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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Tuesday Webcast for Industry: Key Energy-Saving Activities for Smaller Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Tuesday Webcast for Industry Key Energy-Saving Activities for Smaller Facilities Webcast Questions and Answers: January 10, 2012 Presenters: Tom Wenning, Technical Account Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Richard D. Feustel, Corporate Energy Services Manager, Briggs & Stratton Corporation The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Advanced Manufacturing Program (AMO) hosts a series of webcasts on the first Tuesday of every month from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. The series' objective is to help industrial personnel learn about software

3

Industrial Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities October 8, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) encourages Federal agencies requiring assistance with implementing energy-efficiency measures in their industrial facilities to hire a U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) for assessment services. The following resources can be used to plan and implement industrial facility energy-efficiency projects. Technical Publications: The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) website offers fact sheets, handbooks, and self-assessment manuals covering steam system efficiency, fundamentals of compressed air systems, motor systems management, and other topics. Tools: The AMO website offers valuable software tools for evaluating

4

Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Facilities to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial Facilities on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial...

5

User Facilities for Industry 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Organizers:+Andreas+Roelofs+(CNM),+Jyotsana+Lal+(APS),+Katie+Carrado+Gregar+(CNM),+and+Susan+Strasser+ (APS)! ! In! order! to! increase! awareness! of! the! industrial! community! to! Argonne! National! Laboratory! user! facilities,!the!Advanced!Photon!Source!(APS),!the!Center!for!Nanoscale!Materials!(CNM)!and!the!Electron! Microscopy!Center!(EMC)!welcomed!industrial!scientists,!engineers!and!related!professionals!to!a!oneC day! workshop! to! learn! more! about! Argonne's! National! Laboratory! and! the! capabilities/techniques! available! for! their! use.! The! workshop! showcased! several! successful! industrial! user! experiments,! and! explained! the! different! ways! in! which! industrial! scientists! can! work! at! Argonne! or! with! Argonne!

6

NIST Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility. ... Radiation hardness testing; Electron-beam sterilization; Beam diagnostics; Industrial CT scanning. ...

7

NEW NIST MEDICAL-INDUSTRIAL RADIATION FACILITY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NEW NIST MEDICAL-INDUSTRIAL RADIATION FACILITY WILL HELP DEVELOP NEW TECHNOLOGIES, ESTABLISH STANDARDS. ...

9

The Commercial Facility Industry: End-Use and Facility Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ TechWatch investigates the measures that the commercial facility industry is taking to reduce power quality (PQ) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) problems.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Regional Industrial Facility Authorities The Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act is meant to aid the economic development of localities within the Commonwealth. The Act provides a mechanism for localities to establish regional industrial facility authorities, enabling them to pool financial resources to stimulate economic development. The purpose of a regional industrial

11

Local Option- Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds (Utah)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Under the Utah Industrial Facilities and Development Act, counties, municipalities, and state universities in Utah may issue Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRBs) or Industrial Development Bonds (IDBs)...

12

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Pricesand Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Solarex Solar Power Industrial Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Solarex Corporation has designed, built and operated an industrial facility which is totally powered by a Solarex solar electric power system. The solar power system, energy-conserving building and manufacturing operations were treated as a total system for optimizing the entire design. Many special features were included to ensure that highly reliable operations could be achieved without requiring electric utility back-up. The facility was built as both an operating plant for Solarex and as a demonstration of the possibility of solar powered industrial plants. The facility has been in operation since October 1982. During this period the solar power system has operated reliably with only two incidents of short losses of power while the local electric utility has experienced more than seven incidences of power loss for a significant amount of total downtime. This paper presents summaries for the design and operational features of the solar powered facility and the potential for other solar powered plants in the U.S. and abroad.

Macomber, H. L.; Bumb, D. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Daylighting Application and Effectiveness in Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Before the advent of practical mercury vapor and fluorescent lighting, the only available artificial lighting for industrial buildings was incandescent. The illumination of active industrial workspaces with incandescent lighting is difficult, so during the industrial revolution, architects utilized various daylighting strategies such as window walls, skylighting, monitors, etc. However, glazing technologies were primitive compared with our modern choices, When more efficient and effective artificial lighting became available, most older industrial buildings had their daylighting features boarded over. With modern glazing systems and sophisticated designs that minimize glare issues, daylighting for industrial buildings is making a strong comeback. Additionally, new controllable ballasts and automatic lighting controls make possible hybrid lighting systems that are able to provide optimal lighting under all environmental conditions. This paper will discuss how daylighting systems developed decades ago are being modernized to provide high quality, low-glare, uniform lighting. Premium glazing systems that limit heat losses and gain will be discussed. The importance of glare control in day-lit spaces, for worker safety and productivity, will be stressed, and a variety of passive and active strategies will be presented including: redirected beam daylighting; reflective light shelves; and movable baffles and louvers.

McCowan, B.; Birleanu, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities  

SciTech Connect

An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

18

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry November 27, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North Charleston, South Carolina will test large, commercial scale turbines. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North

19

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry November 27, 2013 - 1:35pm Addthis Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North Charleston, South Carolina will test large, commercial scale turbines. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University The Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in North

20

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Commercial, Industrial, Institutional, Local Government Eligible Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, Central Air conditioners, Chillers,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge.

Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oregon Trail Mushrooms Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Oregon Trail Mushrooms Sector Geothermal energy Type Industrial Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

23

Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ennis Laundry Industrial Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ennis Laundry Sector Geothermal energy Type Industrial Location Ennis, Montana Coordinates 45.3488165°, -111.7296968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

24

Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature waste heat streams account for the majority of the industrial waste heat inventory. With a reference temperature of 60F (16C), 65% of the waste heat is below 450F (232C) and 99% is below 1,200F (649C). With a reference temperature of 300F (149C), 14% of the waste heat is below 450F, and 96% is below 1,200F. Waste heat is concentrated in a few industrial manufacturing sectors. Based on a review of 21 manufacturing sectors, the top two sectors that produce waste heat are petroleu...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

25

Tavistock Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tavistock Facility Tavistock Facility Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P. 284 Hope Street RR#2 Tavistock, Ontario, N0B 2R0, Canada The Tavistock facility was built in 1972 as a cheddar cheese plant for a local co-op. Following its co-op years, this facility was owned by McCain (1983-1999), Dairyland (1999-2001) and Saputo. In 2001, Saputo acquired the Tavistock facility as part of its Dairyland acquisition and expansion in Canadian provinces. The plant has expanded significantly in the last 15 years, and now includes a large cheese cutting-and-wrapping department, as well as a whey drying department. Since 1999, the town of Tavistock has been known for hosting the annual World Crokinole Championship. The Tavistock facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012, in one

26

Energy Conservation in Army Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Army Materiel Development and Readiness Command (DARCOM) is responsible for the life cycle functions for all assigned materiel systems of the United States Army and Department of Defense agencies. DARCOM installations account for approximately 19 percent of the Army's total energy consumption (approximately 44 million barrels of oil equivalent) and have reduced energy consumption approximately 26 percent below FY 75 levels. Highlights of the program include a comprehensive energy audit program, process energy studies, several different energy capital investment programs, and an aggressive energy awareness program. This paper describes the program with particular emphasis on the ongoing effort to establish relationships between key production parameters and energy consumption throughout the command. This will enable DARCOM to forecast future energy requirements and to determine the effectiveness of the conservation program in a dynamic industrial environment.

Aveta, G. A.; Sliwinski, B. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cool Storage Economic Feasibility Analysis for a Large Industrial Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of economic feasibility for adding a cool storage facility to shift electric demand to off-peak hours for a large industrial facility is presented. DOE-2 is used to generate the necessary cooling load profiles for the analysis. The aggregation of building information for predicting central plant behavior at the site is discussed. The dollar benefits and costs for the project are favorable, providing a payback in the neighborhood of 4 to 5 years.

Fazzolari, R.; Mascorro, J. A.; Ballard, R. H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Identification of Process Energy and Pollution Reduction Opportunities at DoD Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities operated by the Department of Defense consume large amounts of energy and emit significant quantities of air pollutants. Recent Executive Orders issued by the President set goals for increased energy efficiency and reduced emissions which must be met by these industrial facilities. These new energy and environmental directives in most instances exceed the performance capabilities of DoD's installed industrial technologies. Cost-effective compliance with these directives in the existing DoD industrial base will require a thorough evaluation of DoD industrial activities and their potential for improvements. Understanding the energy-use patterns and options in DoD production sites could be invaluable in identifying energy and emission reduction opportunities. Under the sponsorship of the Federal Energy Management program, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (US ACERL) initiated a project to identify energy and pollution reduction opportunities in processes at DoD industrial facilities in which reduced energy consumption can, via energy efficiency and operational improvements, simultaneously bring about significant reduction of pollutant emissions. In this project, major DoD industrial energy-consuming activities were screened and qualitatively evaluated with respect to their potential to emit pollutants. Site visits were made to representative bases, one for each of the three services, to (1) collect and evaluate available energy consumption/emissions data, (2) directly observe various types of process activities and operations, (3) examine facility conditions, and (4) recommend energy conservation opportunities to reduce energy use and pollution. Based on the opportunities identified, as well as data from other studies and a review of other installations, estimates of generalized DoD-wide process energy savings were developed. A significant amount of potential energy savings were identified. It is recommended that additional work would be beneficial to develop a process database with equipment inventory as well as energy consumption information at DoD industrial facilities, which could then be used to identify and evaluate specific opportunities.

Lin, M. C.; Northrup, J. I.; Smith, E. D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Incorporating Carbon in Energy Planning at Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate legislation appears increasingly likely, reflected by intensifying legislative activity and two generally supportive presidential candidates. Most who track climate legislation predict that a law will be passed in late 2009 or early 2010. Regulations and emission limits are expected in 2012 or 2013, although some mandatory pre-compliance greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reporting by covered entities will need to begin near term. The most significant ramification of climate legislation for industrial facilities will be that GHG emissions will, starting in the first compliance year, have a per tonne emission cost; this will either have to be paid for in (1) pass-through costs on more expensive power or fuel, (2) purchases of allowances for emissions, or (3) purchases of carbon offsets (i.e., CO2 reduction or sequestration projects to offset emissions). Although much remains uncertain as to the nature of the legislation, the inevitability of a per-tonne emissions cost makes it important to begin planning for this economic responsibility right away. If this future carbon liability is not considered in financial analysis, then projects that reduce future carbon-related expenditures may be overlooked in favor of those that will be less economically advantageous without pricing carbon cost. In this respect, it is important to shadow price carbon into financial forecasting, especially in capital planning. Heretofore, all planning for carbon reduction should be made against a properly documented emissions baseline, with full accommodation of the rules of carbon reduction project origination and monetization. If these rules are met in advance, pre-compliance carbon reduction projects may be eligible to earn bankable credits once climate legislation is in effect. However, if capital projects are planned and financed without proper accommodation of the crediting rules, then bankable credits will not be claimable, and the capital spending will not be as efficiently used. This paper speaks to methods of analyzing a facilitys potential greenhouse gas liability and establishing a system of greenhouse gas management that shadow prices carbon into financial planning. The lecture will also give a status report on carbon legislation, and a brief mention of the rules of carbon crediting, as spelled out in the most widely accepted protocol.

Smith, K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN USAEC FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The summary includes descriptions of serious accidents for l959 and 1960, AEC industrial injury frequency rates, criticality accidents, radiation exposures, accidents involving radioactive materials in AEC activities during 1959 and 1960, and accidents involving fatalities in AEC activities during l959 and 1960. (B.O.G.)

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tuesday Webcast for Industry: Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Key Energy-Saving Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities January 10, 2012 Program Name or Ancillary Text eere.energy.gov Key Energy-Saving Activities for Small and Medium Sized Facilities Thomas Wenning Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tuesday Webcast for Industry January 10, 2012 3 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov Percent of Total U.S. Manufacturing Energy Small 5% Mid-Size 37% Large 58% 0 50000 100000 150000 200000 250000 U.S. Manufacturing Plants: By Size Small Plants Mid-Size Plants Large Plants Number of U.S. Plants All Plants 84,298 112,398 4,014 200,710 System-Specific Assessments Crosscutting Assessments Industry Breakdown 4 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov 4,014 large plants use 58% of the energy Energy Saving

32

Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Newman Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Wisconsin. In the last fiscal year, the Newman facility has had the highest percentage increase in production capacity among Saputo facilities in North America. In...

34

Greening Industrial Facilities: A Sustainable Approach to Addressing Energy Concerns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prices for natural gas and oil-based products have risen significantly in recent years, making it more costly for U.S.-based manufacturers to be profitable and compete globally. A poll taken at a recent meeting of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) board of directors revealed that 93 percent of directors from small and medium manufacturing companies believe that higher energy prices are having a negative impact on their bottom line. Furthermore, according to a 2006 report from the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), the domestic environment for manufacturers is dominated by concerns about rising external costs that make manufacturing from a U.S. base difficult. With the cost of oil at or near historic all-time highs, energy efficiency has quickly moved to top priority when analyzing potential savings in manufacturing facilities. The industrial sector currently accounts for about one-third of all U.S. energy consumption at an annual cost of more than $120 billion. NAM says that external outlays related to energy prices (in addition to taxes, litigation, health care, and regulation) have added 22.4 percent to production costs. In addition, according to one analysis, deregulation, security concerns, and a fragile transmission infrastructure are increasing energy price volatility, with negative financial impact on some companies. Those that more tightly control and aggressively reduce energy consumption can minimize exposure to such volatility.

Love, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either constructing thermal storage or using it on a day-by-day basis. This presentation will discuss three technologies for thermal storage systems noting the particular advantages of each. Thermal storage technologies are selected by the temperature range of the storage media. This is not a design-oriented presentation, but an overview of what one utility sees taking place in the commercial and industrial refrigeration market place.

Knipp, R. L.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NGNP Nuclear-Industrial Facility and Design Certification Boundaries White Paper  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project was initiated at Idaho National Laboratory by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act and based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is helium cooled and graphite moderated and can operate at reactor outlet temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. These varied industrial applications may involve a standard HTGR modular design using different Energy Conversion Systems. Additionally, some of these process heat applications will require process heat delivery systems to lie partially outside the HTGR operators facility.

Thomas E. Hicks

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared,...

38

Trois-Rivieres Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

foundry established in 1738. This city was also known as the pulp and paper industry capital of the world from the late 1920s until the early 1960s. The Trois-Rivires...

39

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

40

Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new employees to name a few. The energy and economic impact of these projects can vary widely and be difficult to demonstrate. This paper and presentation will explore the appropriate application and bottom line economics of distributed wind energy through the review of two case studies.

Trapanese, A.; James, F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Responsibility Accounting - An Energy Conservation Tool for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As energy costs continue to rise faster than the rate of inflation, industrial energy management becomes a more important issue in the control of manufacturing costs. Energy Responsibility Accounting (ERA) is a tool which improves management's control of energy through accurate measurement of energy usage and costs by plant burden centers. The concept of responsibility accounting involves the continuous flow of information through, out an organization for the purposes of planning and cost control. In the past, responsibility accounting has been used primarily to control labor costs, to reduce material waste, and to contain the cost of supplies. ERA extends factory responsibility accounting systems to include energy. With ERA, management will know who is making an effort to conserve energy, how a new process affects energy usage, where additional emphasis on conservation may be needed and how much energy is being saved.

Kelly, R. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The October 1, 1987, Whittier Earthquake: Effects on Selected Power, Industrial, and Commercial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnitude 5.9 earthquake near Whittier, California, created moderate-to-strong ground shaking within a large urban area near the central Los Angeles basin. Facilities for power generation, transmission, nonpower utilities, and various industries located in the region of strong motion provided examples of equipment representative of nuclear plant safety systems. This report describes the general performance of the electric power system as well as earthquake effects at selected facilities in the region...

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Scheduling an Industrial Production Facility Eyjolfur Asgeirsson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Pantex plan- ning problem. Second, we wanted to experimentally test various ideas, designed originally National Laboratories has developed and implemented the Pantex Process Model (PPM) [7] to support planning activities at Pantex, a US Department of Energy (DOE) production plant in Amarillo, Texas. The plant

Ásgeirsson, Eyjólfur Ingi

44

A SUMMARY OF INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENTS IN USAEC FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

The accident experience of the AEC contractor operation for 1959 and 1960 is reported. Incidents involving radio active materials are described. A table of inadvertent criticality was included to supplement other tables. A tabulation of exposure records at values from 0 to 15 r is given. (M.C.G.)

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility: Activity Report D. B. Haviland Activity Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albanova Nano Fabrication Facility: Activity Report D. B. Haviland Activity Report Albanova contains a report of the activity carried out in the Albanova Nano- Fabrication Facility, located...................................................................................................... 5 Appendix 1: Nano-Lab projects

Haviland, David

46

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and Contribution to California Agriculture William A. Matthews* University of California Agricultural Issues Center of California Agricultural Issues Center. #12; The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity

Hammock, Bruce D.

47

Safeguards by design - industry engagement for new uranium enrichment facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) has initiated a Safeguards by Design (SBD) effort to encourage the incorporation of international (IAEA) safeguards features early in the design phase of a new nuclear facility in order to avoid the need to redesign or retrofit the facility at a later date. The main goals of Safeguards by Design are to (1) make the implementation of international safeguards at new civil nuclear facilities more effective and efficient, (2) avoid costly and time-consuming re-design work or retrofits at such facilities and (3) design such facilities in a way that makes proliferation as technically difficult, as time-consuming, and as detectable as possible. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has recently hosted efforts to facilitate the use of Safeguards by Design for new uranium enrichment facilities currently being planned for construction in the U.S. While SBD is not a NRC requirement, the NRC is aiding the implementation of SBD by coordinating discussions between DOE's NA-24 and industry's facility design teams. More specifically, during their normal course of licensing discussions the NRC has offered industry the opportunity to engage with NA-24 regarding SBD.

Demuth, Scott F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grice, Thomas [NRC; Lockwood, Dunbar [DOE/NA-243

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Applications of SMES for a Industrial Cogeneration Facility : A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops the coordination of load shedding scheme and presents the effect of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit on improving the transient stability for a large industrial petroleum chemistry cogeneration facility. The proper mathematical models and accurate parameters of the power system network, generators, excitation systems, governor systems and loads in the Lin-Yuan plant of China Petroleum Corporation are investigated.

