National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for industrial electric power

  1. Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nongqishi Electric Power Industrial Corporation Place: Kuitun City, Xinjiang Autonomous Region,...

  2. Carbon Constraints and the Electric Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-11-15

    The report is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the type of carbon constraints that are likely to be imposed, when they are likely to take effect, and how they will impact the electric power industry. The main objective of the report is to provide industry participants with the knowledge they need to plan for and react to a future in which carbon emissions are restricted. The main goal of the report is to ensure an understanding of the likely restrictions that will be placed on carbon emissions, the methods available for reducing their carbon emissions, and the impact that carbon reductions will have on the electric power industry. A secondary goal of the report is to provide information on key carbon programs and market participants to enable companies to begin participating in the international carbon marketplace. Topics covered in the report include: overview of what climate change and the Kyoto Protocol are; analysis of the impacts of climate change on the U.S. and domestic efforts to mandate carbon reductions; description of carbon reduction mechanisms and the types of carbon credits that can be created; evaluation of the benefits of carbon trading and the rules for participation under Kyoto; Description of the methods for reducing carbon emissions available to the U.S. electric power industry; analysis of the impact of carbon restrictions on the U.S. electric power industry in terms of both prices and revenues; evaluation of the impact of carbon restrictions on renewable energy; overview of the current state of the global carbon market including descriptions of the three major marketplaces; descriptions of the industry and government programs already underway to reduce carbon emissions in the U.S. electric power industry; and, profiles of the major international carbon exchanges and brokers.

  3. Challenges of Electric Power Industry Restructuring for Fuel Suppliers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry.

  4. Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Electric Power Industry Needs for Grid-Scale Storage Applications Stationary energy storage technologies will address the growing ...

  5. Challenges of electric power industry restructuring for fuel suppliers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide an assessment of the changes in other energy industries that could occur as the result of restructuring in the electric power industry. This report is prepared for a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric power industry, and the general public. 28 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  7. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" ...onal",289246,247510,254831,273445,260203 "Solar",508,612,864,891,1212 ...

  8. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  9. Service design in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, S.S.; Smith, S.A.; Wilson, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    This essay reviews the basic concepts of product differentiation as they apply to service design in the electric power industry. Unbundling the quality attributes of service conditions benefits utilities as well as their customers. Each customer gains from new opportunities to match the quality and cost of service conditions to the characteristics of their end uses. A well designed product line of service conditions benefits every customer. The utility benefits from improved operating efficiency and from greater flexibility in meeting service obligations and competitive pressures. In addition, the utility obtains better information for planning investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. Together these features provide a foundation for a utility's business strategy. The basic principles of product design are described and a unified methodology for specifying and pricing service conditions is outlined. We also describe how the pricing of quality attributes enables the utility to price other service options systematically, such as long-term supply contracts, cogeneration, and standby service. 60 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  11. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: Selected Issues, 1998

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    Provides an analytical assessment of the changes taking place in the electric power industry, including market structure, consumer choice, and ratesetting and transition costs. Also presents federal and state initiatives in promoting competition.

  12. Institutional contexts of market power in the electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foer, A.A.

    1999-05-01

    Market power is widely recognized as one of the principal issues that must be dealt with if the electricity industry is to make the transition from regulation to competition. In this article, the author provides a legal and economic introduction to what the antitrust community means by market power and offers a primer on why market power is so central an issue in the electricity industry. Finally and most importantly, he offers comments on the institutional contexts of market power, exploring a process which he calls Shermanization that helps explain the institutional aspect of moving from regulation to competition and holds implications for where oversight should reside during this complex transition.

  13. The changing structure of the electric power industry: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The U. S. electric power industry today is on the road to restructuring a road heretofore uncharted. While parallels can be drawn from similar journeys taken by the airline industry, the telecommunications industry, and, most recently, the natural gas industry, the electric power industry has its own unique set of critical issues that must be resolved along the way. The transition will be from a structure based on a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to one equipped to function successfully in a competitive market. The long-standing traditional structure of the electric power industry is the result of a complex web of events that have been unfolding for over 100 years. Some of these events had far-reaching and widely publicized effects. Other major events took the form of legislation. Still other events had effects that are less obvious in comparison (e.g., the appearance of technologies such as transformers and steam and gas turbines, the invention of home appliances, the man-made fission of uranium), and it is likely that their significance in the history of the industry has been obscured by the passage of time. Nevertheless, they, too, hold a place in the underpinnings of today`s electric industry structure. The purpose of this report, which is intended for both lay and technical readers, is twofold. First, it is a basic reference document that provides a comprehensive delineation of the electric power industry and its traditional structure, which has been based upon its monopoly status. Second, it describes the industry`s transition to a competitive environment by providing a descriptive analysis of the factors that have contributed to the interest in a competitive market, proposed legislative and regulatory actions, and the steps being taken by the various components of the industry to meet the challenges of adapting to and prevailing in a competitive environment.

