., NE Bellevue, WA 98004 Prepared under contract to Center for Waste...

  11. Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM) [Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO) [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

  12. Hot

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in graphene by Meng-Chieh Ling A

  13. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  14. Design and Experiments of a Solar Low-temperature Hot Water Floor Radiant Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Z.; Li, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar low-temperature hot water floor radiant heating system combines solar energy heating with floor radiant heating. This kind of environmental heating way not only saves fossil resources and reduces pollution, but also makes people feel more...

  15. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid...

  16. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems II....

  17. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Hot water decontamination of beef carcasses to increase microbiological safety and shelf-life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakate, Michelle Lee

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : -:r . ~ &:: ? ri:~ 4 c:r l, &, ?a??. . ' ' !"-' &! ~i i 4?'&. " ~ li r, '?Pil ril i '. ' rl iit'~'. ~a', '. ''+, I";= t I t h( ii il HOT WATER DECONTAMINATION OF BEEF CARCASSES TO INCREASE MICROBIOLOGICAL SAFETY AND SHELF-LIFE A Thesis... by MICHELLE LEE BARKATE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology HOT WATER DECONTAMINATION...

  19. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Rating Residential Water Heaters. Atlanta, GA: ASHRAE,for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, andthe Energy Consumption of Water Heaters. Title 10 Code of

  20. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  1. Solar process heat technology in action: The process hot water system at the California Correctional Institution at Tehachapi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, R. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Gee, R.; May, K. (Industrial Solar Technology, Arvada, CO (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar process heat technology relates to solar thermal energy systems for industry, commerce, and government. Applications include water preheating and heating, steam generation, process hot air, ventilation air heating, and refrigeration. Solar process heat systems are available for commercial use. At the present time, however, they are economically viable only in niche markets. This paper describes a functioning system in one such market. The California Department of Corrections (CDOC), which operates correctional facilities for the state of California, uses a solar system for providing hot water and space heating at the California Correctional Institute at Tehachapi (CCI/Tehachapi). CCI/Tehachapi is a 5100-inmate facility. The CDOC does not own the solar system. Rather, it buys energy from private investors who own the solar system located on CCI/Tehachapi property; this arrangement is part of a long-term energy purchase agreement. United Solar Technologies (UST) of Olympia Washington is the system operator. The solar system, which began operating in the fall of 1990, utilizes 2677 m{sup 2} (28,800 ft{sup 2}) of parabolic through solar concentrators. Thermal energy collected by the system is used to generate hot water for showers, kitchen operations, and laundry functions. Thermal energy collected by the system is also used for space heating. At peak operating conditions, the system is designed to meet approximately 80 percent of the summer thermal load. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  3. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskin, Evelyn [GE Infrastructure Energy; Craddick, William G [ORNL; Lenarduzzi, Roberto [ORNL; Wendt, Robert L [ORNL; Woodbury, Professor Keith A. [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program. A more detailed description of these program modifications along with detailed comparisons to the experimental data are provided in a report produced by Dr. Woodbury, which accompanies this report as Appendix H.

  4. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  5. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Alison; McMahon, James; Masanet, Eric; Lutz, Jim

    2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential water heating is a large source of energy use in California homes. This project took a life cycle approach to comparing tank and tankless water heaters in Northern and Southern California. Information about the life cycle phases was calculated using the European Union?s Methodology study for EcoDesign of Energy-using Products (MEEUP) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory?s Life Cycle Inventory (NREL LCI) database. In a unit-to-unit comparison, it was found that tankless water heaters would lessen impacts of water heating by reducing annual energy use by 2800 MJ/year (16% compared to tank), and reducing global warming emissions by 175 kg CO2 eqv./year (18% reduction). Overall, the production and combustion of natural gas in the use phase had the largest impact. Total waste, VOCs, PAHs, particulate matter, and heavy-metals-to-air categories were also affected relatively strongly by manufacturing processes. It was estimated that tankless water heater users would have to use 10 more gallons of hot water a day (an increased usage of approximately 20%) to have the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results suggest that if a higher percentage of Californians used tankless water heaters, environmental impacts caused by water heating would be smaller.

  6. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Armyís ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  7. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

  8. FEMP Solar Hot Water Calculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman Aerospace CenterEverlightOpenEyeforenergyFEMSolar Hot

  9. Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principal InvestigatorsSave Energy onof Energy Hot

  10. Reduce Hot Water Use for Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,Past OpportunitiesRedAirReduce Hot

  11. California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing: California Building Industry Association et al....

  12. Multiperiod Planning of Water Networks in Industrial Cities†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishnu, Sumit Kumar

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    approaches would be required to determine the optimal utilization of water over the planning horizon and beyond. Burgara-Montero et al [61] developed an optimization approach that incorporates seasonal variations in the optimal treatment of industrial...

  13. Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water is available via a pipeline from a public supply, and also in cases where recycled or more expensive water

  14. Sacramento Ordinance to Waive Fees for Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An ordinance suspending for the calendar years 2007-2009 all fees related to installations of solar water heaters on existing residences.

  15. Ocala Utility Services- Solar Hot Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Solar Water Heater Rebate Program is offered to residential retail electric customers by the City of Ocala Utility Services. Interested customers must complete an application and receive...

  16. NV Energy (Northern Nevada)- Solar Hot Water Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy is providing an incentive for its residential customers, small commercial, nonprofit, school and other public customers to install solar water heaters on their homes and facilities. ...

  17. Microwave vs. Electric Kettle: Which Appliance Is in Hot Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is more efficient? Tell Us Addthis Microwave or electric kettle, which appliance should win the honor of heating your water? | Graphic by Stacy Buchanan, National Renewable Energy...

  18. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  19. Solar Water Heating: What's Hot and What's Not†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A handful of electric utilities in the United States now pay incentives to their customers to install solar water heaters or are developing programs to do so. The solar water heater incentives are part of a broader utility demand-side management...

  20. Solar Water Heating: What's Hot and What's Not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, J.

    A handful of electric utilities in the United States now pay incentives to their customers to install solar water heaters or are developing programs to do so. The solar water heater incentives are part of a broader utility demand-side management...

  1. Innovation in the Water Industry: Challenges and Opportunities from the Water Engineering Perspective†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schšfer, Andrea

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to address the apparent lack of innovation in the UK water industry one ought to define this term in the context at hand. A definition that appears relevant to the process of water provision is; ĎInnovation is ...

  2. Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, John W. (Sag Harbor, NY)

    1983-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A water heater or system which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

  3. Hot water tank for use with a combination of solar energy and heat-pump desuperheating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andrews, J.W.

    1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A water heater or system is described which includes a hot water tank having disposed therein a movable baffle to function as a barrier between the incoming volume of cold water entering the tank and the volume of heated water entering the tank which is heated by the circulation of the cold water through a solar collector and/or a desuperheater of a heat pump so as to optimize the manner in which heat is imparted to the water in accordance to the demand on the water heater or system. A supplemental heater is also provided and it is connected so as to supplement the heating of the water in the event that the solar collector and/or desuperheater cannot impart all of the desired heat input into the water.

  4. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Solar Hot Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-Op (NHEC) offers rebates to residential customers who install qualified solar water-heating systems. The rebate is equal to 20% of installed system costs, with a maximum...

  5. NV Energy (Southern Nevada)- Solar Hot Water Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NV Energy is providing an incentive for its residential customers to install solar water heaters on their homes. As of July 26, 2013, NV Energy electric customers in Southern Nevada who own their...

  6. Experimental comparison of hot water/propane injection to steam/propane injection for recovery of heavy oil†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesse, Thomas

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , attempts have been made to inject hot water instead of steam. The results have all been rather poor, the major problem being low sweep efficiency. The hot water just doesn?t enhance oil recovery enough. Adding propane to the steam injected in the reservoir...

  7. Experimental comparison of hot water/propane injection to steam/propane injection for recovery of heavy oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesse, Thomas

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , attempts have been made to inject hot water instead of steam. The results have all been rather poor, the major problem being low sweep efficiency. The hot water just doesn?t enhance oil recovery enough. Adding propane to the steam injected in the reservoir...

  8. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  9. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  10. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Solar Domestic Hot Water System†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the accuracy test of a TRNSYS Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) System simulation. The testing is based on comparing the results with the F-Chart software. The selected system to carry out the tests was the Active Solar Domestic...

  11. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Included in this report is detailed information regarding the design and installation of a heating and hot water system in a commercial application. This information includes descriptions of system and building, design philosophy, control logic operation modes, design and installation drawing and a brief description of problems encountered and their solutions.

  12. Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

  13. HOT PHENOL RNA EXTRACTION PROTOCOL 1) Set the water bath to 800

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gill, Kulvinder

    HOT PHENOL RNA EXTRACTION PROTOCOL 1) Set the water bath to 800 C. 2) Make 50 mL Extraction bufferL SDS = 0.5 gm DEPC treated water = 43.2 mL Total = 50 mL 3) Add 50 mL phenol (pH = 4.7), in 50 mL extraction buffer (final concentration of 1:1). For small sample add 200 to 300ul of 1Extraction buffer: 1

  14. Water, Vapor, and Salt Dynamics in a Hot Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahrami, Davood; Danko, George [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, 1664 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV, 89557 (United States); Walton, John [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University, El Paso, TX, 79968 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a new model study examining the high temperature nuclear waste disposal concept at Yucca Mountain using MULTIFLUX, an integrated in-drift- and mountain-scale thermal-hydrologic model. The results show that a large amount of vapor flow into the drift is expected during the period of above-boiling temperatures. This phenomenon makes the emplacement drift a water/moisture attractor during the above-boiling temperature operation. The evaporation of the percolation water into the drift gives rise to salt accumulation in the rock wall, especially in the crown of the drift for about 1500 years in the example. The deposited salts over the drift footprint, almost entirely present in the fractures, may enter the drift either by rock fall or by water drippage. During the high temperature operation mode, the barometric pressure variation creates fluctuating relative humidity in the emplacement drift with a time period of approximately 10 days. Potentially wet and dry conditions and condensation on salt-laden drift wall sections may adversely affect the storage environment. Salt accumulations during the above-boiling temperature operation must be sufficiently addressed to fully understand the waste package environment during the thermal period. Until the questions are resolved, a below-boiling repository design is favored where the Alloy-22 will be less susceptible to localized corrosion. (authors)

  15. A Case Study on In-situ Rejuvenation of Degraded Insulation on Industrial Piping in Hot Service†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -situ Rejuvenation of Degraded Insulation on Industrial Piping In Hot Service John Williams VP, Marketing & Technical Services Aspen Aerogels, Inc. jwilliams@aerogel.com ESL-IE-15-06-35 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 -2- Presentation Overview ē The problem Ė The physics of wet insulation ē The solution Ė The physics of flexible aerogel blanket material ē An example Ė A case study ē Summary and conclusions ESL-IE-15-06-35 Proceedings...

  16. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  17. Low rank coal upgrading in a flow of hot water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masato Morimoto; Hiroyuki Nakagawa; Kouichi Miura [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous hydrothermal degradation and extraction at around 350{sup o}C using flowing solvent as a reaction/extraction medium were proposed for upgrading brown coal, more specifically, for converting brown coal into several fractions having different molecular weight and chemical structure under mild conditions. When an Australian brown coal, Loy Yang coal, was treated by water at 350{sup o}C under 18 MPa, the coal was separated into four fractions: gaseous product by 8% yield, water-soluble extract at room temperature (soluble) by 23% yield, extract precipitates as solid at room temperature (deposit) by 23% yield, and residual coal (upgraded coal) by 46% yield on daf basis. The separation was found to be realized by in situ extraction of low-molecular-weight substances released from coal macromolecular structure and/or those generated by hydrothermal decomposition reactions at 350{sup o}C. The solid products obtained, deposit and upgraded coal, were characterized in detail to examine the possibility of their effective utilization as solid fuel and chemical feed stock. The upgraded coal showed higher heating value and higher gasification reactivity than the parent coal, indicating that the upgraded coal can be a better solid fuel than the parent coal. The solid extract, deposit, was found to show thermoplasticity at less than 200{sup o}C, suggesting the possibility of utilizing the deposit as a raw material of high performance carbon materials. Several variables affecting the performance of the proposed method are also examined in detail in this paper. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Sometimes hot water will have a "sour" smell, similar to that of an old damp rag. This smell often

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Odor-causing bacteria live and thrive in warm water and can infest the water heater. The problem (approximately 160 degrees F) for 8 hours. This will kill the bacteria. (Caution: Be sure the water heater has#12;Sometimes hot water will have a "sour" smell, similar to that of an old damp rag. This smell

  19. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings, is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50% of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collector, two 500 gal storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in 40% fuel savings.

  20. Manufacturing muscle : the hot rod industry and the American fascination with speed, 1915-1984

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucsko, David Nicholas

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the pursuits of a particular subset of automobile users: hot rodders, those who modify their standard production automobiles for improved performance. More specifically, this project examines ...