Yu-Lung Ke Member; Yu-lung Ke; Ieee Cheng-ting Hsu

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Trois-Rivieres Facility: ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trois-Rivières Facility Trois-Rivières Facility Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P. 700 Radisson Street Trois-Rivières, Québec, G9A 2E1, Canada The Trois-Rivières facility was initially built in 1919 as fluid milk plant for Crèmerie des Trois-Rivières (CTR). Over the years, it has diversified its production and included products such as ice cream, butter, fluid milk beverages and juices. In 1997, Saputo acquired CTR and its Trois-Rivières facility as part of its expansion in eastern Canada. Trois-Rivières is Canada's oldest industrial city, with its first foundry established in 1738. This city was also known as the pulp and paper industry capital of the world from the late 1920s until the early 1960s. The Trois-Rivières facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012, in

50

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Electricity Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the electricity consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR) events are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models. Model error makes it difficult to precisely quantify these changes in consumption and understand if C&I facilities exhibit event-to-event variability in their response to DR signals. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and DR variability in C&I facilities facing dynamic electricity prices. Using a regression-based baseline model, we present a method to compute the error associated with estimates of several DR parameters. We also develop a metric to determine how much observed DR variability results from baseline model error rather than real variability in response. We analyze 38 C&I facilities participating in an automated DR program and find that DR parameter errors are large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. Therefore, facilities with variable DR parameters may actually respond consistently from event to event. Consequently, in DR programs in which repeatability is valued, individual buildings may be performing better than previously thought. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method to generate statistical models of electricity demand from Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities including their response to dynamic pricing signals. Models are built with historical electricity demand data. A facility model is the sum of a baseline demand model and a residual demand model; the latter quantifies deviations from the baseline model due to dynamic pricing signals from the utility. Three regression-based baseline computation methods were developed and analyzed. All methods performed similarly. To understand the diversity of facility responses to dynamic pricing signals, we have characterized the response of 44 C&I facilities participating in a Demand Response (DR) program using dynamic pricing in California (Pacific Gas and Electric's Critical Peak Pricing Program). In most cases, facilities shed load during DR events but there is significant heterogeneity in facility responses. Modeling facility response to dynamic price signals is beneficial to the Independent System Operator for scheduling supply to meet demand, to the utility for improving dynamic pricing programs, and to the customer for minimizing energy costs.

Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

303-K Storage Facility report on FY98 closure activities  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and evaluates the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample analysis performed in support of the closure of the 303-K Storage Facility. The evaluation is based on the validated data included in the data validation package (98-EAP-346) for the 303-K Storage Facility. The results of this evaluation will be used for assessing contamination for the purpose of closing the 303-K Storage Facility as described in the 303-K Storage Facility Closure Plan, DOE/RL-90-04. The closure strategy for the 303-K Storage Facility is to decontaminate the interior of the north half of the 303-K Building to remove known or suspected dangerous waste contamination, to sample the interior concrete and exterior soils for the constituents of concern, and then to perform data analysis, with an evaluation to determine if the closure activities and data meet the closure criteria. The closure criteria for the 303-K Storage Facility is that the concentrations of constituents of concern are not present above the cleanup levels. Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, determination has been made that the soils at the 303-K Storage Facility meet the cleanup performance standards (WMH 1997) and can be clean closed. The evaluation determined that the 303-K Building cannot be clean closed without additional closure activities. An additional evaluation will be needed to determine the specific activities required to clean close the 303-K Storage Facility. The radiological contamination at the 303-K Storage Facility is not addressed by the closure strategy.

Adler, J.G.

1998-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

53

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state.. Restructuring means that a monopoly system of electric utilities has been replaced with competing sellers.

Channele Wirman

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

56

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

57

Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 Independent Activity Report, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting - October 2012 October 2012 Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Public Meeting on the Status of Integration of Safety Into the Design of the Uranium Processing Facility [HIAR-Y-12-2012-10-02] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) observed the public hearing of the DNFSB review of the UPF project status for integrating safety into design. The meeting was broken into three parts: a panel discussion and questioning of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) oversight and execution; a panel discussion and questioning of the B&W Y-12 Technical Services, LLC (B&W Y-12) design project team leadership; and an open public

58

Restructuring, Tight Budgets and Executive Order 13123 Create New Incentives to Reduce Waste in Federal Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the positive impact that electric utility industry restructuring, a reduction in the size of government operations, and the recent Presidential Executive Order 13123 should have on energy use in Federal industrial facilities. The Federal government is the single largest U.S. consumer of energy. Federal industrial and energy intensive operations cost the taxpayer $600 million in FY 1998 and were exempt from mandatory energy reduction goals. Executive Order 13123 requires Federal agencies to reduce energy consumption in industrial and laboratory facilities by 25% by 2010 relative to 1990 levels and sets mandatory goals for energy intensive operations.

Verdict, M. E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

60

US Air Force Facility Energy Management Program - How Industry Can Help the Air Force Meet Its Objectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the Air Force's facility energy management program including how industry can help the Air Force meet its facility energy objectives. Background information on energy use and energy conservation efforts are presented to give the reader an understanding of the magnitude of energy used by the Air Force and how greater efficiency of use is being approached.

Holden, P. C.; Kroop, R. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts (Fact Sheet), Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility The IBRF can handle high concentrations of solids in the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis steps, a key factor in reducing costs. Bioreactors from 10 L to 9000 L and separation and concentration equipment are housed in the IBRF allowing for biomass conversion processes to be fully integrated. Access to Experts While using the IBRF, industry partners have access to NREL's world-renowned experts, process equipment, and systems that can be used to develop and evaluate commercial processes for the production of biobased products and fuels. In addition, partners have access to NREL's state-of-the-art molecular

62

DOE/DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY PROGRAMS: A MODEL FOR USE IN NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Many critical infrastructure sectors have been investigating cyber security issues for several years especially with the help of two primary government programs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program have both implemented activities aimed at securing the industrial control systems that operate the North American electric grid along with several other critical infrastructure sectors (ICS). These programs have spent the last seven years working with industry including asset owners, educational institutions, standards and regulating bodies, and control system vendors. The programs common mission is to provide outreach, identification of cyber vulnerabilities to ICS and mitigation strategies to enhance security postures. The success of these programs indicates that a similar approach can be successfully translated into other sectors including nuclear operations, safeguards, and security. The industry regulating bodies have included cyber security requirements and in some cases, have incorporated sets of standards with penalties for non-compliance such as the North American Electric Reliability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection standards. These DOE and DHS programs that address security improvements by both suppliers and end users provide an excellent model for nuclear facility personnel concerned with safeguards and security cyber vulnerabilities and countermeasures. It is not a stretch to imagine complete surreptitious collapse of protection against the removal of nuclear material or even initiation of a criticality event as witnessed at Three Mile Island or Chernobyl in a nuclear ICS inadequately protected against the cyber threat.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability(LWRS) Program conducts a vigorous engagement strategy with the U.S. nuclear power industry, including the nuclear operating companies, major support organizations, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and suppliers. The goal of this engagement strategy is to develop a shared vision and common understanding across the nuclear industry of the need for II&C modernization, the performance improvement that can be obtained, and the opportunities for collaboration to enact this vision. The primary means of engaging the nuclear operating companies is through a

64

INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEM CYBER SECURITY: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS RELEVANT TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES, SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY  

SciTech Connect

Typical questions surrounding industrial control system (ICS) cyber security always lead back to: What could a cyber attack do to my system(s) and; how much should I worry about it? These two leading questions represent only a fraction of questions asked when discussing cyber security as it applies to any program, company, business, or organization. The intent of this paper is to open a dialog of important pertinent questions and answers that managers of nuclear facilities engaged in nuclear facility security and safeguards should examine, i.e., what questions should be asked; and how do the answers affect an organization's ability to effectively safeguard and secure nuclear material. When a cyber intrusion is reported, what does that mean? Can an intrusion be detected or go un-noticed? Are nuclear security or safeguards systems potentially vulnerable? What about the digital systems employed in process monitoring, and international safeguards? Organizations expend considerable efforts to ensure that their facilities can maintain continuity of operations against physical threats. However, cyber threats particularly on ICSs may not be well known or understood, and often do not receive adequate attention. With the disclosure of the Stuxnet virus that has recently attacked nuclear infrastructure, many organizations have recognized the need for an urgent interest in cyber attacks and defenses against them. Several questions arise including discussions about the insider threat, adequate cyber protections, program readiness, encryption, and many more. These questions, among others, are discussed so as to raise the awareness and shed light on ways to protect nuclear facilities and materials against such attacks.

Robert S. Anderson; Mark Schanfein; Trond Bjornard; Paul Moskowitz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Prompt gamma activation analysis facility at MITR-II  

SciTech Connect

A relatively simple and inexpensive prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been constructed at the 5-MW MITR-II research reactor. The analytical beam is obtained by diffraction using a multilayer graphite monochromator placed in the white beam of one of the MITR-II beam tubes. Use of a diffracted beam, with its concomitant reduction in sample flux compared to the direct beam from the reactor moderator, was initially dictated by the need to construct rapidly and inexpensively an analytical facility that could analyze {sup 10}B at the level of a few micrograms per gram in biological samples. By relatively simple modifications to an existing two-axis neutron spectrometer, we were able to produce a useful intensity on the sample. Furthermore, the inherent advantage of reduced background when using a Bragg diffracted beam permitted the use of short sample-to-detector distances, which compensated for the loss in slow neutron intensity in the diffraction process. The resultant facility has exceeded our initial minimum requirements for {sup 10}B analysis. In fact, the current facility provides significantly higher full-energy peak count rates than those reported for direct thermal beam facilities at reactors with twice the power of MITR-II.

Harling, O.K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Tobacco Industry Political Activity in Colorado 1979-1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 TOBACCO INDUSTRY POLITICALcontrol. * Increased tobacco industry political spending atlocal communities. * The tobacco industry seeks preemptive

Monardi, Fred M. Ph.D.; O'Neill, Amanda; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy costs. However, to participate in real-time electricity markets, facilities would receive pricing information

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lankas opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex Facility - June 2013 June 2013 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction SuspensionDelay HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10 Construction on...

73

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared, the battery can be tested to determine the energy output characteristics of a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries.

74

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The New Gold Standard: Environmental Management Introduces the First LEED Gold Industrial Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The buildings efficient design is expected to result in an energy cost savings of more than 70 percent over the life of the facility.

77

Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method for Heat and Electricity Demand for the Purpose ofstatistical models of electricity demand from Commercial andbuilt with historical electricity demand data. A facility

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta Earthquake: Effects on Selected Power and Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnitude 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake created moderate to strong ground shaking over an area of more than 5000 km(2), including the southern portion of the San Francisco Bay cities and centers of population and industry surrounding Monterey Bay. This report summarizes the effects of the earthquake on a large inventory of structures and equipment installations relevant to the electric power industry, including thermal-electric power plants, substations, nonpower utility operations, and industrial sites.

1991-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

79

Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented.

Sharp, D.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Hill, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Atkinson, S.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hu, J.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Siting industrial waste land disposal facilities in Thailand: A risk based approach  

SciTech Connect

The Thailand Industrial Works Department (IWD) has established a toxic industrial waste Central Treatment and Stabilization Center (CTSC) for textile dyeing and electroplating industries located in the Thonburi region of the Bangkok metropolitan area. Industrial waste is treated, stabilized, and stored at the CTSC. Although the IWD plans to ship the stabilized sludge to the Ratchaburi Province in western Thailand for burial, the location for the land disposal site has not been selected. Assessing the relative health risks from exposure to toxic chemicals released from an industrial waste land disposal site is a complicated, data-intensive process that requires a multidisciplinary approach. This process is further complicated by the unique physical and cultural characteristics exhibited by the rapidly industrializing Thai economy. The purpose of this paper is to describe the research approach taken and to detail the constraints to health risk assessments in Thailand. issues discussed include data availability and quality, effectiveness of control or mitigation methods, cultural differences, and the basic assumptions inherent in many of the risk assessment components.

Fingleton, D.J.; Habegger, L.; Peters, R.; Tomasko, D.; Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P.; Boonraksa, C.; Phantumvanit, D.; Smith, K.; Carpenter, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand). Natural Resources and Environment Program; Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Demonstration of Natural Gas Engine Driven Air Compressor Technology at Department of Defense Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent downsizing and consolidation of Department of Defense (DOD) facilities provides an opportunity to upgrade remaining facilities with more efficient and less polluting equipment. Use of air compressors by the DOD is widespread and the variety of tools and machinery that operate on compressed air is increasing. The energy cost of operating a natural gas engine-driven air compressor (NGEDAC) is usually lower than the cost of operating an electric-driven air compressor. Initial capital costs are offset by differences in prevailing utility rates, efficiencies of partial load operation, reductions in peak demand, heat recovery, and avoiding the cost of back-up generators. Natural gas, a clean-burning fuel, is abundant and readily available. In an effort to reduce its over-all environmental impact and energy consumption, the U.S. Army plans to apply NGEDAC technology in support of fixed facilities compressed air systems. Site assessment and demonstration results are presented in this paper.

Lin, M.; Aylor, S. W.; Van Ormer, H.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O'Leary, E. M.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

87

Effects of the 1985 Mexico Earthquake on Power and Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1985 Mexico earthquake affected a large industrial area with a great deal of modern mechanical and electrical equipment. EPRI first investigated this region, which is near the epicenter, in 1985. Additional visits have substantially expanded and clarified the seismic ruggedness database used to assess similar nuclear plant equipment.

1988-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oil to Coal Conversion of Power and Industrial Facilities in the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Realizing that the use of coal has the potential to offset the effects of world oil prices on the Dominican Republic's economy, the Commission Nacional de Politica Energetica (CNPE) requested Bechtel Power Corporation to study the technical and economic feasibility of converting the nation's largest oil-fired facilities to coal and to develop preliminary designs for the conversions. This paper addresses the methodology used in the study, with special emphasis on the determination of the technical and economic feasibility of converting power plants and cement plants from oil to coal. The summary results and conclusions are presented and include coal conversion capital costs, cost savings, and program overall schedule. The intent of the authors is to provide a reference for the study of converting other islands' oil burning facilities to coal.

Causilla, H.; Acosta, J. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined heat and power and coke ovens, and waste managementto ban the use of small-scale coke-producing facilities forcasting, Scrap preheating, Dry coke quenching Inert anodes,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of the 1999 Kocaeli Turkey Earthquake: Effects on Power and Industrial Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On August 17, 1999, a magnitude MW 7.4 earthquake struck the city of Izmit in the province of Kocaeli in western Turkey, causing over 20,000 buildings to collapse, killing 17,000 people, injuring 44,000, and causing an estimated economic loss of 16 billion dollars. This report summarizes the performance of electric power generation and transmission facilities during and after the earthquake. The document summarizes earthquake effects on a large inventory of structures and equipment relevant to the electr...

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Status of Activities to Implement a Sustainable System of MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support at Rosatom Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S.-Russian Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program, the Material Control and Accounting Measurements (MCAM) Project has supported a joint U.S.-Russian effort to coordinate improvements of the Russian MC&A measurement system. These efforts have resulted in the development of a MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support (MEMS) Strategic Plan (SP), developed by the Russian MEM Working Group. The MEMS SP covers implementation of MC&A measurement equipment, as well as the development, attestation and implementation of measurement methodologies and reference materials at the facility and industry levels. This paper provides an overview of the activities conducted under the MEMS SP, as well as a status on current efforts to develop reference materials, implement destructive and nondestructive assay measurement methodologies, and implement sample exchange, scrap and holdup measurement programs across Russian nuclear facilities.

J.D. Sanders

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

94

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Application of motor capacitors to improve facility power usage in the industrial setting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As deregulation of the electric power system in the United States unfolds, many customers are experiencing changes in their billing rate structure. Some face the addition of power factor penalty tariffs, and seek ways to minimize the added burden. The installation of entrance capacitor banks is the common response, but fails to take complete advantage of capacitor abilities. Other project designs exist that can harness these advantages to the full benefit of the customer. This work will show that distributing shunt capacitors in parallel with induction motors will elevate power factor and voltage, and also decrease ohmic losses in the wiring and protection devices that supply the motor. This reduction often produces a better overall economic solution due to energy savings. The distribution of capacitors at induction motors reduces the reactive current in the branch of the distribution system that supplies them. A reduction in the total current flowing to the motor along the distribution system results in smaller losses throughout the system. As losses diminish, the total real power drawn through the distribution system is lessened, and electric bills are reduced. This alternative to entrance capacitor banks is not as commonly implemented. A misconception that the resistance in facility distribution systems is relatively low has discouraged distributed motor capacitor installation for overall facility power factor correction, in favor of entrance capacitor banks. We will show that the resistance in the distribution system is higher than typically thought, that motor capacitors can exploit this fact, and can often economically outperform entrance capacitor banks which are terminated at the point of incoming utility power. Motor capacitors are not a new technology. They are commercially available off the shelf technology, suitable for power factor correction for induction motors. Distributed capacitors can be utilized for all significantly sized induction motors in a facility. The elevation in power factor and voltage, reduction in reactive current and real power are calculated, and trends are observed. The matter is considered from both the standpoint of engineering and economics to provide an integrated study.

Hillhouse, William Jeffrey

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

BURBANK, D.A.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K-West Annex Facility - June K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, K-West Annex Facility - June 2013 June 2013 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Layup Program for Construction Suspension/Delay [HIAR-Hanford-2013-06-10] Construction on the modified K-West Annex Facility was suspended by the Department of Energy in April 2013 due to budget cuts mandated by congressional budget sequestration. After construction was suspended, the Richland Operations Project Office directed the contractor to place the project in a safe, stable configuration to preserve the completed work, and to document completed work activities to support construction restart. In May 2013, the contractor completed the efforts necessary to protect and preserve the completed work at the project site. Independent Oversight

99

Rule-Based Energy Management System Applied to Large Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deregulation of electricity and rising fuel costs are causing renewed interest in Energy Management Systems (EMS). This paper details the results of integrating a rule-based EMS controller at a Pulp and Paper Mill and additional findings from several other large industrial power complexes. It is a PC-based supervisory system that is interfaced to a Distributed Control System (DCS). The EMS has been applied on powerhouse complexes as large as 433 MW of electricity and 7500 KPPH of steam. The EMS may, as required, include boiler load allocation, steam turbine load allocation, combustion turbine and HRSG load allocation, real-time pricing (RTP) tie-line control, coordinated header pressure control, bus voltage and plant power factor control and electric and steam economic load shed systems. It optimizes the powerhouse operations to meet rapidly changing steam and electrical requirements of the plant at minimum cost subject to all of the operating constraints imposed on the generation equipment. Steady state optimization methods, such as linear and non-linear programming, are not suited for on line optimization of power complex operations since the process is rarely in steady state. Instead, it is critical to control the trajectory of the power generation for optimal steam and electric moves while satisfying multiple constraints. The optimization strategy applied here is reduced to a fairly small number of prioritized rules. It has proven itself capable of optimizing large powerhouse complexes while keeping the powerhouse and process units within a safe operating envelop.

Gauthier, M.; Childress, R. L.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The January 17, 1994 Northridge Earthquake: Effects on selected industrial facilities and lifelines  

SciTech Connect

Revision 0 of this report is being published in February 1995 to closely mark the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake. A September 1994 Draft version of the report was reviewed by DOE and NRC, and many of the review comments are incorporated into Revision 0. While this revision of the report is not entirely complete, it is being made available for comment, review, and evaluation. Since the report was written by several authors, sections of the report have slightly different styles. Several sections of Revision 0 are not complete, but are planned to be completed in Revision 1. The primary unfinished section is Section 3.3 on Electric Power Transmission. Other sections of Revision 0, such as Section 4.5.2 on the Energy Technology Engineering Center and 3.2 on Electric Power Generation, will be enhanced with further detailed information as it becomes available. In addition, further data, including processed response spectra for investigated facilities and cataloging of relay performance, will be added to Revision 1 depending upon investigation support. While Revision 0 of this report is being published by LLNL, Revision 1 is planned to be published by EPRI. The anticipated release date for Revision 1 is December 1995. Unfortunately, the one-year anniversary of the Northridge Earthquake was also marked by the devastating Hyogo-Ken Nanbu (or Hanshin-Awaji) Earthquake in Kobe, Japan. As compared to the Northridge Earthquake, there were many more deaths, collapsed structures, destroyed lifelines, and fires following the Kobe Earthquake. Lessons from the Kobe Earthquake will both reemphasize topics discussed in this report and provide further issues to be addressed when designing and retrofitting structures, systems, and components for seismic strong motion.

