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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated

2

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Industrial Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial.gif (5205 bytes) The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing...

3

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module projects energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region projection using the SEDS1 data.

4

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

5

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The energy-intensive industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow accounting procedure, whereas the nonenergy-intensive and the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 14). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region levels; energy consumption at the Census Division level is allocated by using the SEDS24 data.

6

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comleted Copy in PDF Format Comleted Copy in PDF Format Related Links Annual Energy Outlook 2001 Supplemental Data to the AEO 2001 NEMS Conference To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 9 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The distinction between the two sets of manufacturing industries pertains to the level of modeling. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 19). The

7

Industrial Demand Module 1999, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Industrial Demand Module 2005, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Industrial Demand Module 2006, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Industrial Demand Module 2009, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Industrial Demand Module 2003, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Industrial Demand Module 2007, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

13

Industrial Demand Module 2002, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Industrial Demand Module 2001, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Industrial Demand Module 2008, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. C. Honeycutt

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Industrial Demand Module 2000, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Industrial Demand Module 2004, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing industries, subject to delivered prices of energy and macroeconomic variables representing the value of output for each industry. The module includes industrial cogeneration of electricity that is either used in the industrial sector or sold to the electricity grid. The IDM structure is shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure Industrial energy demand is projected as a combination of “bottom up” characterizations of the energy-using technology and “top down” econometric estimates of behavior. The influence of energy prices on industrial energy consumption is modeled in terms of the efficiency of use of existing capital, the efficiency of new capital acquisitions, and the mix of fuels utilized, given existing capital stocks. Energy conservation from technological change is represented over time by trend-based “technology possibility curves.” These curves represent the aggregate efficiency of all new technologies that are likely to penetrate the future markets as well as the aggregate improvement in efficiency of 1994 technology.

19

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Industrial Demand Module Table 17. Industry Categories Printer Friendly Version Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonenergy-Intensive Manufacturing Nonmanufacturing Industries Food and Kindred Products (NAICS 311) Metals-Based Durables (NAICS 332-336) Agricultural Production -Crops (NAICS 111) Paper and Allied Products (NAICS 322) Balance of Manufacturing (all remaining manufacturing NAICS) Other Agriculture Including Livestock (NAICS112- 115) Bulk Chemicals (NAICS 32B) Coal Mining (NAICS 2121) Glass and Glass Products (NAICS 3272) Oil and Gas Extraction (NAICS 211) Hydraulic Cement (NAICS 32731) Metal and Other Nonmetallic Mining (NAICS 2122- 2123) Blast Furnaces and Basic Steel (NAICS 331111) Construction (NAICS233-235)

20

Estimating disaggregated price elasticities in industrial energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short-term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show that overall price elasticities and the energy-constant price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution. 13 refs., 2 tabs.

Elkhafif, M.A.T. (Ontario Ministry of Energy, Toronto (Canada))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Demand Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Demand Module calculates energy consumption for the four Census Regions (see Figure 5) and disaggregates the energy consumption

22

A dynamic model of industrial energy demand in Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and Tabour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIS digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method. 31 refs., 8 tabs.

Haji, S.H.H. [Gothenburg Univ. (Sweden)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

A study of industrial equipment energy use and demand control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand and duty factors were measured for selected equipment [air compressors, electric furnaces, injection-molding machines, a welder, a granulator (plastics grinder), a sheet metal press and brake, a lathe, a process chiller, and cooling tower pumps and fans] in two industrial plants. Demand factors for heavily loaded air compressors were found to be near 100 %, for lightly loaded centrifugal equipment (lathe, sheet metal shear and brake, and granulator) near 10 %, and for injection-molding machines near 50 %. The measured demand factors differ from those often estimated during energy surveys. Duty factors for some equipment were found to exceed 100 %, showing that some loads were on for longer periods than that indicated by plant personnel. Comparing a detailed summary of equipment rated loads to annual utility bills, when measurements are not available, can prevent over-estimation of the demand and duty factors for a plant. Raw unadjusted estimates of demand factors of 60 % or higher are often made, yet comparisons of rated loads to utility bills show that some equipment demand factors may be 50 % or less. This project tested a simple beacon alerting system, which used a blue strobe light to alert plant personnel when a preset demand limit had been reached. Tests of load shedding verified that the estimated demand savings of 50 kVA were realized (out of a total demand of almost 1200 kVA) when lighting and air conditioning loads were turned off.

Dooley, Edward Scott

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS 27 data.

25

Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 non-manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy- intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process-flow or end-use accounting procedure, whereas the non- manufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail. The petroleum refining industry is not included in the Industrial Module, as it is simulated separately in the Petroleum Market Module of NEMS. The Industrial Module calculates

26

Industrial Demand Module 1998, National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description ofthe NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in supportof its models (Public Law 94-385, section 57.b2). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

T. Crawford Honeycutt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Industrial Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Kelly Perl

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Industrial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Industrial Demand Module The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 21 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS25 data.

30

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity Chris in this paper. Energy consumption data was sourced from the Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics' Australian Energy Statistics publication. Price and income data were sourced from the Australian Bureau

31

Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For the industrial sector, EIAs analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8 percent of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9 percent of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In AEO2006, energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50 percent of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities o #and Demand Response History Energy Management Activities

Olsen, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy EfficiencyandDemandResponseintheCalifornia1 4.0 EnergyEfficiencyandDemandResponse5 4.2. DemandResponse

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities for industrial refrigerated warehouses in California. The report describes refrigerated warehouses characteristics, energy use and demand, and control systems. It also discusses energy efficiency and open automated demand response opportunities and provides analysis results from three demand response studies. In addition, several energy efficiency, load management, and demand response case studies are provided for refrigerated warehouses. This study shows that refrigerated warehouses can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for open automated demand response (OpenADR) at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to OpenADR due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Rockoff, Alexandra; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your Power. (2008). "Demand Response Programs." RetrievedS. (2008). Automated Demand Response Results from Multi-Yearusing Open Automated Demand Response, California Energy

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpportunitiesforEnergy EfficiencyandDemandResponseinAgricultural/WaterEnd?UseEnergyEfficiencyProgram. i1 4.0 EnergyEfficiencyandDemandResponse

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and...

39

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Title Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices...

40

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

Olsen, Daniel; Goli, Sasank; Faulkner, David; McKane, Aimee

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California...

42

Statistical analysis of what drives industrial energy demand: Volume III of the PURHAPS model documentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall price of energy has far less direct effect on industrial demand than conventional models, such as the Jorgenson translog model, have indicated. Much of what appears to be conservation in recent years can be explained as the result of structural changes (e.g., less steel production), electrification, and a slowdown in the long-term trend towards more use of energy relative to other factors of production. This report documents these findings and the other findings from the statistical analysis used in developing the PURchased Heat And Power System, as used in producing the 1982 Annual Energy Outlook forecasts. This report is intended partly to convey these findings to substantive energy experts and energy policy analysts; it is also intended to fulfill EIA requirements for model documentation. Volume I of this series documents the full mathematical specification of the model, including accounting identites and benchmarks; Volume II documents the data used both in the estimation and in the model. Appendix B of this report provides a purely historical breakdown of actual changes in oil and electricity use from 1974 to 1981, showing what changes are due to general economic growth, improved general productivity, etc. preliminary work for the 1983 Annual Energy Outlook is discussed in general terms.

Werbos, P.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Addressing Energy Demand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices Bo Shen, Girish Ghatikar, Chun Chun Ni, and Junqiao Dudley Environmental Energy...

44

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Add to Integrated Energy Audit Template for IndustrialLearned from Energy and Demand Response Audit Projects inhave been offering energy efficiency audits to large service

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand Robert P. Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast

46

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Brown (2004). Industrial Refrigeration Best PracticesD. Brown (2004). Industrial Refrigeration Best Practicesoutlet common in industrial refrigeration Source: Wilcox,

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ApplicationsintheCementIndustry. MineralEngineeringCement Production,CementIndustryTechnicalConference,gearlessmilldrive,CementIndustryTechnicalConference,

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Energy Demand Staff Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption per ton steel #12;Industrial Energy EfficiencyIndustrial Energy Efficiency Policy Analysis intensity trends and policy background · Focus on Industrial Energy Efficiency · Policy analysis PrimaryEnergy(Mtce) Commercial Buildings Residential Buildings Transportation Industry China 0 500 1,000 1

Knowles, David William

49

Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Letto, Daryl [Enbala Power Networks; Johnson, Brandon [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dowling, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); George, Raoule [Enbala Power Networks; Khan, Saqib [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Chinas iron and steel industry. ? Int. J. Productionof Chinas iron and steel industry. ? Int. J. ProductionAfter the iron and steel sub-sector, the industries with the

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EnergyConsumptionSurvey. Washington,DC:EnergyInformation Administration,OfficeofEnergyMarkets

Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demandinfrastructure, and energy services for new cities. Urbanfor a variety of energy services like energy-intensive

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographic trends and energy consumption in European Unionand rural commercial energy consumption, as seen in Figure 4Demographic trends and energy consumption in European Union

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Automated Demand Response in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by utility incentives and state business energy tax credits.by state business energy tax credits and utility incentives.

Lekov, Alex

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4.3 Energy Intensity and Fuel Mix Although Chinas currentEnergy Intensity and Fuel Mix Aluminum production is one of China

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement...

58

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensity by Fuel MJ per US$ Diesel Coal Electricity Coke67 Figure 57: Coke Energy Intensity Trends, 2000 -enterprises tend to use coke-based blast furnaces more than

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST METHODS REPORT Companion Report to the California Energy Demand 2006-2016 Staff Energy Demand Forecast Report STAFFREPORT June 2005 CEC-400 .......................................................................................................................................1-1 ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING AT THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION: AN OVERVIEW

60

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of integrating demand response and energy efficiencyand D. Kathan (2009), Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityFRAMEWORKS THAT PROMOTE DEMAND RESPONSE 3.1. Demand Response

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Within Hawaiian Electric Company Service Territory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By reducing power usage during peak demand periods, demand response (DR) programs can help utilities manage power loads and complement energy efficiency activities while providing ratepayers an opportunity to substantially reduce their electric bills. This project assessed the costs and benefits of potential DR programs for Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) commercial and industrial (CI) customers.

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2006-2016 STAFF ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST Demand Forecast report is the product of the efforts of many current and former California Energy Commission staff. Staff contributors to the current forecast are: Project Management and Technical Direction

63

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

64

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia

65

Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Examining Synergies between Energy Management and Demand Response: A Case Study at Two California Industrial Facilities Title Examining Synergies between Energy Management and...

67

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling China End-Use Energy Demand Modeling Speaker(s): Nan Zhou Date: October 8, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 As a consequence of soaring energy demand due to the staggering pace of its economic growth, China overtook the United States in 2007 to become the world's biggest contributor to CO2 emissions (IEA, 2007). Since China is still in an early stage of industrialization and urbanization, economic development promises to keep China's energy demand growing strongly. Furthermore, China's reliance on fossil fuel is unlikely to change in the long term, and increased needs will only heighten concerns about energy security and climate change. In response, the Chinese government has developed a series of policies and targets aimed at improving energy efficiency, including both short-term targets and long-term strategic

68

Letters: Energy demand prediction using GMDH networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry is in transition as it moves towards a competitive and deregulated environment. In this emerging market, traditional electric utilities as well as energy traders, power pools and independent system operators (ISOs) need the ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Energy demand, Forecasting, Group method of data handling (GMDH) networks, Self-organizing networks

Dipti Srinivasan

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.energy efficiency and demand response program and tariffenergy efficiency and demand response programs and tariffs.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Increased demand spurs gas compression industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing demand for natural gas in the last five years has led to dynamic development in the gas compression industry as producers and transmission companies expand operations to supply gas. To handle the increase, for example, transmission companies have been steadily adding new lines to the pipeline infrastructure--3,437 miles in 1995 and an estimated 4,088 miles in 1997. New compression for pipelines has also increased from 212,637 horsepower added in 1989 to an estimated 311,685 horsepower to be added in 1997. Four key trends which influence the gas compression business have developed since the mid 1980s: first, a steady resurgence of demand for natural gas each year; second, a phenomenal number of mergers and buyouts among gas compression companies; third, an alarming drop in average daily gas production per well since 1972; and fourth, high drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico.

Honea, M. [Weatherford Enterra, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Turkey's energy demand and supply  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

Balat, M. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Title Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2010 Authors Goldman, Charles A., Michael Reid, Roger Levy, and Alison Silverstein Pagination 74 Date Published 01/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025.1 Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries-which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity-is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that "the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW" by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

74

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 1.2.4.2. Industrial Energy Usageresearch, industrial energy usage patterns, and terms and1.2.4.2. Industrial Energy Usage Patterns This section

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Industrial Demand Module (IDM) - 2002 EIA Models Directory  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Industrial Demand Module incorporates three components: buildings; process and assembly; and boiler, steam, and cogeneration. Last Model Update:

76

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and D. Kathan (2009). Demand Response in U.S. ElectricityEnergy Financial Group. Demand Response Research Center [2008). Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Long-term Energy Efficiency Strategic Plan. B-2 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response> B-4 Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Regulatory risks paralyzing power industry while demand grows  

SciTech Connect

2008 will be the year the US generation industry grapples with CO{sub 2} emission. Project developers are suddenly coal-shy, mostly flirting with new nuclear plants waiting impatiently in line for equipment manufacturers to catch up with the demand for wind turbines, and finding gas more attractive again. With no proven greenhouse gas sequestration technology on the horizon, utilities will be playing it safe with energy-efficiency ploys rather than rushing to contract for much-needed new generation.

Maize, K.; Peltier, R.

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Definition: Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand The rate at which electric energy is delivered to or by a system or part of a system, generally expressed in kilowatts or megawatts, at a given instant or averaged over any designated interval of time., The rate at which energy is being used by the customer.[1] Related Terms energy, electricity generation References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Demand&oldid=480555"

80

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Massimo www.cepe.ethz.ch #12;US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier Approach Page 1 of 25 US Residential Energy Demand and Energy Efficiency: A Stochastic Demand Frontier

82

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 EMCS EPACT ERCOT FCM FERC FRCC demand side managementEnergy Regulatory Commission (FERC). EPAct began the processin wholesale markets, which FERC Order 888 furthered by

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

84

Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders Demand Response is Focus of New Effort by Electricity Industry Leaders U.S. Utilities, Grid Operators, Others Come Together...

85

"Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both recent economic and environmental conditions in the U.S. have converged to bring about unprecedented attention to energy efficiency and sustainability in the country's industrial sector. Historically, energy costs in the U.S. have been low in comparison to global averages in some measure do to an extended tolerance for externalized costs related to environmental degradation. Consequently, awareness, innovation & implementation of technologies focused on energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact have not kept pace with other industrialized nations. The U.S. is confronted with looming tipping points with respect to energy supply and GHG emissions that represent very tangible constraints on future economic growth and quality of life. A recent 2008 article in Forbes Magazine highlights the top ten most energy efficient economies in the world. The U.S. is conspicuously absent from the list. The U.S. economy, with an estimated energy intensity of 9,000 Btu's/$GDP, is only half as energy efficient as Japan (holding the top spot on the list with an EI of 4,500 Btu's / US$ GDP). The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated the Save Energy Now program to address this by supporting reductions in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 25% by 2020. A recent 2005 survey conducted by Energy & Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the current U.S. inventory of commercial/industrial boilers stands at around 163,000 units and 2.7 million MMBtu/hr. total fuel input capacity. These boilers consume nearly 8,100 Tbtu per year, representing about 40% of all energy consumed in the commercial/industrial sectors. Moreover, this same survey indicates that 47% of all commercial/industrial boilers in the U.S. are 40+ years old while as many as 76% are 30+ years old. Boilers account for nearly half of commercial / industrial energy consumption and represent some of the most energy intensive systems comprising these sectors. Given the preponderance of aged, obsolete boiler technology currently in service in the U.S., it is critical to raise awareness and examine the role of emerging new technologies to address the energy and environmental challenges inherent with steam generation. In the same way that tank-less / instantaneous water heating systems are eschewing a new era in energy efficiency in the residential sector, compact modular on-demand steam generation systems are poised to support the same kind of transformation in the commercial / industrial sector. This paper will illustrate how emerging on-demand steam generation technologies will play a part in addressing the energy and environmental challenges facing the country's commercial/ industrial sectors and in doing so help to transform the U.S. economy.