  1. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options With Validated Analysis Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weitzel, E.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. A full distribution system developed in TRNSYS has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. This study builds upon previous analysis modelling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. Of the configurations evaluated, distribution losses account for 13-29% of the total water heating energy use and water use efficiency ranges from 11-22%. The base case, an uninsulated trunk and branch system sees the most improvement in energy consumption by insulating and locating the water heater central to all fixtures. Demand recirculation systems are not projected to provide significant energy savings and in some cases increase energy consumption. Water use is most efficient with demand recirculation systems, followed by the insulated trunk and branch system with a central water heater. Compact plumbing practices and insulation have the most impact on energy consumption (2-6% for insulation and 3-4% per 10 gallons of enclosed volume reduced). The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  2. Multielement geochemistry of solid materials in geothermal systems and its applications. Part 1. Hot-water system at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical studies of the geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, have led to development of chemical criteria for recognition of major features of the system and to a three-dimensional model for chemical zoning in the system. Based on this improved level of understanding several new or modified geochemical exploration and assessment techniques have been defined and are probably broadly applicable to evaluation of hot-water geothermal systems. The main purpose of this work was the development or adaptation of solids geochemical exploration techniques for use in the geothermal environment. (MHR)

  3. Measured electric hot water standby and demand loads from Pacific Northwest homes. End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, R.G.; Ross, B.A.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration began the End-Use Load and Consumer Assessment Program (ELCAP) in 1983 to obtain metered hourly end-use consumption data for a large sample of new and existing residential and commercial buildings in the Pacific Northwest. Loads and load shapes from the first 3 years of data fro each of several ELCAP residential studies representing various segments of the housing population have been summarized by Pratt et al. The analysis reported here uses the ELCAP data to investigate in much greater detail the relationship of key occupant and tank characteristics to the consumption of electricity for water heating. The hourly data collected provides opportunities to understand electricity consumption for heating water and to examine assumptions about water heating that are critical to load forecasting and conservation resource assessments. Specific objectives of this analysis are to: (A) determine the current baseline for standby heat losses by determining the standby heat loss of each hot water tank in the sample, (B) examine key assumptions affecting standby heat losses such as hot water temperatures and tank sizes and locations, (C) estimate, where possible, impacts on standby heat losses by conservation measures such as insulating tank wraps, pipe wraps, anticonvection valves or traps, and insulating bottom boards, (D) estimate the EF-factors used by the federal efficiency standards and the nominal R-values of the tanks in the sample, (E) develop estimates of demand for hot water for each home in the sample by subtracting the standby load from the total hot water load, (F) examine the relationship between the ages and number of occupants and the hot water demand, (G) place the standby and demand components of water heating electricity consumption in perspective with the total hot water load and load shape.

  4. AN OVERVIEW OF BUILDING AMERICA INDUSTRIALIZED HOUSING PARTNERSHIP (BAIHP) ACTIVITIES IN HOT-HUMID CLIMATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, S.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Colon, C.; Fonorow, K.; Stroer, D.; Martin, E.; McIlvaine, J.; Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Thomas-Rees, S.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.; Gil, C.

    tightness, pressure mapping, outside airflow measurement, static pressure, temperature drop, and exhaust fan air flow measurement. Once these tests have been completed, the homes are given a HERS Index rating calculated by FSEC?s EnergyGauge ? software... and technical assistance activities for new housing. Hot-humid climate efforts described here include: Systems research : NightCool ? A hybrid cooling and dehumidification strategy employing radiative cooling and desiccant materials. Interior Duct...

  5. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagram 1: A Typical Tank Water Heater Source: http://California households. Tank water heaters stayed constant.the same impact as tank water heaters. The project results

  6. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaand AssessmentĒ in Water Heating Rulemaking TechnicalG. Smith, Tankless Gas Water Heaters: Oregon Market Status,

  7. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaheater. Eco-design of Water Heaters and Methodology studyboth storage-type water heaters and tankless water heaters.

  8. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for PAH emissions. The PAHs from tank water heaters in theIncreased Tankless Water Usage: PAHs Heavy Metals to WaterIncreased Tankless Water Usage: VOCs PAHs Heavy Metals to

  9. Cutting Industrial Solar System Costs in Half†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niess, R. C.; Weinstein, A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collectors that result in an installed first cost that approximates one half of that of conventional solar systems. This technology is now available for producing up to 220 F hot water for industrial process heat, space heating, and service hot water heating...

  10. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 281 Solar Hot Water Application Assessment for U.S. Army IMCOM-Southeast Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Chvala, William D.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires installations (EISA) to install solar systems of sufficient capacity to provide 30% of service hot water in new construction and renovations where cost-effective. However, installations are struggling with how to implement solar hot water, and while several installations are installing solar hot water on a limited basis, paybacks remain long. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to address this issue to help determine how best to implement solar hot water projects. This documents discusses the results of that project.

  11. U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton: Using The Sun For Hot Water And Electricity, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Case study overview of integrated solar hot water/photovoltaic systems at the U.S. Marine Corps Camp Pendleton training pools.

  12. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaon Eco-Design of Water HeatersĒ, Task 5 Report, DefinitionTesting of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance. Davis

  13. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF THE SNS CCL HOT MODEL WATER COOLING SYSTEM USING THE SINDA/FLUINT NETWORK MODELING TOOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. AMMERMAN; J. BERNARDIN

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for design and analysis of the hot model water cooling system for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) coupled-cavity linac (CCL). The hot model, when completed, will include segments for both the CCL and coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL). The scope of this report encompasses the modeling effort for the CCL portion of the hot model. This modeling effort employed the SINDA/FLUINT network modeling tool. This report begins with an introduction of the SNS hot model and network modeling using SINDA/FLUINT. Next, the development and operation of the SINDA/FLUINT model are discussed. Finally, the results of the SINDA/FLUINT modeling effort are presented and discussed.

  14. Assembly and comparison of available solar hot water system reliability databases and information.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed commercially for over 30 years, yet few quantitative details are known about their reliability. This report describes a comprehensive analysis of all of the known major previous research and data regarding the reliability of SHW systems and components. Some important conclusions emerged. First, based on a detailed inspection of ten-year-old systems in Florida, about half of active systems can be expected to fail within a ten-year period. Second, valves were identified as the probable cause of a majority of active SHW failures. Third, passive integral and thermosiphon SHW systems have much lower failure rates than active ones, probably due to their simple design that employs few mechanical parts. Fourth, it is probable that the existing data about reliability do not reveal the full extent of fielded system failures because most of the data were based on trouble calls. Often an SHW system owner is not aware of a failure because the backup system silently continues to produce hot water. Thus, a repair event may not be generated in a timely manner, if at all. This final report for the project provides all of the pertinent details about this study, including the source of the data, the techniques to assure their quality before analysis, the organization of the data into perhaps the most comprehensive reliability database in existence, a detailed statistical analysis, and a list of recommendations for additional critical work. Important recommendations include the inclusion of an alarm on SHW systems to identify a failed system, the need for a scientifically designed study to collect high-quality reliability data that will lead to design improvements and lower costs, and accelerated testing of components that are identified as highly problematic.

  15. One Machine for Heating Cooling & Domestic Hot Water: Multi-Function Heat Pumps to Enable Zero Net Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    One Machine for Heating Cooling & Domestic Hot Water: Multi-Function Heat Pumps to Enable Zero Net at the core of a zero-net-energy demonstration home designed to generate enough electricity to also power policy initiatives to advance zero net energy homes as standard practice. #12;As heat pump systems become

  16. Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for single a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat oxide fuel cell, Cogeneration, Storage heat Tank 1. Introduction In residential sector, energy

  17. Water and Energy Savings using Demand Hot Water Recirculating Systems in Residential Homes: A Case Study of Five Homes in Palo Alto, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, M.R.

    2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a preliminary study aimed at estimating the potential of saving potable water, (and the electrical energy used to heat it), that is presently lost directly to the drain while occupants wait for hot water to arrive at the faucet (point of use). Data were collected from five single-family homes in Palo Alto, California. Despite the small sample size in this study, the results make a compelling case for retrofitting homes with hot water recirculation systems to eliminate unnecessary wastage of water at the point of use. Technical as well as behavioral and attitudinal changes towards water conservation are necessary for a fulfilling and successful conservation effort. This report focuses on the technical issues, but behavioral issues are also noted, which may be factored into future studies involving local and state governments and utility companies.

  18. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water Savings Tool for the Wine Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy, Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treated onsite). Pumping energy for wine for the benchmarkwine industry called ďBEST (Benchmarking and Energy andBENCHMARKING AND ENERGY AND WATER SAVINGS TOOL FOR THE WINE

  19. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    an increasing level of interest in the area of high-purity separation especially in water treatment. It is driven primarily by heat which creates a vapor-pressure difference across a porous hydrophobic membrane. Hot produced water and excess low-level heat from...

  20. Performance of a Heat Pump Water Heater in the Hot-Humid Climate, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, C.; Puttagunta, S.; Williamson, J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over recent years, heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have become more readily available and more widely adopted in the marketplace. For a 6-month period, the Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings monitored the performance of a GE Geospring HPWH in Windermere, Florida. The study found that the HPWH performed 144% more efficiently than a traditional electric resistance water heater, saving approximately 64% on water heating annually. The monitoring showed that the domestic hot water draw was a primary factor affecting the system's operating efficiency.

  1. Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.N.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  2. Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieg, Lisa

    1 Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry (Education Paper) Seyyed Ghaderi ................................................................................................................................18 Shale Gas ................................................................................................................................................19 How much water is used in deep shale gas development

  3. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumer/your_home/water_ heating/index.cfm/mytopic=12980heating is a large source of energy use in California homes.heating is the third largest source of energy use in homes [

  4. High temperature hot water distribution system study, Directorate of Public Works, Fort Drum, New York; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA01-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: (1) Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. (2) Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  5. HOT WATER IN THE INNER 100 AU OF THE CLASS 0 PROTOSTAR NGC 1333 IRAS2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visser, Ruud; Bergin, Edwin A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Kristensen, Lars E.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F., E-mail: visserr@umich.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporation of water ice above 100 K in the inner few 100 AU of low-mass embedded protostars (the so-called hot core) should produce quiescent water vapor abundances of {approx}10{sup -4} relative to H{sub 2}. Observational evidence so far points at abundances of only a few 10{sup -6}. However, these values are based on spherical models, which are known from interferometric studies to be inaccurate on the relevant spatial scales. Are hot cores really that much drier than expected, or are the low abundances an artifact of the inaccurate physical models? We present deep velocity-resolved Herschel-HIFI spectra of the 3{sub 12}-3{sub 03} lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (1097 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 249 K) in the low-mass Class 0 protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A. A spherical radiative transfer model with a power-law density profile is unable to reproduce both the HIFI data and existing interferometric data on the H{sub 2}{sup 18}O 3{sub 13}-2{sub 20} line (203 GHz, E{sub u}/k = 204 K). Instead, the HIFI spectra likely show optically thick emission from a hot core with a radius of about 100 AU. The mass of the hot core is estimated from the C{sup 18}O J = 9-8 and 10-9 lines. We derive a lower limit to the hot water abundance of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}, consistent with the theoretical predictions of {approx}10{sup -4}. The revised HDO/H{sub 2}O abundance ratio is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, an order of magnitude lower than previously estimated.

  6. Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory (LENI) Gnie mcanique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    -Liquid Heat Exchanger For Waste Heat Recovery In Exhaust Gases Author: Antoine Breton Supervisors: Prof contained in wasted hot gases will allow to reduce industrial energy consumption. Heat recovery. Hot wasted exhaust gases Cold Water Polymer Spiral Film Gas Liquid Heat Exchanger Cold exhaust gases

  7. Solar heating and hot water system installed at the Senior Citizen Center, Huntsville, Alabama. [Includes engineering drawings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the solar energy system installed at the Huntsville Senior Citizen Center. The solar space heating and hot water facility and the project involved in its construction are described in considerable detail and detailed drawings of the complete system and discussions of the planning, the hardware, recommendations, and other pertinent information are included. The facility was designed to provide 85 percent of the hot water and 85 percent of the space heating requirements. Two important factors concerning this project for commercial demonstration are the successful use of silicon oil as a heat transfer fluid and the architecturally aesthetic impact of a large solar energy system as a visual centerpoint. There is no overheat or freeze protection due to the characteristics of the silicon oil and the design of the system. Construction proceeded on schedule with no cost overruns. It is designed to be relatively free of scheduled maintenance, and has experienced practically no problems.

  8. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andhot water from the water heater to each end-use locationMixed Temperature Water Water Heater Drain Indoor Boundary

  9. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andof water at the water heater and at several end-use pointsshowerhead, entering the water heater and leaving the water

  10. Report on the analysis of field data relating to the reliability of solar hot water systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities are overseeing the installations of thousand of solar hot water (SHW) systems. Utility planners have begun to ask for quantitative measures of the expected lifetimes of these systems so that they can properly forecast their loads. This report, which augments a 2009 reliability analysis effort by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), addresses this need. Additional reliability data have been collected, added to the existing database, and analyzed. The results are presented. Additionally, formal reliability theory is described, including the bathtub curve, which is the most common model to characterize the lifetime reliability character of systems, and for predicting failures in the field. Reliability theory is used to assess the SNL reliability database. This assessment shows that the database is heavily weighted with data that describe the reliability of SHW systems early in their lives, during the warranty period. But it contains few measured data to describe the ends of SHW systems lives. End-of-life data are the most critical ones to define sufficiently the reliability of SHW systems in order to answer the questions that the utilities pose. Several ideas are presented for collecting the required data, including photometric analysis of aerial photographs of installed collectors, statistical and neural network analysis of energy bills from solar homes, and the development of simple algorithms to allow conventional SHW controllers to announce system failures and record the details of the event, similar to how aircraft black box recorders perform. Some information is also presented about public expectations for the longevity of a SHW system, information that is useful in developing reliability goals.

  11. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.

  12. Dealing with big circulation flow, small temperature difference based on verified dynamic model simulations of a hot water district heating system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEALING WITH ďBIG CIRCULATION FLOW RATE, SMALL TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCEĒ BASED ON VERIFIED DYNAMIC MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A HOT WATER DISTRICT HEATING SYSTEM Li Lian Zhong, Senior Sales Consultant, Danfoss Automatic Controls Management (Shanghai...) Co.,Ltd, Anshan, China ABSTRACT Dynamic models of an indirect hot water district heating system were developed based on the first principle of thermodynamics. The ideal model was verified by using measured operational data. The ideal...

  13. Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Demand Electric Water Heaters for Northeast Utilities.Two Demand Electric Water Heaters for Northeast Utilities.Johnson. Heat Pump Water Heater Field Test: 30 Crispaire

  14. Water and Energy Sustainability: A Balance of Government Action and Industry Innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Grunewald

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By completing the tasks and subtasks of the project, the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) through its state regulatory agency members and oil and gas industry partners, will bring attention to water quality and quantity issues and make progress toward water and energy sustainability though enhanced water protection and conservation thus enhancing the viability of the domestic fossil fuel industry. The project contains 4 major independent Tasks. Task 1 - Work Plan: Water-Energy Sustainability: A Symposium on Resource Viability. Task 2 - Work Plan: A Regional Assessment of Water and Energy Sustainability. Task 3 - Work Plan: Risk Based Data Management System-Water Water and Energy Module. Task 4 - Work Plan: Identification and Assessment of States Regulatory Programs Regarding Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems. Each task has a specific scope (details given).

