National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for industrial energy consumption

  1. Energy Intensity Indicators: Industrial Source Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The industrial sector comprises manufacturing and other nonmanufacturing industries not included in transportation or services. Manufacturing includes 18 industry sectors, generally defined at the...

  2. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  3. Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

    2007-01-01

    Industry Constraining Energy Consumption of China’s Largestone-to-one ratio of energy consumption to GDP – given China’goal of reducing energy consumption per unit of GDP by 20%

  4. Energy Consumption and Potential for Energy Conservation in the Steel Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The domestic steel industry, being energy-use intensive, requires between 4 and 5 percent of total annual domestic energy consumption. More than two-thirds of total steel industry energy, however, is derived from coal. During the post-World War II...

  5. U. S. Industrial Energy Consumption and Conservation: Past and Future Perspectives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganeriwal, R; Ross, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines U.S. industrial energy consumption and conservation potentials by defining the concept of energy service which, in turn, leads to more precise consideration of various aspects of conservation. It is seen that there are a number...

  6. Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application explore the implications for Canada's industrial sector of an economy-wide, compulsory greenhouse gas of the Canadian industrial sector to GHG charges implemented throughout the economy, starting in the year 2006

  7. Reduces electric energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

  8. Manufacturing-Industrial Energy Consumption Survey(MECS) Historical

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHNThousandU.S. Energy

  9. Energy Consumption Characteristics of Light Manufacturing Facilities in The Northern Plains: A Study of Detailed Data from 10 Industrial Energy Audits Conducted in 1993 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twedt, M.; Bassett, K.

    1994-01-01

    Extensive research has been done on residential and commercial applications of existing technologies for energy conservation. This study specifically examines industrial facilities for energy consumption profiles and ...

  10. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring of Direct Energy Consumption in Long-Term2007. “Constraining Energy Consumption of China’s LargestProgram: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest

  11. China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Choices, and Energy Consumption. Praeger Publishers,The decomposition effect of energy consumption in China'sThe challenge of reducing energy consumption of the Top-1000

  12. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Industrial Technologies Program provides many software tools for assessing energy efficiency of motors,

  13. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  14. Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Projects Reduce Energy Consumption Eric Niemeyer, Operations Superintendent Drilling Specialties Company A division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... of the paper “Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption” by Bruce Murray and Allison Myers ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Conroe, TX Facility ESL...

  15. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency: Model Energy-Efficiency ProgramEnergy Program provides support to Lawrence Berkeley Nationalnational and 47% of industrial energy usage in 2004. Under the Top-1000 program,

  16. Constraining Energy Consumption of China's Largest Industrial Enterprises Through the Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprise Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Wang, Xuejun

    2007-01-01

    Energy Program provides support to Lawrence Berkeley NationalEnergy-Consuming Enterprise Program Lynn Price, Lawrence Berkeley Nationalnational and 47% of industrial energy usage in 2004. Under the Top-1000 program,

  17. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  18. The Use of Simulation Techniques for Improving Energy Consumption of Industrial Processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourlia, J. P.; Jamen, R.

    1984-01-01

    the physical meaning of available energy function (or exergy) and we show how graphical representations are helpful for the interpretation for the exergy analysis. The study of a crude oil pipestill allows us to identify the irreversibilities of the process...

  19. China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of China’s energy- saving and emission-reduction2008 Power Industry Energy Savings and Emissions Reductionthe Thousand Enterprise Energy-Saving Action Implementation

  20. China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of China’s energy- saving and emission-reduction2008 Power Industry Energy Savings and Emissions Reductionenergy conservation, and energy saving monitoring, testing

  1. "Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional costTotal

  2. Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

  3. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    to establishing targets, energy management within theenterprises in their energy management, energy auditing, andreports, and using energy management software. Documents,

  4. Energy Consumption Profile for Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    ...................................................................................318 12.2.1 Motivations for Energy Harvesting...............................................319 12 the example of a "smart application'' assisted by a decision engine that transforms itself into an "energy317 Chapter 12 Energy Consumption Profile for Energy Harvested WSNs T. V. Prabhakar, R Venkatesha

  5. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    N. , 2007. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values forthe international best practice energy intensity values areR. , 2000. The UK Energy Efficiency Best Practice Programme.

  6. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    the policies and energy management systems implemented inmanagement include s an energy purchase management system,energy use management system, an assessment of each

  7. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    03/06/content_7729607.htm ETSU, 1999. Industrial SectorSee discussion of this report in ETSU, AEA Technology, 2001.environment/ccl/pdf/etsu-analysis.pdf Feng, F. , 2007. “

  8. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  9. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a study of the technical, economic and management principles of effective energy use. The authors report on: energy consumption, conservation, and resources. They present an analysis of thermal-fluid systems. Energy conservation in combustion systems. Heat exchangers, heat recovery, energy conservation in industrial buildings, and industrial cogeneration are discussed.

  10. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    2006). Tax rebates for exports of energy-intensive products2007, export rebates were eliminated on 553 energy-intensiveexport tax rebates for many low-value-added but high energy-

  11. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    RMB¥ ($6B) to promote saving energy and reducing emissions.RMB¥ ($3.9B) to promote saving energy and reducing pollutantmanagement status, and energy saving technology improvement,

  12. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Electric Solar Energy Industries Association Self Generationsolar-electric generation systems and its impacts on energyenergy consumption changes with the installation of a solar electric generation

  13. Industrial energy management and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, L.C.; Schmidt, P.S.; Brown, D.

    1986-01-01

    This text covers the principles of industrial energy conservation and energy conservation applications, with emphasis on the energy-intensive industries. Topics covered include energy consumption, alternative energy sources, elements of energy audits, economic investment analysis, management of energy conservation programs, boilers and fired heaters, steam and condensate systems, classification and fouling of heat exchangers, heat transfer augmentation, waste heat sources, heat recovery equipment, properties and characteristics of insulation, energy conservation in industrial buildings, cogeneration, power circuit components and energy conversion devices, electrical energy conservation. A review of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, as well as examples, problems, and case studies from specific industries are included.

  14. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    energy and reducing pollutant emissions from the Ministry of Financeenergy saving abilities; research and establish multiple channels for project finance;Finance Arranges 27 Billion RMB as Special Financial Support in order to Promote Energy

  15. China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    numbers on coal production and consumption and, in additionrevisions of coal production and consumption, the censusfossil fuel consumption and cement production. Geophysical

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  1. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  5. World energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

  6. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    and Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency inEnergy Consumption ..26 3.1.3. 3D TV Energy Consumption and Efficiency

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey...

  8. Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Energy Consumption of Minimum Energy Coding in CDMA Wireless Sensor Networks Benigno Zurita Ares://www.ee.kth.se/control Abstract. A theoretical framework is proposed for accurate perfor- mance analysis of minimum energy coding energy consumption is analyzed for two coding schemes proposed in the literature: Minimum Energy coding

  9. New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The New York State Homes and...

  10. Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

  11. Energy Intensity Indicators: Commercial Source Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure C1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) commercial building floor space, 2) energy use based on source energy consumption, 3) energy intensity, and 4) the...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  13. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  15. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  12. Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672(MillionFeet)Product:Energy

  13. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSites KDFNational Fuel Cell andEnergy NationalLighting

  14. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements)Feet) Decade8

  15. China's Industrial Energy Consumption Trends and Impacts of the Top-1000 Enterprises Energy-Saving Program and the Ten Key Energy-Saving Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke, Jing

    2014-01-01

    change and intensity change. Energy Economics 25, 625-638.D. , 2010. Why did China’s energy intensity increase duringand policy analysis. Energy Policy 38, 1379-1388. Zheng,

  16. Energy Consumption ESPRIMO E7935 E80+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    Computers is also taking significant effort to reduce the energy consumption in data centres by providingEnergy Consumption ESPRIMO E7935 E80+ White Paper Issue: September 2008 In order to strengthen all important energy information about their products. With the publication of energy consumption

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Energy Information Adminstration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

  18. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4...

  19. Energy Conservation in China North Industries Corporation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, W. T.; De, C. H.; Chu, J. X.; Fu, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    IN CHINA NORTH INDUSTRIES CORPORATION Wang Tian You, Chen Hua De, Jing Xing Chu, Ling Rui Fu, China North Industries Corporation Beijing, People's Republic of China ABSTRACT This paper describes an overview of the energy conservation in China... North Industries Corporation. It shows how the corporation improves energy effi ciencies and how it changes constitution of fuel-- converting oil consumption to coal. Energy management organization, energy balance in plants and several specific...

  20. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  1. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    of LCD TVs to global energy consumption due to theoverall household or global energy consumption is uncertainFigure ES-3. Global TV Energy Consumption by Display Type in

  2. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01

    strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

  3. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the ResidentialFall 2012 Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in theAbstract Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the

  4. Energy consumption in thermomechanical pulping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marton, R.; Tsujimoto, N.; Eskelinen, E.

    1981-08-01

    Various components of refining energy were determined experimentally and compared with those calculated on the basis of the dimensions of morphological elements of wood. The experimentally determined fiberization energy of spruce was 6 to 60 times larger than the calculated value and that of birch 3 to 15 times larger. The energy consumed in reducing the Canadian standard freeness of isolated fibers from 500 to 150 ml was found to be approximately 1/3 of the total fiber development energy for both spruce and birch TMP. Chip size affected the refining energy consumption; the total energy dropped by approximately 30% when chip size was reduced from 16 mm to 3 mm in the case of spruce and approximately 40% for birch. 6 refs.

  5. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  6. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  8. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

  9. Energy and Environmental Profile of the Chemicals Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, Joan L.

    2000-05-01

    This informative report provides an overview of the U.S. Chemical Industry including data on market trends, energy and material consumption, and an environmental overview.

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on a...

  11. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Part 1. Energy Consumption Data Tables Total Energy Intensity Intensity by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part...

  12. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  13. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  14. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01

    3. Actual heating and hot water energy consumption of theon-site energy consumption for heating and hot water. The

  15. Industrial energy use indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

    2009-05-15

    Energy use index (EUI) is an important measure of energy use which normalizes energy use by dividing by building area. Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories ...

  16. Industrial energy use indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, Andrew Aaron

    2008-10-10

    Energy use index (EUI) is an important measure of energy use which normalizes energy use by dividing by building area. Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories ...

  17. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer to monitor the consump- tion of energy in wireless sensor networks based on video streams com- posed from energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  18. Energy Analysis and Diagnostics Data Analysis From Industrial Energy Assessments for Manufacturing Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, B.; Plummer, R. W.; Srinath, S.; Meffe, C. M.; Ipe, J. J.; Veena, R.

    1997-01-01

    m fil o N (") QFORSIC32 Figure 6. Energy consumption for SIC 32 SIC 35 type of industry, which is associated with machinery manufacture. This is probably due to the need for adequate lighting for precision inspection and the possibility...

  19. U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption Estimate Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Multiyear study to evaluate light sources and identify opportunities for saving energy. This report estimates energy consumption for residential, commercial, industrial, and outdoor stationary.

  20. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appendix I Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption For information about how to obtain these publi- cations, see the inside cover of this report. Please note that the...

  1. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this report were based on monthly billing records submitted by the buildings' energy suppliers. The section, "Annual Consumption and Expenditures" provide a detailed...

  2. ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses Rafferty, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES; AUXILIARY HEATING; CAPITALIZED COST; OPERATING...

  3. Energy consumption in optical modulators for interconnects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    Energy consumption in optical modulators for interconnects David A. B. Miller* Ginzton Laboratory@ee.stanford.edu Abstract: We analyze energy consumption in optical modulators operated in depletion and intended for low, even conceivably being more energy-efficient than an ideal loss-less modulator. ©2012 Optical Society

  4. Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Justin David

    2010-01-01

    With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

  5. Energy Consumption and Economic Growth The Case of Australia Hong To a, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;3 depend on imports of crude oil, natural gas, and coal for their industrial and residential energy needs energy consumption and economic growth. Peak oil, energy security and climate change have become key

  6. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  7. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  8. Industrial Energy Efficiency in Ukraine: The Business Outlook 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ukraine is full of profitable opportunities for energy efficiency. Industry accounts for many of these opportunities because of its high level of energy consumption and its ability to pay for energy efficiency measures in hard currency. This paper...

  9. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

  11. Caraustar Industries Energy Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This plant-wide assessment case study is about commissioned energy assessments by the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program at two of Caraustar's recycled paperboard mills.

  12. Biomass Stove Pollution Sam Beck ATOC-3500 Biomass energy accounts for about 15% of the world's primary energy consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , institutions and industries leads to reduced fuel consumption, faster processing, improved product quality's primary energy consumption and about 38% of the primary energy consumption in developing countries Air Pollution due to bad combustion (production of smoke). The improved use of biomass in households

  13. A Field Tested Model of Industrial Energy Conservation Assistance to Small Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jendrucko, R. J.; Mitchell, D. S.; Snyder, W. T.; Symonds, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    industrial energy audits of Tennessee manufacturing firms from which over 150 feasible ECO's have been identified and analyzed. The process consists of the following steps: (1) Analyzing energy consumption and costs for a two year period; (2) Conducting a one...

  14. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    series of tuition free Industrial Energy Management Conferences (over 20 given to date involving many Oklahoma industries). 2. A free energy newsletter entitled "Energy Channel" mailed to all participating Oklahoma industries. 3. A series of Energy...