Smith, J. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Title Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-4837E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Goli, Sasank, Aimee T. McKane, and Daniel Olsen Conference Name 2011 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry Date Published 08/2011 Conference Location Niagara Falls, NY Keywords market sectors, openadr, refrigerated warehouses Abstract Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

87

Demand Response Enabling Technologies and Approaches for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are numerous programs sponsored by Independent System Operators (ISOs) and utility or state efficiency programs that have an objective of reducing peak demand. Most of these programs have targeted the residential and commercial sector, however, there are also huge opportunities for demand response in the industrial sector. This paper describes some of the demand response initiatives that are currently active in New York State, explaining applicability of industrial facilities. Next, we discuss demand response-enabling technologies, which can help an industrial plant effectively address demand response needs. Finally, the paper is concluded with a discussion of case study projects that illustrate application of some of these demand response enabling technologies for process operations. These case studies, illustrating some key projects from the NYSERDA Peak Load Reduction program, will describe the technologies and approaches deployed to achieve the demand reduction at the site, the quantitative impact of the project, and a discussion of the overall successes at each site.

Epstein, G.; D'Antonio, M.; Schmidt, C.; Seryak, J.; Smith, C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

89

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050 RyanResearch Program California Energy Commission November 7,Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2003a)

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

SciTech Connect

California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demand Response and Advanced Metering. Presentation to NYISO35 Table 12. Industrial Participants in Sub-MeteringSection 2.5. Analysis of sub-metering to monitor DR at six

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was written to describe an innovative on-demand industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130 factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical static design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design consumes 70 % more energy than necessary. Total potential electricity saving achieved by using on-demand systems instead of classically designed industrial ventilation in the U.S. could be 26 billion kWh. At the average electricity cost of 7 cents per kWh, this would represent $1.875 billion. Eighty such systems are already installed in the USA and European Union.

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the countrys greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems, and electricity for equipment such as pumps, air compressors, and fans. Lesser, yet significant, amounts of energy are used for industrial buildings heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), lighting and facility use (such as office equipment). Due to economic growth, energy consumption in the industrial sector will continue to increase gradually, as will energy use in industrial buildings. There is a large potential for energy saving and carbon intensity reduction by improving HVAC, lighting, and other aspects of building operation and technologies. Analyses show that most of the technologies and measures to save energy in buildings would be cost-effective with attractive rates of return. First, this paper will investigate energy performance in buildings within the manufacturing sector, as classified in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). Energy use patterns for HVAC and lighting in industrial buildings vary dramatically across different manufacturing sectors. For example, food manufacturing uses more electricity for HVAC than does apparel manufacturing because of the different energy demand patterns. Energy saving opportunities and potential from industrial buildings will also be identified and evaluated. Lastly, barriers for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings.

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

PRELIMINARY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 2012-2022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRELIMINARY CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 2012-2022 AUGUST 2011 CEC-200-2011-011-SD CALIFORNIA or adequacy of the information in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast forecast. Bryan Alcorn and Mehrzad Soltani Nia prepared the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia- Cerrutti

95

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Sector Residential Peak Demand (MW) Commercial IndustrialTable 16. Non-coincident peak demand by sector. growth Avg.IEPR Projected non-coincident peak demand (MW) 3.1.2. Hourly

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Oil, gas tanker industry responding to demand, contract changes  

SciTech Connect

Steady if slower growth in demand for crude oil and natural gas, low levels of scrapping, and a moderate newbuilding pace bode well for the world`s petroleum and natural-gas shipping industries. At year-end 1997, several studies of worldwide demand patterns and shipping fleets expressed short and medium-term optimism for seaborne oil and gas trade and fleet growth. The paper discusses steady demand and shifting patterns, the aging fleet, the slowing products traffic, the world`s fleet, gas carriers, LPG demand, and LPG vessels.

True, W.R.

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

97

Demand Response | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand Response Demand response provides an opportunity for consumers to play a significant role in the operation of the electric grid by reducing or shifting their electricity usage during peak periods in response to time-based rates or other forms of financial incentives. Demand response programs are being used by electric system planners and operators as resource options for balancing supply and demand. Such programs can lower the cost of electricity in wholesale markets, and in turn, lead to lower retail rates. Methods of engaging customers in demand response efforts include offering time-based rates such as time-of-use pricing, critical peak pricing, variable peak pricing, real time pricing, and critical peak rebates. It also includes direct load control programs which provide the

98

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial refrigerated warehouses that implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems can be excellent candidates for Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) due to equipment synergies, and receptivity of facility managers to strategies that control energy costs without disrupting facility operations. Auto-DR utilizes OpenADR protocol for continuous and open communication signals over internet, allowing facilities to automate their Demand Response (DR). Refrigerated warehouses were selected for research because: They have significant power demand especially during utility peak periods; most processes are not sensitive to short-term (2-4 hours) lower power and DR activities are often not disruptive to facility operations; the number of processes is limited and well understood; and past experience with some DR strategies successful in commercial buildings may apply to refrigerated warehouses. This paper presents an overview of the potential for load sheds and shifts from baseline electricity use in response to DR events, along with physical configurations and operating characteristics of refrigerated warehouses. Analysis of data from two case studies and nine facilities in Pacific Gas and Electric territory, confirmed the DR abilities inherent to refrigerated warehouses but showed significant variation across facilities. Further, while load from California's refrigerated warehouses in 2008 was 360 MW with estimated DR potential of 45-90 MW, actual achieved was much less due to low participation. Efforts to overcome barriers to increased participation may include, improved marketing and recruitment of potential DR sites, better alignment and emphasis on financial benefits of participation, and use of Auto-DR to increase consistency of participation.

Goli, Sasank; McKane, Aimee; Olsen, Daniel

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

99

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

100

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services [1].

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.1

102

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Demand Response Duke Energy is using the name Save-a-Energy Efficiency Division. Duke Energy describes all of itsPresident, and C.E.O. Duke Energy Kateri Callahan President

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy Basics: Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters. How Demand Water Heaters Work Demand...

104

Definition: Peak Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peak Demand Peak Demand Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Peak Demand The highest hourly integrated Net Energy For Load within a Balancing Authority Area occurring within a given period (e.g., day, month, season, or year)., The highest instantaneous demand within the Balancing Authority Area.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Peak demand is used to refer to a historically high point in the sales record of a particular product. In terms of energy use, peak demand describes a period of strong consumer demand. Related Terms Balancing Authority Area, energy, demand, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from

105

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Title Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Fuller, Merrian C., Cathy Kunkel, Mark Zimring, Ian M. Hoffman, Katie L. Soroye, and Charles A. Goldman Tertiary Authors Borgeson, Merrian Pagination 136 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department Abstract Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency-they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars1 flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements2, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula-and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs-there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our primary audiences are policy makers and program designers-especially those that are relatively new to the field, such as the over 2,000 towns, cities, states, and regions who are recipients of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act funds for clean energy programs. This report synthesizes lessons from first generation programs, highlights emerging best practices, and suggests methods and approaches to use in designing, implementing, and evaluating these programs. We examined 14 residential energy efficiency programs, conducted an extensive literature review, interviewed industry experts, and surveyed residential contractors to draw out these lessons.

106

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

107

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 REVISED FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

108

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 2: Electricity Demand by Utility ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

109

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVISED CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND FORECAST 20122022 Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The staff demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped

110

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

111

Definition: Demand Side Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Demand Side Management The term for all activities or programs undertaken by Load-Serving Entity or its customers to influence the amount or timing of electricity they use.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Energy demand management, also known as demand side management (DSM), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need

112

Residential sector: the demand for energy services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to project the demand for residential services, and, thereby, the demand for energy into the future. The service demands which best represent a complete breakdown of residential energy consumption is identified and estimates of the amount of energy, by fuel type, used to satisfy each service demand for an initial base year (1978) are detailed. These estimates are reported for both gross (or input) energy use and net or useful energy use, in the residential sector. The various factors which affect the consumption level for each type of energy and each identified service demand are discussed. These factors include number of households, appliance penetration, choice of fuel type, technical conversion efficiency of energy using devices, and relative energy efficiency of the building shell (extent of insulation, resistance to air infiltration, etc.). These factors are discussed relative to both the present and expected future values, for the purpose of projections. The importance of the housing stock to service demand estimation and projection and trends in housing in Illinois are discussed. How the housing stock is projected based on population and household projections is explained. The housing projections to the year 2000 are detailed. The projections of energy consumption by service demand and fuel type are contrasted with the various energy demand projections in Illinois Energy Consumption Trends: 1960 to 2000 and explains how and why the two approaches differ. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Industrial Lift Truck Battery Charger Demand Response Impact Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response and load shifting are two common energy management strategies used by lift truck fleet operators to mitigate on-peak energy consumption, reduce electricity costs, and react to electric system emergency curtailment requests. When customers elect to participate in demand response programs, they are contacted and asked to reduce load during power shortage situations. Alternatively, customers may implement longer-term economic load shifting strategies by reducing power to their lift truck bat...

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependence in natural gas usage. January typically sees theindustrial fuels usage. Natural gas demand has been risinggas demands regionally, to account for variability in energy usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial International Energy Outlook 2010 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by 42 percent, or an average of 1.3 percent per year, from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Ninety-five percent of the growth occurs in non-OECD nations. Overview The world's industries make up a diverse sector that includes manufacturing, agriculture, mining, and construction. Industrial energy demand varies across regions and countries, depending on the level and mix of economic activity and technological development, among other factors. Energy is consumed in the industrial sector for a wide range of activities, such as processing and assembly, space conditioning, and lighting. Industrial energy use also includes natural gas and petroleum products used as feedstocks to produce non-energy products, such as plastics. In aggregate, the industrial sector uses more energy than any other end-use sector, consuming about one-half of the world's total delivered energy.

116

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Power UsageSetpoint (C) Peak Electric Demand Power Usage Effective-Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand Scenario

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

118

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for

119

Analysis of relative industrial performance and it's implications for gas demand  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of the U.S. manufacturing sector and the opportunities it presents to the natural gas industry uses a weighted index of 11 economic/financial/market indicators to evaluate the performance of over 300 industries. Output and investment growth appear to be key determinants of industrial energy demand. Industries with high growth and investment potential over the period 1983-1993 are plastic materials and resins, aluminum rolling and drawing, motor vehicle parts, and glass products. Organic chemicals and paper mills exhibit above average potential, while petroleum refining, sugar, and primary aluminum are deemed slow growing industries.

Feldman, S.J.; Rogers, G.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Planning, Analysis, and Evaluation section in the U.S. Department section in the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;ppaappeerr ttoo bbeeLBNL-292E Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy, Demand Response, Energy Efficiency, and Advanced Energy Storage Infrastructure in UC San Diego's Microgrid Speaker(s): Byron Washom Date: August 14, 2008 -...

122

The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Integration of Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Demand Response and Climate Change: Challenges and Opportunities for Evaluators and Planners Title The Integration of Energy...

123

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems, Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.of Industrial Energy Efficiency Measures, Proceedings of

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Industrial Demand Module Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Economic Subsectors Within the IDM Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Industrial Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Fuel Consuming Activities for the Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Subsectors Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing

125

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

time. 4 Reducing this peak demand through DR programs meansthat a 5% reduction in peak demand would have resulted insame 5% reduction in the peak demand of the US as a whole.

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercialand Industrial Customers:A Scoping Study  

SciTech Connect

Demand response is increasingly recognized as an essentialingredient to well functioning electricity markets. This growingconsensus was formalized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), whichestablished demand response as an official policy of the U.S. government,and directed states (and their electric utilities) to considerimplementing demand response, with a particular focus on "price-based"mechanisms. The resulting deliberations, along with a variety of stateand regional demand response initiatives, are raising important policyquestions: for example, How much demand response is enough? How much isavailable? From what sources? At what cost? The purpose of this scopingstudy is to examine analytical techniques and data sources to supportdemand response market assessments that can, in turn, answer the secondand third of these questions. We focus on demand response for large(>350 kW), commercial and industrial (C&I) customers, althoughmany of the concepts could equally be applied to similar programs andtariffs for small commercial and residential customers.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Title Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response in the California Cement Industry Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4849E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Olsen, Daniel, Sasank Goli, David Faulkner, and Aimee T. McKane Date Published 12/2010 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords cement industry, cement sector, demand response, electricity use, energy efficiency, market sectors, mineral manufacturing, technologies Abstract This study examines the characteristics of cement plants and their ability to shed or shift load to participate in demand response (DR). Relevant factors investigated include the various equipment and processes used to make cement, the operational limitations cement plants are subject to, and the quantities and sources of energy used in the cement-making process. Opportunities for energy efficiency improvements are also reviewed. The results suggest that cement plants are good candidates for DR participation. The cement industry consumes over 400 trillion Btu of energy annually in the United States, and consumes over 150 MW of electricity in California alone. The chemical reactions required to make cement occur only in the cement kiln, and intermediate products are routinely stored between processing stages without negative effects. Cement plants also operate continuously for months at a time between shutdowns, allowing flexibility in operational scheduling. In addition, several examples of cement plants altering their electricity consumption based on utility incentives are discussed. Further study is needed to determine the practical potential for automated demand response (Auto-DR) and to investigate the magnitude and shape of achievable sheds and shifts.

128

Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Despite a 54-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial energy...

129

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transportation Demand Management (TDM) Encyclopedia Agency/Company /Organization: Victoria Transport Policy Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.vtpi.org/tdm/tdm12.htm Cost: Free Language: English References: Victoria Transport Policy Institute[1] "The Online TDM Encyclopedia is the world's most comprehensive information resource concerning innovative transportation management strategies. It describes dozens of Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and contains information on TDM planning, evaluation and implementation. It has thousands of hyperlinks that provide instant access

130

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, report for theand Reliability Demand Response Programs: Final Report.Demand Response

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A residential energy demand system for Spain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharp price fluctuations and increasing environmental and distributional concerns, among other issues, have led to a renewed academic interest in energy demand. In this paper we estimate, for the first time in Spain, an ...

Labandeira Villot, Xavier

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

SciTech Connect

In 2006 the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) formed an Industrial Demand Response Team to investigate opportunities and barriers to implementation of Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) systems in California industries. Auto-DR is an open, interoperable communications and technology platform designed to: Provide customers with automated, electronic price and reliability signals; Provide customers with capability to automate customized DR strategies; Automate DR, providing utilities with dispatchable operational capability similar to conventional generation resources. This research began with a review of previous Auto-DR research on the commercial sector. Implementing Auto-DR in industry presents a number of challenges, both practical and perceived. Some of these include: the variation in loads and processes across and within sectors, resource-dependent loading patterns that are driven by outside factors such as customer orders or time-critical processing (e.g. tomato canning), the perceived lack of control inherent in the term 'Auto-DR', and aversion to risk, especially unscheduled downtime. While industry has demonstrated a willingness to temporarily provide large sheds and shifts to maintain grid reliability and be a good corporate citizen, the drivers for widespread Auto-DR will likely differ. Ultimately, most industrial facilities will balance the real and perceived risks associated with Auto-DR against the potential for economic gain through favorable pricing or incentives. Auto-DR, as with any ongoing industrial activity, will need to function effectively within market structures. The goal of the industrial research is to facilitate deployment of industrial Auto-DR that is economically attractive and technologically feasible. Automation will make DR: More visible by providing greater transparency through two-way end-to-end communication of DR signals from end-use customers; More repeatable, reliable, and persistent because the automated controls strategies that are 'hardened' and pre-programmed into facility's software and hardware; More affordable because automation can help reduce labor costs associated with manual DR strategies initiated by facility staff and can be used for long-term.