  14. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  15. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  16. Vermont Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 108 101 101 100 100 Coal - - - - - Petroleum 108 101 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  17. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 34,740 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 6,150

  18. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1 Other Biomass 2 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 143,598 100.0 Total Renewable

  19. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,251 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  20. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 31 0.2 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 55,127 100.0

  1. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  2. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Industry","All Sources",1,1,12,12 2015,"AR","Total Electric Power Industry","Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic",1,1,12,12 2015,"AZ","Total Electric Power ...

  3. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,743 1,754 1,754 1,754 1,754 Coal - - - - - ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  4. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,411 2,371 2,235 2,226 2,262 Coal 528 528 528 528 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  5. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 667 667 828 834 834 Coal 17 17 17 17 17 Petroleum 5 5 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  6. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 5,498 5,361 5,466 5,582 5,845 Coal 551 551 553 564 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  7. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,770 2,751 2,761 2,738 2,738 Coal 85 85 85 85 85 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  8. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 3,349 3,686 3,653 3,626 3,577 Coal 585 585 585 585 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  9. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,208 2,209 2,208 2,223 2,196 Coal 180 180 180 180 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  10. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 761,603 763,994 770,221 774,279 782,176 Coal 312,956 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  11. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,485 1,561 1,593 1,591 1,618 Coal 105 105 112 111 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  12. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 1,374 1,364 1,449 1,448 1,401 Coal 492 492 497 497 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  13. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 39,351 39,961 39,950 41,443 42,654 Coal 389 389 367 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  14. Electric power industry in Korea: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hoesung

    1994-12-31

    Electrical power is an indispensable tool in the industrialization of a developing country. An efficient, reliable source of electricity is a key factor in the establishment of a wide range of industries, and the supply of energy must keep pace with the increasing demand which economic growth creates in order for that growth to be sustained. As one of the most successful of all developing countries, Korea has registered impressive economic growth over the last decade, and it could be said that the rapid growth of the Korean economy would not have been possible without corresponding growth in the supply of electric power. Power producers in Korea, and elsewhere in Asia, are to be commended for successfully meeting the challenge of providing the necessary power to spur what some call an economic miracle. The future continues to hold great potential for participants in the electrical power industry, but a number of important challenges must be met in order for that potential to be fully realized. Demand for electricity continues to grow at a staggering rate, while concerns over the environmental impact of power generating facilities must not be ignored. As it becomes increasingly difficult to finance the rapid, and increasingly larger-scale expansion of the power industry through internal sources, the government must find resources to meet the growing demand at least cost. This will lead to important opportunities for the private sector. It is important, therefore, for those interested in participating in the power production industry and taking advantage of the newly emerging opportunities that lie in the Korean market, and elsewhere in Asia, to discuss the relevant issues and become informed of the specific conditions of each market.