  15. Energy consumption series: Development of the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-18

    The implementation and results of the proceedings concerning the Energy Information Administration assessment of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) are documented in this report. The text and Appendices C, D, and E summarize the background of the MECS data system, the events that led to the MECS redesign, the major issues address during the review process, and the eventual 1991 MECS design that resulted. For many readers, the most useful part of the report may be Appendices A and B, which contain overall summaries of the users' groups and the industrial roundtables. These appendices capture the rationale for additional data needs as provided by the users. Also, they are a rich source of information on how manufacturers deal with energy use day-to-day, how they have addressed the need for energy efficiency improvement in the past, and the opportunities and problems associated with future efforts to improve efficiency. (VC)

  16. Energy consumption series: Development of the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-18

    The implementation and results of the proceedings concerning the Energy Information Administration assessment of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) are documented in this report. The text and Appendices C, D, and E summarize the background of the MECS data system, the events that led to the MECS redesign, the major issues address during the review process, and the eventual 1991 MECS design that resulted. For many readers, the most useful part of the report may be Appendices A and B, which contain overall summaries of the users` groups and the industrial roundtables. These appendices capture the rationale for additional data needs as provided by the users. Also, they are a rich source of information on how manufacturers deal with energy use day-to-day, how they have addressed the need for energy efficiency improvement in the past, and the opportunities and problems associated with future efforts to improve efficiency. (VC)

  17. Home, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Home, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption James Pierce1 in the home are performed without conscious consideration of energy consumption but rather are unconscious. Put another way, energy consumption can be characterized as "the routine accomplishment of what people

  18. Energy Flow Models for the Steel Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyman, B.; Andersen, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Energy patterns in the U. S. steel industry are examined using several models. First is an end-use model based on data in the 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). Then a seven-step process model is presented and material flow through...

  19. The US textile industry: An energy perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badin, J. S.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01

    This report investigates the state of the US textile industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. Specific objectives were: To update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1984; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1984), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2010); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. Results of this study concluded that in the year 2010, there is a potential to save between 34% and 53% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry in three categories: process modification, basic research, and improved housekeeping practices that reduce energy consumption. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  20. Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program handbook connects industry with the various energy efficiency resources available in the midwest.

  1. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  5. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  6. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are moreRevised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials. 1. INTRODUCTION} Industry accounts for 50% of total energy use in developing countries

  7. Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, X.; Tan, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper surveys the present situation of building energy consumption in Shanghai and points out the problems of insufficient energy consumption statistics based on the survey data. We analyze the relationships of energy consumption between...

  8. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption SurveyVehicles Energy

  10. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  11. Industrial energy savers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This is a series of technical bulletins developed as a quick reference to various energy-saving technologies. Each bulletin provides information on economics, benefits, and applications. Topics are chiller optimization and energy-efficient chillers, evaporative cooling, economizer cycles, thermal energy storage for cooling systems, boiler room energy conservation, cogeneration, industrial heat pumps, steam trap maintenance, energy-efficient motors, and variable speed drive motors.

  12. Optimizing Energy Consumption in Terahertz Band Nanonetworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigle, Michele

    1 Optimizing Energy Consumption in Terahertz Band Nanonetworks Shahram Mohrehkesh, IEEE Student the maximum utilization of harvested energy in perpetual wireless nanonetworks, where nanonodes communicate of energy. Compounding the problem, the arrival of energy is not constant, but follows a stochastic process

  13. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  14. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  15. GIS-based energy consumption mapping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balta, Chrysi

    2014-11-27

    This project aims to provide a methodology to map energy consumption of the housing stock at a city level and visualise and evaluate different retrofitting scenarios. It is based on an engineering, bottom-up approach. It ...

  16. RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L; Martin, Michaela A; Gemmer, Bob; Scheihing, Paul; Quinn, James

    2007-09-01

    In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

  17. Michigan Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on dark matterEnergyPublicatons Contact UsMichelleConsumption

  18. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

  19. Smoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    % of the nation's total electricity consumption. Unfortunately, due to inefficient energy consumption patternSmoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid Shaojie Tang , Qiuyuan Huang of Software, TNLIST, Tsinghua University Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, University

  20. Empowering Developers to Estimate App Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    are not even aware of the amount of energy their app consumes un- der a typical usage pattern. While they couldEmpowering Developers to Estimate App Energy Consumption Radhika Mittal , Aman Kansal , Ranveer on mobile devices. However, it is difficult for app developers to mea- sure the energy used by their apps

  1. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  2. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  3. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    calcu.lat energy consumption in passive solar houses havesolar heating form a major source of energy supply in the second scenario. The energy consumption

  4. Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance logo Industrial facilities seeking...

  5. Energy Technology Partnership (ETP) Energy Industry Doctorates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Energy Technology Partnership (ETP) Energy Industry Doctorates in Low Carbon Energy Technologies for Guidance 1. Introduction The Energy Technology Partnership (ETP) has established an Energy Industry for `industry-ready', post-doctoral researchers to enhance energy industry innovation and knowledge exchange

  6. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  7. Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes, C. B.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    this, the Oklahoma Department of Energy designed a program to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings available through energy management and some basic techniques. The program is, entitled "Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures per Building (thousand cubic feet) per Square Foot (cubic feet) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (cubic feetsquare foot) 25th...

  10. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand...

  11. Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

  12. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricRhode Island ElectricityYearand Tables1995savings

  13. Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building Liping Wang, Paul Mathew, Xiufeng Pang Environmental Energy Technologies Division between predicted and actual building energy consumption can be attributed to uncertainties introduced

  14. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    processing unit (CPU) processing power and capacity of mass storage devices doubles every 18 months. Such growth in both processing and storage capabilities fuels the production of ever more powerful portableEnergy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1

  15. Energy Consumption Characteriation of Heterogeneous Servers School of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    Energy Consumption Characteriation of Heterogeneous Servers Xiao Zhang School of Computer Science Machine between servers to save energy. An accurate energy consumption model is the basic of energy management. Most past studies show that energy consumption has linear relation with resource utilization. We

  16. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  17. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.82 4.235,382 6,358 (Million Cubic S ˆ Y M n i 1E

  18. Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency Report to

  19. Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Stimulating R&D of industrial energy-efficient technology;Turnover, Retrofit and Industrial Energy Efficiency. Energyprograms perform at improving industrial energy efficiency.

  20. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    IEA) 7 July 2006 Industrial motor systems energy efficiency:of energy-efficient equipment in industrial motor systems isin industrial energy efficiency, especially motor, steam,

  1. Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of the analysis is to identify and quantify Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. The introductory chapter is intended as a device for presenting the policy questions about the incentives that can be used to stimulate desired levels of energy development. In the theoretical chapter federal incentives were identified for the consumption of energy as Federal government actions whose major intent or result is to stimulate energy consumption. The stimulus comes through changing values of variables included in energy demand functions, thereby inducing energy consumers to move along the function in the direction of greater quantity of energy demanded, or through inducing a shift of the function to a position where more energy will be demanded at a given price. The demand variables fall into one of six categories: price of the energy form, price of complements, price of substitutes, preferences, income, and technology. The government can provide such incentives using six different policy instruments: taxation, disbursements, requirements, nontraditional services, traditional services, and market activity. The four major energy forms were examined. Six energy-consuming sectors were examined: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, transportation, and public. Two types of analyses of incentive actions are presented in this volume. The generic chapter focused on actions taken in 1978 across all energy forms. The subsequent chapters traced the patterns of incentive actions, energy form by energy form, from the beginning of the 20th century, to the present. The summary chapter includes the results of the previous chapters presented by energy form, incentive type, and user group. Finally, the implications of these results for solar policy are presented in the last chapter. (MCW)

  2. Industrial Compressed Air System Energy Efficiency Guidebook.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1993-12-01

    Energy efficient design, operation and maintenance of compressed air systems in industrial plants can provide substantial reductions in electric power and other operational costs. This guidebook will help identify cost effective, energy efficiency opportunities in compressed air system design, re-design, operation and maintenance. The guidebook provides: (1) a broad overview of industrial compressed air systems, (2) methods for estimating compressed air consumption and projected air savings, (3) a description of applicable, generic energy conservation measures, and, (4) a review of some compressed air system demonstration projects that have taken place over the last two years. The primary audience for this guidebook includes plant maintenance supervisors, plant engineers, plant managers and others interested in energy management of industrial compressed air systems.

  3. On the Interplay of Parallelization, Program Performance, and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scarano, Vittorio

    On the Interplay of Parallelization, Program Performance, and Energy Consumption Sangyeun Cho to either minimize the total energy consumption or minimize the energy-delay product. The impact of static through parallel execution of applications, suppressing the power and energy consumption remains an even

  4. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  5. Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation (IGATE-E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [DOE EERE] [DOE EERE; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; Cox, Daryl [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    IGATE-E is an energy analysis tool for industrial energy evaluation. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple publicly available datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using DOE s Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE s Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to other commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool provides validation against DOE s EIA-MECS state level energy estimations and permits several statistical examinations. IGATE-E is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike.

  6. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    al. (2000). "Energy efficiency and consumption – the reboundinnovation, energy efficient design and the rebound effect."of an energy service, the greater the rebound effect (

  7. User-needs study for the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. [Energy Consumption Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) that is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the primary source of energy data for commercial buildings in the United States. The survey began in 1979 and has subsequently been conducted in 1983, 1986, and 1989. The next survey will cover energy consumption during the year 1992. The building characteristic data will be collected between August 1992 and early December 1992. Requests for energy consumption data are mailed to the energy suppliers in January 1993, with data due by March 1993. Before each survey is sent into the field, the data users' needs are thoroughly assessed. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of that user-needs assessment for the 1992 survey.

  8. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    overall reduction in global energy consumption. Life-cycleenergy consumption and is responsible for about the same share of global

  9. Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacementon Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacementprimary energy savings impacts and petroleum displacement

  10. Energy Consumption in Coded Queues for Wireless Information Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Energy Consumption in Coded Queues for Wireless Information Exchange Jasper Goseling, Richard J customers. We use this relation to ob- tain bounds on the energy consumption in a wireless information. In this work we will analyze the energy consumption of coded wireless networks under the scenario that the ar

  11. Optimizing Communication Energy Consumption in Perpetual Wireless Nanosensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigle, Michele

    Optimizing Communication Energy Consumption in Perpetual Wireless Nanosensor Networks Shahram}@cs.odu.edu Abstract--This paper investigates the effect of various param- eters of energy consumption. Finding the optimum combination of parameters to minimize energy consumption while satisfying the Qo

  12. Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilevich, Eli

    Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes Young-Woo Kwon and Eli, an increasing number of perfective maintenance tasks are concerned with optimizing energy consumption. However, optimizing a mobile application to reduce its energy consumption is non-trivial due to the highly volatile

  13. Minimizing Energy Consumption in Body Sensor Networks via Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    Minimizing Energy Consumption in Body Sensor Networks via Convex Optimization Sidharth Nabar energy consumption while limiting the latency in data transfer. In this paper, we focus on polling energy consumption and latency. We show that this problem can be posed as a geometric program, which

  14. Automated Analysis of Performance and Energy Consumption for Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    Automated Analysis of Performance and Energy Consumption for Cloud Applications Feifei Chen, John providers is thus to develop resource provisioning and management solutions at minimum energy consumption system performance and energy consumption patterns in complex cloud systems is imperative to achieve

  15. On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Appears in the proceedings of the 4th,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption and performance are necessary to understand and identify system. This paper considers the energy consumption and performance of servers running a relatively simple file

  16. The Impact of Distributed Programming Abstractions on Application Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilevich, Eli

    The Impact of Distributed Programming Abstractions on Application Energy Consumption Young-Woo Kwon of their energy consumption patterns. By varying the abstractions with the rest of the functionality fixed, we measure and analyze the impact of distributed programming abstractions on application energy consumption

  17. On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosu, Radu

    On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Zhichao Li, Radu Grosu, Priya Sehgal,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu Abstract Models of energy consumption and performance are necessary to understand and identify system consid- ers the energy consumption and performance of servers running a relatively simple file

  18. Influences of landscape and lifestyle on home energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    Influences of landscape and lifestyle on home energy consumption Cara Nelson & Melissa R. Mc conservation and carbon dioxide emissions reduction. Urban residential energy consumption is a valuable place to increase considerably, therefore, understanding the drivers of home energy consumption should be a priority

  19. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    accounting for 79% of non-biomass energy consumption inreliance on biomass for rural energy consumption shows thereliance on biomass for rural energy consumption shows the

  20. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01

    2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

  1. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01

    Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsresidential vehicular energy consumption is graphed as aon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with vehicles, but

  2. Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    comparison o f energy consumption i n housing (1998) (Trends i n household energy consumption (Jyukankyo Research4) Average (N=2976) Energy consumption [GJ / household-year

  3. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01

    affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

  4. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

    2014-01-01

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  5. One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsven, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    the total annual energy consumption. The behavior patternsin total residential energy consumption per home, even whenthe variability in energy consumption can vary by factors of

  6. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,and Policy of Uniti Energy Consumption (kWh/yr) Ordinary

  7. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01

    to slow the growth of energy consumption in buildings. Thisimprovement on energy consumption in commercial buildings inCommercial Building Energy Consumption in China The service

  8. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid:A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  9. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  10. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

  11. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01

    Loads SHGC Window Solar Energy Consumption Cond InfiltrationLoads SHGC Window Solar Energy Consumption Cond InfiltrationLoads SHGC Window Solar Energy Consumption Cond Infiltration

  12. Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment Recommendations Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment...