McKane, Aimee T.; Piette, Mary Ann; Faulkner, David; Ghatikar, Girish; Radspieler Jr., Anthony; Adesola, Bunmi; Murtishaw, Scott; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Demand response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) response medium sized industry consumers (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Demand response medium sized industry consumers Country Denmark Headquarters Location Aarhus, Denmark Coordinates 56.162937°, 10.203921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.162937,"lon":10.203921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

135

China's Industrial Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Energy China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy- Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects Jing Ke, Lynn Price, Stephanie Ohshita, David Fridley, Nina Khanna, Nan Zhou, Mark Levine China Energy Group Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Reprint version of journal article published in "Energy Policy", Volume 50, Pages 562-569, November 2012 October 2012 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

136

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Energy Efficiency. Prepared for The EnergyIndustrial Sector Energy Efficiency Potential Study - DraftIndustrial Energy Efficiency Market Characterization Study.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; Rafael Friedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRYAN LOVELL Energy supply, demand and impact Now it is Britain's turn to think harder, says Brian both are true. Most predict that fossil fuels must remain a significant part of our energy supply, Britain has had a comfortable and profitable respite from anxieties about security of energy supply. Now

Cambridge, University of

138

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

139

Industrial energy management | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

140

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

step is to calculate energy service demand in each category,mainly determine the energy service demand while pricesthe energy source. In both energy service demand and energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Impact of selected energy conservation technologies on baseline demands  

SciTech Connect

This study is an application of the modeling and demand projection capability existing at Brookhaven National Laboratory to specific options in energy conservation. Baseline energy demands are modified by introducing successively three sets of conservation options. The implementation of improved building standards and the use of co-generation in industry are analyzed in detail and constitute the body of this report. Two further sets of energy demands are presented that complete the view of a low energy use, ''conservation'' scenario. An introduction to the report covers the complexities in evaluating ''conservation'' in view of the ways it is inextricably linked to technology, prices, policy, and the mix of output in the economy. The term as used in this report is narrowly defined, and methodologies are suggested by which these other aspects listed can be studied in the future.

Doernberg, A

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off- site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%off-site energy demand (2030) 20% decrease to parameter 20%

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Energy: Supply, Demand and the Future http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/CUTS//2050/energy05.pdf Edward Beimborn Center for Urban Transportation Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presentation to the District IV Conference Institute of Transportation Engineers June, 2005, updated September

Saldin, Dilano

144

Energy Demand (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Growth in U.S. energy use is linked to population growth through increases in demand for housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, manufacturing, and services. This affects not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels and consumption by sector.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Demand Response Opportunities in Industrial Refrigerated Warehouses in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Open Automated Demand Response. In Grid Interop Forum.work was sponsored by the Demand Response Research Center (load-management.php. Demand Response Research Center (2009).

Goli, Sasank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration systems Elevators Irrigation pumps Water heating Figure 9: Common Examples of Commercial and Industrial

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Assessment of factors affecting industrial electricity demand. Final report (revision version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Chapter 2, we identify those factors affecting the industrial product mix - taste, relative output prices, and relative input prices - and isolate several determinants which have not been adequately accounted for to date in industrial electricity demand forecasts. We discuss how the lower energy prices of foreign producers affect domestic producers and how the growth in the number of substitutes for intermediate products such as steel and aluminum with plastics and composites affects the composition of production and, hence, the demand for electricity. We also investigate how the changing age structure of the population brought on by the baby boom could change the mix of outputs produced by the industrial sector. In Chapter 3, we review the history of the 1970s with regard to changes in output mix and the manufacturing demand for electricity, and with regard to changes in the use of electricity vis-a-vis the other inputs in the production process. In Chapter 4, we generate forecasts using two models which control for efficiency changes, but in different ways. In this chapter we present the sensitivity of these projections using three sets of assumptions about product mix. The last chapter summarizes our results and draw from those results implications regarding public policy and industrial electricity demand. Two appendices present ISTUM2 results from selected electricity intensive industries, describes the ISTUM and ORIM models.

None

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

149

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg251500.pdf....

150

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Title Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings Publication Type Thesis Year of...

151

South Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea-ANL Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Side Management in South Korea Agency...

152

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

demand for renewable fuels increasing the fastestincluding E85 and biodiesel fuels for light-duty vehicles, biomass for co-firing at coal-fired electric power plants, and...

153

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Managing Energy Demand With Standards and Information Speaker(s): Sebastien Houde Date: September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Christopher Payne The goal of this talk is to discuss two interrelated research projects that aim to assess the welfare effects of energy policies that rely on standards and information. The first project focuses on the Energy Star certification program. Using unique micro-data on the US refrigerator market, I first show that consumers respond to certification in different ways. Some consumers appear to rely heavily on Energy Star and pay little attention to electricity costs, others are the reverse, and still others appear to be insensitive to both electricity costs and Energy Star. I then develop a

154

Modeling the residential demand for energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for energy is derived from the demand for services that appliances and energy together provide. This raises a number of serious econometric issues when estimating energy-demand functions: delineation of short-run and long-run household responses, specification of the price variable and in particular, the assumption that the model is recursive, or in other words, that the appliance choice equation and the energy consumption equation are uncorrelated. The dissertation utilizes a structural model of energy use whose theoretical underpinnings derive from the conditional logit model and an extension of that model to the joint-discrete/continuous case by Dubin and McFadden (1980). It uses the 1978 to 1979 National Interim Energy Comsumption Survey. Three appliance portfolio choices are analyzed; choice of water and space heating and central air-conditioning; choice of room air conditioners; and choice of clothes dryers, either as multinomial logit or binary probit choices. Results varied widely across the appliance choice considered; use of Hausman's test led to acceptance of the null hypothesis of orthogonality in some cases but not in others. Demand for electricity and natural gas tended to be price inelastic; however, estimated own-price effects differed considerably when disaggregated by appliance categories and across methods of estimation.

Kirby, S.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Demands..xi Annual natural gas demand for each alternativeused in natural gas demand projections. 34

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

SciTech Connect

Over 40 percent of the energy consumed globally is used in the industrial sector. In China, this sector consumes an even larger proportion, reaching nearly 70 percent in 1997. A variety of energy efficiency policies and programs have been instituted in both industrialized and developing countries in an effort to improve the energy efficiency of the industrial sector. There are very few comprehensive evaluations of these industrial sector energy efficiency policies; however a number of recent workshops and conferences have included a focus on these policies. Three important meetings were the International Energy Agency's Industrial Energy Efficiency: Policies and Programs Conference in 1994, Industrial Energy Efficiency Policies: Understanding Success and Failure - A Workshop Organized by the International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector in 1998, and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy's 1999 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Man y articles from these meetings are included as attachments to this memo. This paper provides a brief description of each of seven categories of individual industrial energy efficiency policies and programs, discuss which industrial sectors or types of equipment they apply to, and provide references for articles and reports that discuss each policy or program in more detail. We begin with mandatory-type policies and move to more voluntary-type policies. We then provide a brief description of four integrated industrial energy efficiency policies and provide references for articles and reports that describe these policies in greater detail.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum demand and Maximum demand incorporate assumptionslevels, or very minor Maximum demand household size, growthvehicles in Increasing Maximum demand 23 mpg truck share

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

"Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" 6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

160

DemandDirect | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DemandDirect DemandDirect Jump to: navigation, search Name DemandDirect Place Woodbury, Connecticut Zip 6798 Sector Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Services Product DemandDirect provides demand response, energy efficiency, load management, and distributed generation services to end-use electricity customers in order to reduce electricity consumption, improve grid reliability, and promote renewable energy. Coordinates 44.440496°, -72.414991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.440496,"lon":-72.414991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

commercial.gif (5196 bytes) commercial.gif (5196 bytes) The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2020. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA’s State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings, however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

162

Survey and Forecast of Marketplace Supply and Demand for Energy-Efficient Lighting Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility incentive programs have placed significant demands on the suppliers of certain types of energy-efficient lighting products--particularly compact fluorescent lamps and electronic ballasts. Two major federal programs may soon place even greater demands on the lighting industry. This report assesses the program-induced demand for efficient lighting products and their likely near-term supply.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building Title Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy...

166

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

167

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power Information about the Department of Energy's Industrial Technologies...

168

Demand Management Institute (DMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Management Institute (DMI) Demand Management Institute (DMI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Management Institute (DMI) Address 35 Walnut Street Place Wellesley, Massachusetts Zip 02481 Sector Buildings Product Provides analysis for buildings on reducing energy use Website http://www.dmiinc.com/ Coordinates 42.3256508°, -71.2530294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3256508,"lon":-71.2530294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) to begin pre-a facility using Energy Management Control Systems (EMCS) orAct of 2007 energy management control systems The Energy

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Demand Modeling Energy Demand Modeling The software is intended to be used for Energy Demand Modeling. This can be utilized from regional to national level. A Graphical User Interface of the software takes the input from the user in a quite logical and sequential manner. These input leads to output in two distinct form, first, it develops a Reference Energy System, which depicts the flow of energy from the source to sink with all the losses incorporated and second, it gives a MATLAB script file for advance post processing like graphs, visualization and optimizations to develop and evaluate the right energy mix policy frame work for a intended region. Keywords Reference Energy System, Software, GUI, Planning, Energy Demand Model EDM, Energy Policy Planning Validation/Testing

171

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8.4 Demand Response Integration . . . . . . . . . . .for each day type for the demand response study - moderatefor each day type for the demand response study - moderate

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumers of electricity by industry type for theira large user of electricity, this industry also warrants apatterns of electricity use in CA and industry- specific

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Draft Chapter 3: Demand-Side Resources Utilities in many states have been implementing energy efficiency and load management programs...

174

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services provided to the energy markets, Order 745 advancesin the wholesale energy market (both day-ahead and real-the capacity market is. The energy market does not feature

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response: International Experiences and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is determined by the market energy price offered by themay be paid the spot market energy price. (e.g. PJM SRM, UKor the wholesale market price for energy. By codifying the

Shen, Bo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optimal Demand Response with Energy Storage Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of optimal demand response and energy storage management for a power consuming entity. The entity's objective is to find an optimal control policy for deciding how much load to consume, how much power to purchase from/sell to the power grid, and how to use the finite capacity energy storage device and renewable energy, to minimize his average cost, being the disutility due to load- shedding and cost for purchasing power. Due to the coupling effect of the finite size energy storage, such problems are challenging and are typically tackled using dynamic programming, which is often complex in computation and requires substantial statistical information of the system dynamics. We instead develop a low-complexity algorithm called Demand Response with Energy Storage Management (DR-ESM). DR-ESM does not require any statistical knowledge of the system dynamics, including the renewable energy and the power prices. It only requires the entity to solve a small convex optimization pr...

Huang, Longbo; Ramchandran, Kannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Univariate Modeling and Forecasting of Monthly Energy Demand Time Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this report. #12;i ABSTRACT These electricity demand forms and instructions ask load-serving entities and Instructions for Electricity Demand Forecasts. California Energy Commission, Electricity Supply Analysis.................................................................................................................................7 Form 1 Historic and Forecast Electricity Demand

Abdel-Aal, Radwan E.

178

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

044E 044E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Charles Goldman, Michael Reid, Roger Levy and Alison Silverstein Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2010 The work described in this report was funded by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes

179

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030 under EnvironmentalEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy EfficiencyEnergy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Japan Long-Term Energy Outlook -A Projection up to 2030Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering EnergyResidential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric DemandDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Scenario Supply/ ReturnDX Cooling Total Annual Energy Usage Peak Electric Demand

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Industrial Energy Procurement Contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rates are going down and services are improving! Or are they? As opportunities to directly contract for energy expand from the larger industrials to include mid-market companies, existing energy supply and service contracts will be renegotiated and new ones developed. Many of these mid-level industrial customers typically lack in-house expertise on energy procurement, yet their operations use significant amounts of energy. This paper looks at some of the issues involved in the main terms of a procurement contract, as well as issues in contract formation and termination. Finally the paper reviews some of the recent energy aggregation and outsourcing deals to highlight some that worked and some that didn't.

Thompson, P.; Cooney, K.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Green Energy Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Industries Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.gecorpusa.co Region United States...

184

Millennium Energy Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Millennium Energy Industries Place Jordan Zip 1182 Sector Solar Product Jordan-based solar energy firm focused in MENA region....

185

California Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name California Solar Energy Industries Association Place Rio Vista, California Zip 94571 Sector Solar Product California Solar Energy Industries Association is a trade group...

186

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption. Key Assumptions Macroeconomic Sector Inputs

187

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banerjee, R. , 2005. Energy Efficiency and Demand SideKiln Systems, Energy Efficiency in the Cement Industry (Ed.for Improving Energy Efficiency, Reducing Pollution and

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

189

Industrial Energy Use Indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories for electricity and natural gas use in small and medium-sized plants in the U.S. Standard deviations often exceed the average EUI for an energy type, with coefficients of variation averaging 290% for 8,200 plants from all areas of the continental U.S. Data from milder climates appears more scattered than that from colder climates. For example, the ratio of the average of coefficient of variations for all industry types in warm versus cold regions of the U.S. generally is greater than unity. Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energys national Industrial Assessment Center database.

Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration freezing Max duration (not well populated) Appendix C: IndustrialRefrigeration Lighting Waste Treatment Ventilation Vending machine Shed Support Average Total Table 8. Industrial

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Industrial Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Industrial Technologies Marketing Summaries Here youll find marketing summaries of industrial technologies available for licensing from U.S. Department of Energy ...

192

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

193

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

194

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Partnerships  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy efficiency by 2020. The Industrial Energy EfficiencyCombined Heat & Power Working Group is developing a number of resources. News Energy Department Invests in...

195

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiency programat various costs is with energy efficiency supply curves.Energy Efficiency in Industry Table 4 summarizes the benefit-cost

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; Rafael Friedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Industrial demand-side management programs: What`s happened, what works, what`s needed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to analyze experience to date with industrial demand-side management (DSM), a survey of utilities was conducted and a database of industrial DSM programs was prepared. More than eighty utilities and third-party organizations were interviewed. Data were collected via phone, fax, and/or mail from the utilities and entered into a database. In order to limit the scope of this study, the database contains incentive-based, energy-saving programs and not load management or information-only programs (including technical assistance programs). Programs in the database were divided into four categories: two ``prescriptive rebate`` categories and two ``custom rebate`` categories. The database contains 31 incentive-based, energy-saving industrial DSM programs offered by 17 utilities. The appendix to this report summarizes the results approximately 60 industrial DSM programs. Most of the programs included in the appendix, but not in the database, are either C&I programs for which commercial and industrial data were not disaggregated or new industrial DSM programs for which data are not yet available.

Jordan, J.A.; Nadel, S.M. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, the flattening of the demand curves (except Maximum demand) reflects decreasing population growth ratesresidential electricity demand are described in Table 11. For simplicity, end use-specific UEC and saturation rates

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover,138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW by 2030, or 14

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Tankless Demand Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is...