  15. Storm-water management for industrial activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

  16. Recycled Water Reuse Permit Renewal Application for the Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No Name

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT This renewal application for the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (IWRP) WRU-I-0160-01 at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Industrial Waste Ditch (IWD) and Industrial Waste Pond (IWP) is being submitted to the State of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). This application has been prepared in compliance with the requirements in IDAPA 58.01.17, Recycled Water Rules. Information in this application is consistent with the IDAPA 58.01.17 rules, pre-application meeting, and the Guidance for Reclamation and Reuse of Municipal and Industrial Wastewater (September 2007). This application is being submitted using much of the same information contained in the initial permit application, submitted in 2007, and modification, in 2012. There have been no significant changes to the information and operations covered in the existing IWRP. Summary of the monitoring results and operation activity that has occurred since the issuance of the WRP has been included. MFC has operated the IWP and IWD as regulated wastewater land treatment facilities in compliance with the IDAPA 58.01.17 regulations and the IWRP. Industrial wastewater, consisting primarily of continuous discharges of nonhazardous, nonradioactive, routinely discharged noncontact cooling water and steam condensate, periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from the MFC facility process holdup tanks, and precipitation runoff, are discharged to the IWP and IWD system from various MFC facilities. Wastewater goes to the IWP and IWD with a permitted annual flow of up to 17 million gallons/year. All requirements of the IWRP are being met. The Operations and Maintenance Manual for the Industrial Wastewater System will be updated to include any new requirements.

  17. DYNAMIC MODEL OF AN INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMP USING WATER AS REFRIGERANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    1 DYNAMIC MODEL OF AN INDUSTRIAL HEAT PUMP USING WATER AS REFRIGERANT CHAMOUN MARWAN as refrigerant is investigated. Technical problems restraining the feasibility of this industrial heat pump of Refrigeration 35, 4 (2012) 1080-1091" DOI : 10.1016/j.ijrefrig.2011.12.007 #12;2 NOMENCLATURE A Cross sectional

  18. Loveland Water & Power- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water & Power, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses incentives for new construction projects and existing building retrofits. The Electric...

  19. The Department of Energy`s Solar Industrial Program: 1994 review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on DOE`s Solar Industrial Program. The topics of the report include an overview of the program, it`s participants and it`s objectives; solar detoxification--using solar energy to destroy environmental contaminants in air, water, and soil; solar process heat--generating industrial quantities of hot water, steam, and hot air from solar energy; and advanced processes--using concentrated solar energy to manufacture high-technology materials and develop new industrial processes.

  20. Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R.K. Johnson. Heat Pump Water Heater Field Test: 30a Market-Optimized Heat- Pump Water Heater. Prepared by TIAXcost savings of heat pump water heaters Field test of

  1. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    news-service/huge-lack-of-water- in-california-means-big-crop irrigation due to lack of steady water sources (CA DWR,concerned over the lack of a water industry trade lobby, ala

  2. Sustaining Industrial Energy Efficiency in Process Cooling in a Potentially Water-Short Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation: ESL-IE-14-05-18 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 15 eco-ATWE Water Efficient Mode (Combined Evaporative and Dry Mode) Third Mode of Operation: ē Two Pumps ē Two Water...

  3. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

  4. Economies of Scale and Scope in Network Industries: Lessons for the UK water and sewerage sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollitt, Michael G.; Steer, Stephen J.

    means that water markets globally (and specifically the demand for water and sewerage services) will continue to grow well into the twenty-first century. Since 1960 the world population has doubled to approximately 7 billion today, and is projected... sectors1 Michael G. Pollitt Steven J. Steer ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group University of Cambridge August 2011 Abstract Many studies of the water and sewerage industries place significant importance on the benefits of economies...

  5. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  6. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, starch and corn refining, since these can be a source of fuel products. The sugar cane industry

  7. Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    - sources ∑ High rates of calcite (CaCO3) precipitation as waters take in atmospheric CO2 Ca2+ + CO3 2- CaCO setting ∑ Two leachate sources: input increases alkalinity (>1500mg/L as CaCO3), pH (>12) and Ca2+ (>600mg/L) ∑ CM2: Pilot CW sized by CaCO3 removal rates from volunteer system ∑ CM3: Monitored through natural

  8. CenterPoint Energy (Gas)- Residential Heating and Hot Water Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage...

  9. Limited Energy Engineering Analysis (EEAP) study of summer boiler at high temperature hot water plants, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a study of the existing High Temperature Hot Water Distribution Systems at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. There are two systems with central boilers located in Buildings 1021 and 2369. The study focuses on the operation of the boilers during the summer months which is required to provide domestic hot water and sanitizing steam to various buildings. Because the boilers are operating under a reduced load condition, it may be cost effective in terms of energy conservation to implement one of the following energy conservation opportunities (ECO`s).

  10. A cash-flow economic model for analyzing utility/ESCO solar hot water programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bircher, C. [ENSTAR, De Pere, WI (United States); DeLaune, J.L. [Wisconsin Public Service Corp., Green Bay, WI (United States); Lyons, C.R. [Energy Alliance Group, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wisconsin Public Service Corporation (WPSC), in partnership with Energy Alliance Group (EAG), has developed a robust cash-flow economic model to analyze an energy service company (ESCO) approach to utility solar water heating programs. This paper describes the ESCO approach and its potential to increase penetration of solar water heating. The economic model is presented, and its use in designing WPSC`s Solar-Wise Water Heating Service program is described. The model`s results for WPSC are positive, indicating that an ESCO approach has strong potential. A feasibility study of ESCO solar water heating programs for a varied sample of other US utilities was also conducted using the model, and the results are summarized. Sensitivity analyses from the study reveal that the three key drivers of ESCO solar water heating success are electric rate, length of the service agreement, and the amount of the customer`s payment for the service.

  11. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  12. Apparatus and method for pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in coal derived, water immiscible liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Carl D. (Olympia, WA)

    1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for and method of pumping hot, erosive slurry of coal solids in a coal derived, water immiscible liquid to higher pressure involves the use of a motive fluid which is miscible with the liquid of the slurry. The apparatus includes a pump 12, a remote check valve 14 and a chamber 16 between and in fluid communication with the pump 12 and check valve 14 through conduits 18,20. Pump 12 exerts pressure on the motive fluid and thereby on the slurry through a concentration gradient of coal solids within chamber 16 to alternately discharge slurry under pressure from the outlet port of check valve 14 and draw slurry in through the inlet port of check valve 14.

  13. Supercritical fluid extraction of bitumen free solids separated from Athabasca oil sand feed and hot water process tailings pond sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.; Woods, J.R.; Ripmeester, J.A. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Div. of Chemistry)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of strongly bound organic matter (SOM), in association with certain solids fractions, causes serious problems in the processability of Athabasca oil sands as well as in the settling and compaction of hot water process tailing pond sludge. It has been demonstrated that a substantial amount of this SOM can be separated from oil sands feed and sludge solids, after removal of bitumen by toluene, using a supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method. The extracted material is soluble in common organic solvents which allows a direct comparison, between the SOM separated from oil sands and sludges, from the point of view of both gross analysis of the major compound types and detailed analysis of chemical structures.

  14. Intrusion of radioactive industrially polluted water from North Sea into central Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vakulovskiy, S.M.; Nikitin, A.I.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of penetration of radioactive industrially polluted water into the central Baltic Sea was studied. The content of Cs-134 as determined in water near the bottom of deep water trenches along the path traveled by North Sea water entering the Baltic. Samples were taken at 5 locations, with Cs-134 concentrated from samples of several thousands of liters. It was found that radioactive pollution caused by the entry of water from the North Sea extends through the system of deep water depressions into the Baltic as far as the Gotland trench. The greatest degree of contamination is found in the Arkona depression adjacent to the straits. The concentration of Cs-134 in the Gdansk trench is one-half as great and in the Gotland trench one-third as great as in the Arkona depression. Radioactive contamination in the Baltic is attributed to discharge of radioactive wastes by plants at Windscale.

  15. Pilot plant studies for a new hot water process for extraction of bitumen from Utah tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlstrom, D.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process development pilot plant for extracting bitumen from tar sands under arid conditions are described. The hot water recovery process under development is required to maximize heat and water recovery, recover more than 90% of the bitumen, minimize the operating cost, and eliminate the use of a tailings pond by increasing the effectiveness of solids separation and dewatering. Technical aspects of process flow conditions, the liquid cyclone separator under development, and testing to analyze the influence of flow rates, size distribution in discharge streams, amount of bitumen recovery from different streams, and air addition are summarized. Test results indicate that bitumen recovery should be at least 90%, water content from thickener underflow and dewater coarse solids averages about 30 weight percent moisture, and the forced vortex cyclone can produce an underflow solids concentration of 69 to 72 weight percent moisture. The proposed flow sheet is believed to be a very low-cost method for bitumen recovery. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. An Analysis Method for Operations of Hot Water Heaters by Artificial Neural Networks†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaha, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Authors tried to apply an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to estimation of state of building systems. The systems used in this study were gas combustion water heaters. Empirical equations to estimate gas consumption from measureble properies...

  17. An Analysis Method for Operations of Hot Water Heaters by Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaha, M.; Takahashi, M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Authors tried to apply an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to estimation of state of building systems. The systems used in this study were gas combustion water heaters. Empirical equations to estimate gas consumption from measureble properies...

  18. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy is used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system has an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water is the transfer medium that delivers solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivers solar-heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy is insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provides auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  19. Instrument Qualification of Custom Fabricated Water Activity Meter for Hot Cell Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoskey, Jacob K.

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a custom fabricated water activity meter and the results of the qualification of this meter as described in the laboratory test plan LAB-PLN-11-00012, Testing and Validation of an Enhanced Acquisition and Control System. It was calibrated against several NaOH solutions of varying concentrations to quantify the accuracy and precision of the instrument at 20 įC and 60 įC. Also, a schematic and parts list of the equipment used to make the water activity meter will be presented in this report.

  20. Water Sampling At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation,

  1. Water Sampling At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood, 2002) Jump| Open

  2. Water Sampling At Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood, 2002)Information Area

  3. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to: navigation,

  4. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to: navigation,Geothermal

  5. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Jump to:

  6. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v i i where, h = molar enthalpy, Btu/mol (J/mol), M = molarEnergy Used at Shower Water Heater average 5169 BTU ( 5.454MJ ) 4335 BTU ( 4.573 MJ ) 4151 BTU ( 4.379 MJ ) 4192 BTU (

  7. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process residual like bagasse are now available (Cornland etsugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industrySection 7.4.7. ). The use of bagasse for energy is likely to

  9. Environmental Radioactivity 47 (2000) 127}133 Radon concentrations in hot spring waters in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HorvŠth, Ńkos

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in northern Venezuela AD . HorvaH th *, L.O. Bohus , F. Urbani , G. Marx , A. PiroH th , E.D. Greaves Eo( tvo and underground waters stemming from uranium-rich soil are the "rst candidates for high radon and radium

  10. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  11. Water Sampling At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater PowerInformation

  12. Water Sampling At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWater

  13. Water Sampling At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformation Beowawe

  14. Water Sampling At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformation

  15. Water Sampling At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, search ContentsWaterInformationEnergy

  16. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use and conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  17. Energy optimization of water and wastewater management for municipal and industrial applications conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings document the presentations given at the Energy Optimization of Water and Wastewater Management for Municipal and Industrial Applications, Conference, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The conference was organized and coordinated by Argonne National Laboratory. The conference focused on energy use on conservation in water and wastewater. The General Session also reflects DOE's commitment to the support and development of waste and wastewater systems that are environmentally acceptable. The conference proceedings are divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the General Session and Sessions 1 to 5. Volume 2 covers Sessions 6 to 12. Separate abstracts are prepared for each item within the scope of the Energy Data Base.

  18. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  19. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water SavingsTool for the Wine Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or the opportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack of knowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an important barrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking has demonstrated to help energy users understand energy use and the potential for energy efficiency improvement, reducing the information barrier. In California, the wine making industry is not only one of the economic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, with a considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed an integrated benchmarking and self-assessment tool for the California wine industry called ''BEST''(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery. BEST Winery enables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practice winery, accounting for differences in product mix and other characteristics of the winery. The tool enables the user to evaluate the impact of implementing energy and water efficiency measures. The tool facilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on the estimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. BEST Winery is available as a software tool in an Excel environment. This report serves as background material, documenting assumptions and information on the included energy and water efficiency measures. It also serves as a user guide for the software package.

  20. WaterFurnace Renewable Energy Inc formerly WaterFurnace Industries Inc WFI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump| Open Energy

  1. ISSUANCE 2015-05-12: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Consumer and Commercial Water Heaters

  2. Engineering and economic evaluation of direct hot-water geothermal energy applications on the University of New Mexico campus. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, D.; Houghton, A.V.

    1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential engineering and economic feasibility of low-temperature geothermal energy applications on the campus of the University of New Mexico is studied in detail. This report includes three phases of work: data acquisition and evaluation, system synthesis, and system refinement and implementation. Detailed process designs are presented for a system using 190/sup 0/F geothermal water to substitute for the use of 135 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/y (141 TJ/y) of fossil fuels to provide space and domestic hot water heating for approximately 23% of the campus. Specific areas covered in the report include economic evaluation, environmental impact and program implementation plans.