Eli, M.W.; Sommer, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Roche, T.R.; Merz, K.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ENGINEERED NEAR SURFACE DISPOSAL FACILITY OF THE INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX FOR SOLID RADWASTE MANAGEMENT AT CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the turnkey project ''Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP)'' an Engineered Near Surface Disposal Facility (ENSDF, LOT 3) will be built on the VEKTOR site within the 30 km Exclusion Zone of the ChNPP. This will be performed by RWE NUKEM GmbH, Germany, and it governs the design, licensing support, fabrication, assembly, testing, inspection, delivery, erection, installation and commissioning of the ENSDF. The ENSDF will receive low to intermediate level, short lived, processed/conditioned wastes from the ICSRM Solid Waste Processing Facility (SWPF, LOT 2), the ChNPP Liquid Radwaste Treatment Plant (LRTP) and the ChNPP Interim Storage Facility for RBMK Fuel Assemblies (ISF). The ENSDF has a capacity of 55,000 m{sup 3}. The primary functions of the ENSDF are: to receive, monitor and record waste packages, to load the waste packages into concrete disposal units, to enable capping and closure of the disposal unit s, to allow monitoring following closure. The ENSDF comprises the turnkey installation of a near surface repository in the form of an engineered facility for the final disposal of LILW-SL conditioned in the ICSRM SWPF and other sources of Chernobyl waste. The project has to deal with the challenges of the Chernobyl environment, the fulfillment of both Western and Ukrainian standards, and the installation and coordination of an international project team. It will be shown that proven technologies and processes can be assembled into a unique Management Concept dealing with all the necessary demands and requirements of a turnkey project. The paper emphasizes the proposed concepts for the ENSDF and their integration into existing infrastructure and installations of the VEKTOR site. Further, the paper will consider the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper provides information on the output of the Detail Design and will reflect the progress of the design work.

Ziehm, Ronny; Pichurin, Sergey Grigorevich

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

industrial sector consumes 25% of theenergy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced in the state. Manycountries around the world have national-level GHG...

103

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

104

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the design and Total Estimated Cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The grout vault facilities in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site were constructed in the 1980s to support Tank Waste disposal activities. The facilities were to serve project B-714 which was intended to store grouted low-activity waste. The existing 4 unused grout vaults, with modifications for remote handling capability, will provide sufficient capacity for approximately three years of immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) production from the Tank Waste Remediation System-Privatization Vendors (TWRS-PV). These retrofit modifications to the grout vaults will result in an ILAW interim storage facility (Project W465) that will comply with applicable DOE directives, and state and federal regulations.

Pickett, W.W.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Efficient Electric Technologies for Industrial Heating: Emerging Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial process heating is typically accomplished with fossil- and by-product fuels. However, new high-efficiency electric technologies for process heating applications are under development and commercially available, including three efficient electric process heating technologies covered in this Brief: Induction heating and melting Microwave (MW) heating, drying and curing Radio frequency (RF) heating, drying, and curing These technologies were selected for three reasons. First, in each case there a...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

Conceptual design statement of work for the immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project  

SciTech Connect

The Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage subproject will provide storage capacity for immobilized low-activity waste product sold to the U.S. Department of Energy by the privatization contractor. This statement of work describes the work scope (encompassing definition of new installations and retrofit modifications to four existing grout vaults), to be performed by the Architect-Engineer, in preparation of a conceptual design for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Interim Storage Facility.

Carlson, T.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity --as of February 2003 --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity -- as of February 2003 -- (February 2003 Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming New Jersey #12;This site provides an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state. Twenty-four states

Laughlin, Robert B.

110

Handbook for the implementation of IAEA inspection activities at Department of Energy nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Nonproliferation Support Program (NSP) in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) has responsibility for supporting and aiding implementation of international and multilateral programs, agreements, and treaties at domestic facilities. In late 1995, the {open_quotes}Readiness Planning Guide for Nonproliferation Visits{close_quotes} (DOE 470.1-1) was issued to assist DOE sites prepare for the host foreign delegations visiting DOE facilities. Since then, field and head-quarters programs have expressed a need for a document that addresses domestic safeguards and security activities, specifically planning for and hosting International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) technical visits and inspections. As a result, OSS/NSP conducted a workshop to prepare a handbook that would contain guidance on domestic safeguards and security preparation and follow-on activities to ensure that this handbook could be utilized by all facilities to improve operational efficiencies and reduce implementation problems. The handbook has been structured to provide detailed background and guidance concerning the obligation, negotiation, inspection, and reporting processes for IAEH safeguards activities in DOE nuclear facilities as well as the lessons-learned by currently inspected facilities and how-we-do-it implementation examples. This paper will present an overview of the preparation and content of this new Handbook.

Zack, N.R.; Thomas, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coady, K.J.; Desmond, W.J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wind Manufacturing Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

America's wind energy industry supports a growing domestic industrial base. Check out this map to find manufacturing facilities in your state.

112

Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the problems of release of items from facilities and installations where radiation-based activities have been carried out. Several situations are reviewed and their release problems are discussed in detail. Particular attention is devoted to the assessment of the activity of the items to be released. A correct assessment of the activity will help the decision about the final use of the items removed from the radiation-related facility, either re-use, entering the public market, recycling, disposal and storage under different procedures. Even the final destination of the building which hosted the facility needs to be decided on the basis of an accurate assessment of the residual activity. The assessment of the activity, besides being fundamental in guaranteeing a safe approach to the procedures related to the release may result in a substantial profit. This is the case of items whose level of activity is so low that they can be put on the public market, reused or recycled for final product subject to very stringent radiation safety requirements. It will be shown that detector techniques play a fundamental role in the release process. In particular, the low-level counting techniques are fundamental in establishing whether or not the unrestrained release is feasible or not.

Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J. E.

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Guideline to good practices for control of maintenance activities at DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Control of Maintenance Activities at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a rigorously controlled maintenance program directed at achieving high quality work performance, personnel safety, radiological protection, operating equipment/system protection, and overall site safety and reliability at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 7. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing maintenance programs that are applicable to their facility.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall  

SciTech Connect

Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

Michael Kruzic

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 87 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 6: Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities u CHP Table........................................................................................................................................................................................... 189 Method of Calculating Results from DOE's Combined Heat and Power Activities Industrial Distributed Energy, a cross-cutting activity within the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), builds on activities conducted by DOE's Office of Industrial Technologies

118

NSLS Industrial User Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Industrial Program Coordinator | Publications Courtesy of The New York Times, Noah Berger The overall goal of the plan to enhance the NSLS facility's Industrial Users'...

119

Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China  

SciTech Connect

Electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11,400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148,000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposure were 2 orders of magnitude higher in people at e-waste recycling facilities than in people at the chemical industrial site, implying greater health risk for humans from dioxin exposures at e-waste recycling facilities. The calculated TEQ exposures for e-waste workers from dust and soil ingestion alone were 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than the exposures from soils in reference locations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Ma, J.; Kannan, K.; Cheng, J.; Horii, Y.; Wu, Q.; Wang, W. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluating Indoor Location Tracking Systems in a Nuclear Facility: Experimentation with Different Techniques in an Industrial Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details how different kinds of indoor geolocalization systems perform when used in nuclear power plants and similar complex industrial environments.BackgroundIndoor location tracking systems can help to ensure worker safety. Over the past several years, indoor geolocalization capabilities have improved, and several technology options now exist. However, these new technologies have to be carefully evaluated in an industrial setting in order for ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Industrial Development Projects (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes municipalities and counties to issue bonds or interest coupons to finance industrial projects, including energy generation facilities.

123

Tobacco Industry Political Activity and Tobacco Control Policy Making in Washington: 1983-1996  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9 TOBACCO INDUSTRY CAMPAIGN19 Tobacco Industry Contributions to Other Politicalby the Tobacco Industry . . . . . . . 30 WASHINGTONS

Monardi, Fred M. Ph.D.; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

In vivo Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility for Total Body Nitrogen and Cd  

SciTech Connect

A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system has been designed and constructed to measure the total body nitrogen and Cd for in vivo studies. An aqueous solution of KNO{sub 3} was used as phantom for system calibration. The facility has been used to monitor total body nitrogen (TBN) of mice and found that is related to their diet. Some mice swallowed diluted water with Cl{sub 2}Cd, and the presence of Cd was detected in the animals. The minimum Cd concentration that the system can detect was 20 ppm.

Munive, Marco; Revilla, Angel [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Solis, Jose L. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility. Final report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar facility that generates 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F) process steam has been designed and constructed by Acurex Corporation and has operated for 1 yr supplying steam to the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The facility consists of 1068 m/sup 2/ (11,520 ft/sup 2/) of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 1 (5000 gal) flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW (25 hp) circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg (682,400 lb) of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value. The successful completion of the first year of operation has demonstrated the technical feasibility of generating industrial process steam with solar energy.

Brink, D.F.; Kendall, J.M.; Youngblood, S.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

Hulvey, R.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

LWRS II&C Industry and Regulatory Engagement Activities for FY 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To ensure broad industry support and coordination for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Controls (II&C) Systems Technologies research pathway, an engagement process will be continually pursued with nuclear asset owners, vendors, and suppliers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the major industry support organizations of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Nuclear asset owner engagement is a necessary and enabling activity to obtain data and accurate characterization of long-term operational challenges, assess the suitability of proposed research for addressing long-term needs, and gain access to data and representative infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure success of the proposed research and development (R&D) activities. Engagement with vendors and suppliers will ensure that vendor expectations and needs can be translated into requirements that can be met through technology commercialization.

Ken Thomas

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating the Technical and Commercial Options for Cogeneration Facilities in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration under the PURPA law is providing opportunity to the Process Industry not only to conserve fuel and electric costs associated with commercial process production, but effectively to share in the revenue from the sale of consumer power. The law permits release of fuel energy significantly in excess of that required for the process, expressly for the production of export electric power, with only a small required fraction contributing to sequential production of useful heat. The low required thermal energy fraction ostensibly allows systems which are hardly integrated at all with the processes involved, subject to evolving agency/legal interpretations. However, greater degrees of process/power system integration can produce increased conservation, not only of energy but of financial resources. This paper describes an integrated approach wherein technical and economic criteria are applied to size and select candidate cogeneration systems. The approach is integrated with regard to technical, economic and financial considerations, as well as to the determination of the appropriate degree of thermal integration of the power and process subsystems. An overview of steam and gas turbine cycle options for process/power integration typical of the refinery, olefins, and other industry complexes is presented. The cycles described include hot gas and steam heat recovery, going beyond the currently popular gas-turbine/ heat-recovery-steam-generator combination.

Cooke, D. H.; McCue, R. H.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

Rennich, M.J. [comp.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

BTRIC - User Facility - ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

whole-building and community integration, improved energy management in buildings and industrial facilities during their operational phase, and market transformations from old...

134

Facile xenon capture and release at room temperature using a metal-organic framework: a comparison with activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

Two well known Metal organic frameworks (MOF-5, NiDOBDC) were synthesized and studied for facile xenon capture and separation. Our results indicate the NiDOBDC adsorbs significantly more xenon than MOF-5, releases it more readily than activated carbon, and is more selective for Xe over Kr than activated carbon.

Thallapally, Praveen K.; Grate, Jay W.; Motkuri, Radha K.

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE-STD-1120-2005; Integration of Environment Safety and Health into Facility Disposition Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20-2005 20-2005 Volume 1 of 2 April 2005 DOE STANDARD INTEGRATION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH INTO FACILITY DISPOSITION ACTIVITIES Volume 1 of 2: Documented Safety Analysis for Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Projects U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE TS i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

136

Using CFN Facilities | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using CFN Facilities Using CFN Facilities CFN facilities are available free of charge to scientists from universities, industry, and national laboratories worldwide, for non-proprietary nanoscience research projects. Access to the facilities is granted to external users through a peer-reviewed proposal system. Proposals are submitted electronically and reviewed and rated by an external Proposal Review Panel. Proposals must include the specific equipment requested, the scientific impact of the research project, and a description of the research to be conducted at the CFN. For an accepted proposal, the actual schedule for work at the CFN is jointly made by the leader(s) of the requested facility (or facilities), and the proposal's principal investigator. User Registration All researchers coming to the CFN to work at a facility must have an active

137

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines...

139

Optimize Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies for Government Agencies, Industrial Facilities, and Military Installations: NREL Offers Proven Tools and Resources to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Efficiency (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Lab provides expertise, facilities, and technical assistance to campuses, facilities, and government agencies to apply renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes coming from the decommissioning of nuclear reactors,use of a nuclear facility The decommissioning, refurbishingdisposed of. The decommissioning of a nuclear power station

Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

142

Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1

143

Office of Industrial Technologies research in progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts research and development activities which focus on improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial conservation. The mission of OIT is to increase the utilization of existing energy-efficient equipment and to find and promote new, cost-effective ways for industrial facilities to improve their energy efficiency and minimize waste products. To ensure advancement of the technological leadership of the United States and to improve the competitiveness of American industrial products in world markets, OIT works closely with industrial partners, the staffs of the national laboratories, and universities to identify research and development needs and to solve technological challenges. This report contains summaries of the currently active projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technologies.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

CURRENT TESTING ACTIVITIES AT THE ACRELAB RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY , E S Spooner2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

undertaken within this facility. Testing of PV systems in the ACRELab facilities has included Solar Home Systems and small PV systems for remote communities in Australia. The results of the development of test performance will also be addressed. Keywords: Qualification and Testing, Reliability, Performance 1

145

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

146

Guideline to good practices for types of maintenance activities at DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Types of Maintenance at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information that may be used for the development and implementation of a properly balanced corrective, preventive and predictive maintenance program at DOE nuclear facilities. This document is intended to be an example guideline for the implementation of DOE Order 4330.4A, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter II, Element 4. DOE contractors should not feel obligated to adopt all parts of this guide. Rather, they should use the information contained herein as a guide for developing maintenance programs that are applicable to their facility.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.9 Industrial Hygiene  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of programs implemented by the contractor to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and control environmental factors or stresses that may adversely affect the health of the Department's workers. The Facility Representative conducts walkthroughs, observes activities, and reviews records to determine if the implementation of the contractor's Industrial Hygiene Program is achieving required results. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5480.10, Contractor Industrial Hygiene Program

148

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

149

Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Advanced window wall systems have the potential to provide demand response by reducing peak electric loads by 20-30% in many commercial buildings through the active control of motorized shading systems, switchable window coatings, operable windows, and ventilated double-skin facade systems. These window strategies involve balancing daylighting and solar heat gains, heat rejection through ventilation, and night-time natural ventilation to achieve space-conditioning and lighting energy use reductions without the negative impacts on occupants associated with other demand responsive (DR) strategies. This paper explores conceptually how advanced window systems fit into the context of active load management programs, which cause customers to directly experience the time-varying costs of their consumption decisions. Technological options are suggested. We present pragmatic criteria that building owners use to determine whether to deploy such strategies. A utility's perspective is given. Industry also provides their perspectives on where the technology is today and what needs to happen to implement such strategies more broadly in the US. While there is significant potential for these advanced window concepts, widespread deployment is unlikely to occur with business-as-usual practice. Technologically, integrated window-lighting-HVAC products are underdeveloped. Implementation is hindered by fragmented labor practices, non-standard communication protocols, and lack of technical expertise. Design tools and information products that quantify energy performance, occupant impacts, reliability, and other pragmatic concerns are not available. Interest within the building industry in sustainability, energy-efficiency, and increased occupant amenity, comfort, and productivity will be the driving factors for these advanced facades in the near term--at least until the dust settles on the deregulated electricity market.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Levi, Mark S.; Blanc, Steven L.; McConahey, Erin; McClintock, Maurya; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Sbar, Neil L.; Myser, Michael P.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Active load management with advanced window wall systems: Research and industry perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Advanced window wall systems have the potential to provide demand response by reducing peak electric loads by 20-30% in many commercial buildings through the active control of motorized shading systems, switchable window coatings, operable windows, and ventilated double-skin facade systems. These window strategies involve balancing daylighting and solar heat gains, heat rejection through ventilation, and night-time natural ventilation to achieve space-conditioning and lighting energy use reductions without the negative impacts on occupants associated with other demand responsive (DR) strategies. This paper explores conceptually how advanced window systems fit into the context of active load management programs, which cause customers to directly experience the time-varying costs of their consumption decisions. Technological options are suggested. We present pragmatic criteria that building owners use to determine whether to deploy such strategies. A utility's perspective is given. Industry also provides their perspectives on where the technology is today and what needs to happen to implement such strategies more broadly in the US. While there is significant potential for these advanced window concepts, widespread deployment is unlikely to occur with business-as-usual practice. Technologically, integrated window-lighting-HVAC products are underdeveloped. Implementation is hindered by fragmented labor practices, non-standard communication protocols, and lack of technical expertise. Design tools and information products that quantify energy performance, occupant impacts, reliability, and other pragmatic concerns are not available. Interest within the building industry in sustainability, energy-efficiency, and increased occupant amenity, comfort, and productivity will be the driving factors for these advanced facades in the near term--at least until the dust settles on the deregulated electricity market.

Lee, Eleanor S.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Levi, Mark S.; Blanc, Steven L.; McConahey, Erin; McClintock, Maurya; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Sbar, Neil L.; Myser, Michael P.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Configuration of Value Chain Activities: The Effect of Pre-Entry Capabilities, Transaction Hazards, and Industry Evolution on Decisions to Internalize  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We integrate insights from organizational capabilities, organizational economics, and industry evolution to examine industry entrants' boundary choices about value chain activities and test hypotheses in 19782009 data from a sample of U.S. ... Keywords: governance choice, industry evolution, pre-entry experience, value chain activity

Lihong Qian; Rajshree Agarwal; Glenn Hoetker

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

AN OVERVIEW OF BUILDING AMERICA INDUSTRIALIZED HOUSING PARTNERSHIP (BAIHP) ACTIVITIES IN HOT-HUMID CLIMATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BAIHP (www.baihp.org ) conducts systems research and technical assistance activities for new housing. Hot-humid climate efforts described here include: Systems research : NightCool A hybrid cooling and dehumidification strategy employing radiative cooling and desiccant materials. Interior Duct Systems in Manufactured Houses Tests are ongoing in an occupied prototype home in Alabama and the FSEC manufactured housing lab. Ventilation and Dehumidification A new strategy has been developed to hook up a whole-house dehumidifier so that it only runs when the air conditioning compressor is off. Plug Load Reduction Whole house feedback devices and security system based plug load reductions are being evaluated in prototype homes. Solar and Conventional Domestic Hot Water (DHW) Testing A test facility is being constructed to conduct side by side testing of three active and passive solar, two gas and two electric DHW systems. Technical assistance was provided on the design, construction and evaluation of four near zero energy homes and over 300 highly energy efficient production homes in subdivisions during 2007 and 2008.