200

Xcel Energy- Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Xcel Energy Large Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer Program (SOP) pays incentives to businesses for retrofit and new construction projects that save energy in peak summer demand periods and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage ..for bulk of the end-use energy usage), and by reducing theet al. 2010b). The energy usage and demand of key equipment

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data Rate of Electricity Demand Growth Slows, Following the Historical Trend Electricity demand fluctuates in the short term in response to business cycles, weather conditions,...

203

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

29 5.6. Peak and hourly demand43 6.6. Peak and seasonal demandthe average percent of peak demand) significantly impact the

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Energy Efficiency Fund (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Gas) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

205

Industrial Energy Management and Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management and Standards Industrial Energy Management and Standards Industrial Energy Management and Standards Industrial Energy Management and Standards More Documents &...

206

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2013 November 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis ...

207

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35 Table 12. Industrial Participants in Sub-MeteringSection 2.5. Analysis of sub-metering to monitor DR at sixreviewed the experience with sub-metering of six industrial

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: A Resource of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

209

Chapter 3 Demand-Side Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

these resources result from one of two methods of reducing load: energy efficiency or demand response load management. The energy efficiency method designs and deploys...

210

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

211

Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov Energy Efficiency/Demand Response/Smart Grid/Distribution ...

212

Industry, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industry, California: Energy Resources (Redirected from Industry, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0197335, -117.9586754 Loading map......

213

Demand management : a cross-industry analysis of supply-demand planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globalization increases product variety and shortens product life cycles. These lead to an increase in demand uncertainty and variability. Outsourcing to low-cost countries increases supply lead-time and supply uncertainty ...

Tan, Peng Kuan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR plant certification ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry See who has taken the Challenge See who has achieved the Challenge See who is promoting the Challenge ENERGY...

215

Success stories: Industrial energy management | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stories Production Strategy Saves Money & Energy: Eastman Chemical Company Related resources Guidelines for Energy Management Energy guides Industrial service and product providers...

216

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

217

NREL: Energy Storage - Industry Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Participants NREL's energy storage project is funded by the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office. We work closely with automobile manufacturers, energy storage developers,...

218

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers...

219

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's...

220

Demand Response - Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

over the last 11 years when interest in demand response increased. Demand response is an electricity tariff or program established to motivate changes in electric use by end-use...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Propane Demand by Sector - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order to understand markets you also have to look at supply and demand. First, demand or who uses propane. For the most part, the major components of propane ...

222

Industrial Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities October 8, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) encourages Federal agencies requiring assistance with implementing energy-efficiency measures in their industrial facilities to hire a U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) for assessment services. The following resources can be used to plan and implement industrial facility energy-efficiency projects. Technical Publications: The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) website offers fact sheets, handbooks, and self-assessment manuals covering steam system efficiency, fundamentals of compressed air systems, motor systems management, and other topics. Tools: The AMO website offers valuable software tools for evaluating

223

Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable Energy Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate '''General Incentive Limits''' Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit: $100,000 per program year Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency: $100,000 per program year Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Industrial Lighting Retrofit Lighting Retrofit: $500/kW of peak-demand reduction

224

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

transportation.gif (5318 bytes) transportation.gif (5318 bytes) The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, industry sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8501-10,000 lbs), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, mass transit, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

225

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research EnergySystemsIntegration Environmentallyenergy systems, and thus greater opportunities for DR and overall energy efficiency. The complete integration

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Response, report for the California Energy Commission, PIER.Christensen Associates. California Energy Commission. 2002.Users. Sacramento, CA: California Energy Commission. Ganji,

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Opportunities, Barriers and Actions for Industrial Demand Response in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of various energy management systems to implementfocused on building Energy Management Systems. The DRRC isthrough building Energy Management Control Systems (EMS).

McKane, Aimee T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module Commercial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates forecasts of commercial sector energy demand through 2030. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) for characterizing the commercial sector activity mix as well as the equipment stock and fuels consumed to provide end use services.12

229

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines...

230

EnergySolve Demand Response | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnergySolve Demand Response EnergySolve Demand Response Jump to: navigation, search Name EnergySolve Demand Response Place Somerset, New Jersey Product Somerset-based utility bill outsourcing company that provides electronic utility bill auditing, tariff analysis, late fee avoidance, and flexible bill payment solutions. Coordinates 45.12402°, -92.675379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.12402,"lon":-92.675379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

232

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

233

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform - REDRAMP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project description * Subdivision energy efficiency features * Home energy monitoring * Demand side management * Feeder loading * Battery Energy Storage System * Future Work Team Members Project Objective and Methodology * The main objective is to reduce peak power demand of a housing subdivision by 65% (compared to housing development that is built to conventional code). * This objective will be achieved by - Energy efficient home construction with roof- integrated PV system - Demand Side Management - Battery Energy Storage System Project schematic Diagram Project Physical Location: Las Vegas, NV Red Rock Hotel/Casino

234

AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ZAMBIAN INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY DEMAND.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is twofold: to examine the electricity use in Zambias mining industry by focusing on own-price, cross price and index of (more)

Chama, Yoram Chama

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

innovation and lets industry pick winning technologies. TheTransforming the Oil Industry intothe Energy Industry BY DANIEL SPERLING AND SONIA YEH A C C E

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Demand Response Quick Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Demand response quick assessment tool image The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. This assessment tool will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfort impact for various demand responsive strategies. Users of the tool will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tool will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points

237

Industrial Technologies Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Bookmark Industrial Technologies Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal on Google; Bookmark Industrial Technologies Success Stories ...

238

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the most natural gas usage (33% and 51% of total demanddependence in natural gas usage, and consequently, Januarygas demand exhibits a strong winter peak in residential usage

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Maximum demand, year 2050 electricity consumption reachesefficiency, year 2050 electricity consumption is 357 TWh,capita electricity consumption increases from 7,421 kWh/year

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often they simply do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, a program was developed to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings allowable through energy management techniques. The program is entitled 'Oklahoma Industrial Energy; Management Program' and is located at Oklahoma State University. This paper describes past, on-going, and proposed activities of this Program and assesses their impact. Included are industrial energy management conferences, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being offered.

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

both types of programs. Xcel Energy markets both energyEnergy Efficiency Marketing Xcel Energy Paul Suskie Chairman

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in the iron and steel industry Energy Policy 30 (user is the iron and steel industry representing almost halfTable 9). The Indian steel industry is slowly shifting from

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demand Response Energy Consulting LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Response Energy Consulting LLC Response Energy Consulting LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Demand Response & Energy Consulting LLC Place Delanson, New York Zip NY 12053 Sector Efficiency Product Delanson-based demand response and energy efficiency consultants. Coordinates 42.748995°, -74.185794° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.748995,"lon":-74.185794,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

245

Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, & Opportunities presentation Industrial Energy Efficiency:Policy, Initiatives, &...

246

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Energy Source Demand Coal, Oil, Gas, Heat, Electricity Demography Japans population, an important factor in predicting residential energy demand as well

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Behavioral Aspects in Simulating the Future US Building Energy Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Structure of SBEAM Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demandUSA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Structure of SBEAM Floor-space forecast to 2050 Gross demandUSA, and published in the Conference Proceedings Relative Importance Total off- site energy demand (

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant Industrial Plant Certification Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Performance Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division June 2013 ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve the energy performance of their facilities and strengthen the effectiveness of their energy management program. Through ENERGY STAR, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) offers a number of forms of recognition, including certification for facility energy efficiency. ENERGY STAR certification for industrial plants recognizes individual manufacturing plants whose

249

Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an industrial energy efficiency benchmarking study to identify facility specific, cost-effective best practices and technologies. Such a study could help develop a common understanding of opportunities for energy efficiency improvements and provide additional information to improve the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The EPA's initial benchmarking efforts will focus on industrial power facilities. The key industries of interest include the most energy intensive industries, such as chemical, pulp and paper, and iron and steel manufacturing.

Hartley, Z.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

EnerNOC Inc. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation Tennant Company Thomson West Toro Unisys U of M Office of IT U.S. Bank Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Tennant Company Thomson West Toro Unisys U of M Office of IT U.S. Bank Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Young Wells Fargo Xcel Energy Young America #12;2007 - 2008 Seminar Attendance Report By Company * Company

251

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

252

Residential Energy Demand Reduction Analysis and Monitoring Platform...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dramatic Peak Residential Demand Reduction in the Desert Southwest Yahia Baghzouz Center for Energy Research University of Nevada, Las Vegas Golden, CO Overview * Project...

253

Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Side Management Website Jump to: navigation, search Name Network-Driven Demand Side Management Website Abstract This task of the International Energy Agency is a broad,...

254

1995 Demand-Side Managment - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and more detailed data on energy savings, peak load reductions and costs attributable to DSM. Target Audience ... Profile: U.S. Electric Utility Demand-Side

255

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2012 November 2012 . Independent Statistics & Analysis . www.eia.gov

256

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy spillage, operating costs and capacityfocused on renewable energy utilization, cost of operationssystem operating costs, renewable energy utilization,

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Profile of the California Energy Industry Analysisand R.L. Cooper, "California Energy Outlook," LawrenceDivision Analysis of the California Energy Industry Energy

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Information Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Industrial Distributed Energy Search Search Help Industrial Distributed Energy EERE...

260

California Energy Demand Scenario Projections to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy scenarios to explore alternative energy pathways indo not include the alternative energy pathways (such asmodeling to investigate alternative energy supply strategies

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Facilities to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial Facilities on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Industrial...

262

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Jump to: navigation, search Name Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Me Country Mexico UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Assisting Mexico in Developing Energy Supply and Demand Projections[1] "CEEESA and the team of experts from Mexico analyzed the country's entire energy supply and demand system using CEEESA's latest version of the popular ENPEP-BALANCE software. The team developed a system representation, a so-called energy network, using ENPEP's powerful graphical user

263

Solar in Demand | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar in Demand Solar in Demand Solar in Demand June 15, 2012 - 10:23am Addthis Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. Kyle Travis, left and Jon Jackson, with Lighthouse Solar, install microcrystalline PV modules on top of Kevin Donovan's town home. | Credit: Dennis Schroeder. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? A new study says U.S. developers are likely to install about 3,300 megawatts of solar panels in 2012 -- almost twice the amount installed last year. In case you missed it... This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article, "U.S. Solar-Panel Demand Expected to Double," highlighting the successes of

264

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory Commission [FERC] (2008). Assessment of DemandRegulatory Commission [FERC] (2009). A National AssessmentEIS EMCS EMS EPA ESCO ESPC FERC GE HVAC ISO ISO-NE kW kWh MW

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of real-time electricity prices (left) and windinflexible) demand and real-time prices. The case study inas a special case. The real-time price process is modeled as

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Shrenik Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

India Zip 416 109 Sector Wind energy Product Maharashtra-based wind turbine tower manufacturer and subsidiary of the Sanjay Ghodawat Group of Industries. References...

267

Ventower Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Monroe, Michigan Zip 48161 Sector Wind energy Product Michigan-based wind turbine tower manufacturer. References Ventower Industries1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

268

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013...

269

Eolica Industrial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Eolica Industrial Place Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip 01020-901 Sector Wind energy Product Brazil based wind turbine steel towers and...

270

Demand for petrochem feedstock to buoy world LPG industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that use of liquefied petroleum gas as petrochemical feedstock will increase worldwide, providing major growth opportunities for LPG producers. World exports of liquefied petroleum gas will increase more slowly than production as producers choose to use LPG locally as chemical feedstock and export in value added forms such as polyethylene. So predicts Poten and Partners Inc., New York. Poten forecasts LPG production in exporting countries will jump to 95 million tons in 2010 from 45 million tons in 1990. However, local and regional demand will climb to 60 million tons/year from 23 million tons/year during the same period. So supplies available for export will rise to 35 million tons in 2010 from 22 million tons in 1990.

Not Available

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Duke Energy (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Duke Energy (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility...

272

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 16 Annual peak electricity demand by sector. Tableincludes an hourly electricity demand (i.e. power) profileof aggregating sectoral electricity demands into a statewide

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 22. Agricultural natural gas demand by planning area.23. Other sector natural gas demand by planning area.Projections Monthly natural gas demands are depicted in

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

275

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant from off-site power plants, gas companies, and fuel distributors. Energy then flows to either a central energy generation utility system or is distributed immediately for direct use. Energy is then processed using a variety of highly energy-intensive systems, including steam, process heating, and

276

"Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total Onsite","Transfers","Net Demand for","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Purchases","In(b)","Generation(c)","Offsite","Electricity(d)","Factors"

277

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

same or better levels of energy services. This definitionSenior Vice President, Energy Services and Technology NewNational Association of Energy Service Companies Chuck Gray

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to managing their energy usage. Greater customer willingnessto managing their energy usage. And greater customera net reduction in energy usage. 5 With sufficient advance

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Regulation Services with Demand Response - Energy Innovation ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; ... (i.e. target ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achieving all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Thisinvestment in cost-effective energy efficiency. Coordinationto achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. 1

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control system energy management system U.S. Environmentalbuilding energy management systems (EMS) can deliversystem; EMS = energy management system; ISO = independent

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of locational renewable energy production in each renewableto total renewable energy production, although accountingproduction data from the 2006 data set of the National Renewable Energy

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs Integrated Energy Audit Provide engineeringtechnicians performed energy audits and provided advice to8 PG&Es Integrated Energy Audit, a program for businesses

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

what if wholesale market energy prices remain low or if CPPwith high prices in the real-time energy market. Nationalmarket prices and reliability circumstances, even though energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasting for wind energy: Temperature dependence andlarge amounts of wind energy with a small electric system.Large scale integration of wind energy in the european power

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Limitations to Large-Scale Renewable EnergyImpacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

Papavasiliou, Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity MarketsEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response?7 3.1.Demand Response in Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A Successful Case Study of Small Business Energy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating Thermostats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to everyone at the Demand Response Research Center, theEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with CommunicatingEnergy Efficiency and Demand Response with Communicating

Herter, Karen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty AfzalEnergy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty ?DER in conjunction with demand response (DR): the expected

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand prepared the residential sector forecast. Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Lynn

292

Industry Profile | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Profile Industry Profile Industry Profile November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis The largest energy consuming industrial sectors account for the largest share of CHP capacity; namely: Chemicals (30%), Petroleum Refining (17%), and Paper Products (14%). Other industrial sectors include: Commercial/Institutional (12%), Food (8%), Primary Metals (5%), Other Manufacturing (8%), and Other Industrial (6%). Combined heat and power (CHP)-sometimes referred to as cogeneration-involves the sequential process of producing and utilizing electricity and thermal energy from a single fuel. CHP is widely recognized to save energy and costs, while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants. CHP is a realistic, near-term option for large energy efficiency improvements and significant CO2 reductions.

293

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director, Energy and Environmental Policy American ForestEnergy Efficiency Partnerships Roger Cooper Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning American

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Energy Research & Development Authority offers incentivesState Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) Existing Facilities Program offers incentives

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A...

296

Strategies for reducing energy demand in the materials sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research answers a key question - can the materials sector reduce its energy demand by 50% by 2050? Five primary materials of steel, cement, aluminum, paper, and plastic, contribute to 50% or more of the final energy ...