  15. Tennessee Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 13,051 12,974 12,999 12,982 13,517 Coal 8,841 8,816 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  16. Minnesota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 9,714 9,550 10,548 10,752 10,519 Coal 5,444 5,207 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  17. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 15,125 14,707 14,454 14,340 14,205 Coal 2,548 2,542 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  18. Michigan Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 23,693 23,826 23,805 23,691 23,205 Coal 11,860 11,910 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  19. Washington Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 4,436 4,343 5,130 5,145 5,183 Coal 1,405 1,405 1,376 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  20. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 18,301 18,083 18,364 18,532 18,350 Coal 5,372 5,364 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  1. Colorado Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 9,644 9,979 10,229 10,545 11,204 Coal 4,939 4,961 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  2. New Mexico Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 6,520 6,620 7,366 7,308 7,312 Coal 3,957 3,957 3,957 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  3. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 4,222 4,212 4,212 4,243 4,247 Coal 4,127 4,119 4,119 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  4. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 19,673 20,247 20,305 20,230 20,081 Coal 13,113 13,068 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  5. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 9,496 10,391 10,340 10,467 10,263 Coal 6,097 6,967 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  6. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 28,071 27,582 26,726 27,022 26,653 Coal 4,014 3,570 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  7. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 9,592 9,709 10,017 10,355 10,302 Coal 5,203 5,208 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  8. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 19,177 19,088 19,016 19,268 19,560 Coal 14,386 14,374 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  9. Louisiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 23,904 23,379 23,207 23,087 23,906 Coal 3,453 3,482 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  10. Missouri Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 18,197 18,099 18,126 18,101 18,861 Coal 11,299 11,259 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  11. Texas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 92,088 91,494 91,450 87,547 92,136 Coal 19,843 19,817 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  12. Arkansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 10,965 11,807 11,756 11,753 12,451 Coal 3,846 3,846 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  13. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 12,100 12,682 13,281 13,189 13,207 Coal 6,088 6,641 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  14. Florida Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 48,044 50,280 50,166 53,733 53,791 Coal 10,333 10,297 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  15. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 32,893 32,751 32,654 32,663 32,530 Coal 18,771 18,581 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  16. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 3,367 3,350 3,344 3,355 3,379 Coal 1,083 1,083 1,083 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  17. Maryland Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 10,071 10,028 10,125 10,050 10,012 Coal 4,958 4,958 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  18. Georgia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 28,238 28,096 28,078 28,103 28,087 Coal 13,438 13,275 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  19. Nebraska Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 5,478 5,423 5,459 6,123 6,169 Coal 3,204 3,204 3,204 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  20. West Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 16,113 15,769 15,756 15,766 15,779 Coal 14,745 14,715 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  1. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 21,804 21,784 22,372 22,540 23,519 Coal 11,557 11,544 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  2. Massachusetts Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 11,050 10,670 10,621 10,770 10,763 Coal 1,743 1,744 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  3. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 2,671 2,671 2,682 2,701 2,782 Coal 2,460 2,458 2,442 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  4. Indiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 26,899 26,922 26,850 26,808 26,186 Coal 19,718 19,759 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  5. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 31,582 31,418 31,154 31,189 30,705 Coal 22,264 22,074 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  6. Utah Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 6,398 6,830 6,819 6,897 6,969 Coal 4,891 4,871 4,871 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  7. Illinois Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 30,626 30,435 30,662 30,795 30,554 Coal 15,731 15,582 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  8. Wisconsin Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 14,000 13,926 15,015 14,928 14,964 Coal 7,063 6,945 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  9. Nevada Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 8,412 8,638 9,942 9,950 9,914 Coal 2,657 2,689 2,916 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  10. Arizona Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 18,784 18,756 18,942 19,351 19,338 Coal 5,830 5,818 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  11. Virginia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 14,968 15,080 15,543 15,740 15,880 Coal 5,774 5,794 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  12. New Jersey Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 14,363 13,741 13,771 13,759 13,676 Coal 2,124 2,054 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  13. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 6,105 6,065 6,150 6,147 6,253 Coal 5,847 5,847 5,932 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  14. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",32417,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3855,11.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3272,10.1 "

  15. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",39357,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",6033,15.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",4314,11 "

  16. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27674,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2499,9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1956,7.1 "

  17. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",6188,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1941,31.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",508,8.2 "

  18. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",33071,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",231,0.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",101,0.3 "

  19. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21022,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2412,11.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",858,4.1 " Solar","-","-"

  20. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14261,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10684,74.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",8425,59.1 "

  1. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",45575,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1984,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",747,1.6 "

  2. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  3. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",23982,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1623,6.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1340,5.6 "

  4. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3623,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2223,61.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1594,44 "

  5. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry: 1970-1991

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive overview of the ownership of the U.S. electric power industry over the past two decades, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  6. Informatics requirements for a restructured competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickle, S.; Marnay, C.; Olken, F.