  3. Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

  4. 8/10/12 Global Water Sustainability Flows Through Natural and Human Challenges --Environmental Protection 1/3eponline.com/articles/.../global-water-sustainability-flows-through-natural-and-human-challenges.aspx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -water-sustainability-flows-through-natural-and-human-challenges.aspx Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear Energy Products by Category Products by Company Directories Environment Industry Directory Industry Links Water and sharing of international rivers have great impacts on water sustainability and quality. At the core

  5. IEA Heat Pump Conference 2011, 16 -19 May 2011, Tokyo, Japan DYNAMIC MODELING OF AN AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMP WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SOURCE HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER Farouk Fardoun, Associate Professor, Department of Industrial Engineering of an air source heat pump water heater (ASHPWH). The mathematical model consists of submodels of the basic countries such as Lebanon, electric water heaters are often used to generate hot water. Electric water

  6. Task 15 -- Remediation of organically contaminated soil using hot/liquid (subcritical) water. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This activity involves a pilot-scale demonstration of the use of hot/liquid water for the removal of organic contaminants from soil at the pilot (20 to 40 kg) scale. Lab-scale studies are being performed to determine the optimum temperature, contact time, and flow rates for removal of the organic contaminants. Initial investigations into using carbon sorbents to clean the extractant water for recycle use and to concentrate the extracted contaminants in a small volume for disposal are also being performed. Liquid water is normally considered to be too polar a solvent to be effective for removal of organic contaminants from contaminated soils and sludges. However, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has demonstrated that the polarity of liquid water can be changed from that of a very polar solvent at ambient conditions to that of an organic solvent (e.g., ethanol or acetonitrile) by simply raising the temperature. The EERC has exploited this unique property of liquid water to obtain highly selective extractions of polar (at lower temperatures) to nonpolar (at 200 to 250 C) organics from contaminated soils and sludges. Only moderate pressures (a maximum of about 45 atm at 250 C and lower pressures at lower temperatures) are required. With this procedure, all detectable hazardous organics were removed from the sludge, thus making the remaining material (about 99% of the original mass) a nonhazardous material. The present understanding of hot/liquid water extraction for the removal of hazardous organics from contaminated soils and sludges is being used to develop the engineering parameters needed to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the remediation technology. Progress during the report period is summarized.

  7. Grundfos HVAC OEM Efficient water hydraulics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    complexity ·20 years of experience in hydraulics for the Boiler System industry. ·Key success factor is our Benefits with an integrated solution #12;Heat pump unit with storage tank 1 2 Efficient water hydraulics 3 return Heatin g supply Cold wate r Hot water PRV Drain 3 way valve 1 2 3 air ventPT Grundfos flow sensor

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-06-25: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Residential and Commercial Water Heaters; Correction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products and Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Residential and Commercial Water Heaters; Correction

  9. The Mobile Test and Demonstration Unit, A Cooperative Project Between EPRI, Utilities and Industry to Demonstrate New Water Treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strasser, J.; Mannapperuma, J.

    THE MOBILE TEST AND DEMONSTRATION UNIT, A COOPERATIVE PROJECT BETWEEN EPRl, UTll.JTIES AND INDUSTRY TO DEMONSTRATE NEW WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES Jurgen Strasser Consultant to the EPRI Food Office Process & Equipment Technology... agencies are encouraging the reduction of the discharge of high BOD and TSS waste water to the local mlUlicipalities and/or waterways. EPRI collaborated with utilities, the US Dept. of Energy, food processor trade groups, and scientists from the Calif...

  10. INTEGRATED CO2 HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS FOR SPACE HEATING AND HOT WATER HEATING IN LOW-ENERGY HOUSES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Stene

    designed as stand-alone systems, i.e. a heat pump water heater (HPWH) in combination with separate units

  11. A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    William Hill (5/25/77). Water conser- vation and deliveries.Santa Cruz Water Department. conservation.Tracey Bliss (5/25/77). Water Standard Oil Refinery. James

  12. NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heater market.

  13. 1 CO2 Heat Pump System for Space Heating and Hot Water Heating in Low-Energy Houses and Passive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Stene

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designed as a stand-alone system, i.e. a heat pump water heater in combination with a separate unit for

  14. Use of a submersible viscometer in the primary separation step of the hot water process for recovery of bitumen from tar sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schramm, L.L.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The patent describes the primary separation step of the hot water process for extracting bitumen from tar sand in primary separation vessel. The bitumen floats upwardly in a tar sand slurry to form a froth layer, the coarse solids drop to form a tailings layer, and a middlings layer is formed between the froth and the tailings. The improvement described here comprises: providing a submerged viscometer in the middlings layer and actuating the viscometer to measure the viscosity of the middlings at one or more levels in the vertical column of middlings and produce signals, external of the vessel, which are indicative of the measurements; taking sufficient measurements to determine the viscosity of the region of maximum viscosity within the middlings layer and adjusting the viscosity of the middlings in response to the signals to maintain the maximum viscosity in the column below a predetermined value, whereby the flotation of the bitumen through the middlings layer to the froth layer is substantially enhanced.

  15. A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy consumption as water conserving measures are applied. These calculations are presented in the following flow chart. (

  16. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  17. Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. Finally an economic analysis, including capital and operational...

  18. Hot air drum evaporator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, Roger L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  19. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and discharge to conserve water resources and reduce the negative environmental impact associated with discharging wastewater into the environment. Wastewater treatment enables providing water with specifications suitable for either recycle in the same... process or reuse in other ways within the process or outside the process. Therefore, water treatment and recycle/reuse contribute to addressing both of the aforementioned water problems: fresh water sacristy and environmental impact of wastewater...

  20. Case Study of Stratified Chilled Water Storage Utilization for Comfort and Process Cooling in a Hot, Humid Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahnfleth, W. P.; Musser, A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by approximately $1.5 million per year. The thermal storage tank is a fully buried cylindrical, precast, pre-stressed tank with four-ring single pipe octagonal diffusers. It holds 5.2 million gallons (1 9.7 million L) of water, and is 140 ft (42.7 m... of the system and its operation is followed by presentation of operating data taken during 1997. INTRODUCTION Chilled water thermal energy storage ('TES) in naturally stratified tanks has been shown to be a valuable central cooling plant load management...

  1. A Detection of Water in the Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter WASP-12b and Implications for its Atmospheric Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L; Stevenson, Kevin B; Desert, Jean-Michel; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan J; Barstow, Joanna K; Henry, Gregory W; Williamson, Michael; Showman, Adam P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed characterization of exoplanets has begun to yield measurements of their atmospheric properties that constrain the planets' origins and evolution. For example, past observations of the dayside emission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b indicated that its atmosphere has a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O $>$ 1), suggesting it had a different formation pathway than is commonly assumed for giant planets. Here we report a precise near-infrared transmission spectrum for WASP-12b based on six transit observations with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3. We bin the data in 13 spectrophotometric light curves from 0.84 - 1.67 $\\mu$m and measure the transit depths to a median precision of 51 ppm. We retrieve the atmospheric properties using the transmission spectrum and find strong evidence for water absorption (7$\\sigma$ confidence). This detection marks the first high-confidence, spectroscopic identification of a molecule in the atmosphere of WASP-12b. The retrieved 1$\\sigma$ water volume mixin...

  2. Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water heaters and hot water storage tanks of June 2010,for water heaters and hot water storage tanks, and of theof water heaters and hot water storage tanks," 2010. http://

  3. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  4. Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. This thesis evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation...

  5. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moisture and subsequent mold problems in buildings are a serious and increasing concern for the building industry. Moisture intrusion in buildings is especially pertinent in hot and humid climates because the climate conditions provide only limited...

  6. Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

  7. ontanans use water in homes, on land, and in industries. We also use the state's streams, rivers, and lakes for recreation. When we

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    , rural domestic uses, self-supplied industry, livestock, and thermal electric power generation. We obtain and lakes and reser- voirs. Instream uses include hydroelectric generation, maintenance of natural water

  8. Treatment of primary tailings and middlings from the hot water extraction process for recovering bitumen from tar sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cymbalisty, L. M. O.; Cymerman, J.

    1995-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary tailings and middlings are combined and fed to a vessel having the general form of a deep cone thickener. The feed is deflected outwardly and generally horizontally by a baffle, as it is delivered to the vessel. Simultaneously, the outwardly radiating layer of newly added feed is contacted from below by an upwelling stream of aerated middlings, which stream moves in parallel with the aforesaid layer. Bitumen froth is formed and recovered. The upwelling stream is provided by circulating middlings through eductor/aerator assemblies and a plenum chamber mounted centrally in the body of middlings in the vessel. A generally circular circulation of middlings is generated. In this manner, the newly added bitumen is quickly and efficiently recovered. Recirculation of middlings to the aeration zone yields an additional recovery of bitumen. Use of the deep cone ensures that the tailings from the vessel are relatively low in water and bitumen content.

  9. Loveland Water and Power- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water and Power, in conjunction with the Platte River Power Authority provides businesses incentives for new construction projects and existing building retrofits. The Electric Efficiency...

  10. District heating feasibility, Industrial Corridor, Jamestown, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Industrial Corridor of Jamestown, New York, contains more than twenty industrial/manufacturing companies, whose thermal demands, in addition to space heating, include significant process heating loads. This study investigated in depth, the technical and economic feasibility of implementing a district heating system in the Industrial Corridor which can serve both process and space heating loads. Based upon the heat load assessment conducted, the study focused upon nine companies with the largest thermal demand. Alternative system implementation designs were considered including new conventional centralized boiler plants, gas turbine cogeneration, and both high temperature hot water and steam as the heat transport media in an underground distribution system. The study concluded that, in view of the nature of existing prospective customer loads being primarily steam based, the most economical system for near term phased development is a steam based system with a new conventional centrally located steam boiler plant. The economic potential for a cogeneration system was found to be sensitive to electricity buy back rates, which at present, are not attractive. Implementing a modern high temperature hot water system would require significant customer retrofit costs to convert their steam based systems to hot water, resulting in long and unattractive pay back periods. Unless customer hot water retrofit costs can be expended without penalty to the district system economics, hot water district heating is not considered economically feasible. Chapters describe heat load assessment; heat source analysis; system implementation; transmission and distribution systems assessment; institutional assessment; system economic analysis; and customer retrofit, economic analysis, and conclusions 20 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Ruijie

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

  12. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste-to-value is a promising and comprehensive wastewater processing solution being pursued by GE that recovers valuable energy and purified water from the abundant wastewater generated and...

  13. Evaluation of Hot Water Wash Parameters to Achieve Maximum Effectiveness in Reducing Levels of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and coliforms/Escherichia coli on Beef Carcass Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Melissa A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF HOT WATER WASH PARAMETERS TO ACHIEVE MAXIMUM EFFECTIVENESS IN REDUCING LEVELS OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM, ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 AND COLIFORMS/ ESCHERICHIA COLI ON BEEF CARCASS SURFACES A Thesis by MELISSA ANN DAVIDSON... PARAMETERS TO ACHIEVE MAXIMUM EFFECTIVENESS IN REDUCING LEVELS OF SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM, ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 AND COLIFORMS/ ESCHERICHIA COLI ON BEEF CARCASS SURFACES A Thesis by MELISSA ANN DAVIDSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  14. Direct-Contact Process Water Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, M. R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the manufacturing processes utilizing direct steam injection from process boilers to a hot water storage tank. Although the boiler plant was in fair operating condition, the boilers were over 30 years old and had measured seasonal heating efficiencies of 60... water heater. Since the new system was better matched to the plant load, energy savings occurred as a result of the new systems reduced input capacity and higher efficiency. This project, which can be duplicated in other industries with facility...

  15. Minimizing Energy Costs Through Water Management in the Pulp and Paper Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, P. H.

    The quantity of steam required by a pulp and paper mill, as well as the quantity of power generated can effectively be optimized by managing the water cycles in the mill. This approach addresses the process systems within the mill and investigates...

  16. IMAGING-BASED OPTICAL CALIPER FOR OBJECTS IN HOT MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Howard

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), in conjunction with its industrial and academic partners, proposes to develop an √ʬ?¬?Imaging-Based Optical Caliper (hereafter referred to as √ʬ?¬?OC√ʬ?¬Ě) for Objects in Hot Manufacturing Processes√ʬ?¬Ě. The goal is to develop and demonstrate the OC with the synergy of OGT√ʬ?¬?s current technological pool and other innovations to provide a light weight, robust, safe and accurate portable dimensional measurement device for hot objects with integrated wireless communication capacity to enable real time process control. The technical areas of interest in this project are the combination of advanced imaging, Sensor Fusion, and process control. OGT believes that the synergistic interactions between its current set of technologies and other innovations could deliver products that are viable and have high impact in the hot manufacture processes, such as steel making, steel rolling, open die forging, and glass industries, resulting in a new energy efficient control paradigm in the operations through improved yield, prolonged tool life and improved quality. In-line dimension measurement and control is of interest to the steel makers, yet current industry focus is on the final product dimension only instead of whole process due to the limit of man power, system cost and operator safety concerns. As sensor technologies advances, the industry started to see the need to enforce better dimensional control throughout the process, but lack the proper tools to do so. OGT along with its industrial partners represent the indigenous effort of technological development to serve the US steel industry. The immediate market that can use and get benefited from the proposed OC is the Steel Industry. The deployment of the OC has the potential to provide benefits in reduction of energy waste, CO2 emission, waste water amount, toxic waste, and so forth. The potential market after further expended function includes Hot Forging and Freight Industries. The OC prototypes were fabricated, and were progressively tested on-site in several steel mill and hot forging facilities for evaluation. Software refinements and new calibration procedures were also carried out to overcome the discovered glitches. Progress was presented to the hot manufacture facilities worldwide. Evidence showed a great interest and practical need for this product. OGT is in the pilot commercialization mode for this new development. The R&D team also successfully developed a 3D measurement function with no additional investment of hardware or equipment to measure low or room temperature object dimensions. Several tests were conducted in the reality environment to evaluate the measurement results. This new application will require additional development in product design.

  17. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

  18. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C: DIRECT LIQUID AND AIR COOLING COMPONENT TCASE FORECASTGRAPHICS Direct Liquid Cooling Thermal Components andThermal Design Margins Air Cooling Thermal Components and

  19. Solar Hot Water Contractor Licensing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to be eligible for Maine's solar thermal rebate program, systems must be installed by licensed plumbers who have received additional certification for solar thermal systems from the North...

  20. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    points for maximum cooling liquid supply temperatures thatLiquid cooling guidelines may include: Supply temperatureliquid supply temperature for liquid cooling guidelines. Due

  1. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defining liquid cooling guidelines for future use. The goalis key to reducing cooling energy consumption for futureliquid-cooling temperatures to guide future supercomputer

  2. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders ofthe heat capacity and transfer efficiency of liquids is

  3. "Hot" for Warm Water Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Format Locations sorted by Dry Bulb Temperature Locationssorted by Wet Bulb Temperature 11. APPENDIX C: DIRECT LIQUIDis constrained by outdoor wet bulb temperature) or dry

  4. dist_hot_water.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand Motor444 U.S.Working34 30

  5. Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

  6. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Task Force, ďWater Recycling 2030: Recommendationís of2007. Water Funding Recycling Program Strategic Plan. Web.grants_loans/water_recycling/docs/strategicplan2007.pdf

  7. NPDES Individual Permit for Industrial Facilities - Mail Merge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WATER DISCHARGES ASSOCIATED WITH INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY FROM FABRICATED METAL PRODUCTS INDUSTRY......44 I. CONTENTS OF PLAN. ......