Sahni, Sahil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $100,000 Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Matching Funds up to $100,000 Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers the Demand and Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to eligible commercial, industrial, and municipal

298

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. Demand for Fossil Fuels Response to several FOIA requests - Renewable Energy. nepdg_251_500.pdf. Demand for Fossil Fuels. Renewable sources of power. Demand for fossil fuels surely will overrun supply sooner or later, as indeed it already has in the casc of United States domestic oil drilling. Recognition also is growing that our air and land can no longer absorb unlimited quantities of waste from fossil fuel extraction and combustion. As that day draws nearer, policymakers will have no realistic alternative but to turn to sources of power that today make up a viable but small part of America's energy picture. And they will be

299

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for sound energy management is no longer worthy of debate. Action is necessary and much is being done by U.S. industry. Unfortunately, however, the majority of the work is being done by the few large energy intensive industries throughout the country. The average small to medium sized company has yet to undertake a dedicated program. The reasons are numerous, but often it is simply because of a lack of knowledge of techniques or the amount of savings possible. Recognizing this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program" and is housed at Oklahoma State University. The program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy through the State Energy Conservation Plan. This paper describes the program offerings, impact to date and plans for the future. The program offerings basically include: 1. A series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy Audit booklets including instructions and forms. 4. Technical aid on a limited basis. 5. A series of laboratory type experiments involving power factor, solar energy, boiler combustion improvement and other energy related projects. 6. Fact sheet publication as the need develops. Plans for the future include expansion of the program to small businesses in general through the Energy Extension Service and more technical aid to participating industries, The basic plan involving the services above shall remain intact. The program has been very successful to date. The results are directly transferable to other states and the program directors are willing to share information.

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for200 emerging energy-efficient technologies in industry, of2000. Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy commodity risk (e.g. gas markets) Attendance at training workshops Technical audits or information information and improved methods that would support more reliable demand response market assessments. Energy

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

new technology and systems integration tools. Energy controland systems that support integration and coordination of energyand systems integration represent key building blocks for enabling greater coordination of energy

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Industry, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industry, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0197335, -117.9586754 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

304

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in China. session2industrytrackpriceen.pdf session2industrytrackpricecn.pdf More...

305

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and DemandRenewable Energy, former Distributed Energy Program of theOptimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Guardian Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Guardian Industries Place Auburn Hills, MI Website http://www.guardian.com/ References Results of NREL Testing (Glass Magazine)[1] Guardian News Archive[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2002 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Guardian Industries is a company located in Auburn Hills, MI. References ↑ "Results of NREL Testing (Glass Magazine)" ↑ "Guardian News Archive" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Guardian_Industries&oldid=381719" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

307

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Commercial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Floorspace Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Service Demand Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Equipment Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Energy Consumption Submodule The commercial demand module (CDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for eight marketed energy sources plus solar thermal energy. For the three major commercial sector fuels, electricity, natural gas and distillate oil, the CDM is a "structural" model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the commercial floorspace stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. For the remaining five marketed "minor fuels," simple econometric projections are made. The commercial sector encompasses business establishments that are not

308

Energy and Emissions Long Term Outlook A Detailed Simulation of Energy Supply-Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents the results of a detailed, bottom-up modeling exercise of Mexicos energy markets. The Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), the Wien Automatic System Planning (WASP) and the Energy Demand Model (MODEMA) were used to develop forecasts to 2025. Primary energy supply is projected to grow from 9,313 PJ (1999) to 13,130 PJ (2025). Mexicos crude oil production is expected to increase by 1 % annually to 8,230 PJ. As its domestic crude refining capacity becomes unable to meet the rising demand for petroleum products, imports of oil products will become increasingly important. The Mexican natural gas markets are driven by the strong demand for gas in the power generating and manufacturing industries which significantly outpaces projected domestic production. The result is a potential need for large natural gas imports that may reach approximately 46 % of total gas supplies by 2025. The long-term market outlook for Mexicos electricity industry shows a heavy reliance on naturalgas based generating technologies. Gas-fired generation is forecast to increase 26-fold eventually accounting for over 80 % of total generation by 2025. Alternative results for a constrained-gas scenario show a substantial shift to coal-based generation and the associated effects on the natural gas market. A renewables scenario investigates impacts of additional renewables for power generation (primarily wind plus some solar-photovoltaic). A nuclear scenario analyzes the impacts of additional nuclear power

Juan Quintanilla Martnez; Autnoma Mxico; Centro Mario Molina; Juan Quintanilla Martnez

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge Challenge for Industry Professional Engineers' Guide for Validating Statements of Energy Improvement Office of Air and Radiation Climate Protection Partnerships Division May 2013 Revised ii Introduction The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) ENERGY STAR program provides guidance, tools, and recognition to help companies improve their energy performance. ENERGY STAR is a voluntary partnership program that companies choose to join. Through ENERGY STAR, U.S. EPA offers a number of forms of recognition for achievements in energy efficiency. The ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry recognizes individual industrial sites for achieving a 10 percent reduction in energy intensity within 5 years from the conclusion of an established baseline. To be

310

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each and every citizen has been affected by the energy crisis by now. Business and industry have especially been hurt as the rising cost of energy and its dwindling supplies are the twin jaws of a vise rapidly closing in on profits. Much work is being done in large companies; but most small to medium companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. The reasons are many but often they simply I do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is, entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program" and is housed at Oklahoma State University. The program is funded by the U. S. Department of Energy through the State Energy Conservation Plan. This paper describes the program offerings, impact to date and plans for the future.

Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Emerging Industrial Innovations for New Energy Efficient Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discussion surrounding industrial efficiency gains typically focuses on industrys own use of energy and the set of technologies that might cost-effectively reduce that consumption. Often overlooked is industrys role as a primary developer of the materials and technologies that can generate large efficiency gains within all other sectors of the economy. For example, its role in developing a new generation of fuel cell vehicles, on demand manufacturing capabilities, or new plastics that double as integrated photovoltaic systems may play an even larger role in the more productive use of our energy resources. This paper explores recent work on industrial innovation, often involving public-private partnerships, and provides a context to understand the role of innovation. It highlights a number of emerging technologies that may foster an even greater energy savings than might be apparent from looking at industrys own energy use patterns alone.

Laitner, J. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

313

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Demand Modelling Introduction to the PhD project Erika Zvingilaite Risø DTU System Analysis for optimization of energy systems Environmental effects Global externalities cost of CO2 Future scenarios for the Nordic energy systems 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, 2050 (energy-production, consumption, emissions, net costs

314

Industrial Energy Auditing: An Opportunity for Improving Energy Efficiency and Industrial Competitiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the Department of Energy's industrial energy auditing program, its achievements to date, and future plans. The Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) Program provides no-cost energy audits to small and medium size manufacturers, and recommends ways to cut plant energy use. The program is conducted by universities for the DOE, and has performed over 3600 audits since 1976. Approximately 55 percent of the recommendations made through the EADC program are implemented by industry. Since program inception, audit recommendations have produced a cumulative national energy savings of about 67 trillion Btus, valued at $365 million. The National Energy Strategy (NES) has identified industrial energy audits as a cost-effective means to reduce energy consumption in industry. In support of the NES, the EADC program is expanding, and plans to have 40 operational EADCs by the year 2000. Through outreach activities, EADCs will also encourage similar private-sector programs, e.g. utility-conducted industrial audits performed for demand-side management programs.

Glaser, C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Japan's Residential Energy Demand Outlook to 2030 Considering Energy Efficiency Standards "Top-Runner Approach"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook tol i f o r n i a Japans Residential Energy Demand Outlook toParticularly in Japans residential sector, where energy

Komiyama, Ryoichi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Specification, estimation, and forecasts of industrial demand and price of electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the specification of electricity-demand and price equations for manufacturing industries and presents empirical results based on the data for 16 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) three-digit industries from 1959 to 1976. Performances of estimated equations are evaluated by sample-period simulation tests. The estimated coefficients are then used to forecast electricity demand by industry. Results show that most of the estimated coefficients have expected signs and are statistically significant. The estimated equations perform well in terms of sample-period simulation tests, registering small mean absolute percentage errors and mean square percentage errors for most of the industries studied. Forecasted results indicate that total electricity demand by manufacturing industries would grow at an average annual rate of 3.53% according to the baseline forecast, 2.39% in the high-price scenario, and 4.76% in the low-price scenario. The forecasted growth rates vary substantially among industries. The results also indicate that the price of electricity would continue to grow at a faster rate than the general price level in the forecasted period 1977 to 1990. 19 references, 6 tables.

Chang, H.S. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville); Chern, W.S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Personnel supply and demand issues in the nuclear power industry. Final report of the Nuclear Manpower Study Committee  

SciTech Connect

The anticipated personnel needs of the nuclear power industry have varied widely in recent years, in response to both increasing regulatory requirements and declining orders for new plants. Recent employment patterns in the nuclear energy field, with their fluctuations, resemble those of defense industries more than those traditionally associated with electric utilities. Reactions to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 by industry and regulators have increased the demand for trained and experienced personnel, causing salaries to rise. Industry, for example, has established several advisory organizations like the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). At the same time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed many new construction and operating requirements in an effort to take advantage of lessons learned from the Three Mile Island incident and to respond to the perceived public interest in better regulation of nuclear power. Thus, at present, utilities, architect-engineer firms, reactor vendors, and organizations in the nuclear development community have heavy workloads.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Socio-Economic Website: www.ieadsm.org/Files/Tasks/Task%20XIII%20-%20Demand%20Response%20Resou Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/estimating-demand-response-market-pot Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation Regulations: Resource Integration Planning This resource presents demand response (DR) potential results from top-performing programs in the United States and Canada, as well as a DR

319

Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Information: Industries End-use(s) Energy typesNotes Market Information: Industries End-use(s) Energy typesNotes Market Information: Industries End-use(s) Energy types

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Kitchen Table Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20/2012 20/2012 1 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Kitchen Table" Strategy: Home Inspectors Driving Demand for Home Energy Upgrades 3/20/2012 2 Benjamin Gromicko, InterNACHI "Although the home performance industry's delivery of comprehensive energy and comfort improvements has been growing across the country, it continues to struggle in creating consumer attention and demand. Our industry's delivery timing is off. We are not yet engaging the homeowner at their sweet spot of making improvements -- right after they purchase a home! This is when they move most aggressively with all sorts of home improvement projects -- and, unfortunately, seldom with any concerns of energy use. I strongly believe the home inspection industry is in a prime position to educate new homeowners on the long-term

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy savings are related to energy price changes through1997 dollars. All energy prices and savings were evaluatedthe relationship of energy prices to industry-wide energy

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheme for Industry: The Energy Audit, Proceedings of thefacilities conduct energy audits, employ an energy manager,1994), and the mandatory energy audits and energy management

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Clean Energy Application Centers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Industrial Distributed Energy Search Search Help Industrial Distributed Energy EERE...

324

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

325

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

326

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

327

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

328

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight, rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

329

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Transportation Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars, light trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger airplanes, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

330

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2008 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

331

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies andStrategies in Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial buildings account for a large portion of summer peak electric demand. Research results show that there is significant potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildings through advanced control technologies and strategies. However, a better understanding of commercial buildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy management and control systems is required to develop this demand response resource to its full potential. The main objectives of the study were: (1) To evaluate the size of contributions of peak demand commercial buildings in the U.S.; (2) To understand how commercial building control systems support energy efficiency and DR; and (3) To disseminate the results to the building owners, facility managers and building controls industry. In order to estimate the commercial buildings contribution to peak demand, two sources of data are used: (1) Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and (2) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). These two sources indicate that commercial buildings noncoincidental peak demand is about 330GW. The project then focused on technologies and strategies that deliver energy efficiency and also target 5-10% of this peak. Based on a building operations perspective, a demand-side management framework with three main features: (1) daily energy efficiency, (2) daily peak load management and (3) dynamic, event-driven DR are outlined. A general description of DR, its benefits, and nationwide DR potential in commercial buildings are presented. Case studies involving these technologies and strategies are described. The findings of this project are shared with building owners, building controls industry, researchers and government entities through a webcast and their input is requested. Their input is presented in the appendix section of this report.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Hydrogen, Transportation Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/ Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/hydra Cost: Free Language: English References: http://maps.nrel.gov/hydra Logo: Hydrogen Demand and Resource Assessment Tool Use HyDRA to view, download, and analyze hydrogen data spatially and dynamically. HyDRA provides access to hydrogen demand, resource, infrastructure, cost, production, and distribution data. A user account is

333

Engineering manpower supply and demand in the petroleum industry as affected by engineering salary trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the changes that occur periodically in engineering manpower supply/demand trends in the petroleum industry, it is desirable to have an awareness of some of the major activity factors affecting such trends, of starting Petroleum Engineering salaries relating to that background, of the on-going engineering salary status which developed from these activities and of the large effect that high starting and on-going salaries do have in attracting and retaining engineers within the petroleum industry.

Brown, D.C.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Potential For Energy, Peak Demand, and Water Savings in California Tomato Processing Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tomato processing is a major component of California's food industry. Tomato processing is extremely energy intensive, with the processing season coinciding with the local electrical utility peak period. Significant savings are possible in the electrical energy, peak demand, natural gas consumption, and water consumption of facilities. The electrical and natural gas energy usage and efficiency measures will be presented for a sample of California tomato plants. A typical end-use distribution of electrical energy in these plants will be shown. Results from potential electrical efficiency, demand response, and natural gas efficiency measures that have applications in tomato processing facilities will be presented. Additionally, water conservation measures and the associated savings will be presented. It is shown that an estimated electrical energy savings of 12.5%, electrical demand reduction of 17.2%, natural gas savings of 6.0%, and a fresh water usage reduction of 15.6% are achievable on a facility-wide basis.

Trueblood, A. J.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Industry Leaders Saving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Leaders Saving Energy Industry Leaders Saving Energy Industry Leaders Saving Energy May 6, 2010 - 11:35am Addthis Joshua DeLung Companies such as 3M, Intel, PepsiCo and Whirlpool are participating in the Energy Department's Save Energy Now LEADER initiative, committing to reducing their energy use by 25 percent or more in 10 years. Another established company participating in the program, AT&T, is also making that commitment to saving energy while producing more renewable power at many of its locations across the country."We're taking meaningful steps to run a more-efficient network and explore alternative and renewable energy use," John Schinter, director of energy for AT&T Services, Inc., says. The company utilizes wind and solar power at some of its buildings. In

336

Demand Responsive and Energy Efficient Control Technologies and Strategies in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to Peak Demand?..5 3.potential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced Controls and Communications for Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a large portion of summer peak demand. Research resultspotential to reduce peak demand in commercial buildingsbuildings contribution to peak demand and the use of energy

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Hansen, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy Basics: Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant from off-site power plants, gas companies, and fuel distributors. Energy then flows to either a central energy generation utility system or...

339

Differential impact of gas shortages and fuel-price increases on demand: the case of the hotel industry in New York State  

SciTech Connect

The authors assess the impact of the energy crisis on the lodging industry in New York (excluding New York City) by estimating the effects of two related, but not necessarily correlated, variables: gas shortages and energy price increases. Strong evidence supports the conclusion that energy shortages dampen hotel demand while price increases encourage international, intrastate, and interstate shifts in distance distributions of travel destinations as well as changes in number of trips and length of stay, resulting in a slight aggregate increase in demand. Recent industry data relating to occupancy rates and profitability seem to support this conclusion. 16 references, 2 tables.

Arbel, A. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY); Ravid, A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

event by paying higher real-time prices and still receivingvarying prices (e.g. , real-time prices, CPP) facilitatecorrelated with high prices in the real-time energy market.