    1996-08-01

    The electric power industry in the United States is undergoing a slow but nonetheless dramatic transformation. It is a transformation driven by technology, economics, and politics; one that will move the industry from its traditional mode of centralized system operations and regulated rates guaranteeing long-run cost recovery, to decentralized investment and operational decisionmaking and to customer access to true spot market prices. This transformation will revolutionize the technical, procedural, and informational requirements of the industry. A major milestone in this process occurred on December 20, 1995, when the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) approved its long-awaited electric utility industry restructuring decision. The decision directed the three major California investor-owned utilities to reorganize themselves by the beginning of 1998 into a supply pool, at the same time selling up to a half of their thermal generating plants. Generation will be bid into this pool and will be dispatched by an independent system operator. The dispatch could potentially involve bidders not only from California but from throughout western North America and include every conceivable generating technology and scale of operation. At the same time, large customers and aggregated customer groups will be able to contract independently for their supply and the utilities will be required to offer a real-time pricing tariff based on the pool price to all their customers, including residential. In related proceedings concerning competitive wholesale power markets, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has recognized that real-time information flows between buyers and sellers are essential to efficient equitable market operation. The purpose of this meeting was to hold discussions on the information technologies that will be needed in the new, deregulated electric power industry.

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, ...

  8. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FILES Electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data ... and demand-side management programs, green pricing and net metering programs, and ...

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Wind",2,2,2,2,2,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0.1,0.1 "Total electric industry",3086,3246,3357,3359,3389,3362,3351,3357,3374,3365,3428,3392,3390,2701,2414,2447,...

  10. Performance Issues for a Changing Electric Power Industry

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the factors affecting reliability within the electric bulk power system. Historical and projected data related to reliability issues are discussed on a national and regional basis. Current research on economic considerations associated with reliability levels is also reviewed.

  11. Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

  12. Distributed generation technology in a newly competitive electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeifenberger, J.P.; Ammann, P.R.; Taylor, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    The electric utility industry is in the midst of enormous changes in market structure. While the generation sector faces increasing competition, the utilities` transmission and distribution function is undergoing a transition to more unbundled services and prices. This article discusses the extent to which these changes will affect the relative advantage of distributed generation technology. Although the ultimate market potential for distributed generation may be significant, the authors find that the market will be very heterogeneous with many small and only a few medium-sized market segments narrowly defined by operating requirements. The largest market segment is likely to develop for distributed generation technology with operational and economical characteristics suitable for peak-shaving. Unbundling of utility costs and prices will make base- and intermediate-load equipment, such as fuel cells, significantly less attractive in main market segments unless capital costs fall significantly below $1,000/kW.

  13. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to commercial and industrial electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment and measures in eligible facilities. Incentives are...

  14. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 1999: Mergers and Other Corporate Combinations, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    Presents data about corporate combinations involving investor-owned utilities in the United States, discusses corporate objectives for entering into such combinations, and assesses their cumulative effects on the structure of the electric power industry.

  15. Changing Structure of the Electric Power Industry 2000: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive overview of the structure of the U.S. electric power industry over the past 10 years, with emphasis on the major changes that have occurred, their causes, and their effects.

  16. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  17. DOE National Power Grid recommendations: unreliable guides for the future organization of the bulk electric-power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.T. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The bulk electric power supply industry needs leadership to meet its problems effectively, economically, and with the least injury to the environment during the rest of the century. The industry's pluralistic character, which is one of its strengths, and the range of the federal antitrust laws have blunted industry response to the challenge of supplying adequate bulk power. DOE failed to recognize the leadership vacuum and to use the opportunity provided by its Final Report on the National Power Grid Study to adopt a more effective role. DOE can still recover and urge Congress to pass the necessary enabling legislation to establish a regional bulk power supply corporation that would generate and transmit electric power for sale to federally chartered, privately owned electric utilities having no corporate links to their wholesale customers. 87 references.

  18. District of Columbia Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." ... Fossil 806 806 790 790 790 Coal - - - - - Petroleum 806 806 ... Natural Gas includes single-fired and dual-fired plants ...

  19. Efficiency, equity and the environment: Institutional challenges in the restructuring of the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeri, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    In the electric power industry, fundamental changes are underway in Europe, America, Australia, New Zealand and, more recently, in Asia. Rooted in increased deregulation and competition, these changes are likely to radically alter the structure of the industry. Liberalization of electric power markets in the United Kingdom is, for the most part, complete. The generation market in the United States began opening to competition following the 1987 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 set the stage for a much more dramatic change in the industry. The most far-reaching provision of the Act was its electricity title, which opened access to the electric transmission grid. With legal barriers now removed, the traditionally sheltered US electric utility market is becoming increasingly open to entry and competition. A number of important legislative, regulatory and governmental policy initiatives are underway in the Philippines that will have a profound effect on the electric power industry. In Thailand, the National Energy Planning Organization (NEPO) has undertaken a thorough investigation of industry restructuring. This paper summarizes recent international developments in the deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets in the U.K., U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. It focuses on the relevance of these experiences to development underway in the Philippines and Thailand, and presents alternative possible structures likely to emerge in these countries, drawing heavily on the authors' recent experiences in Thailand and the Philippines. The impact of these changes on the business environment for power generation and marketing will be discussed in detail, as will the opportunities these changes create for investment among private power producers.