Chandra, S.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Colon, C.; Fonorow, K.; Stroer, D.; Martin, E.; McIlvaine, J.; Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Thomas-Rees, S.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.; Gil, C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

User Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USER PORTAL USER PORTAL BTRICBuilding Technologies Research Integration Center CNMSCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences CSMBCenter for Structural Molecular Biology CFTFCarbon Fiber Technology Facility HFIRHigh Flux Isotope Reactor MDF Manufacturing Demonstration Facility NTRCNational Transportation Research Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Keeping it fresh at the Spallation Neutron Source Nanophase material sciences' nanotech toolbox Home | User Facilities SHARE ORNL User Facilities ORNL is home to a number of highly sophisticated experimental user facilities that provide unmatched capabilities to the broader scientific community, including a growing user community from universities, industry, and other laboratories research institutions, as well as to ORNL

155

The Case for the Application of Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies In the Search for Undeclared Facilities and Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Undeclared nuclear facilities unequivocally remain the most difficult safeguards challenge facing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recent cases of undeclared facilities revealed in Iran and Syria, which are NPT signatory States, show both the difficulty and the seriousness of this threat to nonproliferation. In the case of undeclared nuclear facilities, the most effective deterrent against proliferation is the application of Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES); however, WAES is currently cost-prohibitive. As with any threat, the most effective countering strategy is a multifaceted approach. Some of the approaches applied by the IAEA include: open source analysis, satellite imagery, on-site environmental sampling, complementary access under the Additional Protocol (where in force), traditional safeguards inspections, and information provided by member States. These approaches, naturally, are focused on specific States. Are there other opportunities not currently within the IAEA purview to assess States that may provide another opportunity to detect clandestine facilities? In this paper, the author will make the case that the IAEA Department of Safeguards should explore the area of worldwide marine radioactivity studies as one possible opportunity. One such study was released by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in January 2005. This technical document focused on 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239/240Pu. It is clearly a challenging area because of the many sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the worlds oceans and seas including: nuclear weapons testing, reprocessing, accidents, waste dumping, and industrial and medical radioisotopes, whose distributions change based on oceanographic, geochemical, and biological processes, and their sources. It is additionally challenging where multiple States share oceans, seas, and rivers. But with the application of modern science, historical sampling to establish baselines, and a focus on the most relevant radionuclides, the potential is there to support this challenging IAEA safeguards mission.

Mark Schanfein

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Audit Report: Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site, OAS-RA-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-13-04 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 9, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo, Director Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Modular Office Facilities for Recovery Act Program Activities at the Hanford Site" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (Richland) awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to remediate select portions of the Hanford Site's Central Plateau. As part of the American Recovery and

158

Photon Sciences | Navigation | Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities NSLS About NSLS Accelerator Activity Report Experimental Systems Machine Status & History Operations & Engineering Operating Schedules Ring Parameters NSLS Ops:...

159

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's world-class research facilities provide the venue for innovative advances in photovoltaic technologies and applications. These facilities within the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) serve both multi-use and dedicated-use functions. We encourage our research colleagues in industry, universities, and other laboratories to pursue opportunities in working with our staff in these facilities. Dedicated-Use Facilities Photo of a red-hot coil glowing inside a round machine. Research within these facilities focuses on targeted areas of interest that require specific tools, techniques, or unique capabilities. Our two main dedicated-use facilities are the following: Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) OTF researchers study and evaluate advanced or emerging PV technologies

160

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial sectors (Vermeeren, 2008). Steel industry ? TheDutch steel industry implemented 82 energy-saving projectsfoodstuffs, steel, and mining industries are the most

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agencys Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

September 10, 2010 HSS Briefing to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) on Union Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Labor Union and Stakeholder Labor Union and Stakeholder Outreach and Collaboration Office of Health, Safety and Security Briefing to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Briefing to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Leadership Commitment Leadership Commitment " h "It is imperative that we communicate and establish relationships with those elements that train manage and elements that train, manage and represent our workforce to improve the safety culture at DOE sites." safety culture at DOE sites. Glenn S. Podonsky Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer 2 History History History History October 2006: Formation of HSS to provide an integrated DOE HQ-level function for health, safety, environment, and security into one unified office. February 2007: Established HSS Focus Group -

164

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Review of Cyclotron Production and Quality Control of High Specific Activity Radionuclides for Biomedical, Biological, Industrial and Environmental Applications at INFN-LASA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of Cyclotron Production and Quality Control of High Specific Activity Radionuclides for Biomedical, Biological, Industrial and Environmental Applications at INFN-LASA

Birattari, C; Groppi, F; Gini, L

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

SciTech Connect

Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

Subhash Shah

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Uranium industry annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Biodiesel Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Inc Place Santa Barbara, California Zip 93110 Product Biodiesel producer and facility developer. References Biodiesel Industries Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

170

Environmental Protection- Industrial Compliance (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Industrial Compliance Section develops and administers Certificates of Approval for the Construction and/or Operation of various industrial facilities. Industries with air emissions and/or...

171

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

HFIR Experiment Facilities | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiment Facilities Experiment Facilities HFIR Experiment Facilities Neutron Scattering Facilities Target Positions Experiment Facilities in the Beryllium Reflector Large Removable Beryllium Facilities Small Removable Beryllium Facilities Control-Rod Access Plug Facilities Small Vertical Experiment Facilities Large Vertical Experiment Facilities Hydraulic Tube Facility Peripheral Target Positions Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory and Pneumatic Tube Facilities Slant Engineering Facilities Gamma Irradiation Facility Quality Assurance Requirements Contact Information Neutron Scattering Facilities The fully instrumented HFIR will eventually include 15 state-of-the-art neutron scattering instruments, seven of which will be designed exclusively for cold neutron experiments, located in a guide hall south of the reactor

173

Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, vegetation, workshop-floor dust, and electronic shredder residue from an electronic waste recycling facility and in soils from a chemical industrial complex in eastern China  

SciTech Connect

In this study, 11 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were determined in electronic shredder waste, workshop-floor dust, soil, and leaves (of plants on the grounds of the facility) from a large-scale electronic wastes (e-waste) recycling facility and in surface soil from a chemical-industrial complex (comprising a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) as well as agricultural areas in eastern China. Total PBDD/F concentrations in environmental samples were in the range of 113-818 pg/g dry wt (dw) for leaves, 392-18,500 pg/g dw for electronic shredder residues, 716-80,0000 pg/g dw for soil samples, and 89,600-14,3000 pg/g dw for workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility and in a range from nondetect (ND) to 427 pg/g dw in soil from the chemical-industrial complex. The highest mean concentrations of total PBDD/Fs were found in soil samples and workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility. The dioxin-like toxic equivalent (measured as TEQ) concentrations of PBDD/Fs were greater than the TEQs of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) reported in our previous study for the same set of samples. The concentrations of PBDFs were several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of PBDDs in samples from the e-waste facility or from soil from the chemical-industrial complex. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of {Sigma}PBDD/Fs and {Sigma}PBDEs (r = 0.769, p < 0.01) and between SPBDD/Fs and the previously reported SPCDD/F concentrations (r = 0.805, p < 0.01). The estimated daily human intakes of TEQs contributed by PBDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposures in e-waste recycling facilities were higher than the intakes of TEQs contributed by PCDD/Fs, calculated in our previous study. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Jing Ma; Rudolf Addink; Sehun Yun; Jinping Cheng; Wenhua Wang; Kurunthachalam Kannan [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Best Management Practices for Vegetation Management at Electric Utility Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling vegetation inside key electric utility facilities is a necessary maintenance activity for a utilitys safe and reliable operation. Substations, switchyards, and other facilities require perpetual maintenance to maintain a vegetation-free environment. At a minimum, vegetation-maintenance treatment needs to be conducted annually; in some climatic regions, multiple treatments may be required. The objective of this research paper was to define current industry practices by means of a ...

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

Review of international geothermal activities and assessment of US industry opportunities: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to review and assess international developments in the geothermal energy field and to define business opportunities for the US geothermal industry. The report establishes data bases on the status of worldwide geothermal development and the competitiveness of US industry. Other factors identified include existing legislation, tax incentives, and government institutions or agencies and private sector organizations that promote geothermal exports. Based on the initial search of 177 countries and geographic entities, 71 countries and areas were selected as the most likely targets for the expansion of the geothermal industry internationally. The study then determined to what extent their geothermal resource had been developed, what countries had aided or participated in this development, and what plans existed for future development. Data on the energy, economic, and financial situations were gathered.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Review of international geothermal activities and assessment of US industry opportunities: Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study initiated to review and assess international developments in the geothermal energy field and to define business opportunities for the US geothermal industry. The report establishes data bases on the status of worldwide geothermal development and the competitiveness of US industry. Other factors identified include existing legislation, tax incentives, and government institutions or agencies and private sector organizations that promote geothermal exports. Based on the initial search of 177 countries and geographic entities, 71 countries and areas were selected as the most likely targets for the expansion of the geothermal industry internationally. The study then determined to what extent their geothermal resource had been developed, what countries had aided or participated in this development, and what plans existed for future development. Data on the energy, economic, and financial situations were gathered.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Climate Research Facility Communication Products Garner Awards in ARM Climate Research Facility Communication Products Garner Awards in Competition Bookmark and Share Entries in the Communicator Awards are judged by industry professionals who look for talents that exceed a high standard of excellence and work that serves as a benchmark for the industry. Entries in the Communicator Awards are judged by industry professionals who look for talents that exceed a high standard of excellence and work that serves as a benchmark for the industry. Trying to describe the ARM Climate Research Facility to an educated audience is hard enough; imagine explaining it to someone who knows next to nothing about atmospheric science! Judges of the 2005 Communicator Awards print media competition apparently got the message, as they gave awards to

179

Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility, Project W-465 conceptual design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the design and total estimated cost to modify the four unused grout vaults for the remote handling and interim storage of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW).

Pickett, W.W.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

180

Industrial cogeneration optimization program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to identify up to 10 good near-term opportunities for cogeneration in 5 major energy-consuming industries which produce food, textiles, paper, chemicals, and refined petroleum; select, characterize, and optimize cogeneration systems for these identified opportunities to achieve maximum energy savings for minimum investment using currently available components of cogenerating systems; and to identify technical, institutional, and regulatory obstacles hindering the use of industrial cogeneration systems. The analysis methods used and results obtained are described. Plants with fuel demands from 100,000 Btu/h to 3 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h were considered. It was concluded that the major impediments to industrial cogeneration are financial, e.g., high capital investment and high charges by electric utilities during short-term cogeneration facility outages. In the plants considered an average energy savings from cogeneration of 15 to 18% compared to separate generation of process steam and electric power was calculated. On a national basis for the 5 industries considered, this extrapolates to saving 1.3 to 1.6 quads per yr or between 630,000 to 750,000 bbl/d of oil. Properly applied, federal activity can do much to realize a substantial fraction of this potential by lowering the barriers to cogeneration and by stimulating wider implementation of this technology. (LCL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Industrial energy management | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

182

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

183

Customer Screening - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Safeguarded and unsafeguarded nuclear activities. Nuclear fuel cycle activities, including research on ... A facility for the fabrication of nuclear fuel?

184

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

185

Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Defense-in-Depth and Diversity for Digital Upgrades: Status of Industry and NRC Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear industry has started to transition from analog to digital instrumentation and control (I&C), one issue that has remained particularly problematic is the potential for faults in identical software components to simultaneously disable redundant trains of safety-related systems or multiple critical systems. Such failures may create the possibility to defeat the traditional nuclear plant safety barriers that rely on redundant hardware trains to ensure high reliability of safety-critical system...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Industrial Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Domestic industrial investment has declined due to unfavorable energy prices, and external markets. Investment behavior has changed over the past few years, and will continue due to high labor costs, tight markets and an unstable U.S. economy although, freight costs, favorable exchange rates and high capacity utilization will encourage future industrial investment. Industry will eventually enter a new period of major investment. Future industrial investment will be an opportunity to influence the energy efficiency of these facilities for generations to come. Program managers must begin engaging industrial customers now, in order to exploit this unprecedented opportunity to change future energy use patterns. This paper reviews recent market trends and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: Why has industrial investment declined? What is the outlook for industrial investment? How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?

Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.

Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Female Breast Cancer Feasibility Study: A Comparision of Magnetic Field Exposures in a Garment Manufacturing Facility and Electric U tility Work Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research activities from the first phase of a proposed study of occupational magnetic field exposures and female breast cancer. Due to the small number of female employees in the utility industry with high magnetic field exposures, this project focused on the garment industry. Key activities included magnetic field measurement surveys at an electric utility and garment manufacturing facility, and a comparison of the exposures in these two industries. Additional activities evaluated...

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Climate VISION: Industry Associations  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations Aluminum Aluminum Association (Coordinating aluminum industry Climate VISION activities) The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum products, as well as suppliers to the industry. The Association provides leadership to the industry through its programs and services which aim to enhance aluminum's position in a world of proliferating materials, increase its use as the "material of choice," remove impediments to its fullest use, and assist in achieving the industry's environmental, societal, and economic objectives. Automobile Manufacturers Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (Coordinating automobile industry Climate VISION activities) The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, Inc. is a trade association

191

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with MDF Working with MDF Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility SHARE As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries. Manufacturing industries engage ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization, and process technology to reduce technical risk and validate investment for innovations targeting products of the future. DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, established at ORNL, helps industry adopt new manufacturing technologies to reduce life-cycle energy

192

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF HFIR MDF Working with MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility SHARE As the nation's premier research laboratory, ORNL is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries. Manufacturing industries engage ORNL's expertise in materials synthesis, characterization, and process technology to reduce technical risk and validate investment for innovations targeting products of the future. DOE's Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, established at ORNL, helps industry adopt new manufacturing technologies to reduce life-cycle energy

193

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Users from Industry Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

194

Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

Behrens, Malte

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

196

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Graysburg...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Garysburg, NC Facility 8060 NC 46 HWY Garysburg, NC 27831 The Garysburg facility has the capacity to process...

198

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Selma...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Selma, TX Facility 16435 IH 35 North Selma, TX 78154 The Selma facility contains the company's automated pecan shelling...

199

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Canaan Facility BD Medical Route 7 and Grace Way Canaan, CT 06018 The BD Medical facility in Canaan, Connecticut...

200

BNL | Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's Research Facilities Brookhaven's Research Facilities Tools of Discovery Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities-some available nowhere else in the world. Each year, thousands of scientists from laboratories, universities, and industries around the world use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment-and develop innovative applications that arise, sometimes at the intersections of these disciplines. construction Brookhaven Lab is noted for the design, construction and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities that support thousands of scientists worldwide. RHIC tunnel Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Siting of Industrial 1: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 361: Siting of Industrial Hazardous Waste Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations describe the siting of new industrial hazardous waste facilities located wholly or partially within the State. Industrial hazardous waste facilities are defined as facilities used for the purpose of treating, storing, compacting, recycling, exchanging or disposing of industrial hazardous waste materials, including treatment, compacting,

202

Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented. The plants analyzed employ fluidized bed boilers for generation of steam for process and building/heating/cooling demands, in conjunction with electric power co-generation. Results of the analysis are presented, using life cycle costs and investment payback periods, pinpointing the areas, type and magnitude of costs which should be considered in the selection of combustors or systems. Capital and operating costs, and recognized technical and economic barriers are also presented and their effects indicated. Life cycle cost of each of the alternatives analyzed are compared and the expected payback periods for the different size FBC plants and for different annual average production levels are discussed.

Mesko, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully accomplish deactivation. This concept had to allow for continued operations in FB Line until 2005, while providing distinct task-oriented teams for deactivation of the FCC. Facility workers, always the most knowledgeable about any facility, were integral parts of the project team. The team defined the scope, developed a bottoms-up estimate, reorganized personnel to designated project teams, and developed a baseline schedule with about 12,000 activities. Training was implemented to prepare the facility workers to use project management tools and concepts, which were to execute the project, coordinate activities and track progress. The project budget was estimated at $579 million. The team completed F Canyon and FB Line deactivation in August 2006, four months ahead of schedule and under budget.

Adams, N

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

204

2-6 Molecular Science Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MSCF Overview MSCF Overview Molecular Science Computing Facility The Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) supports a wide range of computational activities in environmental molecular research, from benchmark calculations on small mole- cules to reliable calculations on large molecules, and from solids to simulations of large bio- molecules and reactive chemical transport modeling. The MSCF provides an integrated production computing environment with links to external facilities within the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE), collaborating universities, and industry. Instrumentation & Capabilities * MPP2. Production cluster of 980 HP rx2600 nodes, 1960 1.5 gigahertz IA64 processors, 450 terabytes local disk, 6.8 terabytes memory, 11.8 teraflops * Lustre. Shared cluster

205

3 Cleantech Facilities You Should Know About  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These National Lab facilities are supporting local economies across the country and driving national industries -- and you should definitely know more about them.

206

Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities. Outcomes of the International Conference, 11-15 December 2006, Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full text of publication follows: decommissioning activities are increasing worldwide covering wide range of facilities - from nuclear power plant, through fuel cycle facilities to small laboratories. The importance of these activities is growing with the recognition of the need for ensuring safe termination of practices and reuse of sites for various purposes, including the development of new nuclear facilities. Decommissioning has been undertaken for more than forty years and significant knowledge has been accumulated and lessons have been learned. However the number of countries encountering decommissioning for the first time is increasing with the end of the lifetime of the facilities around the world, in particular in countries with small nuclear programmes (e.g. one research reactor) and limited human and financial resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of lessons learned and good practices between all Member States and to facilitate and improve safety of the planned, ongoing and future decommissioning projects, the IAEA in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency to OECD, European Commission and World Nuclear Association organised the international conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities, held in Athens, Greece. The conference also highlighted areas where future cooperation at national and international level is required in order to improve decommissioning planning and safety during decommissioning and to facilitate decommissioning by selecting appropriate strategies and technologies for decontamination, dismantling and management of waste. These and other aspects discussed at the conference are presented in this paper, together with the planned IAEA measures for amendment and implementation of the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and its future programme on decommissioning.

Batandjieva, B.; Laraia, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an industrial energy efficiency benchmarking study to identify facility specific, cost-effective best practices and technologies. Such a study could help develop a common understanding of opportunities for energy efficiency improvements and provide additional information to improve the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The EPA's initial benchmarking efforts will focus on industrial power facilities. The key industries of interest include the most energy intensive industries, such as chemical, pulp and paper, and iron and steel manufacturing.

Hartley, Z.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Secretarial Policy Statement on Technology Transfer at Department of Energy Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretarial Policy Statement on Secretarial Policy Statement on Technology Transfer at Department of Energy Facilities Introduction This Policy Statement is designed to help guide and strengthen the Department of Energy's technology transfer efforts and to heighten awareness of the importance of technology transfer activities throughout DOE. For purposes of this document, the term "technology transfer" refers to the process by which knowledge, intellectual property or capabilities developed at the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, single- purpose research facilities, and other facilities ("Facilities") are transferred to any other entity, including private industry, academia, state and local governments, or other government entities to meet public and private needs. The Policy Statement follows upon

209

Litigation in Argentina: challenging the tobacco industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Profits over people: Tobacco Industry Activities to MarketBarnoya J, Glantz S. Tobacco industry success in preventingL. Implications of the tobacco industry documents for public

Flores, M L; Barnoya, J; Mejia, R; Alderete, E; Prez-Stable, E J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Users from Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users from Industry Print Users from Industry Print The Advanced Light Source (ALS) welcomes industrial users from large and small companies whose projects advance scientific knowledge, investigate the development of new products and manufacturing methods, or provide economic benefits and jobs to the economy. The nature of industrial research can be different from traditional university and government sponsored projects, so the ALS has created unique opportunities for new and existing industrial users to access our user facilities and engage in productive relationships with our scientific and engineering staff. Examples of past and current research conducted at the ALS can be viewed on the Industry @ ALS Web page. There are several modes of access; the ALS User and Scientific Support Groups are especially committed to helping new industrial users gain a foothold in our user community and welcome inquiries about how to make that happen.