  8. Geothermal: Hot Documents Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hot Documents Search Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links...

  9. Hydrogeologic investigation of Coso Hot Springs, Inyo County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for chemical analysis; determination of the local Coso Hot Springs and regional groundwater hydrology, including consideration of recharge, discharge, movement, and water...

  10. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

  11. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold water to the water heater and hot water from the waterinduced draft water heaters, water heaters with flue designsInput Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tank

  12. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Titlethe 2008 California Building Energy Efficiency Standards forrevision to the Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title

  13. Geothermal resource assessment of Hot Sulphur Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 10 springs whose waters are used for recreation, steam baths and laundry purposes are located at Hot Sulphur Springs. Estimated heat-flow at Hot Sulphur Springs is approximately 100 mW/m2, which is about normal for western Colorado. Recent work tends to show that surface and reduced heat flow in the mountains of northern Colorado could be high. The thermal waters have an estimated discharge of 50 gpm, a temperature that ranges from 104/sup 0/F (40/sup 0/C) to a high of 111/sup 0/F (44/sup 0/C), and a total dissolved solid content of 1200 mg/l. The waters are a sodium bicarbonate type with a large concentration of sulphate. It is estimated that the most likely reservoir temperature of this system ranges from 167/sup 0/F (75/sup 0/F) to 302/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/C) and that the areal extent of the system could encompass 1.35 sq mi (3.50 sq km) and could contain 0.698 Q's (1015 B.T.U.'s) of heat energy. Soil mercury and electrical resistivity surveys were conducted. The geophysical survey delineated several areas of low resistivity associated with the north trending fault that passes just to the west of the spring area. It appears that this fault is saturated with thermal waters and may be the conduit along which the thermal waters are moving up from depth. The appendices to this report include tables showing water temperatures required for various industrial processes, as well as dissolved minerals, trace elements and radioactivity levels found in the thermal waters. Also presented are a complete description of the factors affecting the electrical resistivity measurements, a description of the electrical resistivity equipment used, and the resistivity field procedures. Electrical resistivity calculations are also included in the appendices.

  14. User's Manual for BEST-Dairy: Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.; Ke, J.; Sathaye, J.

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This User's Manual summarizes the background information of the Benchmarking and Energy/water-Saving Tool (BEST) for the Dairy Processing Industry (Version 1.2, 2011), including'Read Me' portion of the tool, the sections of Introduction, and Instructions for the BEST-Dairy tool that is developed and distributed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  15. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Richardson, Mark 2009. Siemens Water Technologies Company2011. www. 3news.co.nz Siemens Water Technologies, 2012.conglomerations, US Filter, now Siemens Water Technologies

  16. Energy Efficient Industrial Building Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holness, G. V. R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " or precooled air concept of ventilation, with a high temperature hot-water/chilled-water changeover piping system. Extensive energy recovery systems would be provided for production equipment and oil mist control would be by local captive systems, rather...

  17. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Boa Vista Apartments: New Bedford Housing Authority/ New Bedford, MA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of Boa Vista Apartments housing development, with CHP system to provide electricity and hot water.

  18. Alternative and Emerging Technologies for an Energy-Efficient, Water-Efficient, and Low-Pollution Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to reduce the environmental impact of textile auxiliariesTextile Industry Ali Hasanbeigi China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental ImpactsTextile Industry Ali Hasanbeigi China Energy Group, Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts

  19. Small-scale AFBC hot air gas turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, R.A. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center; Hall, A.W. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The project is being funded through a cooperative effort between the DOE, EER, W-B, OARDC, CLF and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO). The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately}25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW{sub e} plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1,450 F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.

  20. Small-scale AFBC hot air gas turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, R.A. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center; Hall, A.W. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately} 25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW{sub e} plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1,450 F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.

  1. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  2. Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1) , Estelle Parra hot reversible rolling of AA5182 alloy sheets has been analysed. The sizes and shapes of intermetallic particles in as-cast and industrially hot rolled AA5182 alloys sheets were characterized by 3D X ray

  3. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  4. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  5. Living off-grid in an arid environment without a well : can residential and commercial/industrial water harvesting help solve water supply problems?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axness, Carl L.; Ferrando, Ana

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our family of three lives comfortably off-grid without a well in an arid region ({approx}9 in/yr, average). This year we expect to achieve water sustainability with harvested or grey water supporting all of our needs (including a garden and trees), except drinking water (about 7 gallons/week). We discuss our implementation and the implication that for an investment of a few thousand dollars, many single family homes could supply a large portion of their own water needs, significantly reducing municipal water demand. Generally, harvested water is very low in minerals and pollutants, but may need treatment for microbes in order to be potable. This may be addressed via filters, UV light irradiation or through chemical treatment (bleach). Looking further into the possibility of commercial water harvesting from malls, big box stores and factories, we ask whether water harvesting could supply a significant portion of potable water by looking at two cities with water supply problems. We look at the implications of separate municipal water lines for potable and clean non-potable uses. Implications on changes to future building codes are explored.

  6. Florida Sunshine -- Natural Source for Heating Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure, part of the State Energy Program (SEP) Stellar Project series, describes a utility solar hot water program in Lakeland, Florida. It is the first such utility-run solar hot water program in the country.

  7. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  8. Design approaches for solar industrial process-heat systems: nontracking and line-focus collector technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.; Dougherty, D.A.; Gee, R.C.; Masterson, P.M.; May, E.K.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design methodology for solar industrial process heat systems is described, and an overview is given of the use of solar energy in industry. A way to determine whether solar energy makes sense for a particular application is described. The basic system configurations used to supply hot water or steam are discussed, and computer-generated graphs are supplied that allow the user to select a collector type. Detailed energy calculations are provided, including the effects of thermal losses and storage. The selection of subsystem components is described, and control systems, installation and start-up details, economics, and safety and environmental issues are explained. (LEW)

  9. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial Water Reuse hybridmembranesystemsfa...

  10. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  11. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  12. Hot Summer | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmaxHorizontalHot PlateHotHot

  13. Hot and dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Eramo, Francesco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we build new Effective Field Theory tools to describe the propagation of energetic partons in hot and dense media, and we propose two new reactions for dark matter in the early universe. In the first part, ...

  14. Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a hot water heater...

  15. DECOMMISSIONING OF HOT CELL FACILITIES AT THE BATTELLE COLUMBUS LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Patrick; Henderson, Glenn; Erickson, Peter; Garber, David

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Columbus Laboratories (BCL), located in Columbus, Ohio, must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities for nuclear research buildings and grounds at its West Jefferson Facilities by 2006, as mandated by Congress. This effort includes decommissioning several hot cells located in the Hot Cell Laboratory (Building JN-1). JN-1 was originally constructed in 1955, and a hot cell/high bay addition was built in the mid 1970s. For over 30 years, BCL used these hot cell facilities to conduct research for the nuclear power industry and several government agencies, including the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Department of Energy. As a result of this research, the JN-1 hot cells became highly contaminated with mixed fission and activation products, as well as fuel residues. In 1998, the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) began efforts to decommission JN-1 with the goal of remediating the site to levels of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. This goal requires that each hot cell be decommissioned to a state where it can be safely demolished and transported to an off-site disposal facility. To achieve this, the BCLDP uses a four-step process for decommissioning each hot cell: (1) Source Term Removal; (2) Initial (i.e., remote) Decontamination; (3) Utility Removal; and (4) Final (i.e., manual) Decontamination/Stabilization. To date, this process has been successfully utilized on 13 hot cells within JN-1, with one hot cell remaining to be decommissioned. This paper will provide a case study of the hot cell decommissioning being conducted by the BCLDP. Discussed will be the methods used to achieve the goals of each of the hot cell decommissioning stages and the lessons learned that could be applied at other sites where hot cells need to be decommissioned.

  16. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

  17. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  18. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operations Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  20. Hot air drum evaporator. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Black, R.L.

    1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaporation system for aqueous radioactive waste uses standard 30 and 55 gallon drums. Waste solutions form cascading water sprays as they pass over a number of trays arranged in a vertical stack within a drum. Hot dry air is circulated radially of the drum through the water sprays thereby removing water vapor. The system is encased in concrete to prevent exposure to radioactivity. The use of standard 30 and 55 gallon drums permits an inexpensive compact modular design that is readily disposable, thus eliminating maintenance and radiation build-up problems encountered with conventional evaporation systems.

  1. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  2. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is a high demand for low-temperature hot water in textilehot waste water in autoclaves Autoclave (high temperature/high-temperature dyeing at 130 į for optimum heat recovery, C maximum cut-off between hot bath liquors and rinsing water,

  3. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  4. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid waste from the chemical industry, some paints, solvents and waste sludge from water treatment (

  5. Small-scale AFBC-hot air gas turbine power cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, R.C. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Orrville, OH (United States); Keener, H.M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Hall, A.W. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The project is being funded through a cooperative effort between the DOE, EER, W-B, OARDC, CLF and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO). The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately}25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW, plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1450{degrees}F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.

  6. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Promoting Combined Heat and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    residential applications the heat can be used for domestic hot water, space heating, absorption cooling, or dehumidifying at the building where it is produced. CHP systems consist...

  7. Preliminary geothermal investigations at Manley Hot Springs, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    East, J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manley Hot Springs is one of several hot springs which form a belt extending from the Seward Peninsula to east-central Alaska. All of the hot springs are low-temperature, water-dominated geothermal systems, having formed as the result of circulation of meteoric water along deepseated fractures near or within granitic intrusives. Shallow, thermally disturbed ground at Manley Hot Springs constitutes an area of 1.2 km by 0.6 km along the lower slopes of Bean Ridge on the north side of the Tanana Valley. This area includes 32 springs and seeps and one warm (29.1/sup 0/C) well. The hottest springs range in temperature from 61/sup 0/ to 47/sup 0/C and are presently utilized for space heating and irrigation. This study was designed to characterize the geothermal system present at Manley Hot Springs and delineate likely sites for geothermal drilling. Several surveys were conducted over a grid system which included shallow ground temperature, helium soil gas, mercury soil and resistivity surveys. In addition, a reconnaissance ground temperature survey and water chemistry sampling program was undertaken. The preliminary results, including some preliminary water chemistry, show that shallow hydrothermal activity can be delineated by many of the surveys. Three localities are targeted as likely geothermal well sites, and a model is proposed for the geothermal system at Manley Hot Springs.

  8. Hot tearing test for TIG welding of aluminum alloys: application of a stress parallel to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Page 1 Hot tearing test for TIG welding of aluminum alloys: application of a stress parallel or solidification cracking, in aluminum alloys welding is an important industrial issue and must be carefully the parameters leading to hot tearing during welding. The originality of the test presented here

  9. Hot tearing test for TIG welding of aluminum alloys: application of a stress parallel to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

    Page 1 Hot tearing test for TIG welding of aluminum alloys: application of a stress parallel in aluminum alloys welding is an important industrial issue. Understanding of hot cracking phenomenon welding. The originality of the test presented here is that an external stress is applied on the test

  10. Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject...

  11. Energy-efficient water heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

  12. 41International Journal of Metalcasting/Fall 08 Prediction of Hot tear formation in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    . Keywords: hot tear, magnesium AZ91D, viscoplastic, liquidus introduction The automotive industry is showing or aluminum alloys. Because of their low density, incorporating magnesium alloys into the design of new

  13. Commercial Solar Hot Water Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A variety of financing options will be available depending on the project, including power purchase agreements or energy service agreements. A third party will finance the construction, maintenan...

  14. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  15. Coal-water slurry fuel combustion testing in an oil-fired industrial boiler. Semiannual technical progress report, February 15, 1993--August 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Poe, R.L.; Scaroni, A.W.

    1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University is conducting a coal-water slurry fuel (CWSF) program for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania with the objective of determining the viability of firing CWSF in an industrial boiler designed for heavy fuel oil. Penn State and DOE have entered into a cooperative agreement with the purpose of determining if CWSF prepared from a cleaned coal (containing approximately 3.5 wt % ash and 0.9 wt % sulfur) can be effectively burned in a heavy fuel oil-designed industrial boiler without adverse impact on boiler rating, maintainability, reliability, and availability. The project will also generate information to help in the design of new systems specifically configured to fire these clean coal-based fuels. The approach being used in the program is as follows: 1. Install a natural gas/fuel oil-designed package boiler and generate baseline data firing natural gas; 2. Shake down the system with CWSF and begin the first 1,000 hours of testing using the burner/atomizer system provided with the boiler. The first 1,000-hour demonstration was to consist of boiler operation testing and combustion performance evaluation using CWSF preheat, a range of atomizing air pressures (up to 200 psig as compared to the 100 psig boiler manufacturer design pressure), and steam as the atomizing medium; 3. If the combustion performance was not acceptable based on the combustion efficiency obtained and the level of gas support necessary to maintain flame stabilization, then low-cost modifications were to be implemented, such as installing a quarl and testing alternative atomizers; 4. If acceptable combustion performance was not obtained with the low-cost modifications, then the first demonstration was to be terminated and the burner system replaced with one of proven CWSF design.

  16. Considerations for Energy Efficient Showers in Hot-Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSIDERATIONS FOR ENERGY EFFICIENT SHOWERS IN HOT-HUMID CLIMATES D. E. Claridge and W.D. Turner Energy Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering Texas ALM University ABSTRACT Measurements have been conducted on four low... for typical operation in Texas. This has significant implications for everyone who purchases or uses showerheads; this is particularly true in hot climates where supply water temperatures are relatively high. TESTS CONDUCTED Showerheads Tested Two...