  13. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  14. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    accounting for 79% of non-biomass energy consumption in2000 and 2020. Biomass, the leading energy source in thehigh reliance on biomass for rural energy consumption as

  15. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliot, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2005-05-05

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of thenation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly,society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, moresustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing globalcompetitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges.We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologiesfor industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologiesare characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics andenvironmental performance. This paper provides an overview of theresults, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies toimprove energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, andneither will we in the future. The study shows that many of thetechnologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reducedenvironmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costscompared to current technologies.

  16. Reducing Energy Consumption in Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalen, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    geed housekeeping and mainte nance. 1. Maintain clean condensers and set controls at correct head pressure settings. 2. Keep all evaporator surfaces clean, toth water and air, with proper water treatment tested and maintained regularly. Clean... are set properly. d. Make sure that static pressure controls are set properly and that any discharge dampers or inlet vane controls are functioning. e. Make sure that fan blades, partiCUlarly forward curved, are clean of dust and dirt. 4. Replace...

  17. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector This...

  18. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  19. Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

    2008-01-01

    This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tables 0. Consumption and

  1. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tables 0. Consumption and2003

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tables 0. Consumption

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tables 0. Consumption2003

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun2003 Detailed Tables 0. Consumption20032003

  5. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption Survey (CBECS)aboutSurvey

  6. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption Survey

  7. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets 9,WhyConsumption6 1 April 2006January5t 7

  8. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the energy consumed (elsewhere) to generate and transmit the electricity supplied to the building (see Site and Primary Energy for additional information). The primary consumption...

  9. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Energy Sources Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ** estimates adjusted to match the 1995 CBECS definition of target population Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Table 2....

  10. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy...

  11. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  12. The Analysis and Assessment on Heating Energy Consumption of SAT 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01

    The article introduced the fuel-energy consumption and outdoor temperatures of three heating terms from year 1999 to 2002 of SAT's fuel-boiler heating system. It demonstrated the relationship between the consumption and the temperatures by using...

  13. Experimental and Simulation Study on the Performance of Daylighting in an Industrial Building and its Energy Saving Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    electricity consumption in Hong Kong [3]. For industrial buildings, the percentage varies widely depending-34% of the total building electricity consumption in Dongguan, China [4]. To reduce the energy consumption reduce building energy consumption effectively. Studies on this topic have been mostly conducted

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National...

  15. Connecticut Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic1992 ConsumptionYearYear Jan Feb

  16. South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. Temperature andResidentialConsumption (Million Cubic

  17. Utah Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentric viewing system for light| Department 2GrossConsumption

  18. West Virginia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProjectAdministrationWestConsumption (Million

  19. Hawaii Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚—34OctoberKHarvestingConsumption (Million Cubic

  20. Illinois Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein KhalilResearch88Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

  1. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West...

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South...

  8. Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

    2009-01-01

    The industrial sector accounts for more than one-third of total energy use in the United States and emits 28.7 percent of the country’s greenhouse gases. Energy use in the industrial sector is largely for steam and process heating systems...

  9. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis An error occurred. Try...

  10. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1...

  15. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to...

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    104 306 3,611 Fuel Oil ... 5 1,864 403 179 1,993 District Heat ... 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Energy End Uses...

  17. Ontario's Industrial Energy Services Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ploeger, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-87-09-69.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 13674 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-87-09-69.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ONTARIO'S INDUSTRIAL... ENERGY SERVICES PROGRAM LINDA K. PLOEGER, GENERAL MANAGER, INDUSTRY PROGRAMS ONTARIO MINISTRY OF ENERGY TORONTO, ONTARIO, ABSTRACT The Ontario Ministry of Energy began offering its new Industrial Energy Services Program (IESP) in early 1987...

  18. Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    GASOLINE REFORMER FIGURE 4 14 ESL-IE-86-06-03 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, June 17-19, 1986 REFORMER FEED QUALITY VS ENERGY FIG?URE 5 BASIS: CONSTANT SEVERITY AROMATICS CONSTANT NAP HTHF... is canbined with hydrogen, heated and passed over successive beds of catalyst. The complex reac tions are endothermic, requirirq heatirq prior to each reactor stage. Reactor inlet temperatures are 900 to 950?F and pressures rarqe from 150 to 400 psig...

  19. Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Use in the Australian Manufacturing Industry: An Analysis of Energy Demand Elasticity Chris in this paper. Energy consumption data was sourced from the Bureau of Resources and Energy Economics' Australian Energy Statistics publication. Price and income data were sourced from the Australian Bureau

  20. Georgia Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LET IonizingGeorge B. Zimmerman,Feet)Industrial

  1. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet containing detailed data and graphics for specific transportation modes.

  2. Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs...

  3. Long-term energy consumptions of urban transportation: A prospective...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can significantly curb the trajectories of energy consumption and the ensuing carbon dioxide emissions, if and only if they are implemented in the framework of appropriate urban...

  4. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    expenditure on energy. PV adoption differs conceptually fromeffect around residential PV adoption, and if so what arein consumption changes after PV adoption. Figure 5.5 shows

  5. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document...

  6. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01

    world data from buildings, observational data from users and energyworld data indicates that the houses heated during the night had higher annual heat energy consumption. The data

  7. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Report to Congress This report presents the detailed results, data, and analytical...

  8. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Documentation Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption, Technical Documentation This report presents the detailed results, data, and...

  9. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BENEFITS A Motor Challeng NEW WATER BOOSTER PUMP SYSTEM REDUCES ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY 80 PERCENT AND INCREASES RELIABILITY Summary Due to major renovations at their Pontiac...

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption Physics Colloquium Presented in financial markets. Globally, data analysis of energy consumption per capita around the world shows@american.edu Similarly to the probability distribution of energy in physics, the probability distribution of money among

  11. Elective Participation in Ad Hoc Networks Based on Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jing

    Elective Participation in Ad Hoc Networks Based on Energy Consumption Marc R. Pearlman , Jing Deng of determining the op- timal transmission radius for minimal interference and energy consumption is considered be significant. There- fore, in order to more aggressively conserve energy, one must Currently with the GE Global

  12. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    and energy efficiency policies California Solar Initiative (CSI) data,solar installation and energy consumption, through the analysis of pre- and post-installation consumption datadata regarding 5,243 residential solar system installations located in SDG&E service territory, the energy

  13. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Process in the Adoption of Solar Energy Systems." Journal ofthe diffusion of innovation: Solar energy technology in Sri2010. Washington, DC, Solar Energy Industries Association:

  14. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table272/S The National Interim Energy/HRIf

  15. Outlook for Industrial Energy Benchmarking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is exploring options to sponsor an industrial energy efficiency benchmarking study to identify facility specific, cost-effective best practices and technologies. Such a study could help develop a common...

  16. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  17. Productivity benefits of industrial energy efficiency measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    energy savings are related to energy price changes through1997 dollars. All energy prices and savings were evaluatedthe relationship of energy prices to industry-wide energy

  18. Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012 Fact 792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012 In the...

  19. Student Trainee (Energy Industry)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is an independent regulatory agency that regulates and oversees various aspects of the energy markets within the United States. We value independence...

  20. South Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C. Temperature and energySolvingOxidesCubic

  1. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| DepartmentPeer Review Policies Basic Energy

  2. Maryland Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)PriceHistoricEnergyAprilMartin D.Feet)

  3. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1995...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel oil, and district heat consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings by building characteristics. Previous Page Arrow Separater Bar File Last Modified: January 29,...

  4. Energy consumption of personal computer workstations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The explosive growth of the information age has had a profound effect on the appearance of today`s office. Although the telephone still remains an important part of the information exchange and processing system within an office, other electronic devices are now considered required equipment within this environment. This office automation equipment includes facsimile machines, photocopiers, personal computers, printers, modems, and other peripherals. A recent estimate of the installed base indicated that 42 million personal computers and 7.3 million printers are in place, consuming 18.2 billion kWh/yr-and this installed base is growing (Luhn 1992). From a productivity standpoint, it can be argued that this equipment greatly improves the efficiency of those working in the office. But of primary concern to energy system designers, building managers, and electric utilities is the fact that this equipment requires electric energy. Although the impact of each incremental piece of equipment is small, installation of thousands of devices per building has resulted in office automation equipment becoming the major contributor to electric consumption and demand growth in commercial buildings. Personal computers and associated equipment are the dominant part of office automation equipment. In some cases, this electric demand growth has caused office buildings electric and cooling systems to overload.

  5. Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers for Energy Efficiency Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casillas Barranquero, Jorge

    Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers for Energy Efficiency Consumption in Buildings R. Alcal´a DECSAI- tion in buildings represents about 40% of to- tal energy consumption and more than a half controllers, tuning techniques, multiobjective optimisation, en- ergy efficiency, buildings, BEMS, HVAC sys

  6. Energy Consumption and Air Pollutant Emissions Barnard College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Energy Consumption and Air Pollutant Emissions Barnard College 2005 - 2010 *Total campus square(MBtu) based on electricity, light fuel oil, and natural gas. Barnard's CO2 Emissions 2005 to 2010 (lbs/ft2/ft2 ) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 #12;2 Energy Consumption and Air

  7. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and Department of Energy Test Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Kar, Rahul; Foley, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the real-world energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compared with models and test procedures. The study looked to determine whether the U.S. Department of Energy and industry test procedures actually replicate real world conditions, whether performance degrades over time, and whether installation patterns and procedures differ from the ideal procedures. The study first identified and prioritized appliances to be evaluated. Then, the study determined whether real world energy consumption differed substantially from predictions and also assessed whether performance degrades over time. Finally, the study recommended test procedure modifications and areas for future research.

  8. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    technology. Power consumption of self-emissive displays suchtechnology. Power consumption of self-emissive displays suchof PDP Power Consumption PDPs are self-emissive displays

  9. Energy use and energy intensity of the U.S. chemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, E.; Phylipsen, D.; Einstein, D.; Martin, N.

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. chemical industry is the largest in the world, and responsible for about 11% of the U.S. industrial production measured as value added. It consumes approximately 20% of total industrial energy consumption in the U.S. (1994), and contributes in similar proportions to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Surprisingly, there is not much information on energy use and energy intensity in the chemical industry available in the public domain. This report provides detailed information on energy use and energy intensity for the major groups of energy-intensive chemical products. Ethylene production is the major product in terms of production volume of the petrochemical industry. The petrochemical industry (SIC 2869) produces a wide variety of products. However, most energy is used for a small number of intermediate compounds, of which ethylene is the most important one. Based on a detailed assessment we estimate fuel use for ethylene manufacture at 520 PJ (LHV), excluding feedstock use. Energy intensity is estimated at 26 GJ/tonne ethylene (LHV), excluding feedstocks.The nitrogenous fertilizer production is a very energy intensive industry, producing a variety of fertilizers and other nitrogen-compounds. Ammonia is the most important intermediate chemical compound, used as basis for almost all products. Fuel use is estimated at 268 PJ (excluding feedstocks) while 368 PJ natural gas is used as feedstock. Electricity consumption is estimated at 14 PJ. We estimate the energy intensity of ammonia manufacture at 39.3 GJ/tonne (including feedstocks, HHV) and 140 kWh/tonne, resulting in a specific primary energy consumption of 40.9 GJ/tonne (HHV), equivalent to 37.1 GJ/tonne (LHV). Excluding natural gas use for feedstocks the primary energy consumption is estimated at 16.7 GJ/tonne (LHV). The third most important product from an energy perspective is the production of chlorine and caustic soda. Chlorine is produced through electrolysis of a salt-solution. Chlorine production is the main electricity consuming process in the chemical industry, next to oxygen and nitrogen production. We estimate final electricity use at 173 PJ (48 TWh) and fuel use of 38 PJ. Total primary energy consumption is estimated at 526 PJ (including credits for hydrogen export). The energy intensity is estimated at an electricity consumption of 4380 kWh/tonne chlorine and fuel consumption of 3.45 GJ/tonne chlorine, where all energy use is allocated to chlorine production. Assuming an average power generation efficiency of 33% the primary energy consumption is estimated at 47.8 GJ/tonne chlorine (allocating all energy use to chlorine).

  10. Industrial Energy Conservation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 55 papers presented in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 18 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  11. Industrial energy conservation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, P.S.; Williams, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 60 papers included in this volume, all of which will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA); 21 were selected for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (MCW)

  12. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF ENERGY AND PRODUCTION IN PROCESS INDUSTRIES: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    produces filtered water for consumption in the various mill departments, and so the production rateGLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF ENERGY AND PRODUCTION IN PROCESS INDUSTRIES: A GENETIC ALGORITHM APPLICATION a genetic algorithm is developed and applied for the optimal assignment of all the production sections

  13. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    renewable energy technologies, solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies hold significant potentialenergy consumption: Potential savings and environmental impact." Renewable andpotential new value stream from NEM solar is monetization of the renewable energy

  14. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    and future energy consumption: Potential savings and environmental impact." Renewable andrenewable energy installation in practice. This dissertation will provide insight and make recommendations for program design principles and future

  15. Estimates of U.S. Biomass Energy Consumption 1992

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass derived primary energy used by the U.S. economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption.