211

Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use  

SciTech Connect

California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

213

{open_quotes}Radon{close_quotes} - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities.

Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic File with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Activated-charcoal filters: water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. January 1970-July 1988 (citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated-charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic gases and pollutants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, swimming pool filtration, waste conversion, automobile fuel and exhaust systems, and footwear deodorizing. (Contains 129 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the US Patent Bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications are discussed, including drinking water purification, air and water pollution control, manufacture of industrial materials, materials recovery, waste treatment, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, cigarette filters, ventilation systems, medical filtration, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database with exemplary claims. ) Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, waste conversion, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, swimming pool filtration, tobacco smoke filters, kitchen ventilators, medical filtration treatment, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

219

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28, 2005 [Facility News] 28, 2005 [Facility News] Readiness of New Lidar Evaluated at Southern Great Plains Site Bookmark and Share Aircraft for the Boundary Layer CO2 Intensive Operational Period will fly over the SGP Central Facility using both spirals and racetrack patterns. Data will be collected under a variety of cloud and meteorological conditions. Aircraft for the Boundary Layer CO2 Intensive Operational Period will fly over the SGP Central Facility using both spirals and racetrack patterns. Data will be collected under a variety of cloud and meteorological conditions. As the focus of the Boundary Layer Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP) starting in March, science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

220

Strategic Activities to Address Material Sustainability Issues in the Electric Power Industry: Results of Research with Electric Power Companies and Stakeholders in the United States and Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses activities that electric utilities can take to address the 15 key material sustainability issues that were identified in Material Sustainability Issues for the North American Electric Power Industry (EPRI report 3002000920). This report adds insight to that previous analysis by considering activities and actions for addressing the 15 material sustainability issues. Overall, the research identified 145 possible activities across all 15 material issues, and ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environmental Assessment for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment for the Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant DOE/EA - 1592 April 21, 2008 - - This Page Intentionally Blank - - ii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCIES: United States General Services Administration (GSA) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Modernization of Facilities and Infrastructure for the Non-Nuclear Production Activities Conducted at the Kansas City Plant (DOE/EA-1592) CONTACT: For further information on this EA, write or call: Carlos Salazar GSA Public Buildings Service Heartland Region 1500 E. Bannister Road, Room 2191 (6PTA) Kansas City, MO 64131-3088 (816) 823-2305 Abstract: The United States General Services Administration (GSA) and the United States

223

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Industrial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Industrial Dataset Summary Description The Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Database is a collection of all the publicly available data from energy efficiency assessments conducted by IACs at small and medium-sized industrial facilities. Source Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Centers Date Released September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords assessment energy efficiency Industrial manufacturing small and medium-sized Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon copy_of_iac_database.xls (xls, 28.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Standards Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Daily Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

225

Industrial service and product providers | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

226

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Tuesday Webcasts for Industry  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Most Value from ISO 50001 January 10, 2012 - Tuesday Webcast for Industry: Key Energy-Saving Projects for Smaller Facilities Webcast Questions and Answers December 13, 2011...

227

Laboratory Coordinating Council: Partnerships with Industry (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Coordinating Council, working through OIT, coordinates partnerships between industry, academia, and the 16 U.S. national laboratories and facilities.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

228

METC Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Uranium industry annual 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

230

Uranium industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

NONE

1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sales Tax Exemption for Manufacturing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Exemption for Manufacturing Facilities Sales Tax Exemption for Manufacturing Facilities Sales Tax Exemption for Manufacturing Facilities < Back Eligibility Industrial Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate 50% of capital investment in the eligible project Program Info Start Date 7/1/2008 State Kentucky Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% sales and use tax refund Provider Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development In August 2007 Kentucky established the ''Incentives for Energy Independence Act'' to promote the development of renewable energy and alternative fuel facilities, energy efficient buildings, alternative fuel vehicles, research and development activities and other energy initiatives. This includes a sales tax exemption which allows manufacturers to apply for

232

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

area area Contact Us | Careers | Staff Directory | User Support Search form Search Search Argonne Leadership Computing Facility an Office of Science user facility Home . About Overview History Staff Directory Careers Visiting Us Contact Us Resources & Expertise Mira Cetus Vesta Intrepid Challenger Surveyor Visualization Clusters Data and Networking Our Teams User Advisory Council Science at ALCF INCITE 2014 Projects ALCC 2013 Projects ESP Projects View All Projects Allocation Programs Early Science Program Publications Industry Collaborations News & Events Web Articles In the News Upcoming Events Past Events Informational Materials Photo Galleries User Services User Support Machine Status Presentations Training & Outreach User Survey Getting Started How to Get an Allocation New User Guide

233

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

234

Isotopes facilities deactivation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production and distribution of radioisotopes for medical, scientific, and industrial applications has been a major activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since the late 1940s. As the demand for many of these isotopes grew and their sale became profitable, the technology for the production of the isotopes was transferred to private industry, and thus, many of the production facilities at ORNL became underutilized. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) instructed ORNL to identify and prepare various isotopes production facilities for safe shutdown. In response, ORNL identified 19 candidate facilities for shutdown and established the Isotopes Facilities Shutdown Program. In 1993, responsibility for the program was transitioned from the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to the DOE Office of Environmental Management and Uranium Enrichment Operation`s Office of Facility Transition and Management. The program was retitled the Isotopes Facilities Deactivation Project (IFDP), and implementation responsibility was transferred from ORNL to the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES), Environmental Restoration (ER) Program.

Eversole, R.E.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

INQUIRY FACILITY Inquiry Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to search / query Callista for the student details you want. This can be achieved by entering in any be as follows: Once you have entered the search criteria, click on (query) to activate the search and Term 2 you would select `ASS-TERM2' to obtain your list. · Enter `Teaching Period' if required - those

236

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment and Sustainable Energy. http://www.senternovem.nl/Industries Association. Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI),Report_2007Fnl.pdf Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI), 2009a.

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Facility Representatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Industry Documents ... 3 2.1.1 DOE Directives (Polices, Orders, Manuals, Guides) ... 3 2.1.2 DOE...

238

SERAPH facility capabilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

Castle, J.; Su, W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

DOE-STD-1053-93; DOE Standard Guideline to Good Practices For Control of Maintenance Activities at DOE Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-93 3-93 March 1993 DOE STANDARD GUIDELINE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF MAINTENANCE ACTIVITIES AT DOE NUCLEAR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MNTY Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. Order No. DE93014268 DOE-STD-1053-93 FOREWORD The purpose of the Guideline to Good Practices for Control of M aintenance A ctivities at DOE Nuclear Facilities is to provide contractor maintenance organizations with information

240

Local Option - Industrial Facilities and Development Bonds |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Locally Determined Program Information Utah Program Type State Bond Program Rebate Amount Locally Determined Under the Utah...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CONTACT ? Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will enable: Unprecedented reductions in emissions and noise in aircraft engines and wind turbines, Improved consumer products through a better understanding of how suds...

242

Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Office (AMO) website offers fact sheets, handbooks, and self-assessment manuals covering steam system efficiency, fundamentals of compressed air systems, motor...

243

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science Industry and Neutron Science: Working To Make a Match "In fundamental research, we want to know everything. Industry wants to know enough to answer a question." Research Contact: Mike Crawford September 2011, Written by Deborah Counce Mike Crawford and Souleymane Diallo Mike Crawford of Dupont (right) and Souleymane Diallo, instrument scientist for the Backscattering Spectrometer at SNS, prepare a material sample for an experiment on the instrument. Industrial users are starting to eye the potential of neutron science for solving problems that can't be solved in any other way. At the same time, the SNS and HFIR neutron science facilities at ORNL are exploring ways to woo such users and to make a match of it, to the benefit of both.

244

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

245

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

25, 2013 [Education, Facility News] 25, 2013 [Education, Facility News] Junior Rangers Enjoy Science Education at ARM Facility on Cape Cod Bookmark and Share Children and adults join in the balloon launch countdown at the ARM Mobile Facility site at Cape Cod National Seashore. Weather balloons are launched at regular intervals four times per day throughout the one-year campaign. Children and adults join in the balloon launch countdown at the ARM Mobile Facility site at Cape Cod National Seashore. Weather balloons are launched at regular intervals four times per day throughout the one-year campaign. School break means vacation, and around Cape Cod, that often means a trip to the seashore. On April 17, families looking for fun and educational outdoor activities spent several hours at Cape Cod National Seashore's

246

Geothermal industry assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 15, 2007 [Facility News] October 15, 2007 [Facility News] ARM Joins National Science Foundation Remote Sensing Collaboration Bookmark and Share In September, the ARM Climate Research Facility became an official member of the National Science Foundation's Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere, or CASA. Initial discussions for partnering began nearly a year ago. After a series of informative visits and presentations, the decision was made to move forward with membership process. The transfer of interagency funds was completed on September 18, 2007, solidifying the partnership. In the meantime, CASA dedicated a significant effort to support the CLASIC field campaign in June 2007 by providing a network of four scanning X-band radars. CASA is a multi-sector partnership among academia, industry, and government

248

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CIMEL Sunphotometer Helps Researchers See the Light in Australia CIMEL Sunphotometer Helps Researchers See the Light in Australia Bookmark and Share A CIMEL sunphotometer, similar to this one in Tinga Tingana, Australia, will be installed at the ARM Climate Research Facility Darwin site. Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. A CIMEL sunphotometer, similar to this one in Tinga Tingana, Australia, will be installed at the ARM Climate Research Facility Darwin site. Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Science collaborators at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) and the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industry Research Organization (CSIRO) are using the ARM Climate Research Facility Darwin site in Australia to evaluate aerosol optical properties during the tropical dry season. As part of the Darwin Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a

249

Turning industry visions into reality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure outlines the activities of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in the Department of Energy. OIT activities are aimed at industry adoption of energy-efficient, pollution-reducing technologies and include research and development on advanced technologies, financing, technical assistance, information dissemination, education, and bringing together industry groups, universities, National Laboratories, states, and environmentalists. OIT`s core initiative is to facilitate partnerships within seven materials and process industries: aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metalcasting, petroleum refining, and steel industries.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure. New grid integration capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center will allow testing of many grid integration aspects of multi-megawatt, utility-scale variable renewable generation and storage technologies. The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility can be used to characterize,

251

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to help industrial facilities find the right fit for their own ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

253

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 10, 2012 [Facility News] July 10, 2012 [Facility News] Collaborations in Atmospheric Science and Observations Discussed in Germany Bookmark and Share Susanne Crewell (center) is flanked by Jimmy Voyles (left) and Shaocheng Xie (right) during a tour of the Research Center Juelich and the university's Jülich ObservatorY for Cloud Evolution (JOYCE) site. Crewell explained that JOYCE, like ARM facilities, was designed for long-term continuous measurements of cloud, radiation, boundary humidity, and precipitation, using active and passive remote sensing instruments. Susanne Crewell (center) is flanked by Jimmy Voyles (left) and Shaocheng Xie (right) during a tour of the Research Center Juelich and the

254

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

Research Facilities & Centers | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Clean Energy Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Centers BioEnergy Science Center Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Center For Structural Molecular Biology Climate Change Science Institute Joint Institute for Biological Sciences Manufacturing Demonstration Facility National Transportation Research Center Tools & Resources News and Awards Supporting Organizations Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers SHARE Facilities, Centers Welcome Industry, Academia Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities and capabilities together provide a unique environment for Clean Energy research. For example, as the lead institution for DOE's BioEnergy Science Center, ORNL is pioneering

256

NEMS industrial module documentation report  

SciTech Connect

The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Industrial Plant Certification Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Performance Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division June 2013 ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve the energy performance of their facilities and strengthen the effectiveness of their energy management program. Through ENERGY STAR, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers a number of forms of recognition, including certification for facility energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR certification for industrial plants recognizes individual manufacturing plants whose

258

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEALTH (ISH) HEALTH (ISH) OBJECTIVE ISH.1 A comprehensive industrial safety & health program has been implemented to address applicable safety requirements at the TA 55 SST Facility. (Core Requirements 1, 3, and 4) Criteria * Procedures are implemented to address applicable industrial & health safety issues. * An adequate number of trained personnel are available to support SST facility regarding industrial safety & health concerns. * Portable fire extinguishers are appropriate for the class of fire they are expected to fight and are located within the proper distance. * Cranes, hooks, slings, and other rigging are plainly marked as to their capacity and inspected prior to use. * Forklifts and other powered lifting devices are adequately inspected.

259

Uranium industry annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

High Technology and Industrial Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor clean room Semiconductor clean room High Technology and Industrial Systems EETD's research on high technology buildings and industrial systems is aimed at reducing energy consumed by the industrial sector in manufacturing facilities, including high technology industries such as data centers, cleanrooms in the such industries as electronics and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and laboratories, improving the competitiveness of U.S. industry. Contacts William Tschudi WFTschudi@lbl.gov (510) 495-2417 Aimee McKane ATMcKane@lbl.gov (518) 782-7002 Links High-Performance Buildings for High-Tech Industries Industrial Energy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Although the monopolistic structure of the electric utility industry may convey a perception that an electric utility is unaffected by competition, this is an erroneous perception with regard to industry. Electric utilities face increased competition, both from other utilities and from industrial self-generation. The paper discusses competition for industrial customers and innovative pricing trends that have evolved nationally to meet the growing competition for industrial sales. Cogeneration activities and the emerging concepts of wheeling power are also discussed. Specifics of industry evaluation and reaction to utility pricing are presented. Also enumerated are examples of the response various utilities throughout the United States have made to the needs of their industrial customers through innovative rate design. Industry/utility cooperation can result in benefits to industry, to the electric utility and to all other ratepayers. This discussion includes examples of successful cooperation between industry and utilities.

Ross, J. A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

.Mr. C. Yayne Bickerstaff Manager, Corporate Industrial Hygiene  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Mr. C. Yayne Bickerstaff Mr. C. Yayne Bickerstaff Manager, Corporate Industrial Hygiene Westinghouse Electric Corporation East Pittsburgh Plant Forest Hills Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230 Dear Mr. Bickerstaff: The Department of Energy (DOE), as part of its formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). has reviewed information on the Westinghouse facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to determine whether it contains residual radioactivity traceable to activities conducted on behalf of the Atomic Energy Commisslon (a predecessor to DOE). A radiological survey indicated that the radiation levels are equal to natural background. Therefore. no remedial action Is required, and DOE is eliminating this Uestinghouse facility from further consideration under FUSRAP.

263

Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Industry - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Former User Group Chair Enthusiastic About Relevance of Neutron Scattering Former User Group Chair Enthusiastic About Relevance of Neutron Scattering to Industrial Research Former User Group Chair Mike Crawford Mike Crawford, DuPont Research and Development. The drive is intensifying to encourage research partnerships between Neutron Sciences and private industry. Such partnerships, a long-term strategic goal set by the DOE's Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, will deliver industry and its technological problems to SNS and HFIR, where joint laboratory-industry teams can use the unparalleled resources available here to resolve them. "SNS is a tremendous facility. It has the potential to have a couple of thousand user visits a year and, if they build another target station in the future, you're probably talking about 4000 user visits a year,"

265

Argonne CNM: Industrial Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Industrial Users For Industrial Users The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) has specific interest in growing the industrial user program and encourages researchers in industry to consider the capabilities and expertise we have to offer. As a CNM user, you have easy access to sophisticated scientific instrumentation geared toward nanoscience and nanotechnology. Moreover, our widely recognized staff researchers offer support in designing your experiments, using the equipment, and analyzing your data. Access to the CNM is through peer review of user proposals. Before you submit your first user proposal, we encourage you to contact any of our staff researchers, group leaders, the User Office, or division management to discuss the feasibility of your intended research using the expertise and facilities at the CNM. We are here to serve you as part of our user community and will be happy to address any questions you might have.

266

Tobacco Industry Political Power and Influence in Florida From 1979 to 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco Industry CampaignTobacco Industry Campaign Contributions 1997 -Activities and the Tobacco Industry's Response in California

Givel, Michael S. Ph.D.; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered residue were also important for material control and accountability purposes. In summary, the results of the holdup assays were essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to ensure that administrative criticality safety controls were not exceeded. This paper discusses the {gamma}-ray assay measurements conducted and the modeling of the acquired data to obtain measured holdup in process equipment, exhaust components, and fixed geometry scrap cans. It also presents development work required to model new acquisition configurations and to adapt available instrumentation to perform the assays.

DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

User's guide to DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's research laboratories represent valuable, often unique, resources for university and industrial scientists. It is DOE policy to make these laboratories and facilities available to qualified scientists. The answers to such questions as who are eligible, what and where are the facilities, what is the cost, when can they be used, are given. Data sheets are presented for each facility to provide information such as location, user contact, description of research, etc. A subject index refers to areas of research and equipment available.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] ARM Outreach Materials Chosen for Earth Day Display in Washington DC Bookmark and Share Posters for the ARM Mobile Facility and ARM Education and Outreach were selected for the 2008 Earth Day display at DOE Headquarters. Posters for the ARM Mobile Facility and ARM Education and Outreach were selected for the 2008 Earth Day display at DOE Headquarters. Earth Day is officially honored each year on April 22, however, many groups sponsor activities throughout the entire month of April. At DOE Headquarters in Washington DC, two ARM posters were selected to join a poster display representing programs from numerous DOE offices. The display was featured in the Forrestal Building's ground-level and first floor lobby areas throughout the week of April 21. The posters were then displayed at

270

PNNL: EDO - Facilities & Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities & Equipment Facilities & Equipment Facilities Equipment Decades of government investment on and around the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory campus has made PNNL a business-friendly resource for conducting a wide range of research. As a mission-focused organization, we are dedicated to teaming with government agencies, industry and academia to address what we believe are among the nation's most pressing needs in the areas of energy, environment, national security, and fundamental science. But behind these important missions is a wealth of supporting capabilities including incubator space, research laboratories, and user facilities that may be just what your business needs. We invite you to learn more about how we can work with businesses as well as what research laboratories and user facilities are available.

271

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

Dr. Diane Schaub

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

Not Available

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

ENERGY STAR Score for Worship Facilities | ENERGY STAR Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product...

275

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Using Fuel Cells for Backup...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells provide highly effective backup to power these facilities in event of electrical grid power outages. The telecommunications industry has expanded rapidly as mobile...