  20. Hydrothermal industrialization electric-power systems development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The nature of hydrothermal resources, their associated temperatures, geographic locations, and developable capacity are described. The parties involved in development, required activities and phases of development, regulatory and permitting requirements, environmental considerations, and time required to complete development activities ae examined in detail. These activities are put in proper perspective by detailing development costs. A profile of the geothermal industry is presented by detailing the participants and their operating characteristics. The current development status of geothermal energy in the US is detailed. The work on market penetration is summarized briefly. Detailed development information is presented for 56 high temperature sites. (MHR)

  1. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  2. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  3. U.S. and Chinese experts perspectives on IGCC technology for Chinese electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, B.C.B.; Wang Yingshi

    1997-11-01

    Although China is a very large and populous nation, and has one of the longest known histories in the world, it has only lately begun to seek its place among modern industrial nations. This move, precipitated by the government`s relatively recently adopted strategic goals of economic development, societal reform and promotion of engagement with other industrial nations, has brought to the fore the serious situation in which the Chinese electric power industry finds itself. Owing to the advanced average age of generation facilities and the technology used in them, serious expansion and modernization of this industry needs to take place, and soon, if it is to support the rapid industrial development already taking place in China. While China does have some oil and gas, coal constitutes its largest indigenous energy supply, by far. Coal has been mined and utilized for years in China. It is used directly to provide heat for homes, businesses and in industrial applications, and used to raise steam for the generation of electricity. The presently dominant coal utilization methods are characterized by low or marginal efficiencies and an almost universal lack of pollution control equipment. Because there is so much of it, coal is destined to be China`s predominant source of thermal energy for decades to come. Realizing these things--the rapidly increasing demand for more electric power than China presently can produce, the need to raise coal utilization efficiencies, and the corresponding need to preserve the environment--the Chinese government moved to commission several official working organizations to tackle these problems.

  4. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-21

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

  5. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  6. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  7. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  8. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  9. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" "Total electric industry", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Ultra-Efficient and Power Dense Electric Motors for U. S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Schiferl, Richard F.; Umans, Stephen D.

    2013-03-12

    The primary purpose of this project was to combine the ease-of-installation and ease-of-use attributes of industrial induction motors with the low-loss and small size and weight advantages of PM motors to create an ultra-efficient, high power density industrial motor that can be started across-the-line or operated from a standard, Volts/Hertz drive without the need for a rotor position feedback device. PM motor products that are currently available are largely variable speed motors that require a special adjustable speed drive with rotor position feedback. The reduced size and weight helps to offset the magnet cost in order make these motors commercially viable. The scope of this project covers horsepower ratings from 20 ? 500. Prototypes were built and tested at ratings ranging from 30 to 250 HP. Since fans, pumps and compressors make up a large portion of industrial motor applications, the motor characteristics are tailored to those applications. Also, since there is extensive use of adjustable frequency inverters in these applications, there is the opportunity to design for an optimal pole number and operate at other than 60 Hz frequency when inverters are utilized. Designs with four and eight pole configurations were prototyped as part of this work. Four pole motors are the most commonly used configuration in induction motors today. The results of the prototype design, fabrication, and testing were quite successful. The 50 HP rating met all of the design goals including efficiency and power density. Tested values of motor losses at 50 HP were 30% lower than energy efficient induction motors and the motor weight is 35% lower than the energy efficient induction motor of the same rating. Further, when tested at the 30 HP rating that is normally built in this 286T frame size, the efficiency far exceeds the project design goals with 30 HP efficiency levels indicating a 55% reduction in loss compared to energy efficient motors with a motor weight that is a few