  16. Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

  17. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01

    residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with

  18. One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsven, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Households consume energy in many different waysvariations in energy consumption consume considerably morevariations in energy consumption tend to consume a lot more

  19. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    clean energy arena, such as the nascent building performance industry, are the subject of large-scale policy initiatives.

  20. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  1. EPRI's Industrial Energy Management Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mergens, E.; Niday, L.

    1992-01-01

    supporting national objectives for a clean environment and a strong economic future. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recognizes that the management of energy use and the environmental impacts of industrial activity are of national importance... in municipal water and sewage treatment plants, field evaluation of advanced reverse osmosis to recycle electroplating waste water, and cross divisional analysis and assessment of EPRI-developed technology for industrial customer applications. SUMMARY...

  2. Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information about the Department of Energy’s Industrial Technologies Program and its Combined Heat and Power program.

  3. Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data Kay Cao applies the system of equations approach to energy consumption modelling using the ABS 2008-09 Energy of equations, energy consumption modelling, elasticity of substitution JEL codes: C51, D24 * Please do

  4. Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Transforming the Oil Industry into the Energy Industry BYculprit. It consumes half the oil used in the world andconsuming two thirds of the oil and causing about one third

  5. Study of Air Infiltration Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mingsheng

    1992-01-01

    consumption, showed that results from earlier steady-state measurements can be approximately applied to dynamic conditions when solar radiation is not present. However, this study has shown for the first time that IHEE is strongly dependent on air flow...

  6. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Therkelesen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Energy  Use   and  Energy  Efficiency  Improvement  Summer   Study  on  Energy  Efficiency  in  Industry.  Summer  Study  on  Energy  Efficiency  in  Industry.  

  7. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01

    is cast into a non- cooperative energy consumption game,prove that the non-cooperative energy consumption game has aby introducing a non-cooperative energy consumption game in

  8. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

    2014-01-01

    is cast into a non- cooperative energy consumption game,prove that the non-cooperative energy consumption game has aby introducing a non-cooperative energy consumption game in

  9. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid:A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01

    is cast into a non- cooperative energy consumption game,prove that the non-cooperative energy consumption game has aby introducing a non-cooperative energy consumption game in

  10. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01

    on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomason Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Thomas F. Golob

  11. Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Buildingand actual building energy consumption can be attributed touncertainties in energy consumption due to actual weather

  12. Modern Visualization of Industrial Energy Use and Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.

    2015-01-01

    of Manufacturing Energy Use and Loss June 4, 2015 Presented by: Sabine Brueske ESL-IE-15-06-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Slide 2/46 1. Manufacturing Energy Use and Loss 2. U... New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Slide 3/46 Shedding Light on U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use • Manufacturing ? one quarter of nation’s energy consumption • What types of energy? • Where is the energy used? • Where do the greatest losses occur? 2010...

  13. Monitoring and optimization of energy consumption of base transceiver stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnuolo, Antonio; Vetromile, Carmela; Formosi, Roberto; Lubritto, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    The growth and development of the mobile phone network has led to an increased demand for energy by the telecommunications sector, with a noticeable impact on the environment. Monitoring of energy consumption is a great tool for understanding how to better manage this consumption and find the best strategy to adopt in order to maximize reduction of unnecessary usage of electricity. This paper reports on a monitoring campaign performed on six Base Transceiver Stations (BSs) located central Italy, with different technology, typology and technical characteristics. The study focuses on monitoring energy consumption and environmental parameters (temperature, noise, and global radiation), linking energy consumption with the load of telephone traffic and with the air conditioning functions used to cool the transmission equipment. Moreover, using experimental data collected, it is shown, with a Monte Carlo simulation based on power saving features, how the BS monitored could save energy.

  14. Modeling overall energy consumption in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamyabpour, Najmeh

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing the energy consumption of a wireless sensor network application is crucial for effective realization of the intended application in terms of cost, lifetime, and functionality. However, the minimizing task is hardly possible as no overall energy cost function is available for optimization. Optimizing a specific component of the total energy cost does not help in reducing the total energy cost as this reduction may be negated by an increase in the energy consumption of other components of the application. Recently we proposed Hierarchy Energy Driven Architecture as a robust architecture that takes into account all principal energy constituents of wireless sensor network applications. Based on the proposed architecture, this paper presents a single overall model and proposes a feasible formulation to express the overall energy consumption of a generic wireless sensor network application in terms of its energy constituents. The formulation offers a concrete expression for evaluating the performance of ...

  15. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    Converter Furnace. ” In Ironmaking 2000, 18th Advancedenergy consumption for ironmaking is estimated at 780 TBtu (would reduce energy use in ironmaking by 30 percent relative

  16. The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    policies have significant impacts on diesel oil, gasoline and natural gas consumption. However, some energy The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1 Ming-Jie Lu, C.-Y. Cynthia policies; energy consumption; GDP; China JEL codes: Q48, Q41, Q58

  17. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  18. Energy Conservation Progress and Opportunities in the Pulp and Paper Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, J. J.; Hunter, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 the pulp and paper industry was the third ranking consumer of total purchased fuels and energy in the U.S. industrial sector and the highest single industry in terms of residual oil consumption. Over the past decade in response to rapidly...

  19. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, WestStandard for Industrial Energy Efficiency A. McKane 1 , R.

  20. Industrial Energy Procurement Contracts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, P.; Cooney, K.

    2000-01-01

    suppliers: from the commodity broker to the full range energy services provider. But these contracts are not the same old preordained "service agreements" -where all the real risks were already allocated by the PUC in the terms and conditions section... first decide on which supplier they would prefer to deal with on the basis of customer service, types of customers, ability to meet firm power needs, financial solvency etc. Only after identifying a short list of "qualified suppliers" does the firm...

  1. Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, Joan; Brueske, Sabine; Carole, Tracy; Andres, Howard

    2007-11-01

    This 2007 report provides an overview of the U.S. petroleum refining industry, including new data on market trends and energy and material consumption, as well as information on environmental performance.

  2. Visualization of United States Energy Consumption | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village of Wellington,FL LLC Jump to:Energy Consumption Jump to:

  3. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    7 Figure 3. Energy Consumption in the Agriculture Sector (13 Figure 6. Energy Consumption in the ServiceFinal and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry Sector,

  4. Benchmarks for industrial energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarnath, K.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Kumana, J.D. [Linnhoff March, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shah, J.V. [Electric Power Research Inst., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemicals and Petroleum Center

    1996-12-31

    What are the standards for improving energy efficiency for industries such as petroleum refining, chemicals, and glass manufacture? How can different industries in emerging markets and developing accelerate the pace of improvements? This paper discusses several case studies and experiences relating to this subject emphasizing the use of energy efficiency benchmarks. Two important benchmarks are discussed. The first is based on a track record of outstanding performers in the related industry segment; the second benchmark is based on site specific factors. Using energy use reduction targets or benchmarks, projects have been implemented in Mexico, Poland, India, Venezuela, Brazil, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Republic of South Africa and Russia. Improvements identified through these projects include a variety of recommendations. The use of oxy-fuel and electric furnaces in the glass industry in Poland; reconfiguration of process heat recovery systems for refineries in China, Malaysia, and Russia; recycling and reuse of process wastewater in Republic of South Africa; cogeneration plant in Venezuela. The paper will discuss three case studies of efforts undertaken in emerging market countries to improve energy efficiency.

  5. BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

  6. DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration...

  7. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds, rain, thunderstorms… at Solar Decathlon Village? Oh my, you may say. But less-than-ideal weather conditions are no match for this year's teams, thanks to smart grid technology that is helping them monitor their energy consumption.

  8. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and district heating scheme* data. Year Energy Consumption (KWh) Percentage Change 2005/06 65,916,243 N/A 2006 buildings are connected to the Nottingham District Heating Scheme. This service meets all the heating

  9. New Water Booster Pump System Reduces Energy Consumption by 80...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be adjusted to meet plant requirements. As a result, the company reduced pumping system energy consumption by 80 percent (225,100 kWh per year), saving an annual 11,255 in...

  10. Reducing 3G energy consumption on mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Shuo

    2012-01-01

    The 3G wireless interface is a significant contributor to battery drain on mobile devices. This paper describes the design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of methods to reduce the energy consumption of the 3G ...

  11. Efficiency alone as a solution to increasing energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidorfer, Luke

    2005-01-01

    A statistical analysis was performed to determine the effect of efficiency on the total US energy consumption of automobiles and refrigerators. Review of literature shows that there are many different opinions regarding ...

  12. Federal Government's Energy Consumption Lowest in Almost 40 Years...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the U.S. federal government continues to be one of the largest energy consumers in the world, its consumption has been steadily declining for nearly four decades, and now stands...

  13. Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects Improve Competitiveness and Protect Jobs U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

  14. Promoting Energy Efficiency in Cement Making: The ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2007-01-01

    Estimated using energy consumption data from the U.S.DOE Manufacturing Consumption of Energy, 2002 and 1994 data

  15. Supporting industries energy and environmental profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-09-21

    As part of its Industries of the Future strategy, the Industrial Technologies Program within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy works with energy-intensive industries to improve efficiency, reduce waste, and increase productivity. These seven Industries of the Future (IOFs) – aluminum, chemicals, forest products, glass, metal casting, mining, and steel – rely on several other so-called “supporting industries” to supply materials and processes necessary to the products that the IOFs create. The supporting industries, in many cases, also provide great opportunities for realizing energy efficiency gains in IOF processes.

  16. Industrial Energy Use Indices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

    2007-01-01

    data and present the results of the study. ____________________________ 1 This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under award numbers DE-FC36-02GO12086 and DE-FC36-06GO16067. This report was prepared based on work....04 25 0.97 1.49 0.98 26 0.46 0.56 0.53 27 1.04 0.89 1.56 28 0.65 0.74 1.13 29 2.38 1.05 2.40 30 1.15 1.01 1.60 32 0.86 1.34 0.92 33 1.03 1.01 0.99 34 1.40 1.10 1.75 35 1.08 1.07 1.03 36 1.03 0.98 1.15 37 0.90 1.08 1.07 38 2.11 2.41 1.25 39 1.12 1.36 1...

  17. Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Aerogel-Based Insulation for High-Temperature Industrial Processes Dr. Owen Evans 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; COMPETITION; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; MARKET;...

  18. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, E.; Martin, N.; Price, L.; Ruth, M.; Elliott, N.; Shipley, A.; Thorn, J.

    2001-01-01

    consists of all industrial activity outside of agriculture, mining, and construction, accounts for 70% of industrial value added (4). In 1998, the United States consumed 94 Quadrillion Btu (99 EJ) of primary energy or 25% of world primary energy use..., mining, construction, energy intensive industries, and non-energy intensive manufacturing. Energy is necessary to help our industries create useful products; however, we are increasingly confronted with the challenge of moving society toward a...

  19. Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Andrew Gearhart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    in energy efficiency can significantly reduce operating costs. Such challenges have influenced re- search variety of machines. Motivated by the large and increas- ingly growing dominant cost (in time and energyBounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Kernels Andrew Gearhart Electrical Engineering

  20. How Efficient Can We Be?: Bounds on Algorithm Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    How Efficient Can We Be?: Bounds on Algorithm Energy Consumption Andrew Gearhart #12;Relation design use feedback to "cotune" compute kernel energy efficiency #12;Previous Work: Communication Lower-optimal" algorithms #12;Communication is energy inefficient! · On-chip/Off-chip gap isn't going to improve much Data

  1. Classification of Energy Consumption in Buildings with Outlier Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    1 Classification of Energy Consumption in Buildings with Outlier Detection Xiaoli Li, Chris P is to enable a building management system to be used for forecasting and detection of abnormal energy use. First, an outlier detection method is proposed to identify abnormally high or low energy use in building

  2. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy performance of appliances and equipment as it compares with models and test procedures. The study looked to determine whether DOE and industry test procedures...

  3. Energy efficiency opportunities in China. Industrial equipment and small cogeneration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    A quick glance at comparative statistics on energy consumption per unit of industrial output reveals that China is one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. Energy waste not only impedes economic growth, but also creates pollution that threatens human health, regional ecosystems, and the global climate. China`s decision to pursue economic reform and encourage technology transfer from developed countries has created a window of opportunity for significant advances in energy efficiency. Policy changes, technical training, public education, and financing can help China realize its energy conservation potential.

  4. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    pp. IEA, 2006b: Industrial motor systems energy efficiency:industrial energy efficiency. Presented at Energy Efficiency in Motorenergy-efficient electric motors and motor-systems. These include: (1) industrial

  5. Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program are to assist Texas industry in using energy more efficiently through seminars, workshops, technical information exchange and other supportive programs with the goal of conserving at least...