  17. Petroleum industry assists hurricane relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that the petroleum industry is aiding victims of last month's Hurricane Andrew with cash, clothing, food, water, and other supplies. Cash contributions announced as of last week totaled more than $2.7 million for distribution in South Florida and South Louisiana. Petroleum industry employees were collecting relief items such as bottled water and diapers for distribution in those areas.

  18. Working in Hot Weather or Hot Workplace Environments Subject: Procedures and Guidelines for Working in Hot Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lennard, William N.

    Working in Hot Weather or Hot Workplace Environments Subject: Procedures and Guidelines for Working is intended to prevent potential heat induced illness as a result of hot weather or hot workplace environments in hot weather or hot workplace environments. The following parameters will serve as triggers

  19. Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

  20. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Alissa

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    blankets to electric hot water heaters in South Africa,Ē J.for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, andfor Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and

  1. Optimization of Hot Standby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, J.; Holden, D.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Optimization is one of the key issues facing the chemical process industries today. The drivers are both economic and environmental. Utilities are among the top operating expenses for manufacturers, reflecting elevated energy prices...

  2. Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic TroughPhotoCell StructureUranium MillPilgrim Hot

  3. Hot Plate Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmaxHorizontalHot Plate

  4. Idaho_HotSprings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude: N. 43 deg.

  5. The Homopolar Generator as a Pulsed Industrial Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, J. M.; Weldon, W. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power supply for numerous industrial applications such as large metal cross section pulsed resistance welding, pulsed billet heating for subsequent hot working processes, pulsed heating for localized forging processes, and magnetic metal forming. Each...

  6. The Homopolar Generator as a Pulsed Industrial Power Supply†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, J. M.; Weldon, W. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power supply for numerous industrial applications such as large metal cross section pulsed resistance welding, pulsed billet heating for subsequent hot working processes, pulsed heating for localized forging processes, and magnetic metal forming. Each...

  7. Advanced Burners and Combustion Controls for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferri, J. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When recuperators are installed on industrial furnaces, burners and ratio control systems must continue to operate reliably under a wider range of conditions. Most currently available hot air burners use dilution air to prevent fuel decomposition...

  8. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Use Unaccounted-for Water Demand Managementdetermine whether its unaccounted-for losses exceed typicalof distribution zones Unaccounted-for treated water Units

  9. Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    1 Pollution Prevention and New Industrial Estates Chris Pittner Associate Director WSP 21 May 2012 POLLUTION PREVENTION AND NEW INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Pollution within Industrial Estates Legal Framework and Guidance Surface Water Management Project Examples #12;2 POLLUTION WITHIN INDUSTRIAL ESTATES Sources Poor

  10. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Navigating Energy Management: A Roadmap for Business.Characteristics and Energy Management Opportunities. BurtonCaffal, C. 1995. Energy Management in Industry. Centre for

  11. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  12. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort, January 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R.J.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our objective, together with our CRADA partners, is to demonstrate advanced technology that could lead to an economic and environmentally acceptable commercialization of oil shale. We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  13. Evaluation of 27+ Years Old Photovoltaic Modules Operated in a Hot-Desert Climatic Condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Raghutaman, B.; Kuitche, J.; TamizhMani, G.; Backus, C. E.; Osterwald, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of failure mechanisms from the long-term field deployed modules is of great importance to the photovoltaic industry. This paper investigates the modules removed from a water pumping array operated over 27+ years in a hot-desert climatic condition, Arizona. Thirty-two modules were evaluated in this investigation. Each module is comprised of silicone rubber superstrate/encapsulant, mono-Si cells, fiberglass-like substrate, potted junction box and neoprene cable. Ten of these thirty-two modules were either non-functional or near non-functional with less than 30% of the original power. The other twenty-two functional modules showed an average power degradation of 1.08% per year over 27 years of operation. After the damp-heat (1000 hours of 85degC/85%RH), thermal cycling (two-hundred cycles of 90degC/-40degC) and hot-spot stress tests the modules lost about 11%, 9.8% and 3.5% of power, respectively.

  14. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  15. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    . Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial water re-treatment Tariff mechanism. 5 Annexure IV and V: Non-agricultural and agricultural tariffs. 6, accessibility, Quantity and timeliness. Agriculture Domestic Industry 21 % 23 % 56 % pg. 12: Principles, tariff

  17. Quantification of thermophilic archaea and bacteria in a Nevada hot spring using fluorescent in situ hybridization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    in situ hybridization Abstract Previous studies of high temperature hot springs in Yellowstone National temperatures. The cells, which were concentrated from 300 liters of hot spring water through tangential flow dominate in high-temperature environments such as Yellowstone National Park. However, our study indicates

  18. Steam treatment of surface soil: how does it affect water-soluble organic matter, C mineralization, and bacterial community composition?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roux-Michollet, Dad; Dudal, Yves; Jocteur-Monrozier, Lucile; Czarnes, Sonia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    organic components Water extraction was performed by shakingresulting from hot water extraction, as measured by Sparlingboiling soil in water resulted in the extraction of both

  19. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioners and heat pumps, and water heaters We modifiedConditioners and Heat Pumps NAECA 1987 Water Heaters NAECAConditioners and Heat Pumps EPACT 1992 Water Heaters, Hot

  20. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioners and heat pumps, and water heaters We modifiedConditioning Heat Pumps NAECA 1987 Water Heaters NAECA 1987Conditioners and Heat Pumps EPACT 1992 Water Heaters, Hot

  1. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 through 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioners and heat pumps, and water heaters We modifiedConditioners and Heat Pumps NAECA 1987 Water Heaters NAECAConditioners and Heat Pumps EPACT 1992 Water Heaters, Hot

  2. Geothermal Exploration in Hot Springs, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toby McIntosh, Jackola Engineering

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves drilling deeper in the Camp Aqua well dri lled in June 1982 as part of an effort to develop an ethanol plant. The purpose of the current drill ing effort is to determine if water at or above 165√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įF exists for the use in low temperature resource power generation. Previous geothermal resource study efforts in and around Hot Springs , MT and the Camp Aqua area (NE of Hot Springs) have been conducted through the years. A confined gravel aquifer exists in deep alluvium overlain by approximately 250√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? of si lt and c lay deposits from Glacial Lake Missoula. This gravel aquifer overlies a deeper bedrock aquifer. In the Camp Aqua area several wel l s exist in the gravel aquifer which receives hot water f rom bedrock fractures beneath the area. Prior to this exploration, one known well in the Camp Aqua area penetrated into the bedrock without success in intersecting fractures transporting hot geothermal water. The exploration associated with this project adds to the physical knowledge database of the Camp Aqua area. The dri l l ing effort provides additional subsurface information that can be used to gain a better understanding of the bedrock formation that i s leaking hot geothermal water into an otherwise cold water aquifer. The exi s t ing well used for the explorat ion is located within the √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?center√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ě of the hottest water within the gravel aquifer. This lent i t sel f as a logical and economical location to continue the exploration within the existing well. Faced with budget constraints due to unanticipated costs, changing dril l ing techniques stretched the limited project resources to maximize the overa l l well depth which f e l l short of original project goals. The project goal of finding 165√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬įF or hotter water was not achieved; however the project provides additional information and understanding of the Camp Aqua area that could prove valuable in future exploration efforts

  3. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  4. Comparison of experimental and simulated thermal ratings of drain-back solar water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, J.H.; Carlson, W.T.; Duff, W.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States)); Schaefer, P.J.; Beckman, W.A.; Klein, S.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-term experimental tests of drain-back solar water heaters are compared to ratings obtained using TRNSYS to determine if computer simulations can effectively replace laboratory thermal ratings of solar domestic hot water heating systems. The effectiveness of TRNSYS in predicting changes in rating due to limited changes in collector area, collector flow rate, recirculation flow rate, storage tank volume, and storage tank design is validated to within [plus minus]10 percent. Storage tank design is varied by using a stratification manifold in place of the standard drop tube. Variations in other component sizes and operating factors are based on current industry standards.

  5. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Project Objective Develop and demonstrate advanced hybrid industrial water treatment system that will... Cost-effectively enable at least 50% water reuse...

  6. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  7. Potential for supplying solar thermal energy to industrial unit operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, E.K.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have identified major industries deemed most appropriate for the near-term adoption of solar thermal technology to provide process heat; these studies have been based on surveys that followed standard industrial classifications. This paper presents an alternate, perhaps simpler analysis of this potential, considered in terms of the end-use of energy delivered to industrial unit operations. For example, materials, such as animal feed, can be air dried at much lower temperatures than are currently used. This situation is likely to continue while economic supplies of natural gas are readily available. However, restriction of these supplies could lead to the use of low-temperature processes, which are more easily integrated with solar thermal technology. The adoption of solar technology is also favored by other changes, such as the relative rates of increase of the costs of electricity and natural gas, and by energy conservation measures. Thus, the use of low-pressure steam to provide process heat could be replaced economically with high-temperature hot water systems, which are more compatible with solar technology. On the other hand, for certain operations such as high-temperature catalytic and distillation processes employed in petroleum refining, there is no ready alternative to presently employed fluid fuels.

  8. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid waste from the chemical industry, some paints, solvents and waste sludge from water treatment.

  9. Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

  10. Hot carrier diffusion in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzicka, Brian Andrew; Wang, Shuai; Werake, Lalani Kumari; Weintrub, Ben; Loh, Kian Ping; Zhao, Hui

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an optical study of charge transport in graphene. Diffusion of hot carriers in epitaxial graphene and reduced graphene oxide samples are studied using an ultrafast pump-probe technique with a high spatial resolution. Spatiotemporal...

  11. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  12. Coping with Hot Work Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David

    2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    exposed to these conditions. A hot work environment can impair safety and health. Both workers and their employers are responsi- ble for taking steps to prevent heat stress in the work- place. How Your Body Handles Heat Humans are warm-blooded, which... evaporation. Wiping sweat from the skin with a cloth also prevents cooling from evaporation. In hot, humid conditions, hard work becomes harder. The sweat glands release moisture and essential David W. Smith, Extension Safety Program The Texas A...

  13. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    31, 2010. ) U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (3, 2010. ) Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, ElectricEPRI. 1997. Quality Energy Efficiency Retrofits for Water

  14. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.pdf. (Last accessed September 2, 2010. ) EPRI. 1997.Retrofits for Water Systems. EPRI with the California EnergyFoundation Project # 298. EPRI report CR-107838. Palo Alto,

  15. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melody, Moya; Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Brown, Richard

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As American drinking water agencies face higher production costs, demand, and energy prices, they seek opportunities to reduce costs without negatively affecting the quality of the water they deliver. This guide describes resources for cost-effectively improving the energy efficiency of U.S. public drinking water facilities. The guide (1) describes areas of opportunity for improving energy efficiency in drinking water facilities; (2) provides detailed descriptions of resources to consult for each area of opportunity; (3) offers supplementary suggestions and information for the area; and (4) presents illustrative case studies, including analysis of cost-effectiveness.

  16. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  17. Hot Pot Detail - Evidence of Quaternary Faulting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compilation of published data, field observations and photo interpretation relevant to Quaternary faulting at Hot Pot.

  18. SMUD- Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Solar Domestic Hot Water Program provides rebates and/or loan financing to customers who install solar water heating systems. The amount of the...

  19. DEPOSITIONAL FACIES AND AQUEOUS-SOLID GEOCHEMISTRY OF TRAVERTINE-DEPOSITING HOT SPRINGS (ANGEL TERRACE, MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, U.S.A.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    include hot spring travertine (precipitates from high-temperature springs, also called carbonate sinters spring water in the higher-temperature (-50-73¬įC) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine from waters in low- to high- * Present Address: Department of Geology, Arizona State University, Box

  20. Hot Beverages Cold Beverages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Juices $3.19 Vitamin Water $1.79 Java Tree Iced Coffee $2.59 Milk, 2% or Low Fat $1.39 20 oz. Coke Products $1.39 Energy Drinks Rockstar $2.39 Full Throttle $2.39 Red Bull Energy Drink $2.39 Rejuvenation in a sustainable way. 12 oz. 16 oz. 20 oz. House Blend $1.69 $1.79 $1.90 French Roast $1.69 $1.79 $1.90 Decaf Dark

  1. air-water interactions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C (Revised 0809) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION WATER SIDE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS (Part 2 27 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE...

  2. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  3. IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND REDUCING COSTS IN THE DRINKING WATER SUPPLY INDUSTRY: An ENERGY STAR Resource Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Moya Melody, Camilla Dunham Whitehead, Rich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MGD)óWeighted Average Total Use Treatment electricity costelectricity cost Units kWh kW kWh kW Source Water (by MGD)óWeighted Averagecosts are for electricity (EPRI, 2002). ? Groundwater systems use an average

  4. The Expanding Dairy Industry: Impact on Ground Water Quality and Quantity with Emphasis on Waste Management System Evaluation for Open Lot Dairies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.; Wolfe, Mary Leigh

    of dairy waste management practices. The results of these studies will aid producers, engineers, planners, and regulatory officials in the refinement and adoption of appropriate practices for water quality protection....

  5. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  6. Hot Gas Halos in Galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E. [UCO/Lick Observatories (United States)

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Chandra and XMM-Newton to study how the hot gas content in early-type galaxies varies with environment. We find that the L{sub X}-L{sub K} relationship is steeper for field galaxies than for comparable galaxies in groups and clusters. This suggests that internal processes such as supernovae driven winds or AGN feedback may expel hot gas from low mass field galaxies. Such mechanisms are less effective in groups and clusters where the presence of an intragroup or intracluster medium may confine outflowing material.

  7. Hot Spot | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel Jump to:Pennsylvania: EnergyHopkinsville,WindEnergyOpenHotPot,Hot

  8. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  9. How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supplyheat pump water heaters). http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/CSA 4.3- 2004 Gas Water Heaters - Volume III, Storage

  10. Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

  11. apoplastic water flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    district heating system Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: -rise building hot water heating system. Energy for sustainable development, the journal of the international...

  12. Durable zinc ferrite sorbent pellets for hot coal gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Mahesh C. (Arvada, CO); Blandon, Antonio E. (Thornton, CO); Hepworth, Malcolm T. (Edina, MN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable, porous sulfur sorbents useful in removing hydrogen sulfide from hot coal gas are prepared by water pelletizing a mixture of fine zinc oxide and fine iron oxide with inorganic and organic binders and small amounts of activators such as sodium carbonate and molybdenite; the pellets are dried and then indurated at a high temperature, e.g., 1800.degree. C., for a time sufficient to produce crush-resistant pellets.