  16. An overview of market power issues in today`s electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, L.A.

    1998-07-01

    With the tendency for vertical disintegration of control and/or ownership of assets within the industry, however, properly defining the relevant product in horizontal competition at each stage of production, transmission, distribution, and marketing assumes increasing importance. There is every reason to expect that market power issues and antitrust concerns will arise in each of the five dimensions outlined above. In each case, the author believes the framework will continue to be properly measuring market shares and concentration for carefully defined product and geographic markets as a basis for making informed judgments about market power concerns. The modeling of industry demand, supply, and competitive interactions certainly helps to inform this process by testing the proper scopes of product and geographic markets and of the economic significance of productive assets in the market defined. Modeling should also help the screening process where the issue is possible market power in markets being restructured for retail competition.

  17. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  18. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  19. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  20. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    FILES ‹ FORM EIA-861 DETAILED DATA Revisions \ Corrections for electric power sales, revenue, and energy efficiency Form EIA-861 detailed data files Annual 2013 data revisions: August 2, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: August 2, 2016 Column headers corrected for the Potential and Actual Peak Demand Savings. Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the

  1. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  2. A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klara, J.M.; Weinstein, R.E.; Wherley, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

  3. Electric power emergency handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labadie, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Emergency Electric Power Administration's Emergency Operations Handbook is designed to provide guidance to the EEPA organization. It defines responsibilities and describes actions performed by the government and electric utilities in planning for, and in operations during, national emergencies. The EEPA Handbook is reissued periodically to describe organizational changes, to assign new duties and responsibilities, and to clarify the responsibilities of the government to direct and coordinate the operations of the electric utility industry under emergencies declared by the President. This Handbook is consistent with the assumptions, policies, and procedures contained in the National Plan for Emergency Preparedness. Claimancy and restoration, communications and warning, and effects of nuclear weapons are subjects covered in the appendices.

  4. Solar-electric power: The U.S. photovoltaic industry roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-01-01

    To meet this challenge, we — the U.S.-based PV industry — have developed this roadmap as a guide for building our domestic industry, ensuring U.S. technology ownership, and implementing a sound commercialization strategy that will yield significant benefits at minimal cost. Putting the roadmap into action will call for reasonable and consistent co-investment by our industry and government in research and technology development.

  5. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price Correction/Update Annual data revisions: January 13, 2016 The re-release of the form EIA-861 survey data: January 13, 2016 Revenue data values were revised due to enhancements to the SEDAPs imputation system. Contact: Electricity data experts

  6. Prospects for the medium- and long-term development of China`s electric power industry and analysis of the potential market for superconductivity technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-05-01

    First of all, overall economic growth objectives in China are concisely and succinctly specified in this report. Secondly, this report presents a forecast of energy supply and demand for China`s economic growth for 2000--2050. In comparison with the capability of energy construction in China in the future, a gap between supply and demand is one of the important factors hindering the sustainable development of Chain`s economy. The electric power industry is one of China`s most important industries. To adopt energy efficiency through high technology and utilizing energy adequately is an important technological policy for the development of China`s electric power industry in the future. After briefly describing the achievements of China`s electric power industry, this report defines the target areas and policies for the development of hydroelectricity and nuclear electricity in the 2000s in China, presents the strategic position of China`s electric power industry as well as objectives and relevant plans of development for 2000--2050. This report finds that with the discovery of superconducting electricity, the discovery of new high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials, and progress in materials techniques, the 21st century will be an era of superconductivity. Applications of superconductivity in the energy field, such as superconducting storage, superconducting transmission, superconducting transformers, superconducting motors, its application in Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD), as well as in nuclear fusion, has unique advantages. Its market prospects are quite promising. 12 figs.

  7. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  8. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly Data for January 2016 | Release Date: March 25, 2016 | Next ... Revisions made to the March 2016 Electric Power Monthly: March 30, 2016 Tables 2.8.A-B ...