  6. Reduction in Energy Consumption & Variability in Steel Foundry Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Peters

    2005-05-04

    This project worked to improve the efficiency of the steel casting industry by reducing the variability that occurs because of process and product variation. The project focused on the post shakeout operations since roughly half of the production costs are in this area. These improvements will reduce the amount of variability, making it easier to manage the operation and improve the competitiveness. The reduction in variability will also reduce the need for many rework operations, which will result in a direct reduction of energy usage, particularly by the reduction of repeated heat treatment operations. Further energy savings will be realized from the reduction of scrap and reduced handling. Field studies were conducted at ten steel foundries that represented the U.S. steel casting industry, for a total of over 100 weeks of production observation. These studies quantified the amount of variability, and looked toward determining the source. A focus of the data collected was the grinding operations since this is a major effort in the cleaning room, and it represents the overall casting quality. The grinding was divided into two categories, expected and unexpected. Expected grinding is that in which the location of the effort is known prior to making the casting, such as smoothing parting lines, gates, and riser contacts. Unexpected grinding, which was approximately 80% of the effort, was done to improve the surfaces at weld repair locations, to rectify burnt on sand, and other surface anomalies at random locations. Unexpected grinding represents about 80% of the grinding effort. By quantifying this effort, the project raised awareness within the industry and the industry is continuing to make improvements. The field studies showed that the amount of variation of grinding operations (normalized because of the diverse set of parts studied) was very consistent across the industry. The field studies identified several specific sources that individually contributed to large process variation. This indicates the need for ongoing monitoring of the process and system to quantify the effort being expended. A system to measure the grinding effort was investigated but did not prove to be successful. A weld wire counting system was shown to be very successful in tracking casting quality by monitoring the quantity of weld wire being expended on a per casting basis. Further use of such systems is highly recommended. The field studies showed that the visual inspection process for the casting surface was a potentially large source of process variation. Measurement system analysis studies were conducted at three steel casting producers. The tests measured the consistency of the inspectors in identifying the same surface anomalies. The repeatability (variation of the same operator inspecting the same casting) was found to be relatively consistent across the companies at about 60-70%. However, this is still are very large amount of variation. Reproducibility (variation of different operators inspecting the same casting) was worse, ranging between 20 to 80% at the three locations. This large amount of variation shows that there is a great opportunity for improvement. Falsely identifying anomalies for reworking will cause increased expense and energy consumption. This is particularly true if a weld repair and repeated heat treatment is required. However, not identifying an anomaly could also result in future rework processing, a customer return, or scrap. To help alleviate this problem, casting surface comparator plates were developed and distributed to the industry. These plates are very inexpensive which enables them to be provided to all those involved with casting surface quality, such as operators, inspectors, sales, and management.

  7. Reid Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergyRedfield1989) JumpLiteratureReid Industries Jump

  8. United States Industrial Sector Energy End Use Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shehabi, Arman; Morrow, William R.; Masanet, Eric

    2012-05-11

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducts the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to provide detailed data on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector. The survey is a sample of approximately 15,000 manufacturing establishments selected from the Economic Census - Manufacturing Sector. MECS provides statistics on the consumption of energy by end uses (e.g., boilers, process, electric drives, etc.) disaggregated by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. The manufacturing sector (NAICS Sector 31-33) consists of all manufacturing establishments in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. According to the NAICS, the manufacturing sector comprises establishments engaged in the mechanical, physical, or chemical transformation of materials, substances, or components into new products. The establishments are physical facilities such as plants, factories, or mills. For many of the sectors in the MECS datasets, information is missing because the reported energy use is less than 0.5 units or BTUs, or is withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual establishments, or is withheld because the standard error is greater than 50%. We infer what the missing information likely are using several approximations techniques. First, much of the missing data can be easily calculated by adding or subtracting other values reported by MECS. If this is not possible (e.g. two data are missing), we look at historic MECS reports to help identify the breakdown of energy use in the past and assume it remained the same for the current MECS. Lastly, if historic data is also missing, we assume that 3 digit NAICS classifications predict energy use in their 4, 5, or 6 digit NAICS sub-classifications, or vice versa. Along with addressing data gaps, end use energy is disaggregated beyond the specified MECS allocations using additional industry specific energy consumption data. The result is a completed table of energy end use by sector with mechanical drives broken down by pumps, fans, compressed air, and drives.

  9. Energy Consumption Series: Assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This study originally had two primary objectives: (1) to improve EIA`s estimates of district heat consumption for commercial buildings in the CBECS sample that lacked individual metering and (2) to provide a basis for estimating primary fuel consumption by central plants serving commercial buildings. These objectives were expanded to include additional questions relating to these central plants. Background information is provided on the CBECS and on district heating and cooling, which is the most important type of energy-related service provided by multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapters 2 and 3 present data results on multibuilding facilities from the 1989 CBECS and the pilot Facility Survey. Chapter 2 presents the characteristics of multibuilding facilities and the individual buildings located on these facilities. Chapter 3 provides estimates of energy inputs and outputs of multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapter 4 assesses the quality of the pilot Facility Survey and includes recommendations for future work in this area. The appendices provide more detailed information on the Facility Survey itself, in particular the limitations on the use of these results. Appendix B, ``Data Quality``, provides detailed information relating to the limitations of the data and the conclusions presented in this report. As a pilot study, the 1989 Facility Survey has some serious flaws and limitations which are recognized in this report.

  10. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    consumption, increasing imports, supply shortages, and difficulties integrating fully into global energyconsumption has a growing impact on world energy markets, affecting the availability of energy resources and global

  11. Assessing the Energy Efficiency Potential of Industrial Motor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2014-01-01

    2003. Energy-efficient motor systems in the industrial andpotential for energy efficiency in industrial motor systemspotential for energy efficiency in industrial motor systems

  12. uFLIP: Understanding the Energy Consumption of Flash Devices Matias Bjrling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uFLIP: Understanding the Energy Consumption of Flash Devices Matias Bjørling IT University Abstract Understanding the energy consumption of flash devices is important for two reasons. First, energy about the energy consumption of flash devices beyond their approximate aggregate consumption (low power

  13. Application of Industrial Heat Improving energy efficiency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Application of Industrial Heat Pumps Improving energy ­ efficiency of industrial processes . H Session Application of Industrial Heat Pumps Improving energy ­ efficiency of industrial processes Agency (IEA) - Agreements "Heat Pump Programme" "Industrial Energy-related Technologies and Systems #12

  14. Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs Industrial Customer Perspectives on Utility Energy Efficiency Programs These presentations from ATK Aerospace Systems,...

  15. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Resource Type: Guidemanual Website: china.lbl.govsiteschina.lbl.gov...

  16. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  5. World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 Ñ 2050 Richard Schmalensee, Thomas M. Stoker, andRuth A. Judson* Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may-U" relation with a within- sample peak between carbon dioxide emissions (and energy use) per capita and per

  6. California Energy and Consumption Projections 2005-2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    US Gas/Diesel Foreign Gas/Diesel Biomass-Ethanol, Bio. D, H2 Solar - H2 Wind - H2 Geothermal - H2 3 Natural Gas - Heating Natural Gas - Electrical Generation Gas/Diesel Coal Non-Fossil Fuels Nuclear Large Hydro Renewable Energy Biomass Solar Wind Geothermal #12;Model Energy Consumption in Quads Take the 2005

  7. Vending Machine Energy Consumption and VendingMiser Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, J.; Hugghins, J.

    2000-01-01

    As an effort to decrease the amount of non-critical energy used on the Texas A&M campus, and to assist Dixie Narco in evaluating the efficiency of their vending machines, the Texas A&M Energy Systems Laboratory investigated the power consumption...

  8. MIT and Energy Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    and demand, security and environmental impact. MITEI's interdisci- plinary research program focuses on: 1 of nanotechnology to solar and thermoelectric energy conversion. The mission of the MIT Photovoltaic Research synthesizes and characterizes commer- cial and next-generation photovoltaic materials and devices, engineering

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in CBECS. In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Activities with Large Amounts of Hot Water: One of the energy-related space...

  10. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    at the national level as well as State level in several EIA reports, including State Energy Data Report (SEDR) and the Monthly Energy Review (MER). When comparing the CBECS totals...

  11. A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based on Large Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based consumption of buildings based on historical performances is an important approach to achieve energy (SVMs), Prediction, Model, Energy Efficiency, Parallel Computing. 1. INTRODUCTION Building energy

  12. Energy conservation and cost benefits in the dairy processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-01-01

    Guidance is given on measuring energy consumption in the plant and pinpointing areas where energy-conservation activities can return the most favorable economics. General energy-conservation techniques applicable to most or all segments of the dairy processing industry, including the fluid milk segment, are emphasized. These general techniques include waste heat recovery, improvements in electric motor efficiency, added insulation, refrigeration improvements, upgrading of evaporators, and increases in boiler efficiency. Specific examples are given in which these techniques are applied to dairy processing plants. The potential for energy savings by cogeneration of process steam and electricity in the dairy industry is also discussed. Process changes primarily applicable to specific milk products which have resulted in significant energy cost savings at some facilities or which promise significant contributions in the future are examined. A summary checklist of plant housekeeping measures for energy conservation and guidelines for economic evaluation of conservation alternatives are provided. (MHR)

  13. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  15. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  4. Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stapley, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could...

  5. Industry Professional | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt. WaterInformationPlant ServicesIndustry

  6. Shrenik Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy Equipment Co Ltd JumpShrenik Industries

  7. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the sponsor the government, utility or sponsored in-house. Energy Management and Control System Heating or cooling system monitored or controlled by a computerized building...

  8. Signatures of Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption for Typical AHUs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    -patient measured values, respectively. hospital facility with a total conditioned floor area of 298,500 ft2. There are four constant 40 50 60 70 80 90 Tdb (OF) Figure 4. Comparison of measured and initial model predicted heating and cooling energy consumption.... 20 A M-Steam o S-Steam o M-CHW S-CHW La 9 \\ a g 10 --- ---------A r, 2 40 50 60 70 80 90 Tdb (OF) Figure 5. Comparison of measured and calibrated model predicted heating and cooling energy consumption 20 Measured chilled water...

  9. Social Network Users Share Electricity Consumption Habits to Reduce Energy Costs for Consumers and Utility Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    Social Network Users Share Electricity Consumption Habits to Reduce Energy Costs for Consumers approximately 74 percent of the nation's electricity consumption. During peaks in electricity demand, generators companies keep generators on, ready to respond to sudden upswings in electricity consumption

  10. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    electricity, oil and coal consumption, offset by increasedsaved in electricity, oil and gas consumption, offset by 2.4energy consumption by fuel type. Natural gas, oil and some

  11. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Brewery Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, E.; Galitsky, C.; Martin, N.

    2002-01-01

    Breweries in the United States spend annually over $200 Million on energy. Energy consumption is equal to 3-8% of the production costs of beer, making energy efficiency improvement an important way to reduce costs, especially in times of high energy...

  12. Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130...

  13. Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  14. Determinants of measured energy consumption in public housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greely, K.M.; Mills, E.; Goldman, C.A.; Ritschard, R.L. )

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the authors used a two-part methodology to analyze metered energy use patterns in 91 public housing projects. Their goal was to develop a technique that could be used by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and public housing authorities (PHAs) to derive reasonable energy use guidelines for different segments of the public housing stock. In the authors' approach, actual energy use was first normalized to consumption in a year with ''typical'' weather and then used in a multiple regression analysis of different cross-sectional variables. The regression model explained 80% of the variation in energy use, with the type of account and the management practices of PHAs emerging as important explanatory factors. As compared to previous engineering estimates of public housing consumption, the projects in this study used 8% (per square foot) to 16% (per apartment) less fuel and electricity, but consumption was still significantly higher (43%) than that of privately owned multifamily housing. They conclude that this methodology could be used to help HUD and PHAs increase their understanding of energy use patterns and appropriate consumption levels in public housing.

  15. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Glass Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Masanet, Eric; Graus, Wina

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. glass industry is comprised of four primary industry segments--flat glass, container glass, specialty glass, and fiberglass--which together consume $1.6 billion in energy annually. On average, energy costs in the U.S. glass industry account for around 14 percent of total glass production costs. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There is a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. glass industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. glass industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in glass manufacturing. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in glass production facilities and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. glass industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures--as well on as their applicability to different production practices--is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  16. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Table 12 Projected Primary Energy Savings between ReferenceEnergy (Primary Energy) .18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in

  17. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01

    in the Pulp and Paper Industry: An Energy Benchmarkingin the Pulp and Paper Industries. Integrated Pollutionin the Pulp and Paper Industry: An Energy Benchmarking

  18. Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    experience reviewing energy consumption data reported bybe noted that energy consumption data are not directlythe cement sector energy consumption data published by the

  19. Policy modeling for industrial energy use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    CO 2 Taxation in OECD . Energy Policy 29, no. 6 (2001): 489-Economic Activity. Energy Policy 6-7 28 pp.351-501 Worrell,and Paper Industry", Energy Policy, Vol. 25, Nos. 7-9, pp.

  20. Industrial energy efficiency policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2001-01-01

    Economic Indicators," Energy Policy 25(7'-9): 727-744. X u ,Best Practice Energy Policies in the Industrial Sector, Mayand Intensity Change," Energy Policy 22(3): Sinton, J.E.

  1. Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed...

  2. Setting the Standard for Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee; Williams, Robert; Perry, Wayne; Li, Tienan

    2008-01-01

    7 th European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy SummerVoluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, West

  3. Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs: Development and Trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.; Elliot, N.

    2010-01-01

    As more states establish Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS), goals for energy efficiency savings are increasing across the country. Increasingly, states are relying on their industrial energy efficiency programs to find and help implement...

  4. Energy Technical Assistance: Industrial Processes Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Energy Technical Assistance Division of Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) has implemented an energy conservation program to assist small industry in using energy more efficiently. This full time service, an outgrowth of the Texas A...