276

OSS 19.9 Industrial Hygiene 4/10/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Industrial Hygiene 4/10/95 9 Industrial Hygiene 4/10/95 OSS 19.9 Industrial Hygiene 4/10/95 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of programs implemented by the contractor to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and control environmental factors or stresses that may adversely affect the health of the Department's workers. The Facility Representative conducts walkthroughs, observes activities, and reviews records to determine if the implementation of the contractor's Industrial Hygiene Program is achieving required results. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. OSS19-09.doc More Documents & Publications OSS 19.8 Heat Stress 4/3/95 OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 3/21/95

277

Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

Boehlecke, R. F.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Data Sharing Report for the Quantification of Removable Activity in Various Surveillance and Maintenance Facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OR-EM) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. Specifically, DOE OR-EM requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting potential removable radiological contamination that may be transferrable to future personal protective equipment (PPE) and contamination control materialscollectively referred to as PPE throughout the remainder of this reportused in certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Project facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Routine surveys in Bldgs. 3001, 3005, 3010, 3028, 3029, 3038, 3042, 3517, 4507, and 7500 continuously generate PPE. The waste is comprised of Tyvek coveralls, gloves, booties, Herculite, and other materials used to prevent worker exposure or the spread of contamination during routine maintenance and monitoring activities. This report describes the effort to collect and quantify removable activity that may be used by the ORNL S&M Project team to develop radiation instrumentation screening criteria. Material potentially containing removable activity was collected on smears, including both masselin large-area wipes (LAWs) and standard paper smears, and analyzed for site-related constituents (SRCs) in an analytical laboratory. The screening criteria, if approved, may be used to expedite waste disposition of relatively clean PPE. The ultimate objectives of this effort were to: 1) determine whether screening criteria can be developed for these facilities, and 2) provide process knowledge information for future site planners. The screening criteria, if calculated, must be formally approved by Federal Facility Agreement parties prior to use for ORNL S&M Project PPE disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). ORAU executed the approved sampling and analysis plan (SAP) (DOE 2013) while closely coordinating with ORNL S&M Project personnel and using guidelines outlined in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012). WHP guidelines were followed because the PPE waste targeted by this SAP is consistent with that addressed under the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile for disposal at EMWMFthis PPE is a future waste stream as defined in the WHP. The SAP presents sampling strategy and methodology, sample selection guidelines, and analytical guidelines and requirements necessary for characterizing future ORNL S&M Project PPE waste. This report presents a review of the sample and analysis methods including data quality objectives (DQOs), required deviations from the original design, summary of field activities, radiation measurement data, analytical laboratory results, a brief presentation of results, and process knowledge summaries.

King, David A

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Implementing waste minimization at an active plutonium processing facility: Successes and progress at technical area (TA) -55 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has ongoing national security missions that necessitate increased plutonium processing. The bulk of this activity occurs at Technical Area -55 (TA-55), the nations only operable plutonium facility. TA-55 has developed and demonstrated a number of technologies that significantly minimize waste generation in plutonium processing (supercritical CO{sub 2}, Mg(OH){sub 2} precipitation, supercritical H{sub 2}O oxidation, WAND), disposition of excess fissile materials (hydride-dehydride, electrolytic decontamination), disposition of historical waste inventories (salt distillation), and Decontamination & Decommissioning (D&D) of closed nuclear facilities (electrolytic decontamination). Furthermore, TA-55 is in the process of developing additional waste minimization technologies (molten salt oxidation, nitric acid recycle, americium extraction) that will significantly reduce ongoing waste generation rates and allow volume reduction of existing waste streams. Cost savings from reduction in waste volumes to be managed and disposed far exceed development and deployment costs in every case. Waste minimization is also important because it reduces occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, risks of transportation accidents, and transfer of burdens from current nuclear operations to future generations.

Balkey, J.J.; Robinson, M.A.; Boak, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

282

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

283

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

284

Regulatory facility guide for Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rymer, A.C. [Transportation Consulting Services, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

285

130 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 56, NO. 1, JANUARY 2009 Static Var Compensator and Active Power Filter With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformers scaled in the power of three. The filter can compensate load currents with a high harmonic content Compensator and Active Power Filter With Power Injection Capability, Using 27-Level Inverters and Photovoltaic, and Luis Morán, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--An active power filter and static var compensator with active power

Rudnick, Hugh

286

Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rolf Butters Rolf Butters Industrial Technologies Program Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources Webinar - June 11, 2009 Michael MacDonald Agenda  Introduction to Industrial Buildings Opportunity and Tools  EERE Funding, Opportunities, and Resources  Next Steps 6/11/2009 2 Facilities Energy  ITP has been working for a couple years now to develop tools to address facilities energy use, present in most plants, and about 8% of total sector energy use  First tool is a Score Card, implemented both as a stand- alone Excel file and for QuickPEP - Score Card has to be simple, so is approximate - But it can be a very important tool for scoping facilities energy use at a plant  Second tool is an adaptation of the BCHP Screening Tool, originally developed by the Distributed Energy program but

287

Uranium industry annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

Lewandowski, A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 327 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 327 Facility [Post-Irradiation Testing Laboratory] provides office and laboratory space for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) scientific and engineering staff conducting multidisciplinary research in the areas of post-irradiated fuels and structural materials. The facility is designed to accommodate the use of radioactive and hazardous materials in the conduct of these activities. This report summarizes the airborne emissions and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Equity Industrial Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equity Industrial Partners Equity Industrial Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Equity Industrial Partners Facility Equity Industrial Partners Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Equity Industrial Turbines LLC Developer Equity Industrial Turbines LLC Energy Purchaser City of Gloucester Location Gloucester MA Coordinates 42.625864°, -70.65621° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.625864,"lon":-70.65621,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or documented ? Provides instructions for implementing annual S&M inspections and activities The following facilities that were included in Revision 1 of this plan have reached final disposition and are no longer in the S&M program: ? Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 25-3110 ? Test Cell A Facility, Building 25-3113 ? TCC Facility, Building 25-3210 ? Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 26-2201 ? Super Kukla Facility, Building 27-5400

Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec] [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec] [NSTec

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: china.lbl.gov/sites/china.lbl.gov/files/LBNL-3991E.Industrial%20Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Screenshot References: Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook[1] "This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and

293

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

294

Facility Security Officer Contractor Toolcart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESPONSIBILITIES RESPONSIBILITIES FSO Overview FSO Reporting Responsibilities Questions an FSOs at a Non-Possesssing Site Could Be Asked During an Audit Non-Possessing Contractor Security Requirements Plan Training for Facility Security Officers (FSOs) PHY-210DE Facility Security Officer Overview PHY-210DB, Introduction to Facility Security Officer (Self-Study Course ) Duration: 3 days Description: This correspondence course provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the DOE or DOE-contractor FSO. The course emphasizes facility clearance requirements, personnel security, information security, incident reporting, and other related programs. The course references the National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) (DoD 5220.22-M) and a comprehensive listing of DOE orders, manuals, guides, forms, and notices.

295

Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Basis Safety Basis FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A fully compliant Nuclear Facility Safety Basis. Program is implemented and maintained across the site. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830 Subpart B Guidance:  DOE STD 3009  DOE STD 1104  DOE STD  DOE G 421.1-2 Implementation Guide For Use in Developing Documented Safety Analyses To Meet Subpart B Of 10 CFR 830  DOE G 423.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Developing Technical Safety Requirements  DOE G 424.1-1 Implementation Guide For Use In Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation The site contractor has developed an up-to-date, comprehensive, compliant, documented nuclear facility safety basis and associated implementing mechanisms and procedures for all required nuclear facilities and activities (10 CFR

296

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow inside an Industrial Boiler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Industrial boilers that produce steam or electric power represent a large capital investment as well as a crucial facility for overall plant operations. In real (more)

Saripalli, Raja

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Participant Handbook | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Participant Handbook Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial...

298

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Bainbridge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 47 million inshell pounds of peanuts. The Bainbridge facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2010. This plant reached 16% reduction in energy...

299

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing Long Beach - Douglas Center Complex Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility...

300

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letter from California Portland Cement CEO to the Cement Industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of a Performance-based Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the work of EPA and the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry to develop an Energy Performance Indicator (EPI) for facilities that develop and manufacture pharmaceutical products...

302

Guidelines for Estimating Unmetered Industrial Water Use | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

approach to estimate industrial water use in evaporative cooling systems, steam boiler systems, and facility wash applications. This document assists federal agencies in the...

303

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

304

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Danville Facility (Tape) Intertape Polymer Corporation 1101 Eagle Springs Road Danville, Virginia 24540 The Intertape...

305

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Intertape...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Brighton Facility Intertape Polymer Corp. 1095 South 4 th Avenue Brighton, Colorado 80601 The Brighton Intertape Polymer...

306

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Elgin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Elgin, IL Corporate Headquarters & Facility 1703 N. Randall Rd. Elgin, IL 60123 The Elgin Site was designed to operate...

307

Dakota Electric Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Conservation Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dakota Electric provides low-interest loans to help its commercial and industrial customers finance projects which will improve the energy efficiency of participating facilities. The minimum loan...

308

Collaborating with Industry for Innovation: Laboratory Coordinating Council (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a brochure describing Laboratory Coordinating Council's network of labs and facilities to promote partnership between industry and national laboratories.

Not Available

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Existing Facilities Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program Existing Facilities Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Pre-Qualified Measures (General): $30,000 (electric and gas) Electric Efficiency and Energy Storage: 50% of cost or $2 million Natural Gas Efficiency: 50% of cost or $200,000 Demand Response: 75% of cost or $2 million (limit also applies to combined performance based efficiency and demand response measures) Industrial Process Efficiency: 50% of cost or $5 million

310

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

311

Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

None

1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

312

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science Office of Defense Science Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities Facilities Office of Research and Development, Facilities The Office of Research and Development manages and oversees the operation of an exceptional suite of science, technology, and engineering facilities that support and further the national stockpile stewardship agenda. Of varying size, scope and capabilities, the facilities work in a concert to accomplish the following activities: Annual assessment of the stockpile in the face of increasing challenges due to aging or remanufacture, Reduced response times for resolving stockpile issues, Timely and certifiable completion of Life Extension Programs,

313

Interfacial and Nanscale Science Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INSF Overview INSF Overview Section 2-5-1 Interfacial and Nanoscale Science Facility The Interfacial & Nanoscale Science (I&NS) Facility is a world-class resource for scientific expertise and instrumentation focused on the study of interfacial phenomena and nanoscience and technology. This section summarizes the capabilities available in the I&NS Facility, along with research programs associated with facility users. Activities in the I&NS Facility address national needs in environmental restoration, waste management, pollution prevention, energy, and national security through research that specializes in preparation, characterization, interactions, and reactivity of interfaces and nanoscale materials. The range of scientific expertise and instrumentation within the I&NS Facility provides a unique envi-

314

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Suzhou Facility BD Medical No.5 Baiyu Road Suzhou Industrial Park Jiangsu P.R. China In 1995 BD became the second...

315

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development of renewable energy production facilities in theProduction at a Food Processing Facility. Office of Industrial Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Wind/hybrid power system test facilities in the United States and Canada  

SciTech Connect

By 1995, there will be four facilities available for testing of wind/hybrid power systems in the United States and Canada. This paper describes the mission, approach, capabilities, and status of activity at each of these facilities. These facilities have in common a focus on power systems for remote, off-grid locations that include wind energy. At the same time, these facilities have diverse, yet complimentary, missions that range from research to technology development to testing. The first facility is the test facility at the Institut de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec (IREQ), Hydro-Quebec`s research institute near Montreal, Canada. This facility, not currently in operation, was used for initial experiments demonstrating the dynamic stability of a high penetration, no-storage wind/diesel (HPNSWD) concept. The second facility is located at the Atlantic Wind Test Site (AWTS) on Prince Edward Island, Canada, where testing of the HPNSWD concept developed by Hydro-Quebec is currently underway. The third is the Hybrid Power Test Facility planned for the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, which will focus on testing commercially available hybrid power systems. The fourth is the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Conservation and Production Research Laboratory in Bushland, Texas, where a test laboratory is being developed to study wind-energy penetration and control strategies for wind/hybrid systems. The authors recognize that this summary of test facilities is not all inclusive; for example, at least one US industrial facility is currently testing a hybrid power system. Our intent, though, is to describe four facilities owned by nonprofit or governmental institutions in North America that are or will be available for ongoing development of wind/hybrid power systems.

Green, H J [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Clark, R N [USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, TX (United States); Brothers, C [Atlantic Wind Test Site, North Cape, PE (Canada); Saulnier, B [Institut de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Classical approaches to predicting industrial noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting operational noise levels is an essential part of designing an industrial facility. Community noise levels are usually predicted for environmental assessment and licensing. In?plant noise levels are predicted

Frank H. Brittain

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

319

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2004 Facility News ARM Climate Research Facility Achieves User Milestone Three Months Ahead of Schedule Bookmark and Share Summary of the ARM Climate Research Facility User...

320

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

322

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hanford Site waste tank farm facilities design reconstitution program plan  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the commercial nuclear industry the lack of design reconstitution programs prior to the mid 1980`s has resulted in inadequate documentation to support operating facilities configuration changes or safety evaluations. As a result, many utilities have completed or have ongoing design reconstitution programs and have discovered that without sufficient pre-planning their program can be potentially very expensive and may result in end-products inconsistent with the facility needs or expectations. A design reconstitution program plan is developed here for the Hanford waste tank farms facility as a consequence of the DOE Standard on operational configuration management. This design reconstitution plan provides for the recovery or regeneration of design requirements and basis, the compilation of Design Information Summaries, and a methodology to disposition items open for regeneration that were discovered during the development of Design Information Summaries. Implementation of this plan will culminate in an end-product of about 30 Design Information Summary documents. These documents will be developed to identify tank farms facility design requirements and design bases and thereby capture the technical baselines of the facility. This plan identifies the methodology necessary to systematically recover documents that are sources of design input information, and to evaluate and disposition open items or regeneration items discovered during the development of the Design Information Summaries or during the verification and validation processes. These development activities will be governed and implemented by three procedures and a guide that are to be developed as an outgrowth of this plan.

Vollert, F.R.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. Combustion Test Facility. Quarterly activity report, January 1, 1979--April 1, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Number six fuel oil tests, 30% COM tests, and 40% COM tests were conducted. Operation, modification, and maintenance of the combustion test facility is described. (LTN)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Audit of the Department of Energy's User Facilities, IG-0395  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 19, 1996 August 19, 1996 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-1 SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of the Department of Energy's User Facilities" TO: The Secretary BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy has for years made certain designated user facilities available to universities, industry, and other research organizations. Due to technology transfer efforts and excess capacities, even more facilities, such as defense program facilities, are being made available to outside users. Today, Department user facilities fall into one of three categories - designated user facilities, other user resources, and Technology Deployment Center/User Facilities. The objectives of the audit

326

Use of Activated Charcoal for Rn-220 Adsorption for Operations Associated with the Uranium Deposit in the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility  

SciTech Connect

Measurements have been collected with the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of {sup 220}Rn from process off-gas at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A series of bench-scale tests were performed at superficial flow velocities of 10, 18, 24, and 33 cm s{sup -1} (20, 35, 47, and 65 ft min{sup -1}) with a continuous input concentration of {sup 220}Rn in the range of 9 x 10{sup 3} pCi L{sup -1}. In addition, two tests were performed at the MSRE facility by flowing helium through the auxiliary charcoal bed uranium deposit. These tests were performed so that the adsorptive effectiveness could be evaluated with a relatively high concentration of {sup 220}Rn. In addition to measuring the effectiveness of activated charcoal as a {sup 220}Rn adsorption media, the source term for available {sup 220}Rn and gaseous fission products was evaluated and compared to what is believed to be present in the deposit. The results indicate that only a few percent of the total {sup 220}Rn in the deposit is actually available for removal and that the relative activity of fission gases is very small when compared to {sup 220}Rn. The measurement data were then used to evaluate the expected effectiveness of a proposed charcoal adsorption bed consisting of a right circular cylinder having a diameter of 43 cm and a length of 91 cm (17 in. I.D. x 3 ft.). The majority of the measurement data predicts an overall {sup 220}Rn activity reduction factor of about 1 x 10{sup 9} for such a design; however, two measurements collected at a flow velocity of 18 cm s{sup -1} (35 ft min{sup -1}) indicated that the reduction factor could be as low as 1 x 10{sup 6}. The adsorptive capacity of the proposed trap was also evaluated to determine the expected life prior to degradation of performance. Taking a conservative vantage point during analysis, it was estimated that the adsorption effectiveness should not begin to deteriorate until a {sup 220}Rn activity on the order of 10{sup 10} Ci has been processed. It was therefore concluded that degradation of performance would most likely occur as the result of causes other than filling by radon progeny.

Coleman, R.L.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Use of Activated Charcoal for {sup 220}Rn Adsorption for Operations Associated with the Uranium Deposit in the Auxiliary Charcoal Bed at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility  

SciTech Connect

Measurements have been collected with the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of {sup 220}Rn from process off-gas at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A series of bench-scale tests were performed at superficial flow velocities of 10, 18, 24, and 33 cm/s (20, 35, 47, and 65 ft/min) with a continuous input concentration of {sup 220}Rn in the range of 9 x 10{sup 3} pCi/L. In addition, two tests were performed at the MSRE facility by flowing helium through the auxiliary charcoal bed uranium deposit. These tests were performed so that the adsorptive effectiveness could be evaluated with a relatively high concentration of {sup 220}Rn. In addition to measuring the effectiveness of activated charcoal as a {sup 220}Rn adsorption media, the source term for available {sup 220}Rn in the deposit is actually available for removal and that the relative activity of fission gases is very small when compared to {sup 220}Rn. The measurement data were then used to evaluate the expected effectiveness of a proposed charcoal adsorption bed consisting of a right circular cylinder having a diameter of 43 cm and a length of 91 cm (17 in. I.D. x 3 ft.). The majority of the measurement data predicts an overall 220Rn activity reduction factor of about 1 x 10{sup 9} for such a design; however, two measurements collected at a flow velocity of 18 cm/s (35 ft/min) indicated that the reduction factor could be as low as 1 x 10{sup 6}. The adsorptive capacity of the proposed trap was also evaluated to determine the expected life prior to degradation of performance. Taking a conservative vantage point during analysis, it was estimated that the adsorption effectiveness should not begin to deteriorate until a {sup 220}Rn activity on the order of 10{sup 10} Ci has been processed. It was therefore concluded that degradation of performance would likely occur as the result of causes other than filling by radon progeny.

Coleman, R.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

ASD(NII)/DoD CIO SUBJECT: Defense Industrial Base (DIB) Cyber Security/Information Assurance (CS/IA) Activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directing the conduct of DIB CS/IA activities to protect unclassified DoD information, as defined in the Glossary, that transits or resides on unclassified DIB information systems and networks. 2. APPLICABILITY. This Instruction applies to OSD, the Military Departments, the Office of

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

331

Drainage, Sanitation, and Public Facilities Districts (Virginia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Drainage, Sanitation, and Public Facilities Districts (Virginia) Drainage, Sanitation, and Public Facilities Districts (Virginia) Drainage, Sanitation, and Public Facilities Districts (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Local Governments and Districts This legislation provides for the establishment of sanitary, sanitation, drainage, and public facilities districts in Virginia. Designated districts are public bodies, and have the authority to regulate the construction and development of sanitation and waste disposal projects in their

332

Property Tax Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities Property Tax Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 5/25/2007 State Montana Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 50% tax abatement Provider Montana Department of Revenue In May 2007, Montana enacted legislation (H.B. 3) that allows a property tax abatement for new renewable energy production facilities, new renewable energy manufacturing facilities, and renewable energy research and

333

Optimal Life Cycle Cost Design for an Energy Efficient Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past twelve years, Texas Instruments has developed extensive energy management programs that have enabled them to reduce energy usage by 42%. Typically, these reductions have been a result of the application of microprocessor based energy management systems in existing facilities. Because of the nature of the electronics industry, i .e., light manufacturing and the continued use of more energy intensive technologies, it has become economically advantageous to take a more active role in the architectural design of new facilities. The goal is to incorporate those energy conservation features into the design having the lowest lifecycle costs.