Goldman, Charles

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Swarm intelligence approaches to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes two new models based on artificial bee colony (ABC) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) techniques to estimate electricity energy demand in Turkey. ABC and PSO electricity energy estimation models (ABCEE and PSOEE) are developed ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Artificial bee colony, Electricity energy estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Swarm intelligence

Mustafa Servet K?Ran; Eren Zceylan; Mesut GNdZ; Turan Paksoy

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Industrial Technology Program - Energy  

energy and eliminating oxide byproducts ... such as copper-indium- ... Goal is to approach solar cell performance observed at lab-scale

343

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energys (DOEs) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Global Energy Demand, Supply, Consequences, Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Joule Population-Energy Equation Power = N x (GDP/N) x (Watts/GDP) C Emission Rate = Power x (Carbon/J) #12;d HVAC Onsite Power & Heat Natural Ventilation, Indoor Environment Building Materials Appliances Thermal · Building Materials Tenants · Lease space from Developer or Property Manager · Professional firms, retailers

Knowles, David William

345

Promoting Energy Efficiency in Industry: Utility Roles and Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper identifies the factors that influence industrial firms' decisions to invest in energy efficiency and notes how the emerging wave of electric utility 'demand-side' planning and marketing can help industry control costs of production and also improve utility operations. The external and internal influences on electric utility demand-side management are identified, along with typical objectives of utility marketing programs. The concept of 'strategic marketing' is also introduced. Finally, a summary of selected electric utility experiences with industrial programs is provided, along with emerging trends in utility marketing.

Limaye, D. R.; Davis, T. D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Assessment of Achievable Potential from Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Programs in the United States (U.S.) (2010-2030) Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.edisonfoundation.net/IEE/Documents/EPRI_AssessmentAchievableEEPote Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/assessment-achievable-potential-energ Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Mandates/Targets This report discusses the 2008 U.S. Energy Information Administration statistic that electricity consumption in the United States is predicted to

347

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

348

Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use  

SciTech Connect

California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Improve Energy Efficiency and Reduce Greenhouse Gasand Industrial Energy Efficiency. Energy Policy, 33: 949-Galitsky (2005) Energy efficiency improvement opportunities

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy Conservation and Management for Electric Utility Industrial Customers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comprehensive energy management assistance within the industrial section is currently being offered by a growing number of electric utilities as part of their efforts to - provide additonal demand side services to their industrial customers. One of the keys to these enhanced services is the availability of a unique Industrial Energy Conservation and Management (EC&M) computer model that can be used to evaluate the technical and economic benefits of installing proposed process related energy management systems within an industrial plant. Details of an EPRI sponsored pilot program are summarized and results presented on the use of the computer model to provide comprehensive EC&M system evaluations of potential energy management opportunities in HL&P's and other utility service areas. This capability is currently being offered to HL&P's industrial customers and is primarily concerned with identifying and evaluating possible process heat recovery and other energy management opportunities to show how a plant's energy related operating costs can be reduced.

McChesney, H. R.; Obee, T. N.; Mangum, G. F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Economics of Energy (and Electricity) Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% electrical efficiency might be able to deliver electrical heat using half the gas of gas fired boiler with 90% efficiency (p.152-153). An electric car uses around 15 kWh per 100 km, around 5 times less than the average fossil fuel car. This implies... that there is always a wide-range of observed efficiencies in the economy, with the average efficiency of the provision of an energy service being significantly less than the efficiency of the most efficient. Current new fossil fuel cars and gas boilers are 50...

Platchkov, Laura M.; Pollitt, Michael G.

352

Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an existing Market Information: Industries End-use(s) EnergyGas Boiler Market Information: Industries End-use(s) Energyelectricity Market Information: Industries End-use(s) Energy

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy 30:initiatives of Japans steel industry against globalenergy use in the steel industry, but can reduce both energy

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters Tankless or Demand-Type Water Heaters May 2, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis Diagram of a tankless water heater. Diagram of a tankless water heater. How does it work? Tankless water heaters deliver hot water as it is needed, eliminating the need for storage tanks. Tankless water heaters, also known as demand-type or instantaneous water heaters, provide hot water only as it is needed. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters, which can save you money. Here you'll find basic information about how they work, whether a tankless water heater might be right for your home, and what criteria to use when selecting the right model. Check out the Energy Saver 101: Water Heating infographic to learn if a tankless water heater is right for you.

355

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: Statement of Energy Improvement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry: Statement of Energy Improvement Use this form to document the energy intensity reduction of an industrial site that is participating in the ENERGY STAR...

356

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

357

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

358

Comparison of National Programs for Industrial Energy Efficiency: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report looks at the Better Buildings, Better Plants program from the Department of Energy; E3, an initiative of five U.S. federal agencies; ENERGY STAR for Industry from the Environmental Protection Agency; and Superior Energy Performance, a product of the U.S. Council for Energy-Efficient Manufacturing. By comparing the goals of several energy-efficiency programs that have been established to support industry, this report hopes to help industrial facilities find the right fit for their own ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

Overview of Industrial Energy Training and Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management ... A Suggestion for Establishing Energy Management Policy in Primary Aluminum Industry...

360

PNNL: Available Technologies: Energy & Utilities Industry  

Industry: Energy & Utilities. Click on the portfolios below to view the technologies that may have potential applications in the Energy & ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Information about the Department of Energys Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

362

United States energy supply and demand forecasts 1979-1995  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of U.S. energy supply and demand by fuel type and economic sector, as well as historical background information, are presented. Discussion and results pertaining to the development of current and projected marginal energy costs, and their comparison with market prices, are also presented.

Walton, H.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (Open Auto-DR or OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Nanotechnology for Energy, Healthcare and Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy, Healthcare and Industry. Sponsorship.

365

Sponsors of CIEEDAC: Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Industry Program for Energy Conservation, Aluminium Industry Association, Canadian Petroleum Products Institute, Canadian Portland Cement Association, Canadian Pulp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Industrial Consumption of Energy, and the Quarterly Report of Energy Supply and Demand 3. Annual Canada (NRCan): 1. Annual Survey of Manufacturers (ASM, from STC) 2. Industrial Consumption of Energy consistent source of historical data related to energy consumption in all Canadian industry by region

366

Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component of that wide-ranging program focused on industrial compressed air systems as the target for such electric use reductions. What stands out about the compressed air effort is that customer acceptance of the program was very high (8 out of 10 customer sites implemented at least some of the efficiency projects recommended in the program's air system audits) and overall savings levels were more than 3X the original program goal (550 kW vs. 1730 kW). XENERGY, Inc. designed and carried out the program on behalf of PG&E. Key features of the program included working with compressed air system distributors to identify and qualify good customer leads and post-audit technical assistance to help customer implement recommended projects. This paper reviews the project and outlines some of the lessons learned in completing the project."

Skelton, J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

368

Power Industry Development Paths and Natural Gas Market Risks: Cycles of Markets, Drilling, and Demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current natural gas market is depressed by a combination of unusual factorsa great excess of supply and weak demand. Excess supply comes from the momentum of exploration and production (EP) to the new U.S. gas shale plays, a phenomenon barely 18 months old and a game-changing event in the industry. Weak demand comes from the "Great Recession." The seeds for correcting this imbalance would appear to be a dramatic cutback in drilling, which has collapsed over the past year and which is a principal focu...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection ADB-Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Software/modeling tools Website: cdm-mongolia.com/files/2_Methods_Hoseok_16May2010.pdf Cost: Free Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection Screenshot References: Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References ↑ "Methods and Tools for Energy Demand Projection" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ADB-Methods_and_Tools_for_Energy_Demand_Projection&oldid=398945" Categories:

370

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Energy Demand: Limits on the Response to Higher Energy Prices in the End-Use Sectors (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Energy consumption in the end-use demand sectorsresidential, commercial, industrial, and transportationgenerally shows only limited change when energy prices increase. Several factors that limit the sensitivity of end-use energy demand to price signals are common across the end-use sectors. For example, because energy generally is consumed in long-lived capital equipment, short-run consumer responses to changes in energy prices are limited to reductions in the use of energy services or, in a few cases, fuel switching; and because energy services affect such critical lifestyle areas as personal comfort, medical services, and travel, end-use consumers often are willing to absorb price increases rather than cut back on energy use, especially when they are uncertain whether price increases will be long-lasting. Manufacturers, on the other hand, often are able to pass along higher energy costs, especially in cases where energy inputs are a relatively minor component of production costs. In economic terms, short-run energy demand typically is inelastic, and long-run energy demand is less inelastic or moderately elastic at best.

Information Center

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy performance Communicate energy efficiency Industrial energy management information center Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector An effective energy...

373

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry BYculprit. It consumes half the oil used in the world andconsuming two thirds of the oil and causing about one third

Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Demand Response Quick...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool Back to Tool Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick assessment tool screenshot Demand response quick...

375

Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency Energy Matters: Industrial Energy Efficiency November 18, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis On November 16, 2011, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Dr. Kathleen Hogan joined us for a live chat on Energy.gov to discuss the role of industrial energy efficiency in strengthening the American economy. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs On Wednesday, November 16th, Dr. Kathleen Hogan, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency, discussed industrial energy efficiency on an Energy Matters video livechat. Dr. Hogan answered questions, submitted by industry professionals and the interested public via email, Facebook and Twitter, on how commercial building efficiency, advanced manufacturing, and corporate partnerships can

377

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

378

Danish Wind Industry Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Danish Wind Industry Association Place Copenhagen V, Denmark Zip DK-1552 Sector Wind energy Product The Danish Wind Industry Association (DWIA) is...

379

Industrial - Program Areas - Energy Efficiency & Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Animation The ORNL Industrial Technologies Program has made technological advances in industry that contribute to improved efficiency through decreased energy consumption, improved...

380

CRV industrial Ltda | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRV industrial Ltda Place Carmo do Rio Verde, Goias, Brazil Sector Biomass Product Ethanol and biomass energy producer References CRV industrial Ltda1 LinkedIn Connections...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Program Strategies and Results for Californias Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Energy Partners provides a review of Californias strategic approach to energy efficiency and demand response implementation, with a focus on the industrial sector. The official role of the state, through the California Energy Commission (CEC), is presented along with special efforts being made in support of industrial end users. The interrelationship between the CEC and the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) with regard to advancing demand side programs is highlighted. The specific cost recovery mechanisms put in place by the CPUC is discussed, including Californias experience with revenue decoupling, public purpose funds, and avoided cost calculations. Next, the role as energy efficiency (EE) and demand response (DR) program implementer played by each of the state Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs) is outlined. Each utility is responsible for serving major end use market segments with target programs designed to provide unique value. Within the industrial sector, there is special attention paid to the needs of the various sub-markets such as oil refining, agriculture, food processing, water and wastewater, manufacturing, and others. A review is presented of how EE and DR measures are selected, how incentive values are determined, which customers are eligible for programs, and how programs are evaluated to gage effectiveness. Lastly, mechanisms used by the IOUs to deliver industrial EE and DR incentive programs are discussed. This includes a review of core programs administered by the utilities as well as subcontracted programs administered by third party implementers and local government partners. Global Energy Partners will offer specific examples of program experience in the oil & gas, agriculture, and food processing sectors, and will also highlight program success within the emerging automated demand response market.

Ehrhard, R.; Hamilton, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sinton, J.E. 1996. Energy Efficiency in Chinese Industry:and Wang, Q. 1998. "Energy Efficiency Accomplishments and1999. Status Report on Energy Efficiency Policy and Programs

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

International industrial sector energy efficiency policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington,1997. Electric Motor Energy Efficiency Regulations: Theet al. , (eds. ). Energy Efficiency Improvements in Electric

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,of cleaner, more energy- efficient technologies can play a

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. Emerging Energy-Saving Technologies and Practices for2000. Emerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies,of cleaner, more energy- efficient technologies can play a

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Characterizing emerging industrial technologies in energy models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies, 2000. Scenarios ofEmerging Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, Lawrenceinformation about energy efficiency technologies, their

Laitner, John A. Skip; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Hanson, Donald A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of costs and benefits of industrial energy efficiencyof the annual costs of an energy efficiency measure, therebyof cost- effectiveness of energy- efficiency improvement

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Intensity

389

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8b Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings Primary Energy Intensity

390

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: About Industrial Distributed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through energy efficiency and fossil fuel displacement by using alternative fuels and capturing waste energy streams Providing...

391

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a growing number of utilities, however, such peak-reduction programs don't go far enough in the face of new problems and challenges, and hence are proving ineffective or counterproductive. For example, many of a utility's largest customers--especially industrial customers who may be "locked into" seemingly inflexible process activities--have limited ability to respond to load-management programs that employ price signals as a central peak-reduction tool. Moreover, utilities in general are finding that vigorous efforts to reduce electric load can result in underutilization of base-load generating facilities. In these and other instances, "load-shaping," which emphasizes a shift of electric load or demand from peak to off-peak periods and provides for greater customer flexibility, may be a more effective strategy. This paper explains the need for and presents the components of a load-shaping program, and describes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PGandE) recent experience in designing and pursuing an industrial-load-shaping program. The paper also outlines important obstacles and opportunities likely to confront other utilities and industrial customers interested in working together to develop such programs.

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ontario Ministry of Energy began offering its new Industrial Energy Services Program (IESP) in early 1987. This 3-year, $5-million program, while not new in concept, is thought to be unique for its depth of service and method of delivery. It provides Ontario's manufacturers with advice and funding assistance for the identification and definition of industrial energy efficiency opportunities. The first phase provides for a free comprehensive site energy audit/analysis, conducted over one to five days, by teams of private sector consultants, selected to match expertise with manufacturer's needs. The emphasis is on process and equipment improvements, but site services and buildings are also examined. The final report includes detailed descriptions of major opportunities, along with estimated costs, savings, and paybacks. The next phases provide for sharing the detailed feasibility study costs and project engineering costs for those energy projects that move to implementation. In this paper, the author briefly describes the novel administrative structure of the program, presents the results of the activities to date, and describes, in some detail, several case studies from different industrial sectors.

Ploeger, L. K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

US energy industry financial developments, 1993 first quarter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net income for 259 energy companies-- including, 20 major US petroleum companies-- rose 38 percent between the first quarter of 1992 and the first quarter of 1993. An increased level of economic activity, along with colder weather, helped lift the demand for natural gas. crude oil, coal, and electricity. The sharp rise in the domestic price of natural gas at the wellhead relative to the year-ago quarter was the most significant development in US energy during the first quarter. As a consequence of higher natural gas prices, the upstream segment of the petroleum industry reported large gains in income, while downstream income rose due to higher refined product demand. Increased economic activity and higher weather-related natural gas demand also led to improvements in income for the rate-regulated energy segment. However, declining domestic oil production continued to restrain upstream petroleum industry earnings growth, despite a moderate rise in crude oil prices.

Not Available

1993-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Summary of Conclusions. . . The global rate of production of oil is peaking now, coal will peak in 2U.S. Energy Demand, Offshore Oil Production and BP's Macondo Well Spill Tad Patzek, Petroleum that run the U.S. Complexity, models, risks Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.3/4 #12

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

395

Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Industries Association Solar Energy Industries Association Name Solar Energy Industries Association Address 575 7th Street NW #400 Place Washington, DC Zip 20004 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1974 Website http://www.seia.org/ Coordinates 38.897162°, -77.021563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.897162,"lon":-77.021563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive for the industrial customer to alter their present operation. Utilities recognize that industry offers the greatest potential for peak load reduction.