  5. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    Heat Recovery and Energy Saving in a Bakery. ” Project No.energy in the baking industry. (Heat recovery without food contamination in a bakery. )”energy-intensive process step was used in another process step. At bakeries,

  6. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01

    residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption ReferencesDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-

  7. Towards Energy Consumption Measurement in a Cloud Computing Wireless Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Torsten

    systems such as Long Term Evolution (LTE), Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiTowards Energy Consumption Measurement in a Cloud Computing Wireless Testbed Vitor Bernardo, Marilia Curado Center for Informatics and Systems University of Coimbra Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030

  8. Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions and Energy Consumption for Environmentally Adapted Metalworking of environmentally adapted lubricants have been proposed in response to the environmental and health impacts/or deliver minimum quantities of lubricant in gas rather than water, with the former strategy being more

  9. A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marique, Anne-Francoise Reiter, Sigrid

    2012-02-15

    Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by reducing distances to travel through a good mix between activities at the local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of transport used in only of little impact in the studied suburban neighborhoods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work can significant energy savings.

  10. Industry Leaders Saving Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide toIMPROVEMENT OFBarriers to Industrial EnergyTheJoshua DeLung

  11. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Chang, Sheng-chieh; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. pharmaceutical industry consumes almost $1 billion in energy annually. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, system, and organizational levels. A discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry is provided along with a description of the major process steps in the pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Expected savings in energy and energy-related costs are given for many energy efficiency measures, based on case study data from real-world applications in pharmaceutical and related facilities worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining the quality of products manufactured. At individual plants, further research on the economics of the measures?as well as their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess potential implementation of selected technologies.

  12. Building a State Industrial Energy Efficiency Network 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferland, K.

    2005-01-01

    Energy Efficiency Network? Kathey Ferland Project Manager Texas Industries of the Future University of Texas at Austin (512)232-4823 or kferland@mail.utexas.edu http://TexasIOF.ces.utexas.edu Texas Industries of the Future brings the tools... industrial energy users. The presentation will cover recent activities of the program, technology highlights from a conference on NOx reduction and energy efficiency, and upcoming events. ...

  13. Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

    2006-01-01

    Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy...

  14. Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC JumpBiossenceBrunswick,Calendar HomeGmbHFundsCampeauCanada's Fuel

  15. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    arts: student activities. Field test edition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition You are...

  16. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01

    49 3.3.3. Pre-installation electricity consumption of CSIE. Kahn (2011). Electricity Consumption and Durable Housing:on Electricity Consumption .

  17. Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

    1981-10-01

    The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 INDUSTRIAL ENERGY USE BASELINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    known as the Consumption of Purchased Fuels and Electricity (CPFE), which is generated from the Annual of consumption on the generation of emissions and the monitoring of changes in consumption levels has captured national and international public interest. In any analysis of total energy consumption, changes in energy

  19. Electrical Energy Monitoring in an Industrial Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorhofer, F. J.; Heffington, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE 1994 ESL-PA-94/04-04 REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION ELECTRICAL ENERGY MONITORING IN AN INDUSTRIAL PLANT Frank J. Dorhofer and Warren M. Heffington Energy Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering Texas A...&M University College Station, Texas ABSTRACT The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University is currently monitoring the electrical energy use of a metal fabrication facility in Houston, Texas. This paper deals with the installation of the data...

  20. Implementation and Rejection of Industrial Steam System Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therkelesen, Peter; McKane, Aimee

    2013-05-01

    Steam systems consume approximately one third of energy applied at U.S. industrial facilities. To reduce energy consumption, steam system energy assessments have been conducted on a wide range of industry types over the course of five years through the Energy Savings Assessment (ESA) program administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE). ESA energy assessments result in energy efficiency measure recommendations that are given potential energy and energy cost savings and potential implementation cost values. Saving and cost metrics that measure the impact recommended measures will have at facilities, described as percentages of facility baseline energy and energy cost, are developed from ESA data and used in analyses. Developed savings and cost metrics are examined along with implementation and rejection rates of recommended steam system energy efficiency measures. Based on analyses, implementation of steam system energy efficiency measures is driven primarily by cost metrics: payback period and measure implementation cost as a percentage of facility baseline energy cost (implementation cost percentage). Stated reasons for rejecting recommended measures are primarily based upon economic concerns. Additionally, implementation rates of measures are not only functions of savings and cost metrics, but time as well.

  1. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    increased use of biomass and energy efficiency improvements,Moreira, J. , 2006: Global biomass energy potential. Journal1971–2004 Notes 1) Biomass energy included 2) Industrial

  2. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, ``purchased`` energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census`s Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA`s Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as ``offsite-produced fuels.``

  3. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  4. Commercial Office Plug Load Energy Consumption Trends and the Role of Occupant Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Priya

    2015-01-01

    ULI-Documents/TheBullittCenter.pdf U.S. Energy InformationCommercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Retrievedcommercial/ U.S. Energy Information Administration. (2014).

  5. Energy conservation in electrostatic fabric filtration of industrial dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ariman, T.

    1981-12-01

    Conservation in energy consumption in industrial fabric filtration systems has become very important due to the substantial increase in energy costs. Recently, an external electric field was utilized in the industrial dust control by fabric filters with very promising initial results. A substantial decrease in the pressure drop and an increase in collection efficiency were observed. The detailed outcome of the experimental research program in electrostatic fabric filtration was presented. The results show that pressure drop decreases substantially with the increased electrostatic field strength for all relevant parameters. Furthermore, the data of the experimental program was utilized to develop a semi-empirical model for the determination of the pressure drop and to establish an Energy-Optimized Design Criteria.

  6. Developing a solar energy industry in Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AbdelMessih, Sherife (Sherife Mohsen)

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses Egypt's current energy infrastructure and its problems, the available solar energy resource, and the technologies required to harness this resource. After this assessment, an industry based on high ...

  7. Effective Transfer of Industrial Energy Conservation Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    Voluntary participation in industrial energy conservation programs resulted in savings of approximately 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day in the U.S. during 1981. These energy savings accrued largely from the ...

  8. Canadian Industrial Energy End-use Data and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Canadian Oil Refineries, 1990, 1994 to the current year Detailed reports on energy consumption, an initiative begun in October, 1991, is to expand and improve the existing knowledge on energy consumption data on energy consumption, on the characteristics of energy using equipment and buildings

  9. Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    w i t h global warming, Japan's energy consumption for spaceGlobal-warming Impactfrom Daily-life Activities and Home Energy Consumptionenergy consumption, the technologies for the prevention o f global

  10. Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    in pulp and paper industry are insight-based approaches limited to local sections of the mill as they lack of Water and Energy (SOWE) Adapting SOWE to pulp and paper industry Conclusions Master's Thesis MAZIARIndustrial Energy Systems Laboratory School of Mechanical Engineering Ressources naturelles Canada

  11. The Texas Industrial Energy Conservation Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldrop, T.

    1982-01-01

    Industry is Texas' largest consumer of energy (46+% of total). With foresight of the escalating cost of energy, it was apparent these additional costs to industry would have two adverse effects. First, the cost of their product to the consumer would...

  12. International Experience with Key Program Elements of Industrial Energy Efficiency or Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Target-Setting Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn; Galitsky, Christina; Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2008-01-01

    Global Reporting Initiative, Energy Consumption Protocol153 the Global Reporting Initiative’s Energy Consumption

  13. Fusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business not big science InternationalCompetitivenessissue - $26T/yr energy market with $300B/yr futureFusion Energy An Industry-Led Initiative September 10,1993 ATeam Effort TRW General Dynamics;Energy Supply and Needs Global per capita energy usage Global Per Capita energy usage will increase even

  14. Industrial Energy Management: Doing More with Less 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheppard, J.; Tisot, A.

    2006-01-01

    . In fact, recent advances in enterprise energy management (“EEM”) technology are helping businesses to control costs, optimize processes, and prevent downtime. Energy management systems use a combination of advanced metering hardware and software... the historical consumption data provided to predict energy usage for the month, allocate costs by department, and identify waste. A detailed understanding of the facility’s energy requirements over time can also help managers spot recurring trends, simulate...

  15. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power: Effective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power:...

  16. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developing country industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-01-01

    trend due to the constant energy price bias assumption. ThisIndian industries, Energy price bias (standard error)industries, 1980–1997 Energy price bias (standard error)

  17. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    temperature (and thus the best energy-efficiency) and lowBest practices/case studies - Indian Industries, Energy-Best practices/case studies - Indian Industries, Energy-

  18. Department Of Energy Offers $60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department Of Energy Offers 60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement in Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department Of Energy Offers 60 Million to Spur Industry Engagement in...

  19. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developing country industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-01-01

    Productivity trends in India's energy-intensive industries,estimates. However, in India, the energy trend is negativefor several energy-intensive industries in India and South

  20. Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    report their coal production and consumption to city-leveldata on both production and energy consumption. The coveredinto clinker production energy consumption and the others (

  1. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    is possible to save both water and energy. This process wasprocesses, resulting in water and energy savings. The waterinstallations. Savings in water and energy consumption can

  2. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Energy- efficient Motor Systems: A Handbook on Technology, Program, and Policy. New Energy and Industrial

  3. Policy modeling for industrial energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Park, Hi-Chun; Lee, Sang-Gon; Jung, Yonghun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ramesohl, Stephan; Boyd, Gale; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Nyboer, John; Jaccard, Mark; Nordqvist, Joakim; Boyd, Christopher; Klee, Howard; Anglani, Norma; Biermans, Gijs

    2003-03-01

    The international workshop on Policy Modeling for Industrial Energy Use was jointly organized by EETA (Professional Network for Engineering Economic Technology Analysis) and INEDIS (International Network for Energy Demand Analysis in the Industrial Sector). The workshop has helped to layout the needs and challenges to include policy more explicitly in energy-efficiency modeling. The current state-of-the-art models have a proven track record in forecasting future trends under conditions similar to those faced in the recent past. However, the future of energy policy in a climate-restrained world is likely to demand different and additional services to be provided by energy modelers. In this workshop some of the international models used to make energy consumption forecasts have been discussed as well as innovations to enable the modeling of policy scenarios. This was followed by the discussion of future challenges, new insights in the data needed to determine the inputs into energy model s, and methods to incorporate decision making and policy in the models. Based on the discussion the workshop participants came to the following conclusions and recommendations: Current energy models are already complex, and it is already difficult to collect the model inputs. Hence, new approaches should be transparent and not lead to extremely complex models that try to ''do everything''. The model structure will be determined by the questions that need to be answered. A good understanding of the decision making framework of policy makers and clear communication on the needs are essential to make any future energy modeling effort successful. There is a need to better understand the effects of policy on future energy use, emissions and the economy. To allow the inclusion of policy instruments in models, evaluation of programs and instruments is essential, and need to be included in the policy instrument design. Increased efforts are needed to better understand the effects of innovative (no n-monetary) policy instruments through evaluation and to develop approaches to model both conventional and innovative policies. The explicit modeling of barriers and decision making in the models seems a promising way to enable modeling of conventional and innovative policies. A modular modeling approach is essential to not only provide transparency, but also to use the available resources most effectively and efficiently. Many large models have been developed in the past, but have been abandoned after only brief periods of use. A development path based on modular building blocks needs the establishment of a flexible but uniform modeling framework. The leadership of international agencies and organizations is essential in the establishment of such a framework. A preference is given for ''softlinks'' between different modules and models, to increase transparency and reduce complexity. There is a strong need to improve the efficiency of data collection and interpretation efforts to produce reliable model inputs. The workshop participants support the need for the establishment of an (in-)formal exchanges of information, as well as modeling approaches. The development of an informal network of research institutes and universities to help build a common dataset and exchange ideas on specific areas is proposed. Starting with an exchange of students would be a relative low-cost way to start such collaboration. It would be essential to focus on specific topics. It is also essential to maintain means of regular exchange of ideas between researchers in the different focus points.

  4. Industrial Utility Webinar: Opportunities for Cost-Effective Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-13

    The Industrial Utility Webinars focus on providing utilities with information on how to develop sucessful energy efficeincy programs for industrial energy consumers.