  13. Is My Water Safe? disaster may disrupt the electricity needed to pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Emergency water Your hot water heater or water pressure tank could supply many gallons of safe water during the water heater on again until the water system is back in service. Water from the toilet tank may be used an emergency. Before using water from the water heater, switch off the gas or elec- tricity that heats

  14. Statistical mechanics of hot dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, R.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on properties of hot dense matter produced with high intensity laser radiation is described in a brief informal review.

  15. Partitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fouke, Bruce W.

    flow of spring water from the high-temperature to low-temperature facies. These results suggest of depositional facies models that correlate (1) the depth, velocity, temperature, and chemistry of waterPartitioning of bacterial communities between travertine depositional facies at Mammoth Hot Springs

  16. 2000 Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin Full Of Hot Air?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemenway, Mary Kay

    ©2000 Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin Full Of Hot Air? Introduction Light has standing by a pool, the medium is air. If you are looking at the Moon from under water after you jump into the pool, the mediums are both air and water. The Moon would appear dif- ferent from underwater because

  17. Wind information derived from hot air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Wind information derived from hot air balloon flights for use in short term wind forecasts E Introduction/Motivation Hot air balloons as wind measuring device Setup of nested HIRLAM models Results ∑ Three, The Nertherlands #12;Hot air balloon ∑Displacement/time unit = wind speed ∑Vertical resolution 30m ∑Inertia (500 kg

  18. Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes the requirements governing the discharge or deposit of sewage, industrial wastes and other wastes into waters and establishes water quality standards.

  19. PREDICTION OF DEFORMATION AND HOT TEAR FORMATION USING A VISCOPLASTIC MODEL WITH DAMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    of the hot tears. Introduction The automotive industry is showing greater interest in magnesium alloys as they have a high strength to weight ratio when compared to steel or aluminum alloys. Because of their low was 8.61% aluminum, 0.6% zinc, 0.23% manganese, 0.017% silicon, 0.003% copper, 0.0038% iron, 0

  20. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Alissa

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODELING THE IMPACT OF SOLAR WATER HEATERS ON THE REDUCTIONinsurance industry as a solar water heater driver in Southwith water heaters, solar water heaters are gaining in

  1. Emergency Factsheet for Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an alternate water source during the treatment period. Most water treatment equipment (such as water heaters, release the air to allow the tank to be filled with chlorinated water. Drain all hot water heatersEmergency Factsheet for Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination Mark L. McFarland, Associate

  2. Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson, New York:GLDWaunita Hot

  3. Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson, New York:GLDWaunita HotOpen|

  4. Wayland Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,AreaWatson,Wayland Hot Springs Geothermal

  5. Wedell Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to:Ohio: EnergyWebGen Systems66¬į,Texas: EnergyWedell Hot

  6. Soil mercury investigations, Waunita Hot Springs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588¬į,Socorromercury investigations, Waunita Hot

  7. Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,Eaga Solar LtdZhonghuiteZim's Hot Springs

  8. Squaw Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,Southeast ColoradoOhio:Maine: EnergyUtah: EnergySputnikSquaw Hot

  9. The US Hot Dry Rock Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to:UncertaintySocial36 Sector:TheUS Hot

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Ingebritsen, Et

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC JumpWoodlands,EnergyHot-Dry-RockAl., 1993) |

  11. Roystone Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont: Energy Resources Jump to:Roystone Hot

  12. Umpqua Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpTypeforUSDOIinUlubelu UnitUmpqua Hot

  13. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperativeCROSS-VALIDATION OF SWERA'sUpperUpper Hot

  14. Vale Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies andVacant Jump to:Vale Hot Springs Geothermal

  15. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  16. MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring@ilp.mit.edu, or visit http://ilp-www.mit.edu. MIT and Automotive Industries The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics important to the automotive industry

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Drain Water Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    household, the NPV of DWHR is -$203.68 for homes with electric water heaters and -$464.88 for homes with natural gas water heaters. DWHR is much more economical for households with electric hot water heaters as their energy costs are much higher. A household of 4 or more people with an electric hot water heater would

  18. Energy And The Foods Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R.

    temperature of the outside air. Other factors limiting downward progression of SCT inc lude gas pressure-driven pumping systems and improperly designed hot-gas defrost systems. The chief factors limiting upward progression of the SST include excess... flows is performed, with the objective of determining where heat can be transferred from cooling to heating streams. The heat transfer can be either via recuperative heat exchangers or industrial heat pumps; the choice of which is defined...

  19. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  20. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  1. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users The

  2. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users

  3. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSol√©(tm)HydrogenRFP ¬Ľsummerlectures [ICO]default Sign InIndustrial

  4. Energy and Economic Impacts of U.S. Federal Energy and Water Conservation Standards Adopted From 1987 Through 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Heat Pumps NAECA 1987 Water Heaters NAECA 1987 FurnacesPumps EPACT 1992 Water Heaters, Hot Water Supply Boilers andand heat pumps, and water heaters We modified the analytical

  5. Assessment of hot gas contaminant control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

  6. Solar space and water heating system installed at Charlottesville, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greer, Charles R.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy system located at David C. Wilson Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Charlottesville, Virginia, consists of 88 single glazed, Sunworks Solector copper base plate collector modules; hot water coils in the hot air ducts; a domestic hot water (DHW) preheat tank; a 3,000 gallon concrete urethane-insulated storage tank and other miscellaneous components. This report includes extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  7. Threats to the world's water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    la Riviere, J.W.M.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is in short supply in many regions; almost everywhere increasing amounts of organic waste and industrial pollutants threaten its quality. Only international cooperation in the integrated management of water resources can ameliorate the situation. Agriculture is usually the main drain on the water supply. Problems associated with overirrigation, increased population, and organic and industrial wastes are described. The paper explains the global water cycle; illustrates the uneven distribution of water among the oceans, ground water, ice caps, glaciers, lakes, and soil moisture; and gives data on the global water consumption from 1950 to 1980. Recommendations for water management are given.

  8. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fact she~t was i initiated las a ! 5. Recognizes outstanding activities or contributions Consequently, the terms technology, and equipmeqt are One of the problems encountered is that ene~gy management technology is not very mature (in gen~ral). i...~ , being developed includes: i 1. A solar collector connected'to a coffee pot tio produce hot water for instant coffee. 2. A solar photovoltaic converter used to deli~er power to a child's toy. 3. Two power factor experiments designed to shoW what...

  9. Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those processing or extracting coal or gas. The purpose of the...

  10. Arsenic in your water?: Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic in water?your tx H2O | pg. 27 Story by Kathy Wythe Economists study perceptions of risks from drinking water high in arsenic In several ?hot spots? across the United States people may be drinking water with high levels of naturally... occurring arsenic without understanding the associated risks, according to agricultural economists. ?Many households in arsenic ?hot spots? are in fact being exposed to harmful doses of arsenic,? said Dr. Douglass Shaw, professor of agricultural...

  11. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

  12. Industrial Decision Making†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: ē Why has industrial investment declined? ē What is the outlook for industrial investment? ē How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?...

  13. Building America Webinar: Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by DOE's Building America program, this webinar will focus on the effective use of central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) and control systems to reduce the energy use in hot water distribution.

  14. Building America Webinar: Central Multifamily Water Heating Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to 4:30PM EST This free webinar will focus on the effective use of central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) and control systems to reduce the energy use in hot water...

  15. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  16. Thermal Insulation Performance in the Process Industries: Facts and Fallacies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tye, R. P.

    Guarded Hot Box Study on Thermal Performance of Fibrous Insulations Used in Lofts," private com munication. 295 ESL-IE-85-05-54 Proceedings from the Seventh National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, May 12-15, 1985 ...THERMAL INSULATION PERFORMANCE IN 'mE PROCESS INDUSTRIES: FACTS AND FALLACIES R.P. Tye Dynatech RID Company, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A. ABSTRACT The efficient use of thermal insulation materials and systems for design of cryogenic and elevated...

  17. Image Storage in Hot Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

  18. Axion hot dark matter bounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Raffelt; S. Hannestad; A. Mirizzi; Y. Y. Y. Wong

    2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive cosmological limits on two-component hot dark matter consisting of neutrinos and axions. We restrict the large-scale structure data to the safely linear regime, excluding the Lyman-alpha forest. We derive Bayesian credible regions in the two-parameter space consisting of m_a and sum(m_nu). Marginalizing over sum(m_nu) provides m_aaxions the same data and methods give sum(m_nu)< 0.63 eV (95% CL).

  19. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

  20. Hot Springs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to: navigation, searchHotPage Edit

  1. Idaho_LavaHotSprings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude: N. Lava

  2. Continuous Commissioningģ Leading Energy Project Process - An Industry Approach†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Wang, J.; Hansen, K.; Seltzer, A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,000 CFM to over 150,000 CFM. The building automation varies from the most advanced system with wireless sensors to aged pneumatic controllers. Table 2 summarizes both the retrofit and optimization measures for each building. The primary system... chillers, 10 hot water boilers 2 Single duct VAV AHUs DDC 2 1972 49,436 Office 6:00/ 8:00 5:00/9:00 1 water cooled chiller, 1 hot water boiler 1 single duct VAV AHU DDC and pneumatic 3 1970 71,000 Office 6:00/ 8:00 5:00/9:00 3 air cooled chillers...

  3. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program Annual Report Fiscal Year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Zora V.; Murphy, Hugh D.; Smith, Morton C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete list of HDR objectives is provided in Reference 10, and is tabulated below in Tables 1 and 2 for the reader's convenience. The primary, level 1, objective for HDR is ''to improve the technology to the point where electricity could be produced commercially from a substantial number of known HDR resource sites in a cost range of 5 to 8 cents/kWh by 1997''. A critically important milestone in attaining this cost target is the level II objective: ''Evaluate the performance of the Fenton Hill Phase II reservoir''. To appreciate the significance of this objective, a brief background is helpful. During the past 14 years the US DOE has invested $123 million to develop the technology required to make Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy commercially useful. The Governments of Japan and the Federal Republic of Germany have contributed an additional $32 million to the US program. The initial objectives of the program were met by the successful development and long-term operation of a heat-extraction loop in hydraulically-fractured hot dry rock. This Phase I reservoir produced pressurized hot water at temperatures and flow rates suitable for many commercial uses such as space heating and food processing. It operated for more than a year with no major problems or detectable environmental effect. With this accomplished and the technical feasibility of HDR energy systems demonstrated, the program undertook the more difficult task of developing a larger, deeper, hotter reservoir, called ''Phase II'', capable of supporting pilot-plant-scale operation of a commercial electricity-generating power plant. As described earlier in ''History of Research'', such a system was created and operated successfully in a preliminary 30-day flow test. However, to justify capital investment in HDR geothermal technology, industry now requires assurance that the reservoir can be operated for a long time without major problems or a significant decrease in the rate and quality of energy production. Industrial advisors to the HDR Program have concluded that, while a longer testing period would certainly be desirable, a successful and well-documented flow test of this high-temperature, Phase II reservoir lasting at least one year should convince industry that HDR geothermal energy merits their investment in its commercial development. This test is called the Long Term Flow Test (LTFT), and its completion will be a major milestone in attaining the Level 1 objective. However, before the LTFT could be initiated, well EE-2 had to be repaired, as also briefly described in the ''History of Research''. During this repair operation, superb progress was made toward satisfying the next most critically important Level II objective: Improve the Performance of HDR Drilling and Completion Technology. During the repair of EE-2, Los Alamos sidetracked by drilling out of the damaged well at 2.96 km (9700 ft), and then completed drilling a new-wellbore (EE-2A) to a total depth of 3.78 km (12,360 ft). As a consequence of this drilling experience, Los Alamos believes that if the original wells were redrilled today their combined cost would be only $8 million rather than the $18.8 million actually spent (a 60% cost saving). Further details, particularly of the completion of the well, can be found in the major section, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, but it can be seen that the second, Level II objective is already nearing attainment.

  4. agencies impact industry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tackling flooding and pollution incidents, reducing industrys impacts on the environment, cleaning up rivers, coastal waters and contaminated land, and improving wildlife...

  5. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Develo Project Objecve Current StateChallenges Heavy industrial water utilization footprint Freshwater Withdrawals in the U.S. by Sector (2005) Domestic...

  6. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

  7. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

  8. A new approach to hot particle dosimetry using a Monte Carlo transport code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busche, Donna Marie

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ci-hrs. This value assumes a threshold dose of 2000 rads to an area of 0. 1 cm&, at a depth of 100 ltm (NCRP 1988). The purpose of this research was evaluate the current methods used in industry to assess the doses from hot particles. A Monte Carlo electron... radioactivity being released from the site. Frisking, portal monitors, and step off pads are important HP areas and should involve overview and supervision. IDENTMCATION To properly assess the dose from these hot particles, the source strength, type...

  9. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  10. Detachment Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Faulting & Geothermal Resources - Pearl Hot Spring, NV Conducting a 3D Converted Shear Wave Project to Reduce Exploration Risk at Wister, CA Crump Geyser: High Precision...

  11. U.S. Energy Service Company (ESCO) Industry and Market Trends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DG technologies Customer distribution system equip. Industrial process improvements Cogeneration Non-energy improvements Air quality Miscellaneous equipmentsystems Water heating...

  12. air-water countercurrent flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C (Revised 0809) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION WATER SIDE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS (Part 2 38 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE...

  13. Spatial Water Balance in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Seann; Maidment, David; Patoux, Jerome

    Water availability is critical to the economy in the state of Texas. Numerous reservoirs and conveyance structures have been constructed across the State to meet the water supply needs of farmers, municipalities, industries, and power generating...

  14. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  15. Lakeland Electric- Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeland Electric, a municipal utility in Florida, is the nation's first utility to offer solar-heated domestic hot water on a "pay-for-energy" basis. The utility has contracted with a solar...