Thompson, C. T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4837E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Goli, Sasank, Aimee T. McKane, and Daniel Olsen Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 08/2011 Conference Location Niagara Falls, NY Keywords market sectors, openadr, refrigerated warehouses Abstract Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

335

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025...

336

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility. Summary: ... Cf irradiation facility (Photograph by: Neutron Physics Group). Lead Organizational Unit: pml. Staff: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

337

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility. ... NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

ORISE: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) science education and research mission. From on-site medical laboratories to consortium research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

339

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

340

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

342

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

343

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: Two case studies  

SciTech Connect

Energy-use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of the existing mix of industries in the US. Many California firms operate small- and medium-sized facilities housed in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably over time for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services (providing occupant comfort and necessities like lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. Electricity for building services is sometimes priced as if it were base loaded like process uses; in reality this load varies significantly according to occupancy schedules and cooling and heating loads, much as in any commercial building. Using informal field surveys, simulation studies, and detailed analyses of existing data (including utility commercial/industrial audit files), we studied the energy use of this industrial subsector through a multi-step procedure: (1) characterizing non-process building energy and power use in California industries, (2) identifying conservation and load-shaping opportunities in industrial building services, and (3) investigating industrial buildings and system design methodologies. In an earlier report, we addressed these issues by performing an extensive survey of the existing publicly available data, characterizing and comparing the building energy use in this sector. In this report, we address the above objectives by examining and analyzing energy use in two industrial case-study facilities in California. Based on the information for the case studies, we discuss the design consideration for these industrial buildings, characterize their energy use, and review their conservation and load-shaping potentials. In addition, we identify and discuss some research ideas for further investigation.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Facility automation for retail facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article will focus on retail chain stores with areas of 22,000 to 75,000 sq ft, but much of the article will apply to all retail stores independent of size. Typically, a store is serviced by 5 to 15 rooftop HVAC units with a total cooling capacity of 50 to 150 tons, depending on the floor area and geographic location. The interior lighting represents a load of 80 to 300 KW with three lighting levels--retail, stocking, and security or night. Most stores are located in strip centers, and therefore, the parking lot lighting is provided by the landlord, but each store does control and service its own sign lighting. Generally, the total load controlled by an FAS represents 130 to 450 KW with corresponding annual energy costs ranging from $65,000 to $200,000 (natural gas and electricity), depending on the size of the store and the local unit costs of energy. Historical utility data, electrical and mechanical drawings, site surveys, significant analyses of data, and most importantly, discussions with corporate facilities management personnel and store operations personnel provide the source for the development theory and sequence of operation of the design of the facility automation systems for retail stores. The three main goals of an FAS are: reduce utility operating costs, maintain comfort levels during occupied hours, reduce HVAC maintenance costs.

Ameduri, G. (Roth Bros., Inc., Youngstown, OH (United States). Facilities Automation Division)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental radiation protection studies related to nuclear industries, using AMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

14 C is produced in nuclear reactors during normal operation and part of it is continuously released into the environment. Because of the biological importance of carbon and the long physical half-life of 14 C it is of interest to study these releases. The 14 C activity concentrations in the air and vegetation around some Swedish as well as foreign nuclear facilities have been measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 59 Ni is produced by neutron activation in the stainless steel close to the core of a nuclear reactor. The 59 Ni levels have been measured in order to be able to classify the different parts of the reactor with respect to their content of long-lived radionuclides before final storage. The technique used to measure 59 Ni at a small accelerator such as the Lund facility has been developed over the past few years and material from the Swedish nuclear industry has been analyzed.

Ragnar Hellborg; Bengt Erlandsson; Mikko Faarinen; Helena Hkansson; Kjell Hkansson; Madis Kiisk; Carl-Erik Magnusson; Per Persson; Gran Skog; Kristina Stenstrm; Sren Mattsson; Charlotte Thornberg

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s September 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific iems discussed include: (1) merger of Urangesellschaft and Interuran, (2) cessation of uranium mining in Bulgaria, (3) record operation of Limerick-2 and Tokai-2, (4) MRS in Wyoming, (5) low-level waste facilities at Perry, (6) closure of Trojan, (7) restart of Kozloduy-6, (8) agreements between Cogema and Minatom, (9) planning for a large nuclear power plant in Japan moves forward, (10) order of a new reactor at Civaux, (11) relicensing of Yankee Rowe, (12) operation of Bradwell-2, and (13) high-level waste management in Japan.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Recent developments: Industry briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s August 2992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items discussed include: (1) non-proliferation in Argentina and Brazil, (2) a joint-venture uranium leaching project in the USA, (3) life extension for Yankee Rowe, (4) contracts for nuclear plants in the Republic of Korea, (5) cleanup of Wismut, (6) record operation of Three Mile Island-1, Oconee-1, and Cook-1, (7) closure of Kozloduy units, (8) China`s ascension to the non-proliferation treaty, and (9) a centrifuge enrichment facility in Japan.

NONE

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the countrys greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) OBJECTIVE TQ.1 SST Trailer facility has a training and qualifications program in place to facilitate the selection of trained and qualified personnel performing the SST Trailer facility activities and a sufficient number of qualified personnel are available to ensure operations in a safe and compliant manner. NMT-4 management and support staff have the level of knowledge required to operate SST Trailer facility activities and to ensure that any modifications are controlled and reviewed for potential impacts on training and qualification requirements. SST Trailer facility personnel have been trained on emergency response activities and requirements. (CORE REQUIREMENTS 3, 4, 6, and 11) Criteria 1. The training and qualification program is identified for the SST Trailer facility that

350

Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97  

SciTech Connect

This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Addendum to the composite analysis for the E-Area Vaults and Saltstone Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the composite analysis performed on the two active SRS low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The facilities are the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility and the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility.

Cook, J.R.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

352

ORELA accelerator facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator The Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator Pulsed Neutron Source The ORELA is a powerful electron accelerator-based neutron source located in the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It produces intense, nanosecond bursts of neutrons, each burst containing neutrons with energies from 10e-03 to 10e08 eV. ORELA is operated about 1200 hours per year and is an ORNL User Facility open to university, national laboratory and industrial scientists. The mission of ORELA has changed from a recent focus on applied research to nuclear astrophysics. This is an area in which ORELA has historically been very productive: most of the measurements of neutron capture cross sections necessary for understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis through the slow neutron capture process (s-process) have

353

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. combustion test facility. Yearly activity report, April 3, 1978--April 1, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The operation, modifications and maintenance of the DOE/PETC 700 H.P. combustion test facility are described. Shakedown and operation limit tests were performed with No. 6 fuel oil and 30% COM. The tests involved flame studies, erosion, corrosion and the examination of boiler deposits. Various construction, modification and maintenance efforts are detailed. The original 100 H.P. test facility was scrapped after 3 months operation under this contract and construction of a new 100-20 H.P. test facility begun. (LTN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Science and Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Technology Facility Science and Technology Facility Photo of the Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) at NREL. NREL's Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) has a sustainable and energy efficient design and will support solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research. Solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research are conducted in our Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) with the benefits of a forty percent reduction in energy use compared to standard laboratory buildings; energy recovery for ventilation in laboratories; and functional and flexible laboratory space. Designed specifically to reduce time delays associated with transferring technology to industry, the S&TF's 71,000 square feet is a multi-level facility of laboratory space, office space, and lobby connected by an

356

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility A photo of a grey, three-story research facility on a large campus. The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) incorporates a large number of energy efficiency and sustainability practices into its cutting-edge design. This facility received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Gold-level certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and supports a variety of advanced biofuels projects and enables researchers and industry partners to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate processes for the production of bio-based products and fuels. Fast Facts Cost: $33.5M Square feet: 27,000 Occupants: 32 Labs/Equipment: high-bay biochemical conversion pilot plant that

357

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

358

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

359

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Facility repowering study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic, fuel, and environmental implications of repowering existing nonreheat, oil-fired electrical generating facilities in California with distillate fuels, and was extended by CEC staff to include coal-derived synthetic fuels are evaluated. California's older oil-fired power plants are very inefficient and repowering would significantly reduce the amount of oil burned to produce a unit of electrical energy at these facilities. Repowering would also add new generating capacity without requiring new sites. Specific power plants were categorized according to their potential for repowering. Between the initiation of the contract and the termination date, federal legislation was enacted (Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (PIFUA)), which effectively prohibits oil-based repowering. In order to make best use of the repowering work, CEC staff supplemented the study with analysis based upon replacing the distillate fuel for combustion turbine utilization with relatively clean-burning fuels derived from coal (i.e., methanol, SNG). This work concluded that 42 units statewide have good potential for repowering and would add greater than 5200 MW of new capacity at approximately $250/kW ($ 1977). For both distillate and synfuels repowering, emissions would decrease over the nonrepowered levels.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFMRF Overview HFMRF Overview Section 2-3-1 High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility The High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) focuses a significant portion of its research on developing a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of biochemical and biological systems and their response to environmental effects. A secondary focus is materials science, including catalysis and chemical mechanisms and processes. Staff and science consultants within this facility offer expertise in the areas of structural biology, solid-state materials characterization, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Research activities in the HFMRF include: * structure determination of large molecular assemblies such as protein-DNA (normal and damaged DNA) and protein-RNA complexes

364

Alternate Cooling Methods for Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling in industrial facilities has traditionally been performed by mechanical vapor compression units. While it remains the standard, recent concerns with the rising cost of electricity and environmental legislation restricting or outlawing CFC refrigerants has caused many plants to evaluate existing cooling methods. This paper presents case studies on alternate cooling methods used for space conditioning at several different industrial facilities. Methods discussed include direct and indirect evaporative, desiccant, and absorption cooling. Cooling effectiveness, operating cost and investment are also presented. Data for this evaluation was collected from clients served by Georgia Tech's Industrial Energy Extension Service, a state-sponsored energy conservation assistance program.

Brown, M.; Moore, D.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 3, 2010 [Facility News] November 3, 2010 [Facility News] Arctic Campaign Cut Short; Spring Restart A Possibility Bookmark and Share An unfortunate incident in the early stages of the Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) field campaign at Oliktok Point on the North Slope of Alaska has resulted in the campaign being terminated. The primary in situ measurement platform for the campaign was a tethered balloon for making ascents through the clouds with instruments that measure cloud microphysical properties, while ground-based instruments simultaneously collect additional data. During one of the balloon's initial flights, its primary and secondary tethers broke. A radio-controlled cut-down device was activated to bring down the balloon, which landed with its instrument

366

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2007 [Facility News] 6, 2007 [Facility News] Radiative Heating in Unexplored Bands Campaign Begins Today Bookmark and Share This chart shows the spectral and height dependence of the infrared cooling rates for a mid-latitude summer profile. Note that the majority of the infrared cooling in the middle and upper tropsphere occurs in spectral regions that RHUBC will investigate. This chart shows the spectral and height dependence of the infrared cooling rates for a mid-latitude summer profile. Note that the majority of the infrared cooling in the middle and upper tropsphere occurs in spectral regions that RHUBC will investigate. In conjunction with other scientific activities taking place during International Polar Year 2007-2008, today (February 26) an international research team begins a three-week field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. The

367

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2006 [Facility News] January 31, 2006 [Facility News] Media Day Kicks Off Tropical Cloud Study in Australia Bookmark and Share While on the ground, the Twin Otter (left) and Proteus (right) are sharing hangar space at the Royal Australian Air Force base for the duration of TWP-ICE field operations. While on the ground, the Twin Otter (left) and Proteus (right) are sharing hangar space at the Royal Australian Air Force base for the duration of TWP-ICE field operations. Two days after a highly successful media day, January 21 marked the official start of flight operations for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment in Darwin, Australia. Science team members are guiding the aircraft missions from the Bureau of Meteorology's Forecast Center in Darwin; the rest of the experiment activities are being managed

368

The VAO Transient Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time domain community wants robust and reliable tools to enable production of and subscription to community-endorsed event notification packets (VOEvent). The VAO Transient Facility (VTF) is being designed to be the premier brokering service for the community, both collecting and disseminating observations about time-critical astronomical transients but also supporting annotations and the application of intelligent machine-learning to those observations. This distinguishes two types of activity associated with the facility: core infrastructure and user services. In this paper, we will review the prior art in both areas and describe the planned capabilities of the VTF. In particular, we will focus on scalability and quality-of-service issues required by the next generation of sky surveys, such as LSST and SKA.

Graham, Matthew J; Drake, Andrew; Mahabal, Ashish; Williams, Roy; Seaman, Rob

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE MG.1 Formal agreements between the operating contractor and NNSA have been established via the contract or other enforceable mechanism to govern the safe operation of the facility. A systematic review of the facility's conformance to these requirements has been performed. These requirements have been implemented in the facility. (Core Requirement 14) Criteria 1. The formal agreements (Authorization Agreement) between the operating contractor and the NNSA were reviewed and in place for the current facility operations. The agreement was revised to include the TA-55 Facility activities and has been approved by the Site Office. 2. Any issues or actions identified as not fully implemented are evaluated for impact on TA- 55 Facility operations, and compensatory measures are identified.

370

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls strategies that are 'hardened' and pre-programmed into facility's software and hardware; More affordable because automation can help reduce labor costs associated with manual DR strategies initiated by facility staff and can be used for long-term.

McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation applies to energy conversion facilities designed for or capable of generating 100 MW or more of electricity, wind energy facilities with a combined capacity of 100 MW, certain transmission facilities, and

372

International Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities International Activities International Activities The International Program assists the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in identifying technologies and strategies for waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, spent nuclear fuel and surplus nuclear material disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning. The International Program seeks to transform advances in science and engineering into practical solutions for environmental remediation. Collaboration with governmental, academic, and industrial organizations in other countries expands the technical depth of the EM program. Working with the international community offers the opportunity to develop consensus on approaches to science, technology and policy for environmental

373

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

374

Office of Nuclear Facility Basis & Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design(HS-31) Reports to the Office of Nuclear Safety About Us The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety...

375

Industrial Retrofits are Possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario is the industrial heartland of Canada and more than 80% of its energy comes from Canadian sources with the remainder from the neighbouring U.S. states. Because of the ever increasing demand for energy relating to increased economic activity, the provincial government's major energy priority is efficiency. In April of 1987, the provincial government initiated a program to assist industrial energy users to reduce their energy usage. This program was designed to concentrate on an in-depth analysis of the complete operations of industrial plants with the analyses being performed by specialist, private sector, engineering consultants. The program is in 3 phases providing an Ontario industrial plant with an Energy Analysis, a Feasibility Analysis Grant and a Project Engineering Design Grant. In this presentation, the author will outline the results of the program to date and will attempt to share with the audience the individual case experiences. Since the program's start, the Ontario Ministry of Energy has completed over 320 energy analyses of industrial plants which had combined energy bills of over $420 million. The potential annual energy savings identified were over $40 million or 9.51%. Electricity and natural gas are the major fuels used by Ontario industries and our surveys to date have shown savings of 6% in electricity and 11% in natural gas. Over the first two years of the program, individual plants have or are intending to implement more than half of the energy analysis recommendations.

Stobart, E. W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than any other quarter on record-961 The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual...

378

Environmental Assessment of Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 0 DOEEA-0930 Environmental Assessment of Facility Operations at the US. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Off ice, Grand Junction, Colorado June 1996 U S . Deparfment of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Finding of No Significant Impact, Facility Operations at the U . S . Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION Finding of No Sigdkant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide o S T ~ environmental assessment (EA) @OE/EA-0930) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects office (GJPO) facility

379

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

380

Operation, modification, and maintenance of DOE/PETC 700 H. P. combustion test facility. Quarterly activity report, April 2-July 1, 1979, second quarter  

SciTech Connect

The coal-oil mixture (COM) combustion test program of the 700 H.P. Combustion Test Facility has been performed successfully according to schedule. The parametric coal-oil mixture combustion tests with 30 and 40% coal concentrations were completed. Test data are being analyzed; some meaningful results were obtained. The combustor tests with 50% coal concentration have been initiated. The installation of the new 100 H.P., oil-fired, fire tube boiler for COM combustion studies is on schedule and facility shake down tests are scheduled.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Evaluating Sites for Industrial Cogeneration in Chicago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration is an industrial energy conservation technology that is particularly suited to urban applications. Large cities and metropolitan areas have large numbers of energy intensive industrial firms as well as commercial buildings; universities and hospital complexes; and new, densely populated residential developments that have large thermal and electric demands. Potential sites have been evaluated as part of a project to encourage industrial cogeneration applications in Chicago. Energy-intensive industries and commercial, industrial, and residential facilities were grouped by energy use type. Natural gas and electricity consumption data then were used to develop energy use profiles by energy use type and location. Complementary thermal energy use profiles and the geographical proximity of firms and facilities were used to exclude unfavorable sites. Thirty-four sites were then evaluated in detail and ranked according to their suitability for consideration in detailed feasibility studies of different cogeneration technologies.

Fowler, G. L.; Baugher, A. H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) Hazardous and Industrial Waste (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section describes standards that must be met by facilities generating and processing hazardous and industrial waste, as well as required permits for the construction and operation of such a facility. The statute also

384

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last...

385

Program on Technology Innovation: Research Plan for Applying Visualization, Simulation, and Interactive Human System Interface Technologies to Sensor Information for Electric Power Industry Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a plan for a multi-year research program to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate visualization, simulation, and interactive human system interface (HSI) technologies to support electric power industry needs. The research program will include demonstrations and produce guidelines. These guidelines will aid not only in identifying and selecting electric power industry applications that are the most likely to provide benefits to the electric power industry from applying advances in visua...

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility News Data Collection from Mobile Facility on Gan Island Suspended Local weather balloon launch volunteers pose with the AMF team on Gan Island after completing their...

387

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

388

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

389

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

390

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

391

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

392

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

393

User Facility Agreement Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. Which Argonne user facility will be hosting you? * Advanced Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne Tandem Linear...

394

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

395

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2008 Facility News National User Facility Organization Meets to Discuss Progress and Ideas In late April, the ARM Technical Director attended an annual meeting of the...

396

Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site or other appropriate disposal facility. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) operated...

397

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in August and October...

398

AVLIS industrial access program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document deals with the procurements planned for the construction of an Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) production plant. Several large-scale AVLIS facilities have already been built and tested; a full-scale engineering demonstration facility is currently under construction. The experience gained from these projects provides the procurement basis for the production plant construction and operation. In this document, the status of the AVLIS process procurement is presented from two viewpoints. The AVLIS Production Plant Work Breakdown Structure is referenced at the level of the items to be procured. The availability of suppliers for the items at this level is discussed. In addition, the work that will result from the AVLIS enrichment plant project is broken down by general procurement categories (construction, mechanical equipment, etc.) and the current AVLIS suppliers are listed according to these categories. A large number of companies in all categories are currently providing AVLIS equipment for the Full-Scale Demonstration Facility in Livermore, California. These companies form an existing and expanding supplier network for the AVLIS program. Finally, this document examines the relationship between the AVLIS construction project/operational facility and established commercial suppliers. The goal is to utilize existing industrial capability to meet the needs of the project in a competitive procurement situation. As a result, costs and procurement risks are both reduced because the products provided come from within the AVLIS suppliers' experience base. At the same time, suppliers can benefit by the potential to participate in AVLIS technology spin-off markets. 35 figures.