Williams, M. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecast methods report. California Energy Commission, CEC-Chris Kavalec. California Energy Commission. CEC (2005d)Office, 5/12/2006. California Energy Advanced Energy

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Policy implications of the GRI Baseline Projection of US Energy Supply and Demand to 2010; 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1991 edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand is summarized. Three broad implications for the future of the natural gas industry are highlighted: the impact of the Middle East turmoil on the expected price of crude oil and the potentional for increased interfuel price competition between natural gas and petroleum in the mid-1990s if world oil prices return to lower levels.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

400

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: china.lbl.gov/sites/china.lbl.gov/files/LBNL-3991E.Industrial%20Energy Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities Screenshot References: Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook[1] "This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate California electricity consumption (GWh) Over two-thirds of total electricity demand is concentrated in the residential andrate N/A PG&E SMUD SCE LADWP SDGE BGP Other All CA 2005 IEPR Residential electricity

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

404

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

405

U.S. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second U.S.-China Second U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Forum May 6, 2011 James Quinn Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs 2 | Industrial Energy Efficiency eere.energy.gov Global Energy Challenges Energy efficiency and renewable energy provide solutions to global energy challenges. Security Environment Economy Clean Energy Solutions Overarching Challenges: * Carbon reduction * Market delivery of clean energy technologies * Research and development needs * Economic growth * Workforce development 3 | Industrial Energy Efficiency eere.energy.gov U.S. industry accounts for about one-third of all U.S. energy consumption. Petroleum Natural Gas Electricity* Coal and Coke Renewable Energy Residential 21.8% Industry 31.4% Commercial

406

Energy Efficiency Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds and Demand Funds and Demand Response Programs - National Overview Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory November 2, 2006 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group San Francisco CA Overview of Talk * National Overview * Energy Efficiency Programs and Funds * Demand Response Programs and Funds * FEMP Resources on Public Benefit Funds *Suggestions for Federal Customers DSM Spending is increasing! * 2006 Utility DSM and Public Benefit spending is ~$2.5B$ - $1B for C&I EE programs * CA utilities account for 35% of total spending 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1994 2000 2005 2006 Costs (in billion $) DSM Costs Load Management Gas EE Other States Electric EE California Electric EE EE Spending in 2006 (by State) $ Million < 1 (23) 1 - 10 (2) 11 - 50 (13) 51 - 100 (7) > 100 (5) 790 101 257

407

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reducing the demand forecast error due to the bullwhip effect in the computer processor industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intel's current demand-forecasting processes rely on customers' demand forecasts. Customers do not revise demand forecasts as demand decreases until the last minute. Intel's current demand models provide little guidance ...

Smith, Emily (Emily C.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model's parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Hwang, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A model for Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to establish the content and structural validity of the Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model, and to provide estimates for the model`s parameters. The model is intended to provide decision makers with a relatively simple, yet credible tool to forecast the impacts of policies which affect long-term energy demand in the manufacturing sector. Particular strengths of this model are its relative simplicity which facilitates both ease of use and understanding of results, and the inclusion of relevant causal relationships which provide useful policy handles. The modeling approach of LIEF is intermediate between top-down econometric modeling and bottom-up technology models. It relies on the following simple concept, that trends in aggregate energy demand are dependent upon the factors: (1) trends in total production; (2) sectoral or structural shift, that is, changes in the mix of industrial output from energy-intensive to energy non-intensive sectors; and (3) changes in real energy intensity due to technical change and energy-price effects as measured by the amount of energy used per unit of manufacturing output (KBtu per constant $ of output). The manufacturing sector is first disaggregated according to their historic output growth rates, energy intensities and recycling opportunities. Exogenous, macroeconomic forecasts of individual subsector growth rates and energy prices can then be combined with endogenous forecasts of real energy intensity trends to yield forecasts of overall energy demand. 75 refs.

Ross, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Hwang, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Energy Demand Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Building Energy Software Tools Directory Search Search Help Building Energy Software Tools Directory...

412

Control of energy saving at industrial enterprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems connected with improvement of control systems for power systems of industrial enterprises, which are most important elements of energy and fuel consumption in industry, are considered. The growth of energy and fuel cost, the increasing requirements ...

A. F. Rezchikov

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs Energy Department Partners...

414

Geothermal Energy Industry Briefing Packet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earl Warren Legal Institute, part of the University of California at Berkeley, is a center for law-related interdisciplinary research and public service in areas of national social concern. Since 1975, we have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on various projects addressing energy policy and environmental issues. We are now engaged in a major effort to identify current legal, economic and institutional obstacles to commercial development and use of geothermal energy sources. Geothermal resources--heat reservoirs beneath the earth's surface--have received increasing attention in recent years of growing energy consciousness, and much progress has been made toward understanding their nature, extent and uses. Encouraged by federal and state development programs, there now exists an active and growing community of geologists, geophysicists, engineers, drilling companies, developers and end-users of geothermal heat. However, Department of Energy studies indicate that current knowledge and available technology would support substantially broader use of the resource, particularly by private sector commercial, industrial and agricultural concerns. Accordingly, we are now seeking to determine the knowledge and attitudes of such entities toward geothermal use; the factors which will influence decisions to utilize geothermal or not; the perceived obstacles, if any, to expanded use in their own industries; and the types of government policies or programs which might minimize such obstacles. The industries we have chosen to approach have been targeted by others as potential geothermal users. However, we recognize that many firms today have little or no knowledge of the resource or of its potential applications. We have therefore prepared the following brief summary as an introduction for some, perhaps a refresher for others, and hopefully a stimulus for an exchange of ideas with all whose views we intend to solicit as our work proceeds.

Bressler, Sandra E.; Hanemann, Michael; Katz, Ira Benjamin; Nimmons, John T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Industrial Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy ...  

Industrial Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research institutions have technologies ...

416

Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home Savings Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and...

417

Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics & Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics & Industry ... Electrochemical Optimization of TiO2 Nanotubular Structure Formation and...

418

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Barat, D. Watson. Demand Response Spinning ReserveOpen Automated Demand Response Communication Standards:Dynamic Controls for Demand Response in a New Commercial

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

U.S. Propane Demand - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Demand is higher in 1999 due to higher petrochemical demand and a strong economy. We are also seeing strong demand in the first quarter of 2000; however, ...

420

STRATEGIC ENERGY INITIATIVE @ Winter 2005 Precarious energy situation demands strategic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy solutions that could have a significant impact, especially in the southeastern U.S. Blowin of the oil it produced in 1970. -- Georgia Tech Strategic Energy Initiative and U.S. Dept. of Energy's Energy energy. At the U.S.Department of Energy-funded SolarThermal Test Facility on the main campus, Georgia

Sherrill, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Industrial operations and maintenance energy measures: A review  

SciTech Connect

Industry consumes a significant percentage of the total electric energy consumption both nationally and in the Pacific Northwest. However, industrial demand-side management (DSM) activities in this sector are underdeveloped and typically concentrate on new technologies and new equipment. An overlooked opportunity for electric resource development is through operations and maintenance (O and M) activities. The purpose of this project is to determine the industrial DSM potential that may be achieved through O and M practices both in the US and the Pacific Northwest. The overall goal of the project is to identify, quantify, confirm, and develop conservation resources that can be achieved from the industrial sector through O and M practices and energy measures. The results of the study identify a significant electric resource potential available through improved O and M activities in industry. Several O and M type energy-saving measures that increase efficiencies and reduce loads are identified and estimates of potential energy savings associated with each measure are presented. Systems identified with the most potential include compressed-air systems; motors and motor drives; lighting; heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC); and control systems. The results of the research show that industrial electric energy consumption can be notably reduced by implementing key O and M type energy measures. Specifically, the results of industrial energy audits, case studies, and other published sources indicate that reductions in energy consumption from improved O and M activities can average between 8% and 12.5%.

Parker, S.A.; Gaustad, K.L.; Winiarski, D.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Industrial applications of solar energy. First quarterly progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to define solar energy systems that are technically and economically feasible, can satisfy all or part of selected industry demands, and to determine the market potential for such systems. The primary emphasis is placed on the application of total energy systems where industrial process heat, electrical needs, and space heating and cooling requirements are satisfied with a single solar collector field at maximum possible efficiency. Industrial energy usage in the United States and the Southwest was surveyed to determine which industries were most energy intensive. This resulted in the selection of six major groups: (1) Chemicals and Allied Products - SIC 28, (2) Primary Metals - SIC 33, (3) Petroleum and Coal Products - SIC 29, (4) Paper and Allied Products - SIC 26, (5) Stone, Clay, and Glass Products - SIC 32, and (6) Food and Kindred Products - SIC 20. These groupings account for approximately 80% of the total industrial energy usage, both nationwide and within the Southwest. These major groups were then pursued through their subdivisions to determine more specifically the largest energy users and their locations within the Southwest, allowing the final industry selection. Approximately 300 representatives of the selected industries were contacted to determine their specific energy requirements as well as architecturally related energy parameters. Climatic and seismic data is also being collected for the areas encompassing the selected regions.

Rogan, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Industry Energy Efficiency Workshop - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes on the Energy Information Administration's summary session on Industry Sector Energy-Efficiency Workshop on March 5, 1996

424

Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs: Development and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As more states establish Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS), goals for energy efficiency savings are increasing across the country. Increasingly, states are relying on their industrial energy efficiency programs to find and help implement those savings. Historically, industrial energy efficiency programs have not been completely effective at finding those savings, in large part because the programs have not been flexible enough to accommodate the heterogeneous needs and unique characteristics of the industrial sector. This paper will discuss the state of industrial energy efficiency programs today. Relying on an ACEEE-administered survey of 35 industrial energy efficiency programs, we will determine current trends and challenges, address emerging needs, and identify best practices in the administration of today's industrial efficiency programs. The paper will serve as an update on industrial energy efficiency program activities and discuss the ways in which today's programs are trying to serve their industrial clients better.

Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.; Elliot, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Information: Industries Iron and Steel SIC 331 End-use(s) Process heating Energyinformation on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Emerging energy-efficient technologies for industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Information: Industries Iron and Steel SIC 331 End-use(s) Process heating Energyinformation on energy savings, economic, non-energy benefits, major market

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7a Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

428

Export.gov - Energy Industry Associations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Problems Locations Domestic Offices International Offices FAQ Blog Connect Home > By Industry > Energy Print | E-mail Page Main Topics Energy Home Oil & Gas Civil Nuclear...

429

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 4 Total Square Feet of U.S. Housing Units

430

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 5c Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Site Page Last Revised: July 2009

431

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2008-2018 STAFF REVISED FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the entire forecast period, primarily because both weather-adjusted peak and electricity consumption were forecast. Keywords Electricity demand, electricity consumption, demand forecast, weather normalization, annual peak demand, natural gas demand, self-generation, conservation, California Solar Initiative. #12

432

Integrating Energy Efficiency and Demand Response into Utility Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the methods in which utilities integrate their supply-side and demand-side resources to meet their generating resource requirements. The major steps in developing a resource plan are reviewed, including the alternative methods currently employed. Finally, the report presents the results of a short survey that was administered to the advisors in Energy Utilization. The results show that methods are more sophisticated than 20 years ago, but more could be accomplished in ...

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K.C. Mares, D. Shroyer. 2010. Demand Response andOpen Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Dataand the Role of Automated Demand Response. Lawrence Berkeley

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Program Participation Rates on Demand Response MarketTable 3-1. Methods of Estimating Demand Response PenetrationDemand Response

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential customers with peak demand greater than 350 kWs) Eligible Customers (peak demand) Optional hourly pricingis relatively small; the peak demand of its large, non-

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

2008-2010 Research Summary: Analysis of Demand Response Opportunities in California Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

534 megawatts (MW) of peak demand reduction and 1 gigawatt (power generators during peak demand periods. Onsite powerit can be used during peak-demand periods. Implementing load

Goli, Sasank

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

casting technology. Energy Policy 31: 1339-1356. Martin,Energy Efficiency. Energy Policy, 33: 949-962. Worrell, E.and pulp industry. Energy Policy 25: 745-758. Flannery,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics Experts Meeting: Behavioral Economics as Applied to Energy Demand Analysis and Energy Efficiency Programs EIA Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 | Washington, DC Meeting Agenda Jim Turnure, Director, Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis July 17, 2013 2 * EIA WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION (15 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: OVERVIEW OF EIA RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL DEMAND MODELS AND CURRENT METHODS FOR INCORPORATING ENERGY EFFICIENCY/EFFICIENCY PROGRAMS (30 minutes) * ORIENTATION/PRESENTATION: BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS GENERAL OVERVIEW AND DISCUSSION (45 minutes) * EXPERTS ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION/BRAINSTROMING: HOW CAN EIA BENEFIT FROM APPLICATION OF BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS TO RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ENERGY DEMAND MODELING?

439

Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on Energy Efficiency Service Industry, Shanghai,Workshop on Energy Efficiency Service Industry, Shanghai,Workshop on Energy Efficiency Service Industry, Shanghai,

Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy...

442

Best Practices: Energy Savings Efficient energy use reduces Colorado State's total energy demand, decreases harmful  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

square foot on campus has flattened out. Students making a difference In 2004, Colorado State became one, decreases harmful emissions, and minimizes the cost of providing energy to the campus. As a result of energy conservation initiatives that have been implemented over the past 20 years, growth in the average demand per

443

Process Energy Audit for Large Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the author's approach to energy audits of large industries. Five large industrial segments, with energy intensive processes have been selected as examples. Items include: 1) the general methodology of conducting comprehensive industrial energy audit, 2) how one can identify energy efficiency opportunities, and 3) illustrate a few case study examples of energy conservation measures implemented in some of the industries, and 4) the importance of quality assurance/quality control in an energy audit. I will restrict this discussion to only electrical energy audit.

Chari, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Jump to: navigation, search Name International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project Agency/Company /Organization United States Department of Energy (USDOE), Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Alliance for Energy Efficient Economy (India), Confederation of Indian Industry Sector Energy Focus Area Industry Topics Implementation, Low emission development planning, Technology characterizations Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country China, India Eastern Asia, Southern Asia References International Industrial Energy Efficiency Deployment Project[1] Overview China "China is prioritizing a low carbon, energy efficient economy and has

445

Policy implications of the GRI baseline projection of US energy supply and demand to 2015, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The summary of the 1997 Edition of the GRI Baseline Projection of U.S. Energy Supply and Demand discusses the implications of the projection that are important for GRI strategic planning and scenario development, and for the gas industry. The projection indicates that with adequate technology advances, natural gas will play a major role in an increasingly competitive energy mix well into the next century. It is expected that the expansion in gas markets experienced over the last decade will continue over the long term.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program are to assist Texas industry in using energy more efficiently through seminars, workshops, technical information exchange and other supportive programs with the goal of conserving at least 283.81 trillion BTU's of industrial energy in 1980. As the primary consumer of Texas' energy (54% of total, industry is a major focal point of the state's energy conservation effort. Although industry's overall record of energy conservation is good, such a large consumer must receive serious attention in any plan aimed at improving the overall efficiency of energy use in the state. The Texas Industrial Commission has been designated lead agency of the industrial conservation effort, and as such, created the Energy Utilization Department in the Fall of 1977. The multi-faceted department has established programs to accomplish its mission including: The Energy Search Center, an information access point for Texas manufacturers; a series of technical workshops and seminars; an annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference; the coordination of a university program for the training of industrial energy auditors; and organizational assistance in the establishment of regional energy conservation groups. Although manufacturers are encouraged to utilize the programs, they are designed primarily for small or medium-sized industries and low-technology operations where the employment of an energy specialist is economically impractical.

Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Estes Park Light and Power Department - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estes Park Light and Power Department - Commercial and Industrial Estes Park Light and Power Department - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Estes Park Light and Power Department - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Other Construction Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $50,000 per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Energy Incentive: $0.10 per annual kWh saved Demand Incentive: $500 per kW saved during Summer Peak Period Cooling Efficiency Room AC: $50 - $110/ton, plus $3.50 - $5.00 for each 0.1 above minimum

448

Energy Demand and Fuel Supply in Developing Countries Brazil, Korea and the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased o f coke hydroelectricity. S u b s t a n t i a l roccurred of in industry, hydroelectricity, in the demand for

Sathaye, Jayant A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

450

Fuel choice and aggregate energy demand in the commercial sector  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a fuel choice and aggregate-demand model of energy use in the commercial sector of the United States. The model structure is dynamic with short-run fuel-price responses estimated to be close to those of the residential sector. Of the three fuels analyzed, electricity consumption exhibits a greater response to its own price than either natural gas or fuel oil. In addition, electricity price increases have the largest effect on end-use energy conservation in the commercial sector. An improved commercial energy-use data base is developed which removes the residential portion of electricity and natural gas use that traditional energy-consumption data sources assign to the commercial sector. In addition, household and commercial petroleum use is differentiated on a state-by-state basis.