  16. The US Hot Dry Rock project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

  17. Hot electron production and heating by hot electrons in fast ignitor research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Key, M.H.; Estabrook, K.; Hammel, B. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an experimental study of the physics of fast ignition the characteristics of the hot electron source at laser intensities up to 10(to the 20th power) Wcm{sup -2} and the heating produced at depth by hot electrons have been measured. Efficient generation of hot electrons but less than the anticipated heating have been observed.

  18. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests being conducted by Westinghouse at Foster-Wheeler's Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFBC) test facility in Karhula, Finland. Task 5 was designed to demonstrate the improvements implemented in Task 4 by fabricating fifty 1.5-meter hot gas filters. These filters were to be made available for DOE-sponsored field trials at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), operated by Southern Company Services in Wilsonville, Alabama.

  19. An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the refinery, olefins, and other industry complexes is presented. The cycles described include hot gas and steam heat recovery, going beyond the currently popular gas-turbine/ heat-recovery-steam-generator combination....

  20. Water Quality Control (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state of Texas is to promote the quality of the state's water by regulating existing industries, taking into consideration the economic development of the state, and by...

  1. Water information bulletin No. 30 geothermal investigations in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, J.C.; Johnson, L.L.; Anderson, J.E.; Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 899 thermal water occurrences known in Idaho, including 258 springs and 641 wells having temperatures ranging from 20 to 93/sup 0/C. Fifty-one cities or towns in Idaho containing 30% of the state's population are within 5 km of known geothermal springs or wells. These include several of Idaho's major cities such as Lewiston, Caldwell, Nampa, Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls. Fourteen sites appear to have subsurface temperatures of 140/sup 0/C or higher according to the several chemical geothermometers applied to thermal water discharges. These include Weiser, Big Creek, White Licks, Vulcan, Roystone, Bonneville, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, Indian Creek, and Deer Creek hot springs, and Raft River, Preston, and Magic Reservoir areas. These sites could be industrial sites, but several are in remote areas away from major transportation and, therefore, would probably be best utilized for electrical power generation using the binary cycle or Magma Max process. Present uses range from space heating to power generation. Six areas are known where commercial greenhouse operations are conducted for growing cut and potted flowers and vegetables. Space heating is substantial in only two places (Boise and Ketchum) although numerous individuals scattered throughout the state make use of thermal water for space heating and private swimming facilities. There are 22 operating resorts using thermal water and two commercial warm-water fish-rearing operations.

  2. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  3. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski (Wilmington, DE); Forsythe, George Daniel (Landenberg, PA); Domanski, Daniel Matthew (New Castle, DE); Chambers, Jeffrey Allen (Hockessin, DE); Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam (Boothwyn, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  4. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  5. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

  6. Applications of Industrial Wireless Sensor Milan Erdelj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ...................................... 10 1.3.2.2 Hazard ........................................ 10 1.3.2.3 Security manuscript, published in "Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards CRC the problems of air, water (together with waste water) pollution, but covers the production material pollution

  7. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossmiller, R.L. (HDR Engineering, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.

  8. Emission of Visible Light by Hot Dense Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    More, R.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1761 EMISSION OF VISIBLE LIGHT BY HOT DENSE METALS ByDE-AC52-07NA27344. HI FAN Emission of Visible Light by HotABSTRACT We consider the emission of visible light by hot

  9. Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Safety First Safety Last Safety Always Summer in Minnesota means high humidity and sunny, hot days. · Heat stroke is life threatening! Symptoms include high body temperature, red and dry skin, rapid before you get thirsty. Adequate fluid intake is the biggest key. Cool (not ice cold) water is the best

  10. Droplet impingement and vapor layer formation on hot hydrophobic surfaces Ji Yong Park1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, David G.

    diameter) water droplets that bounce from hydrophobic surfaces whose temperature exceeds the boiling point angle. The residence time determined by high-speed imaging is constant at 1 msec over the temperature-speed imaging is approximately independent of the temperature of the hot surface. Measurements of thermal

  11. Chemical markers of possible hot spots on Mars Ah-San Wong and Sushil K. Atreya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    Chemical markers of possible hot spots on Mars Ah-San Wong and Sushil K. Atreya Department not be ruled out. If outgassing does occur somewhere on Mars, water, carbon dioxide, sulfur species, methane, and to a lesser extent, halogens would be the likely molecules of outgassing, based on terrestrial analogs

  12. Computerized, Transient Hot-Wire Thermal Conductivity (HWTC) Apparatus for Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Computerized, Transient Hot-Wire Thermal Conductivity (HWTC) Apparatus for Nanofluids M. KOSTIC for thermal conductivity measurements of common fluids and nanofluids has been recently developed, designed nanofluids of 1 % volumetric concentration of 35 nm size copper nanoparticles in ethylene glycol and in water

  13. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

  14. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  15. Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Villa Hot Springs Spa Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  16. Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwater Athletic Club & Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature...

  17. Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Salida Hot Springs (Poncha Spring) Space Heating Low...

  18. Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson Hot Springs Lodge Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  19. Quenching and Partitioning Process Development to Replace Hot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Partitioning Process Development to Replace Hot Stamping of High-Strength Automotive Steel Quenching and Partitioning Process Development to Replace Hot Stamping of...

  20. Proceedings: EPRI Workshop on Condition and Remaining Life Assessment of Hot Gas Path Components of Combustion Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The severity of modern combustion turbine operation is a reflection of industry competition to achieve higher thermal efficiency. This competitive stance has resulted in new turbine designs and material systems that have at times outpaced condition and remaining life assessment (CARLA) technology. These proceedings summarize a two-day workshop on CARLA technology for hot section components of large combustion turbines.

  1. Hot Water Heating System Operation and Energy Conservation†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Z.; Chen, H.; Wei, P.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating period, and temperature-flow adjustment with frequency control. The study shows the most energy efficient operating method is a variable flow heating system, which should be popularized to the heating field....

  2. TYPICAL HOT WATER DRAW PATTERNS BASED ON FIELD DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy Laboratory Natural Resources Canada GasRenewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performed with Integrated Building and Construction Solutions (IBACOS) Natural Resources Canada

  3. Mandating Solar Hot Water by California Local Governments: Legal Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman,, Peter C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and counties the power to require dedication of solar accessthe power to re- quire dedication of solar easements as a

  4. Mandating Solar Hot Water by California Local Governments: Legal Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman,, Peter C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the county building code to require solar energy to be thebuilding code, in accord with the energy element of its general plan, to require solar

  5. CC Retrofits and Optimal Controls for Hot Water Systems†

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, L.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and exterior zones. Each AHU has design airflow of 45,000 CFM. The high gas usage is caused by a dual-duct system with CAV boxes, which is an outdated and inefficient technology. Pneumatic controls make the operation and maintenance more difficult and do...

  6. Why Is Nevada in Hot Water? Structural Controls and Tectonic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to the northwest in west-central Nevada near the southeast margin of the high heat-flow region. The abundant geothermal fields may therefore result from a transfer of...

  7. ENERGY USE AND DOMESTIC HOT WATER CONSUMPTION Final Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of oversizing of existing boilers (in study buildings) based on actual DHW and EDR loads. Phase I1 of this project which will investigate these issues with the assistance...

  8. Affordable Solar Hot Water and Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) | OpenInformationAffinity Wind

  9. ENERGY USE AND DOMESTIC HOT WATER CONSUMPTION Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work withJerseyMarketsWhyPressPolicyPortfolio2 0 1

  10. Predictive Control of Hot Water Heaters - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARD ACCOUNTING SYSTEMMeso-Scale during Electron

  11. Water Sampling At Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Faulder, 1991) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpen EnergyKauaiMtInformationOpen

  12. Water Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Carpenter, 1981) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation, searchOpenInformation Henkle,EnergyOpen

  13. Model Simulating Real Domestic Hot Water Use - Building America Top

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4EnergyMissionIllness |BasedInnovation |

  14. Interpretation of Water Sample Analysis, Waunita Hot Spring Project,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Open EnergyIGP JumpInformation

  15. Webinar: ENERGY STAR Hot Water Systems for High Performance Homes |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong, Smart,Department of Energy Webinar: ENERGY STAR

  16. Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department ofDepartment| Department ofSavingDepartment ofof

  17. Hot New Advances in Water Heating Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign InData inmaxHorizontal

  18. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department ofDepartment

  19. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Source Heat Pumps | Department

  20. Domestic Hot Water Event Schedule Generator - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69 Federal Register /NATIONALDoes

  1. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationógiven at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meetingócovers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  2. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  3. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IndustryCouncil.shtml The new members that joined the Industry Council include NPP owneroperators with analysis capability: Tyrone Stevens of Exelon, and SMR vendors:...

  4. Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGrid Integration0-1 March 2013

  5. Peer Review of the Hot Dry Rock Project at Fenton Hill, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly describes the history of the hot dry rock experiment project conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy and Los Alamos National Laboratory at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, from about 1971 through 1995. The authors identify the primary lessons learned and techniques developed during the course of the Fenton Hill project, and summarize the extent to which these technologies have been transferred to the U.S. geothermal industry.

  6. On the Thermodynamic Geometry of Hot QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Bellucci; Vinod Chandra; Bhupendra Nath Tiwari

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nature of the covariant thermodynamic geometry arising from the free energy of hot QCD. We systematically analyze the underlying equilibrium thermodynamic configurations of the free energy of 2- and 3-flavor hot QCD with or without including thermal fluctuations in the neighborhood of the QCD transition temperature. We show that there exists a well-defined thermodynamic geometric notion for QCD thermodynamics. The geometry thus obtained has no singularity as an intrinsic Riemannian manifold. We further show that there is a close connection of this geometric approach with the existing studies of correlations and quark number susceptibilities in hot QCD.

  7. On the Thermodynamic Geometry of Hot QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellucci, Stefano; Tiwari, Bhupendra Nath

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the nature of the covariant thermodynamic geometry arising from the free energy of hot QCD. We systematically analyze the underlying equilibrium thermodynamic configurations of the free energy of 2- and 3-flavor hot QCD with or without including thermal fluctuations in the neighborhood of the QCD transition temperature. We show that there exists a well-defined thermodynamic geometric notion for QCD thermodynamics. The geometry thus obtained has no singularity as an intrinsic Riemannian manifold. We further show that there is a close connection of this geometric approach with the existing studies of correlations and quark number susceptibilities in hot QCD.

  8. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for...

  9. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

  10. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  11. Light Duty Utility Arm System hot test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.; Conrad, R.B.; Kiebel, G.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Engineering Task Plan describes the scope of work and cost for implementing a hot test of the Light Duty Utility Arm System in Tank T-106 in September 1996.

  12. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang [Columbia University Department of Chemistry

    2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    During this funding period, we made a significant breakthrough and established for the first time that hot electron transfer from photoexcited NCs to an electron acceptor was indeed possible.

  13. Charm and Beauty in a Hot Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmut Satz

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the spectral analysis of quarkonium states in a hot medium of deconfined quarks and gluons, and we show that such an analysis provides a way to determine the thermal properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  14. A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stormwater Management Hydropower Generation Wastewateragricultural irrigation, hydropower, industry, fishing,dams for water storage and hydropower and diversions for

  15. World launch! Hot-Steam Aerostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    Info HeiDAS UH World launch! Hot-Steam Aerostat #12;"If you intend to view the land, if you plan Verne: "Fife weeks on a balloon". HeiDAS stands for Hei√?DampfAeroStat (Hot-Steam AeroStat) and it refers to the first operable balloon ever that became buoyant by means of superheated steam. The performance of Hei

  16. Wastewater treatment in the oil-shale industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.P.; Phillips, T.E.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the stringent state and federal standards governing the discharge of wastes into local waters and the limited water supplies in this area, an oil shale industry will probably reuse process effluents to the maximum extent possible and evaporate the residuals. Therefore, discharge of effluents into surface and ground waters may not be necessary. This paper reviews the subject of wastewater treatment for an oil shale industry and identifies key issues and research priorities that must be resolved before a large-scale commercial industry can be developed. It focuses on treatment of the waters unique to an oil shale industry: retort water, gas condensate, and mine water. Each presents a unique set of challenges.

  17. Industry Analysis February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    technology ­ Clean tech/ clean technology #12;7 Industry Studies · IbisWorld ­ U.S. and global industry-Industries · Biodiesel ­ Biofuel ­ Alternate fuels ­ Green fuels ­ Renewable fuels/energy ­ Green energy ­ Green Canada, Census, Industry Canada, the OECD, European Union, IMF, World Bank, UN . . . Never pay for stats

  18. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    : Occupational biomechanics, work physiology, industrial ergonomics, environmental hygiene, cognitive engineeringINDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor

  19. Journal of Mammalogy, 83(3):665673, 2002 WATER INFLUX AND FOOD CONSUMPTION OF FREE-LIVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    , Columbus, OH 43210 (JBW) We measured water-influx rate during the hot summer in free-ranging adult Arabian.2% of total water influx. For ungulates living in hot environments, we constructed an allometric curve: log(water influx Desert environments are characterized by high ambient temperature, intense solar ra- diation

  20. Geothermal-resource assessment of the Steamboat-Routt Hot Springs area, Colorado. Resources Series 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.; Zacharakis, T.G.; Ringrose, C.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the Steamboat Springs region in northwest Colorado was initiated and carried out in 1980 and 1981. The goal of this program was to delineate the geological features controlling the occurrence of the thermal waters (temperatures in excess of 68/sup 0/F (20/sup 0/C)) in this area at Steamboat Springs and 8 miles (12.8 km) north at Routt Hot Springs. Thermal waters from Heart Spring, the only developed thermal water source in the study area, are used in the municipal swimming pool in Steamboat Springs. The assessment program was a fully integrated program consisting of: dipole-dipole, Audio-magnetotelluric, telluric, self potential and gravity geophysical surveys, soil mercury and soil helium geochemical surveys; shallow temperature measurements; and prepartion of geological maps. The investigation showed that all the thermal springs appear to be fault controlled. Based on the chemical composition of the thermal waters it appears that Heart Spring in Steamboat Springs is hydrologically related to the Routt Hot Springs. This relationship was further confirmed when it was reported that thermal waters were encountered during the construction of the new high school in Strawberry Park on the north side of Steamboat Springs. In addition, residents stated that Strawberry Park appears to be warmer than the surrounding country side. Geological mapping has determined that a major fault extends from the Routt Hot Springs area into Strawberry Park.