Not Available

1984-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

400

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial energy management Industrial energy management » Measure, track, and benchmark » Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices

403

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Activated charcoal. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning theoretical aspects and industrial applications of activated charcoal. Topics include adsorption capacity and mechanism studies, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects, and description and evaluation of adsorptive abilities. Applications include use in water analyses and waste treatment, air pollution control and measurement, and in nuclear facilities. (Contains a minimum of 151 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), 2336W Building, on the Hanford Site is designed to receive, confirm, repackage, certify, treat, store, and ship contact-handled transuranic and low-level radioactive waste from past and present U.S. Department of Energy activities. The WRAP facility is comprised of three buildings: 2336W, the main processing facility (also referred to generically as WRAP); 2740W, an administrative support building; and 2620W, a maintenance support building. The support buildings are subject to the normal hazards associated with industrial buildings (no radiological materials are handled) and are not part of this analysis except as they are impacted by operations in the processing building, 2336W. WRAP is designed to provide safer, more efficient methods of handling the waste than currently exist on the Hanford Site and contributes to the achievement of as low as reasonably achievable goals for Hanford Site waste management.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Revenue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial, natural resources, recreational development or manufacturing purposes. The board of county commissioners of any county or the governing body of any city may approve an exemption of property funded by industrial revenue bonds (IRB's). Some

407

Review: 1991 industry developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is NUEXCO`s annual summary of the previous year`s (1991) events. There are reviews of major nuclear developments in each continent, as well as international developments. Specific topics include fuels, waste management, new facilities, and decommissioning. Nuclear activities in the following countries are noted: South Africa, Yemen, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Namibia, France, Japan, Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Pakistan, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Italy, Czechoslovakia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Canada, USA, Argentina, Brazil, and Uraguay.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Industry/Utility Partnerships: Formula for Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry/utility partnerships are created when both parties work productively toward common goals. American industry faces tough global competition and to be successful must create and operate modern production facilities. Cost and energy efficient electrotechnologies play a critical role in their competitiveness. Utilities can play a central role in industrial competitiveness, not only by providing competitively priced and reliable power, but also by helping their customers to identify and implement the most appropriate technologies. When the correct environment is created, both win. Industry reduces costs and produces high quality products. The utility gains customer loyalty and achieves business success.

Smith, W. R.; Spriggs, H. D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Technologies - Industrial Partnerships Office  

Jupiter Laser Facility. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center. Program for Climate Model Diagnosis & Intercomparison. Site 300. Terascale Simulation Facility.

410

Industrial Carbon Capture Project Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Partner Organizations) Funding Lead Organization Location (City, State) Project Title - Project Description 1) Large Scale Testing of Advanced Gasification Technologies Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. $71,700,000 Allentown, PA Development of ITM Oxygen Technology for Integration with Advanced Industrial Systems Air Products will accelerate commercial manufacture of ion transport membranes modules and initiate the development a 2,000 TPD pre- commercial scale facility ahead of schedule, enabling this technology

411

NISCO Cogeneration Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NISCO Cogeneration facility utilizes two fluidized bed boilers to generate 200 MW of electricity and up to 80,000 LBS/HR of steam for process use. The partnership, of three industrial electricity users, Citgo, Conoco, and Vista Chemical, and the local utility, Gulf States utilities, was formed in the late 1980's. In August and September 1992 two fluidized bed boilers were brought into operation to repower existing turbine generating equipment. The fluidized bed units were designed to utilize 100 percent petroleum coke, a locally produced fuel. Petroleum coke is a high heating value, low volatile, high sulfur fuel which is difficult to utilize in conventional boilers. It is readily available in most areas throughout the world, including North and South America. Because of superior environmental performance, lower capital cost, and fuel versatility, circulating fluidized bed boilers were selected to repower the existing turbines. Fluidized bed boilers were ideally suited for a repowering application. Existing equipment matched or was modified for utilization in the project optimizing capital cost. The fluidized bed boilers, designed and fabricated by Foster Wheeler, are each capable of producing 825,000 LBS/HR of steam. This paper describes the results attained at NISCO during the first full year of operation. The design attributes of the project which enabled a successful and efficient unit startup are explained. Descriptions of design enhancements and modifications installed during the first year to improve the operability of the repowered facility are included. This paper describes technology and experiences of value to those considering steam generating unit repowering or construction.

Zierold, D. M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: Two case studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Energy-use patterns in many of California`s fastest-growing industries are not typical of the existing mix of industries in the US. Many California firms operate small- and medium-sized facilities housed in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably over time for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services (providing occupant comfort and necessities like lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. Electricity for building services is sometimes priced as if it were base loaded like process uses; in reality this load varies significantly according to occupancy schedules and cooling and heating loads, much as in any commercial building. Using informal field surveys, simulation studies, and detailed analyses of existing data (including utility commercial/industrial audit files), we studied the energy use of this industrial subsector through a multi-step procedure: (1) characterizing non-process building energy and power use in California industries, (2) identifying conservation and load-shaping opportunities in industrial building services, and (3) investigating industrial buildings and system design methodologies. In an earlier report, we addressed these issues by performing an extensive survey of the existing publicly available data, characterizing and comparing the building energy use in this sector. In this report, we address the above objectives by examining and analyzing energy use in two industrial case-study facilities in California. Based on the information for the case studies, we discuss the design consideration for these industrial buildings, characterize their energy use, and review their conservation and load-shaping potentials. In addition, we identify and discuss some research ideas for further investigation.

Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Wetaskiwin Facility: Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Wetaskiwin Facility Saputo Dairy Products Canada G.P. 4719 40th Avenue Wetaskiwin, Alberta, T9A 0A1, Canada The Wetaskiwin...

416

PLANNING AND COORDINATION OF ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE RUSSIAN SYSTEM OF CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS AT ROSATOM FACILITIES IN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION.  

SciTech Connect

The MC&A Equipment and Methodological Support Strategic Plan (MEMS SP) for implementing modern MC&A equipment and methodologies at Rosatom facilities has been developed within the framework of the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program. This plan developed by the Rosatom's Russian MC&A Equipment and Methodologies (MEM) Working Group and is coordinated by that group with support and coordination provided by the MC&A Measurements Project, Office of National Infrastructure and Sustainability, US DOE. Implementation of different tasks of the MEMS Strategic Plan is coordinated by Rosatom and US-DOE in cooperation with different U.S.-Russian MC&A-related working groups and joint site project teams. This cooperation allows to obtain and analyze information about problems, current needs and successes at Rosatom facilities and facilitates solution of the problems, satisfying the facilities' needs and effective exchange of expertise and lessons learned. The objective of the MEMS Strategic Plan is to enhance effectiveness of activities implementing modern equipment and methodologies in the Russian State MC&A system. These activities are conducted within the joint Russian-US MPC&A program aiming at reduction of possibility for theft or diversion of nuclear materials and enhancement of control of nuclear materials.

SVIRIDOVA, V.V.; ERASTOV, V.V.; ISAEV, N.V.; ROMANOV, V.A.; RUDENKO, V.S.; SVIRIDOV, A.S.; TITOV, G.V.; JENSEN, B.; NEYMOTIN, L.; SANDERS, J.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

418

Air quality impacts due to construction of LWR waste management facilities  

SciTech Connect

Air quality impacts of construction activities and induced housing growth as a result of construction activities were evaluated for four possible facilities in the LWR fuel cycle: a fuel reprocessing facility, fuel storage facility, fuel fabrication plant, and a nuclear power plant. Since the fuel reprocessing facility would require the largest labor force, the impacts of construction of that facility were evaluated in detail.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL NATIONAL STAKEHOLDERS TRANSPORTATION FORUM WHO IS GIPA? * Alliance made up of 15 companies from the Medical Device Manufacturers, Cobalt source , manufacturers and one industrial processing company Represents all the major gamma processing * Represents all the major gamma processing facilities within the US to the regulatory bodies such as the USNRC. * Member of International Irradiation Association (iiA) WHO IS GIPA? An alliance created to advocate the development of An alliance created to advocate the development of responsible regulations that enhance the safe and secure management of Cobalt-60 sources and related irradiation processing facilities related irradiation processing facilities. APRIL 15, 2010 PRESENTATION TITLE WORLD SUPPLIERS OF COBALT 60 COBALT 60 * Nordion Inc

420

Guidance for Preparing ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Plant Profile  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Suzhou Facility Suzhou Facility BD Medical No.5 Baiyu Road Suzhou Industrial Park Jiangsu P.R. China In 1995 BD became the second multinational company to open a manufacturing facility in Suzhou Industrial Park. The BD Medical facility in Suzhou currently employs approximately 1,100 associates and produces catheters, infusion products, anesthesia kits and other medical devices. BD is a leading global medical technology company that manufactures and sells medical devices, instrument systems and reagents. The Suzhou facility achieved the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry in 2012. The facility reduced its energy intensity by 22.2% in two years, avoiding greenhouse gas emissions in the amount of 1,192 metric tons of CO 2 e. Energy achievements were accomplished through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

422

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

423

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

424

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

425

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities (Montana) Facilities (Montana) Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Interconnection Provider Montana Public Service Commission For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that: : (a) produces electricity by the use, as a primary energy source, of biomass, waste, water, wind, or other renewable resource, or any combination of those sources; or : (b) produces electricity and useful forms of thermal energy, such as heat

426

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

427

Tobacco Industry and Corporate Social Responsibility ... an Inherent Contradiction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Links between the Tobacco Industry and Canadian Universitiesfull/325/7367/734/a II Tobacco Industry Strategies toVI Pro?ts Over People, Tobacco Industry Activities to Market

World Health Organization

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Quantifying potential industrial symbiosis : a case study of brick manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humanity is currently on an unsustainable path of growth and development. One tool to address sustainability in industrial activities is Industrial Symbiosis, which is the study of cooperation across industry boundaries ...

Hodge, Matthew M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

430

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

431

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

432

WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of wireless technology into a government site where nuclear material is processed and stored brings new meaning to the term ''harsh environment''. At SRNL, we are attempting to address not only the harsh RF and harsh physical environment common to industrial facilities, but also the ''harsh'' regulatory environment necessitated by the nature of the business at our site. We will discuss our concepts, processes, and expected outcomes in our attempts to surmount the roadblocks and reap the benefits of wireless in our ''factory''.

Shull, D; Joe Cordaro, J

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

WIRELESS FOR A NUCLEAR FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of wireless technology into a government site where nuclear material is processed and stored brings new meaning to the term ''harsh environment''. At SRNL, we are attempting to address not only the harsh RF and harsh physical environment common to industrial facilities, but also the ''harsh'' regulatory environment necessitated by the nature of the business at our site. We will discuss our concepts, processes, and expected outcomes in our attempts to surmount the roadblocks and reap the benefits of wireless in our ''factory''.

Shull, D; Joe Cordaro, J

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Power Systems Development Facility progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a report on the progress in design and construction of the Power Systems Development Facility. The topics of the report include background information, descriptions of the advanced gasifier, advanced PFBC, particulate control devices, and fuel cell. The major activities during the past year have been the final stages of design, procurement of major equipment and bulk items, construction of the facility, and the preparation for the operation of the Facility in late 1995.

Rush, R.E.; Hendrix, H.L.; Moore, D.L.; Pinkston, T.E.; Vimalchand, P.; Wheeldon, J.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

HAZWOPER project documents for demolition of the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document, in support of the Waste Evaporator Facility (WEF) demolition project and contains the Project Work Plan and the Project Health and Safety Plan for demolition and partial remediation actions by ATG at the Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 3506. Various activities will be conducted during the course of demolition, and this plan provides details on the work steps involved, the identification of hazards, and the health and safety practices necessary to mitigate these hazards. The objective of this document is to develop an approach for implementing demolition activities at the WEF. This approach is based on prior site characterization information and takes into account all of the known hazards at this facility. The Project Work Plan provides instructions and requirements for identified work steps that will be utilized during the performance of demolition, while the Health and Safety Plan addresses the radiological, hazardous material exposure, and industrial safety concerns that will be encountered.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L. (Energy Associates International, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Caicedo, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Decommissioning of U.S. uranium production facilities  

SciTech Connect

From 1980 to 1993, the domestic production of uranium declined from almost 44 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to about 3 million pounds. This retrenchment of the U.S. uranium industry resulted in the permanent closing of many uranium-producing facilities. Current low uranium prices, excess world supply, and low expectations for future uranium demand indicate that it is unlikely existing plants will be reopened. Because of this situation, these facilities eventually will have to be decommissioned. The Uranium Mill Tailings and Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) vests the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with overall responsibility for establishing environmental standards for decommissioning of uranium production facilities. UMTRCA also gave the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) the responsibility for licensing and regulating uranium production and related activities, including decommissioning. Because there are many issues associated with decommissioning-environmental, political, and financial-this report will concentrate on the answers to three questions: (1) What is required? (2) How is the process implemented? (3) What are the costs? Regulatory control is exercised principally through the NRC licensing process. Before receiving a license to construct and operate an uranium producing facility, the applicant is required to present a decommissioning plan to the NRC. Once the plan is approved, the licensee must post a surety to guarantee that funds will be available to execute the plan and reclaim the site. This report by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) represents the most comprehensive study on this topic by analyzing data on 33 (out of 43) uranium production facilities located in Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Washington.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Industrial application of geothermal energy in Southeast Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Those phosphate related and food processing industries in Southeastern Idaho are identified which require large energy inputs and the potential for direct application of geothermal energy is assessed. The total energy demand is given along with that fractional demand that can be satisfied by a geothermal source of known temperature. The potential for geothermal resource development is analyzed by examining the location of known thermal springs and wells, the location of state and federal geothermal exploration leases, and the location of federal and state oil and gas leasing activity in Southeast Idaho. Information is also presented regarding the location of geothermal, oil, and gas exploration wells in Southeast Idaho. The location of state and federal phosphate mining leases is also presented. This information is presented in table and map formats to show the proximity of exploration and development activities to current food and phosphate processing facilities and phosphate mining activities. (MHR)

Batdorf, J.A.; McClain, D.W.; Gross, M.; Simmons, G.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial facility activities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

User User Facilities Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers Electron-Beam Microcharacterization Centers Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BES User Facilities Brochure .pdf file (7.4MB)Brochure .pdf file (7.4MB) The BES user facilities provide open access to specialized instrumentation and expertise that enable scientific users from universities, national laboratories, and industry to carry out experiments and develop theories that could not be done at their home institutions. These forefront research facilities require resource commitments well

443

300 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) Authorization Envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish the facility Authorization Envelope (AE) for the 300 Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEP )Project and identify the requirements related to the maintenance of the AE as Specified in HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The 300 LEF Project consists of two separate facilities operating under one management organization. They are the 310 Facility and the 340 Facility. The AE documents the limits of operations for all 300 LEF Project activities.

WRIGHT, E.J.; STORDEUR, R.T.

2000-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Progress Report {number_sign}1 on the materials identification, characterization and evaluation activity: Acquisition of materials data from the Exploratory Studies Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the initial work within the Materials Identification, Characterization and Evaluation Sub-activity Integration Activity within the Introduced Materials Task (IMT) (WBS 1.2.3.12.5). The goals of this activity are twofold.: (1) to identify and characterize types and usage of materials that are most likely to be introduced into a potential High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a result of its construction and operation and (2) to provide tools for the Integration Activity to evaluate the chemical impact on the repository based on information gathered from sources external and internal to the Introduced Materials Task-by the Literature Survey Sub-activity (Integration Activity, IMT). Based on this information and assessment, the Integration Activity activates relevant activities within the Introduced Materials Task and provides information to other Tasks within the Yucca Mountain Project.

Meike, A., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

446

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

447

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

340 Facility emergency preparedness hazards assessment  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 340 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated.

CAMPBELL, L.R.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

STS.036 Industrial Landscapes, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subject considers how the visual and material world of "nature" has been reshaped by industrial practices, beliefs, structures, and activities. Readings in historical geography, aesthetics, American history, environmental ...

Fitzgerald, Deborah Kay

450

Kansas City Power & Light- Commercial/Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kansas City Power & Light (KCP&L) provides financial incentives for commercial and industrial customers to increase the energy efficiency of eligible facilities. Rebates are available for...

451

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations (OP) Conduct of Operations (OP) OBJECTIVE OP.1 Resources are effectively allocated to address environmental, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q), programmatic, and operational considerations required for commencing AR Project II activities to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: OP.1.1. There are sufficient numbers of trained/qualified operations personnel to conduct and support the activity. OP. 1.2 There are adequate facilities and equipment available to ensure operational support is adequate for the activity. (Such support services include operations, training, maintenance, waste management, environmental protection, industrial safety and hygiene, radiological protection and health physics, emergency preparedness, fire protection, quality assurance, criticality safety, and

452

Development of power facility management services using RFID/USN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the electric power industry, there are many research projects to stabilise the power and increase the efficiency using ubiquitous technology. Many power utilities control and supervise the transmission line of energy to avoid power failures. In this ... Keywords: #, 47, RFID, RFID&, USN, cable joint, electric power industry, power facility management, radio frequency identification, service framework, ubiquitous sensor networks, wireless networks

Young-Il Kim; Jae-Ju Song; Jin-Ho Shin; Bong-Jae Yi; Hoon Choi

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manhattan Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities Manhattan Project Signature Facilities The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight Manhattan Project properties that were designated as "Signature Facilities." These properties, taken together, provided the essential core for successfully interpreting for the American public the Manhattan Project mission of developing an atomic bomb. The Department's goal was to move foward in preserving and interpreting these properties by integrating departmental headquarters and field activities and joining in a working partnership with all interested outside entities, organizations, and individuals, including Congress, state and local governments, the Department's contractors, and various other stakeholders.

454

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

455

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

SPI Sonora Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sonora Biomass Facility Sonora Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name SPI Sonora Biomass Facility Facility SPI Sonora Sector Biomass Owner Sierra Pacific Industries Location Sonora, California Coordinates 37.9840911°, -120.3821381° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.9840911,"lon":-120.3821381,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Microsoft Word - NEAC Facilities report.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the NEAC Facilities Subcommittee Review of the NEAC Facilities Subcommittee In 2008 then NE-1 Spurgeon tasked NEAC to examine "Facilitization of US Nuclear R&D Infrastructure." A preliminary response was produced in July of 2008. Subsequently this was incorporated in the NEAC Technical Subcommittee report in the November 2008 NEAC report Nuclear Energy: Policies and Technology for the 21 st Century. This section used several reports which also served as a base for the facilities subcommittee: Nuclear Energy for the Future: Required R&D Capabilities - An Industry Perspective, Battelle, September 2008; Required Assets for a Nuclear Energy Applied R&D Program, INL, September 2008; Executive Recommendations for Nuclear R&D Capabilities, Battelle, July, 2008; Evaluation of Existing DOE Facilities to Support the