Cohn, S.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry promotional posters | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenge for Industry helpful tools and resources ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry promotional posters Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

452

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

SciTech Connect

Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

454

Energy packet networks: smart electricity storage to meet surges in demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When renewable energy is used either as a primary source, or as a back-up source to meet excess demand, energy storage becomes very useful. Simple examples of energy storage units include electric car batteries and uninterruptible power supplies. More ... Keywords: energy packet networks, network control of energy flow, on-demand energy dispatching, smart grid, store and forward energy, storing renewable energy

Erol Gelenbe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Energy-weighted industrial production indices December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy...

456

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand shifting are thermal energy storage systems, whichlockout, pre-cooling, thermal energy storage, cooling loadlockout Pre-cooling Thermal energy storage Cooling

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources and Demand Response under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution Procedure for SDP Energy Prices We use electricityLondon for assistance with energy price modeling. Siddiquiof DER under uncertain energy prices with demand response

Siddiqui, Afzal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Coal supply/demand, 1980 to 2000. Task 3. Resource applications industrialization system data base. Final review draft. [USA; forecasting 1980 to 2000; sector and regional analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of data and forecasts resulting from an analysis of the coal market and the factors influencing supply and demand. The analyses performed for the forecasts were made on an end-use-sector basis. The sectors analyzed are electric utility, industry demand for steam coal, industry demand for metallurgical coal, residential/commercial, coal demand for synfuel production, and exports. The purpose is to provide coal production and consumption forecasts that can be used to perform detailed, railroad company-specific coal transportation analyses. To make the data applicable for the subsequent transportation analyses, the forecasts have been made for each end-use sector on a regional basis. The supply regions are: Appalachia, East Interior, West Interior and Gulf, Northern Great Plains, and Mountain. The demand regions are the same as the nine Census Bureau regions. Coal production and consumption in the United States are projected to increase dramatically in the next 20 years due to increasing requirements for energy and the unavailability of other sources of energy to supply a substantial portion of this increase. Coal comprises 85 percent of the US recoverable fossil energy reserves and could be mined to supply the increasing energy demands of the US. The NTPSC study found that the additional traffic demands by 1985 may be met by the railways by the way of improved signalization, shorter block sections, centralized traffic control, and other modernization methods without providing for heavy line capacity works. But by 2000 the incremental traffic on some of the major corridors was projected to increase very significantly and is likely to call for special line capacity works involving heavy investment.

Fournier, W.M.; Hasson, V.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could greatly impact the energy purchases of U.S. firms. Depending on how energy suppliers react, this change could represent a threat or an opportunity.

Stapley, C. E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Industrial energy efficiency policy in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Indicators," Energy Policy 25(7'-9): 727-744. X u ,Best Practice Energy Policies in the Industrial Sector, Mayand Intensity Change," Energy Policy 22(3): Sinton, J.E.

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy supply system plans? The 1) describe quantitatively the California energy industryenergy supply and de~and, but first we describe some economic impacts of the existing energy industry.

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

California Baseline Energy Demands to 2050 for Advanced Energy Pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dryer WH - Clothes Washer Clothes Washer WH - DishwasherDishwasher Water Heating Figure 7 Breakdown of residentialUEC Water Heating (WH) Dishwasher Advanced Energy Pathways -

McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - World Energy Demand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about energy security and greenhouse gas emissions support the development of new nuclear generating capacity. World average capacity utilization rates have continued to rise...

464

Linking Continuous Energy Management and Open Automated Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minimization Monthly peak demand management Daily time-of-Some tariff designs have peak demand charges that apply tothat may result in a peak demand that occurs in one month to

Piette, Mary Ann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Forecasts of intercity passenger demand and energy use through 2000  

SciTech Connect

The development of national travel demand and energy-use forecasts for automobile and common-carrier intercity travel through the year 2000. The forecasts are driven by the POINTS (Passenger Oriented Intercity Network Travel Simulation) model, a model direct-demand model which accounts for competition among modes and destinations. Developed and used to model SMSA-to-SMSA business and nonbusiness travel, POINTS is an improvement over earlier direct demand models because it includes an explicit representation of cities' relative accessibilities and a utility maximizing behavorial multimodal travel function. Within POINTS, pathbuilding algorithms are used to determine city-pair travel times and costs by mode, including intramodal transfer times. Other input data include projections of SMSA population, public and private sector employment, and hotel and other retail receipts. Outputs include forecasts of SMSA-to-SMSA person trips and person-miles of travel by mode. For the national forecasts, these are expanded to represent all intercity travel (trips greater than 100 miles, one way) for two fuel-price cases. Under both cases rising fuel prices, accompanied by substantial reductions in model-energy intensities, result in moderate growth in total intercity passenger travel. Total intercity passenger travel is predicted to grow at approximately one percent per year, slightly fster than population growth, while air travel grows almost twice as fast as population. The net effect of moderate travel growth and substantial reduction in model energy intensities is a reduction of approximately 50 percent in fuel consumption by the intercity passenger travel market.

Kaplan, M.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Millar, M.; Gur, Y.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed. The paper describes the Center's Least-Cost Energy Strategy, the Industrial Energy Productivity Project, and presents least-cost results for 1978 and for energy markets over the next two decades.

Hoffman, A. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Wells Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Wells Public Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed....

468

Empire District Electric - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates Empire District Electric - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility...

469

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

SciTech Connect

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Projecting household energy consumption within a conditional demand framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Few models attempt to assess and project household energy consumption and expenditure by taking into account differential household choices correlated with such variables as race, ethnicity, income, and geographic location. The Minority Energy Assessment Model (MEAM), developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides a framework to forecast the energy consumption and expenditure of majority, black, Hispanic, poor, and nonpoor households. Among other variables, household energy demand for each of these population groups in MEAM is affected by housing factors (such as home age, home ownership, home type, type of heating fuel, and installed central air conditioning unit), demographic factors (such as household members and urban/rural location), and climate factors (such as heating degree days and cooling degree days). The welfare implications of the revealed consumption patterns by households are also forecast. The paper provides an overview of the model methodology and its application in projecting household energy consumption under alternative energy scenarios developed by Data Resources, Inc., (DRI).

Teotia, A.; Poyer, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

471

ENERGY DEMAND AND CONSERVATION IN KENYA: INITIAL APPRAISAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Statistics d) Nairobi, Kenya. See also Estimates ofDEMAND AND CONSERVATION IN KENYA: INITIAL APPRAISAL LeeDemand and Conservation in Kenya: Initial Appraisal Lee

Schipper, Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Electric grid planners: demand response and energy efficiency to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Source: Form EIA-411, Coordinated Bulk Power Demand and Supply Report Note: All data are reported for time of summer peak, rather than overall demand.

473

Online Modeling in the Process Industry for Energy Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"This paper discusses how steady state models are being used in the process industry to perform online energy optimization of steam and electrical systems. It presents process demands commonly found in the processing industry in terms of steam and electricity. It further discusses the methods of providing this energy for refineries, petrochemical plants, and other processing plants - chemical, paper, and metal. A typical system flow diagram is used to highlight the energy system network and describe areas where steady-state models are used. The types of models used are discussed, and a scheme for putting the models together to provide total process plant energy optimization is summarized. The types of optimization which can be implemented in a process plant is thus presented. The paper points out what steady-state modeling is needed to do online optimization of an energy network in a processing plant. Finally, a discussion of the economics on online energy optimization is presented."

Alexander, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

Hartman, Raymond Steve

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 - Estimation for the Potential of Massive CO2 Mitigation Title Japan's Long-term Energy Demand and Supply Scenario to 2050 -...

476

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world's largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China's energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China's energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

An overview of energy supply and demand in China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although China is a poor country, with much of its population still farming for basic subsistence in rural villages, China is rich in energy resources. With the world`s largest hydropower potential, and ranking third behind the US and USSR in coal reserves, China is in a better position than many other developing countries when planning for its future energy development and self-sufficiency. China is now the third largest producer and consumer of commercial energy, but its huge populace dilutes this impressive aggregate performance into a per capita figure which is an order of magnitude below the rich industrialized nations. Despite this fact, it is still important to recognize that China`s energy system is still one of the largest in the world. A system this size allows risk taking and can capture economies of scale. The Chinese have maintained rapid growth in energy production for several decades. In order to continue and fully utilize its abundant resources however, China must successfully confront development challenges in many areas. For example, the geographic distribution of consumption centers poorly matches the distribution of resources, which makes transportation a vital but often weak link in the energy system. Another example -- capital -- is scarce relative to labor, causing obsolete and inefficiently installed technology to be operated well beyond what would be considered its useful life in the West. Major improvements in industrial processes, buildings, and other energy-using equipment and practices are necessary if China`s energy efficiency is to continue to improve. Chinese energy planners have been reluctant to invest in environmental quality at the expense of more tangible production quotas.

Liu, F.; Davis, W.B.; Levine, M.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption in the IEO2009 reference case increases from 85 million barrels per day in 2006 to 107 million barrels per day in 2030. Unconventional liquids, at 13.4 million barrels per day, make up 12.6 percent of total liquids production in 2030. Figure 25. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 26. World Liquids Supply in Three Cases, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

479

Industrial Energy Efficient Technology Guide 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates the Industrial Energy Efficient Technology Reference Guide, previously known as the Electrotechnology Reference Guide. The last version of the Electrotechnology Reference Guide was published in 1992. This 2007 edition specifically updates information on industrial-sector energy consumption and the status of energy efficient technologies.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Estimating Demand Response Market Potential Among Large Commercial and Industrial Customers: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

size (average maximum demand) 84 , business type (SIC code),HECO customers average maximum demands was not available.to estimate the maximum demand (kW) of each customer.

Goldman, Charles; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan, Bernie; Cappers, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial energy demand" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5: Periods of Elevated Electricity Demand 8am-12pm 12pm-2pmC-8: Diurnal Variations in Electricity Demand Figure C-9:Variations in Electricity Demand Figure C-10: Seasonal

Ghatikar, Girish

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Dynamic Controls for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response: Framework Concepts and a New Construction Study Case in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fully Automated Demand Response in Large Facilities.for Energy Efficiency and Demand Response, Proceedings ofAuthority (NYSERDA), the Demand Response Research Center (

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Hughes, Glenn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Policy modeling for industrial energy use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple energy intensity is not a good indicator for energyEnergy Intensity in the Iron & Steel industry: A Comparison of Physical and Economic Indicators",energy efficiency in the Korean manufacturing sector, studies using economic energy efficiency indicators (energy intensity

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Advanced Control Technologies and Strategies Linking Demand Response and Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Peak Demands in Commercial Buildings Center for Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies (CADDET), IEA/OECD Analyses

Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA: Personal Computing Industry Center, working paper.flows in the wind energy industry. Peterson Institute, WPin the Global Wind Energy Industry Jason Dedrick, Syracuse

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Policy modeling for industrial energy use  

SciTech Connect

The international workshop on Policy Modeling for Industrial Energy Use was jointly organized by EETA (Professional Network for Engineering Economic Technology Analysis) and INEDIS (International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector). The workshop has helped to layout the needs and challenges to include policy more explicitly in energy-efficiency modeling. The current state-of-the-art models have a proven track record in forecasting future trends under conditions similar to those faced in the recent past. However, the future of energy policy in a climate-restrained world is likely to demand different and additional services to be provided by energy modelers. In this workshop some of the international models used to make energy consumption forecasts have been discussed as well as innovations to enable the modeling of policy scenarios. This was followed by the discussion of future challenges, new insights in the data needed to determine the inputs into energy model s, and methods to incorporate decision making and policy in the models. Based on the discussion the workshop participants came to the following conclusions and recommendations: Current energy models are already complex, and it is already difficult to collect the model inputs. Hence, new approaches should be transparent and not lead to extremely complex models that try to ''do everything''. The model structure will be determined by the questions that need to be answered. A good understanding of the decision making framework of policy makers and clear communication on the needs are essential to make any future energy modeling effort successful. There is a need to better understand the effects of policy on future energy use, emissions and the economy. To allow the inclusion of policy instruments in models, evaluation of programs and instruments is essential, and need to be included in the policy instrument design. Increased efforts are needed to better understand the effects of innovative (no n-monetary) policy instruments through evaluation and to develop approaches to model both conventional and innovative policies. The explicit modeling of barriers and decision making in the models seems a promising way to enable modeling of conventional and innovative policies. A modular modeling approach is essential to not only provide transparency, but also to use the available resources most effectively and efficiently. Many large models have been developed in the past, but have been abandoned after only brief periods of use. A development path based on modular building blocks needs the establishment of a flexible but uniform modeling framework. The leadership of international agencies and organizations is essential in the establishment of such a framework. A preference is given for ''softlinks'' between different modules and models, to increase transparency and reduce complexity. There is a strong need to improve the efficiency of data collection and interpretation efforts to produce reliable model inputs. The workshop participants support the need for the establishment of an (in-)formal exchanges of information, as well as modeling approaches. The development of an informal network of research institutes and universities to help build a common dataset and exchange ideas on specific areas is proposed. Starting with an exchange of students would be a relative low-cost way to start such collaboration. It would be essential to focus on specific topics. It is also essential to maintain means of regular exchange of ideas between researchers in the different focus points.

Worrell, Ernst; Park, Hi-Chun; Lee, Sang-Gon; Jung, Yonghun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Nyboer, John; Jaccard, Mark; Nordqvist, Joakim; Boyd, Christopher; Klee, Howard; Anglani, Norma; Biermans, Gijs

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Industrial service and product providers | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

488

Energy and Environmental Challenges in Aluminium Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Energy and Environmental Challenges in Aluminium Industry - A Review ... A projection based on the present global Alumina and Aluminium...

489

Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industry Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Barron Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industry Energy Efficiency Lighting Rebates (Wisconsin) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the...

490

Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Electronics and Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits can range from higher system properties and energy efficiency, to innovative healthcare solutions, to advanced industry products and solutions.

491

Nanotechnology for Energy, Environment, Healthcare and Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits can range from higher system properties and energy efficiency, to innovative healthcare solutions, to advanced industry products and solutions.

492

XH Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name XH Industries Inc Place Ilwaco, Washington, DC Zip 98624-9046 Sector Wind energy Product Washington-based repairer of wind power...

493

Alten Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Inc Place Baltimore, Maryland Zip 21218 Product Maryland-based integrated alternative energy development corporation dedicated to supporting a viable domestic...

494

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Distributed Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industry Classification System (NAICS) code, system size, technologyprime mover, fuel, thermal energy use, and year installed. Access the CHP Project Profiles database....

495

Jinlong Industrial Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Product Solar energy company based in Hebei province, engaged in manufacturing photovoltaic cell, crystal silicon and other key products. References Jinlong Industrial...

496

Energy Opportunities in the Aluminum Processing Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As carbon management has grown in importance and project payback becomes ... overall energy within a plant and within the aluminum processing industry.

497

Energy Perspectives: Industrial and transportation sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since 2008, energy use in the transportation, residential, and commercial sectors stayed relatively constant or fell slightly. Industrial consumption grew in 2010 and ...

498

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Western Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Send a link to Advanced Manufacturing Office: Western Industrial Energy Efficiency & Combined Heat and Power Regional Dialogue Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Advanced...

499

ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Senior care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant Certification: Instructions for applying This document...

500

Rotem Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

research, development, construction & consultation of major solar energy projects: solar power plants and solar powered desalination study. References Rotem Industries Ltd1...