  5. Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling Using Mechanism Design for the Future Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling Using Mechanism Design for the Future Smart Grid Pedram may need to collect various information about users and their energy consumption behavior, which can this problem, different programs have been proposed to shape the energy consumption pattern of the users

  6. StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    StressCloud: A Tool for Analysing Performance and Energy Consumption of Cloud Applications Feifei. It requires the evaluation of system performance and energy consumption under a wide variety of realistic and energy consumption analysis tool for cloud applications in real-world cloud environments. Stress

  7. Measuring the Client Performance and Energy Consumption in Mobile Cloud Gaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Measuring the Client Performance and Energy Consumption in Mobile Cloud Gaming Chun-Ying Huang1, Po-constrained devices may lead to inferior performance and high energy consumption. For example, the gaming frame rate and energy consumption of mobile clients is critical to the success of the new mobile cloud gaming ecosystem

  8. Bounding the Energy Consumption of Mobile Sensor Nodes For Triangulation-based Coverage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    1 Bounding the Energy Consumption of Mobile Sensor Nodes For Triangulation-based Coverage Asheq the energy consumption of the MTA interms of the distance and time taken to complete the full coverage of the field. The bounds on the minimum total and individual energy consumption per MSN is determined. A prior

  9. INFLUENCES OF RAKE RECEIVER/TURBO DECODER PARAMETERS ON ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    INFLUENCES OF RAKE RECEIVER/TURBO DECODER PARAMETERS ON ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND QUALITY Lodewijk T are selected and their influences on the energy consumption and quality are investigated by means power hardware is needed to save energy consumption. Furthermore, an adequate quality of the wireless

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL 1 Coverage and Energy Consumption Control in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL 1 Coverage and Energy Consumption Control in Mobile Abstract--In this paper 1 , we investigate the coverage and energy consumption control in mobile. Meanwhile, we can operate a tradeoff control between coverage performance and energy consumption

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Consumption Study Report Benny ChunYin Chan University of British Columbia EECE 492 April 6th the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report April 2012 0 2012 Elevator Drive Systems Energy Consumption Study Report Benny CY Chan UBC

  12. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  13. Modelling Business Energy Consumption using Agent-based Simulation Modelling Jason Wong and Kay Cao1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to develop a prototype agent based simulation model for business energy consumption, using data from the 2008 presents a framework of the model for estimating business energy consumption. Section V discusses the dataModelling Business Energy Consumption using Agent-based Simulation Modelling Jason Wong and Kay Cao

  14. Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-02-10

    The rapid development of the Chinese economy over the past two decades has led to significant growth in China's energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 1980 and 2000, China's energy consumption more than doubled from 602 million to 1.3 billion tons of coal-equivalent (NBS, 2003). In 2000, China's GHG emissions were about 12% of the global total, ranked second behind only the US. According to the latest national development plan issued by the Chinese government, China's energy demand is likely to double again by 2020 (DRC, 2004), based on a quadrupling of its gross domestic product (GDP). The objectives of the national development plan imply that China needs to significantly raise the energy efficiency of its economy, i.e., cutting the energy intensity of its economy by half. Such goals are extremely ambitious, but not infeasible. China has achieved such reductions in the past, and its current overall level of energy efficiency remains far behind those observed in other developed economies. However, challenges remain whether China can put together an appropriate policy framework and the institutions needed to improve the energy efficiency of its economy under a more market-based economy today. Shanghai, located at the heart of the Yangtze River Delta, is the most dynamic economic and financial center in the booming Chinese economy. With 1% of Chinese population (13 million inhabitants), its GDP in 2000 stood at 455 billion RMB yuan (5% of the national total), with an annual growth rate of 12%--much higher than the national average. It is a major destination for foreign as well as Chinese domestic investment. In 2003, Shanghai absorbed 10% of actual foreign investment in all China (''Economist'', January 17-23, 2004). Construction in Shanghai continues at a breakneck pace, with an annual addition of approximately 200 million square foot of residential property and 100 million square foot of commercial and industrial space over the last 5 years. It is one reason that China consumed over 60% of the world's cement production in 2003 (NBS 2004). Energy consumption in Shanghai has been growing at 6-8% annually, with the growth of electricity demand at over 10% per year. Shanghai, with very limited local energy resources, relies heavily on imported coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. While coal still constitutes over half of Shanghai's energy consumption, oil and natural gas use have been growing in importance. Shanghai is the major market for China's West to East (natural gas) Pipeline (WEP). With the input from WEP and off-shore pipelines, it is expected that natural gas consumption will grow from 250 million cubic meters in 2000 to 3000-3500 million cubic meters in 2005. In order to secure energy supply to power Shanghai's fast-growing economy, the Shanghai government has set three priorities in its energy strategy: (1) diversification of its energy structure, (2) improving its energy efficiency, and (3) developing renewable and other cleaner forms of energy. Efficiency improvements are likely to be most critical, particularly in the near future, in addressing Shanghai's energy security, especially the recent electricity shortage in Shanghai. Commercial buildings and industries consume the majority of Shanghai's, as well as China's, commercial energy. In the building sector, Shanghai has been very active implementing energy efficiency codes for commercial and residential buildings. Following a workshop on building codes implementation held at LBNL for senior Shanghai policy makers in 2001, the Shanghai government recently introduced an implementation guideline on residential building energy code compliance for the downtown area of Shanghai to commence in April, 2004, with other areas of the city to follow in 2005. A draft code for commercial buildings has been developed as well. In the industrial sector, the Shanghai government started an ambitious initiative in 2002 to induce private capital to invest in energy efficiency improvements via energy management/services companies (EMC/ESCOs). In partic

  15. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01

    Renewable Energy. Renewable Energy Policy Project ResearchIndustrial Policy and Renewable Energy Technology.Development of Renewable Energy. Energy Policy, 31, 799-812.

  16. Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Agricultural Savings Category Geothermal...

  17. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    design code for energy saving, energy consumption auditingEnergy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential,” ProceedingsCement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement

  18. Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Cement Industry in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Energy Consumption and Energy Saving Potential,” ProceedingsGomes, A. S. 1990. “Energy Saving and Environmental Impactdesign code for energy saving, energy consumption auditing

  19. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01

    specified in the ‘Energy Technology List’ during the yearenergy consumers in the chemical industry, and list examples of technology

  20. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. pulp and paper industry consumes over $7 billion worth of purchased fuels and electricity per year. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. pulp and paper industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This paper provides a brief overview of the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR(R) for Industry energy efficiency guidebook (a.k.a. the"Energy Guide") for pulp and paper manufacturers. The Energy Guide discusses a wide range of energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. Also provided is a discussion of the trends, structure, and energy consumption characteristics of the U.S. pulp and paper industry along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Many energy efficiency measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in pulp and paper mills and related industries worldwide. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. pulp and paper industry reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?as well as on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  1. Process modeling and industrial energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S O; Pilati, D A; Sparrow, F T

    1980-11-01

    How the process models developed at BNL are used to analyze industrial energy use is described and illustrated. Following a brief overview of the industry modeling program, the general methodology of process modeling is discussed. The discussion highlights the important concepts, contents, inputs, and outputs of a typical process model. A model of the US pulp and paper industry is then discussed as a specific application of process modeling methodology. Case study results from the pulp and paper model illustrate how process models can be used to analyze a variety of issues. Applications addressed with the case study results include projections of energy demand, conservation technology assessment, energy-related tax policies, and sensitivity analysis. A subsequent discussion of these results supports the conclusion that industry process models are versatile and powerful tools for energy end-use modeling and conservation analysis. Information on the current status of industry models at BNL is tabulated.

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Blinde, Paul; Neelis, Maarten; Blomen, Eliane; Masanet, Eric

    2010-10-21

    Energy is an important cost factor in the U.S iron and steel industry. Energy efficiency improvement is an important way to reduce these costs and to increase predictable earnings, especially in times of high energy price volatility. There are a variety of opportunities available at individual plants in the U.S. iron and steel industry to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner. This Energy Guide discusses energy efficiency practices and energy-efficient technologies that can be implemented at the component, process, facility, and organizational levels. A discussion of the structure, production trends, energy consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions of the iron and steel industry is provided along with a description of the major process technologies used within the industry. Next, a wide variety of energy efficiency measures are described. Many measure descriptions include expected savings in energy and energy-related costs, based on case study data from real-world applications in the steel and related industries worldwide. Typical measure payback periods and references to further information in the technical literature are also provided, when available. The information in this Energy Guide is intended to help energy and plant managers in the U.S. iron and steel industry reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective manner while maintaining the quality of products manufactured. Further research on the economics of all measures?and on their applicability to different production practices?is needed to assess their cost effectiveness at individual plants.

  3. Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Finalizes Regulations to Increase Energy Efficiency in New Federal Buildings by 30% Department of Energy Awards 2.2 Million to Save Energy in the Pulp and Paper Industry...

  4. The Role of Thermal Energy Storage in Industrial Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage for Industrial Applications is a major thrust of the Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with process or reject heat recovery systems has been shown to be extremely...

  5. Industrial energy-efficiency-improvement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Progress made by industry toward attaining the voluntary 1980 energy efficiency improvement targets is reported. The mandatory reporting population has been expanded from ten original industries to include ten additional non-targeted industries and all corporations using over one trillion Btu's annually in any manufacturing industry. The ten most energy intensive industries have been involved in the reporting program since the signing of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act and as industrial energy efficiency improvement overview, based primarily on information from these industries (chemicals and allied products; primary metal industry; petroleum and coal products; stone, clay, and glass products; paper and allied products; food and kindred products; fabricated metal products; transportation equipment; machinery, except electrical; and textile mill products), is presented. Reports from industries, now required to report, are included for rubber and miscellaneous plastics; electrical and electronic equipment; lumber and wood; and tobacco products. Additional data from voluntary submissions are included for American Gas Association; American Hotel and Motel Association; General Telephone and Electronics Corporation; and American Telephone and Telegraph Company. (MCW)

  6. Lean Analysis of Industrial Energy Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viera, R. J.; Lee, J.; McInerny, S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy Assessments Raul Viera, Jim Lee, Sally Ann McInerny, and Zahra Sardoueinasab Mechanical Engineering University of Louisiana at Lafayette IETC Conference June 2015 ESL-IE-15-06-19 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology... Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Research for a reason. LOUISIANA SMART AND SECURE ENERGY LABORATORY (LASSEL) Replacement to Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center (LIAC): • LIAC at UL Lafayette from1999-2012, Funded by the DOE • Last year...

  7. Energy Industry Days- Performance Contracting- Sacramento, CA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy is hosting several Energy Industry Day events to promote and publicize opportunities for small businesses seeking to meet DOE support requirements. Opportunities will be available for attendees to learn of potential partnerships with prime and subcontracting companies. These Energy Industry Day events would both support the agency's commitment to DOE's "Small Business First Policy" and would provide dedicated sessions that introduce Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) and other prime contract holders with small business.

  8. Global Inequality in Energy Consumption from 1980 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Yakovenko, Victor M

    2013-01-01

    We study the global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita around the world using data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for 1980-2010. We find that the Lorenz curves have moved up during this time period, and the Gini coefficient G has decreased from 0.66 in 1980 to 0.55 in 2010, indicating a decrease in inequality. The global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita in 2010 is close to the exponential distribution with G=0.5. We attribute this result to the globalization of the world economy, which mixes the world and brings it closer to the state of maximal entropy. We argue that global energy production is a limited resource that is partitioned among the world population. The most probable partition is the one that maximizes entropy, thus resulting in the exponential distribution function. A consequence of the latter is the law of 1/3: the top 1/3 of the world population consumes 2/3 of produced energy. We also find similar results for the global pro...

  9. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; Mc Donald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, T. . Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. )

    1989-01-01

    This is the second volume of a two volume report on energy efficient industrialized housing. Volume II contains support documentation for Volume I. The following items are included: individual trip reports; software bibliography; industry contacts in the US, Denmark, and Japan; Cost comparison of industrialized housing in the US and Denmark; draft of the final report on the systems analysis for Fleetwood Mobile Home Manufacturers. (SM)

  10. The Energy Dashboard: Improving the Visibility of Energy Consumption at a Campus-Wide Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    energy use. Our detailed observations identify the primary components of the baseline energy useThe Energy Dashboard: Improving the Visibility of Energy Consumption at a Campus-Wide Scale Yuvraj- tation and implementation of energy use policies, the Univer- sity of California at San Diego provides

  11. Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Michael

    ;Figure 32: Alternative Transportation Fuels T k l fTank volume for same energy as 55 liters of gasolineFigure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 2008 1E Roberts, Energy in US Source: www.eia.gov #12;Figure 2: US Liquid Demand by Sector and Fuel 2E Roberts, Energy in US Source: EIA: Annual Energy Outlook

  12. Industrial Energy Auditing: An Opportunity for Improving Energy Efficiency and Industrial Competitiveness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, C.

    1992-01-01

    AUDITING: AN OPPORTUNITY FOR IMPROVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND INDUSTRIAL COMPETITIVENESS CHARLES GLASER, PROGRAM MANAGER, IMPLEMENTATION AND DEPLOYMENT DIVISION OFFICE OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASHINGTON, D.C. ABSTRACT..., economically sou environmentally sustainable fut wareness at nal Energy g 1991, has ficiency 1 in building nd, and ure ( I} ? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE ) , Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), number of programs that are all goals...

  13. Industry Perspective | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Supports the deployment ofIndustry

  14. Thinking Globally: How ISO 50001 - Energy Management can make industrial energy efficiency standard practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    Tracking Industrial Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions: Aapplication of Energy Efficiency in Industry, Vienna,for Promoting Industrial Energy Efficiency in Developing

  15. International Data Base for the U.S. Renewable Energy Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-05-01

    The International Data Base for the US Renewable Energy Industry was developed to provide the US renewable energy industry with background data for identifying and analyzing promising foreign market opportunities for their products and services. Specifically, the data base provides the following information for 161 developed and developing countries: (1) General Country Data--consisting of general energy indicators; (2) Energy Demand Data--covering commercial primary energy consumption; (3) Energy Resource Data--identifying annual average insolation, wind power, and river flow data; (4) Power System Data--indicating a wide range of electrical parameters; and (5) Business Data--including currency and credit worthiness data.

  16. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01

    Energy Intensity by End-use Assumptions Urban enduse intensity SpaceEnergy Consumption by Fuel Table 3 End Use Saturations and Intensities Saturation, % Urban Space

  17. ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Klaas Jan

    2010-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies

  18. Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Cornbased Ethanol Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and waste water discharge. We consider the corn-based ethanol plant reported in Karuppiah et al. (2008 industrial operation and waste water is no longer discharged. Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Alternative fuels, including the treatment and recycling of waste water (Petrakis, 2008) as shown later in this paper. The task

  19. Secure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehab, Mohamed

    periods. The peak value of electricity consumption data is extremely important for electric companiesSecure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid Mohammad usage. The scheduling of the energy consumption is often formulated as a game- theoretic problem, where

  20. TRANSACTION ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 1 Minimizing Energy Consumption for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    % of commercial electrici- ty consumption; a large data center can consume as much electricity as a city. HighTRANSACTION ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS 1 Minimizing Energy Consumption for Frame. As the performance increases, the energy consumption in these systems also increases significantly. Dynamic Voltage

  1. Accounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    that computing consumes more than 3% of the global electricity consumption. (ii) We characterize the powerAccounting for the Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Devices Pavel.S.A vinod.namboodiri@wichita.edu ABSTRACT In light of the increased awareness of global energy consumption

  2. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    television sets. ” Austrian Energy Agency, June. Chen, H.F.of Options for Improving Energy Efficiency Test Proceduresfor Displays”, March. Energy Conservation Center, Japan (

  3. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    TV Specification Revision Update (ENERGY STAR 2007) uses atv_vcr/TV_update_doc ument_Final.pdf ENERGY STAR. 2010. “ENERGY STAR Qualified Televisions Specification Revision Update”,

  4. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency, energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Energy Efficiency energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles The Energy Efficiency Page reflects EIA's information on energy efficiency and...

  5. Solar Industry Scorches Records | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Records Solar Industry Scorches Records March 6, 2014 - 5:24pm Addthis Workers install a solar energy system on the rooftop of a home in Golden, Colorado. More than 4,751...

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Motor Gasoline Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The motor gasoline consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide forecasts of total U.S. consumption of motor gasolien based on estimates of vehicle miles traveled and average vehicle fuel economy.

  7. DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification DOE Announces First Companies to Receive Industrial Energy Efficiency Certification December 9,...

  8. EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX February 18, 2009 EIS-0412:...

  9. Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium Sep 04 2013 09:00 AM - 05:30 PM Energy Storage Solutions Industrial Symposium - Wednesday September 4, 2013 CONTACT : Email: Phone:...

  10. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power - A Decade of Progress, A Vision for the Future ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power - A Decade of...

  11. Government and Industry A Force for Collaboration at the Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government and Industry A Force for Collaboration at the Energy Roadmap Update Workshop Government and Industry A Force for Collaboration at the Energy Roadmap Update Workshop...

  12. Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment Fund Management Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guangdong Nuclear Power and New Energy Industrial Investment Fund...

  13. Practicing Energy, or Energy Consumption as Social Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipschutz, Ronnie

    2015-01-01

    practice”: people don’t “consume” energy directly or evenpeople do at home which consume energy, such as cooking or

  14. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

    2008-12-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

  15. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko . Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. )

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

  16. Energy Responsibility Accounting - An Energy Conservation Tool for Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    As energy costs continue to rise faster than the rate of inflation, industrial energy management becomes a more important issue in the control of manufacturing costs. Energy Responsibility Accounting (ERA) is a tool which improves management...

  17. Financing of Industrial Energy Efficiency Through State Energy Offices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; Weidenbaum, A.

    1994-01-01

    The New York State Energy Office Energy Investment Loan Program has a uniquely successful track record on financing industrial energy efficiency projects. The program is conducted in cooperation with 105 financial institutions in New York State...

  18. Energy efficient industrialized housing research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko . Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Maxwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. )

    1990-02-01

    This report summarizes three documents: Multiyear Research Plan, Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports, and Volume II Appendices. These documents describe tasks that were undertaken from November 1988 to December 1989, the first year of the project. Those tasks were: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. While this document summarizes information developed in each task area, it doesn't review task by task, as Volume I FY 1989 Task Reports does, but rather treats the subject of energy efficient industrialized housing as a whole to give the reader a more coherent view. 7 figs., 9 refs.

  19. Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

  20. Comprehensive Energy Efficiency in the Process Industries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, A.

    2015-01-01

    Efficiency in the Process Industries Alan Rossiter Rossiter & Associates alan@rossiters.org Beth Jones LyondellBasell (ret) ESL-IE-15-06-15a Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 The Main.... June 2-4, 2015 Keys to Improvement •Behavioral changes ? people and organizations ? no-cost savings •Process improvements ? typically capital projects ESL-IE-15-06-15a Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans...

  1. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  2. Overview of the Electrical Energy Segment of the Energy Information Administration/ Manufacturing Consumption Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockhead, S.

    1999-01-01

    , liquefied petroleum gas, coke and breeze, coal, and electricity, only the electricity segment is overviewed. Along with pure electrical energy consumption information, newly available data covers methods that manufacturers used to purchase and modify...

  3. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  4. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David G.

    2009-07-01

    Urbanization has re-shaped China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2007 China added 290 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 45%. This population adjustment spurred energy demand for construction of new buildings and infrastructure, as well as additional residential use as rural biomass was replaced with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average annual rate of 10% between 2000 and 2007. Urbanization's effect on energy demand was compounded by the boom in domestic infrastructure investment, and in the export trade following World Trade Organization (WTO) accession in 2001. Industry energy consumption was most directly affected by this acceleration. Whereas industry comprised 32% of 2007 U.S. energy use, it accounted for 75% of China's 2007 energy consumption. Five sub-sectors accounted for 78% of China's industry energy use in 2007: iron and steel, energy extraction and processing, chemicals, cement, and non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals alone accounted for 25% of industry and 18% of total primary energy use. The rapid growth of heavy industry has led China to become by far the world's largest producer of steel, cement, aluminum, and other energy-intensive commodities. However, the energy efficiency of heavy industrial production continues to lag world best practice levels. This study uses scenario analysis to quantify the impact of urbanization and trade on industrial and residential energy consumption from 2000 to 2025. The BAU scenario assumed 67% urbanization, frozen export amounts of heavy industrial products, and achievement of world best practices by 2025. The China Lightens Up (CLU) scenario assumed 55% urbanization, zero net exports of heavy industrial products, and more aggressive efficiency improvements by 2025. The five dominant industry sub-sectors were modeled in both scenarios using a LEAP energy end-use accounting model. The results of this study show that a CLU-style development path would avoid 430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More than 60% of these energy savings would come from reduced activity and production levels. In carbon terms, this would amount to more than a billion-tonne reduction of energy-related carbon emissions compared with the BAU scenario in 2025, though the absolute level of emissions rises in both scenarios. Aside from the energy and carbon savings related to CLU scenario development, this study showed impending saturation effects in commercial construction, urban appliance ownership, and fertilizer application. The implication of these findings is that urbanization will have a direct impact on future energy use and emissions - policies to guide urban growth can play a central role in China's efforts to mitigate emissions growth.

  5. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  6. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01

    in 3D mode is likely to consume more energy than in 2D modeTVs are expected to consume more energy relative to currentcompose 3D images. consume more energy in standby mode than

  7. Opportunity Analysis for Recovering Energy from Industrial Waste Heat and Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vish V.; Davies, Richard W.; Holbery, Jim D.

    2006-04-01

    United States industry consumed 32.5 Quads (34,300 PJ) of energy during 2003, which was 33.1% of total U.S. energy consumption (EIA 2003 Annual Energy Review). The U.S. industrial complex yields valuable goods and products. Through its manufacturing processes as well as its abundant energy consumption, it supports a multi-trillion dollar contribution to the gross domestic product and provides millions of jobs in the U.S. each year. Industry also yields waste products directly through its manufacturing processes and indirectly through its energy consumption. These waste products come in two forms, chemical and thermal. Both forms of waste have residual energy values that are not routinely recovered. Recovering and reusing these waste products may represent a significant opportunity to improve the energy efficiency of the U.S. industrial complex. This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program (DOE-ITP). It analyzes the opportunity to recover chemical emissions and thermal emissions from U.S. industry. It also analyzes the barriers and pathways to more effectively capitalize on these opportunities. A primary part of this analysis was to characterize the quantity and energy value of the emissions. For example, in 2001, the industrial sector emitted 19% of the U.S. greenhouse gases (GHG) through its industrial processes and emitted 11% of GHG through electricity purchased from off-site utilities. Therefore, industry (not including agriculture) was directly and indirectly responsible for emitting 30% of the U.S. GHG. These emissions were mainly comprised of carbon dioxide (CO2), but also contained a wide-variety of CH4 (methane), CO (carbon monoxide), H2 (hydrogen), NMVOC (non-methane volatile organic compound), and other chemicals. As part of this study, we conducted a survey of publicly available literature to determine the amount of energy embedded in the emissions and to identify technology opportunities to capture and reuse this energy. As shown in Table E-1, non-CO2 GHG emissions from U.S. industry were identified as having 2180 peta joules (PJ) or 2 Quads (quadrillion Btu) of residual chemical fuel value. Since landfills are not traditionally considered industrial organizations, the industry component of these emissions had a value of 1480 PJ or 1.4 Quads. This represents approximately 4.3% of the total energy used in the United States Industry.

  8. Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996Deutsche Bank AGTotal Delivered

  9. Analyzing the Trade-offs Between Minimizing Makespan and Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Heterogeneous Resource Allocation Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A. "Tony"

    Analyzing the Trade-offs Between Minimizing Makespan and Minimizing Energy Consumption@engr.colostate.edu, wcoliver@rams.colostate.edu, HJ@colostate.edu, aam@colostate.edu Abstract--The energy consumption of data their energy consumption while maintaining a high level of performance. Minimizing energy consumption while

  10. Analyzing the Impact of Useless Write-Backs on the Endurance and Energy Consumption of PCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youtao

    -effective and energy-efficient alternative to traditional DRAM main memory. Due to the high energy consumptionAnalyzing the Impact of Useless Write-Backs on the Endurance and Energy Consumption of PCM Main in considerable energy savings and endurance improvement. In this paper, we introduce the concept of useless write

  11. Biodiesel Supply and Consumption in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The historical biodiesel consumption data published in the Energy Information Administration's Monthly Energy Review March 2009 edition were revised to account for imports and exports. Table 10.4 of the Monthly Energy Review was expanded to display biodiesel imports, exports, stocks, stock change, and consumption. Similar revisions were made in the April 2009 edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO).

  12. Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    or "green" energy. This paper introduces a general, optimization-based framework for enabling multi-data-center services to manage their brown en- ergy consumption and leverage green energy, while respecting their SLAs. "green" or renewable energy.) We argue that placing caps on the brown energy consumption of data centers

  13. Fine-grained Energy Consumption Characterization and Modeling Catherine Mills Olschanowsky, Tajana Rosing, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    supercomputer. As with performance, energy-efficiency is not an attribute of a compute resource alone the performance and energy-efficiency of candidate resources. Predicting the energy consumption of an HPC resource of the applications in the workload affect the energy consumption of the resource. Our experiments confirm that data

  14. Modelling Office Energy Consumption: An Agent Based Approach , Peer-Olaf Siebers1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    1 Modelling Office Energy Consumption: An Agent Based Approach Tao Zhang1 , Peer-Olaf Siebers1 integrates four important elements, i.e. organisational energy management policies/regulations, energy, to simulate the energy consumption in office buildings. With the model, we test the effectiveness of different

  15. Experimental Analysis of Task-based Energy Consumption in Cloud Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    computing, green cloud, energy consumption, performance analysis, energy efficiency. 1. INTRODUCTION Cloud in green cloud computing systems [4]. Many efforts have been made to improve the energy efficiency of cloudExperimental Analysis of Task-based Energy Consumption in Cloud Computing Systems Feifei Chen, John

  16. Energy Efficiency Programs for Small and Medium Sized Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, A. M.; Elliott, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Abundant, low-cost energy efficiency opportunities exist in industries with a high representation of small and medium-sized manufacturers. Small industrial facilities with fewer than 250 employees consume 25% of all industrial energy. Designing...

  17. Financing the growth of energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang; Gilligan, Donald; Zhao, Yinghua

    2005-01-01

    capacity to use to finance an energy-saving project. Becausefinance for other reasons. Industrial customers typically expected a very short payback on energyfinance industrial and commercial projects. The resistance of commercial and industrial customers to implementing energy

  18. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01

    Cost Reduction in the Pulp and Paper Industry: An EnergyTechniques in the Pulp and Paper Industries. IntegratedCost Reduction in the Pulp and Paper Industry: An Energy

  19. Recirculation of Factory Heat and Air to Reduce Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiel, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    such as wet scrubbers and activated carbon collectors) are fairly well known. So are the cyclone and filter devices which are capable of collecting relatively large parti ESL-IE-83-04-32 Proceedings from the Fifth Industrial Energy Conservation.... To collect such submicron particulates in filter type air cleaners necessi tates selection of media having extremely small air passages. Substantial resistance to airflow, With consequent high static pressure drop across the collector, is therefore...

  20. Mechanical Engineering Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    's operation consists of two succeeding cycles, heat-pump and thermal- engine which represents the chargingSchool of Mechanical Engineering Industrial Energy Systems Laboratory Study of the Integration of District Heating and Cooling with an Electro-Thermal Energy Storage System Master Thesis ANURAG KUMAR