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  11. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  12. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  13. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  14. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  15. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  16. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  17. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  18. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  19. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  1. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  2. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  3. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  4. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  5. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  6. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  7. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  8. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  9. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric

  10. Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2002-02-27

    During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

  11. CASL - Electric Power Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Research Institute Palo Alto, CA EPRI is a collaborative nonprofit organization that conducts research and development relating to generation, delivery, and use of electricity for the benefit of the public. Our members include operators of all U.S. nuclear power plants and a large fraction of the nuclear plants worldwide. Key Contributions Leading the CASL Industry Council Technology and expertise on fuel performacne modeling User requirements for virtual reactor simulation

  12. Electric Power Research Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Technical Notes This appendix describes how the U.S. Energy Information Administration collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the Electric Power Annual. Data Quality and Submission The Electric Power Annual (EPA) is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics (ERUS), U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ERUS performs routine reviews of the data collection respondent frames, survey forms, and reviews

  13. EIA Electric Power Forms

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms

  14. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23050,23419,23615,23642,23642,23285,23144,23182,23218,23252,23346,22943,23429,22532,22366,21461,21292,20840,20692,20463,19878,19972,19972,19902,19354,95,72.9,72.1

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11526,11559,13131,11464,11488,11456,11459,11467,10669,10434,9769,9774,9551,9615,9330,9279,9619,9688,9639,9639,9168,9033,9000,8996,8944,96,71.9,78.1

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",2313,2205,1946,1891,1889,1868,1847,1820,1736,1769,1722,1752,1740,1770,1775,1725,1702,1763,1739,1737,1740,1715,1679,1551,1547,84,91.4,93.9

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",21311,20668,20277,20168,20115,20127,19717,19551,19566,18860,16854,15542,15516,15284,15140,15091,15084,15164,15147,15222,15067,14990,14970,14911,14906,98.9,76.2,75.4

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28201,28165,30294,29011,28685,28021,26467,26334,26346,25248,23739,23171,24390,24347,24321,24324,30665,43711,43936,43303,42329,43140,42673,42780,42822,46.5,42.6,37.8

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10204,10238,10475,10580,9114,8454,8142,8008,8034,7955,7954,7883,7596,7479,7271,7255,6938,6851,6795,6648,6675,6637,6629,6610,6533,86.6,66.2,68.3

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",161,152,152,154,160,111,111,111,37,25,174,210,78,185,2204,2454,5617,6295,6321,6723,6579,6600,6600,6764,7079,34.2,1.9,1.8

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",51775,50967,51373,51298,50853,50781,47222,47224,45184,45196,42619,41996,40267,38238,37265,36537,36472,39460,36899,35857,34769,33663,33403,32204,32103,89.7,86,87.1

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",28873,28875,29293,27146,26639,26558,26462,26432,26542,26538,25404,24804,25821,24099,24861,23331,23392,23148,22791,22299,21698,21163,21160,20752,20731,89.6,72.7,75.5

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1732,1821,1821,1821,1828,1859,1730,1730,1730,1705,1691,1624,1622,1622,1627,1609,1617,1597,1611,1603,1603,1603,1602,1522,1488,68.1,72.1,64.8

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3413,3394,3394,3035,3035,3029,2686,2547,2558,2558,2394,2439,2674,2521,2585,2571,2576,2576,2553,2559,2500,2300,2308,2282,2282,85.7,76.1,69

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5263,5269,5274,5280,4789,4819,4680,4630,4731,3976,4233,3007,4151,4420,17497,16817,30367,33550,33169,33143,32951,32770,33644,32644,32597,48.1,10.9,11.8

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",23319,23309,23031,22763,23008,23631,23598,22012,22021,22017,21261,21016,20392,20616,20554,20358,20337,20201,20681,20712,20632,20901,20901,20702,20588,85.9,83.2,84.8

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",12655,12092,12179,11863,11282,11479,11274,10669,9562,10090,9895,9039,8457,8402,8511,8438,8370,8217,8161,8237,8219,8069,8074,8093,7702,93.5,77.3,76.7

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11468,11485,11593,11746,11732,11733,11246,10944,10829,10734,10705,10729,10244,10223,10089,10023,9918,9789,9697,9678,9525,9525,9518,9507,9475,99.5,93.5,80.6

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",19473,19599,19681,19601,18945,18763,16759,16819,16878,16234,15860,15349,15419,15229,14781,14708,13995,15660,15686,15425,15397,15297,15297,15333,15511,88,92.6,93.3

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",18120,17297,16661,15991,16471,15615,15755,14756,15176,15137,14249,12728,14233,14165,14317,16339,17014,17080,17150,17019,16433,16221,16221,15883,15839,67.8,61.6,68

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10,14,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,19,16,17,21,63,1457,1502,2388,2433,2253,2222,2222,2379,2369,0.5,0.4,0.2

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",85,85,85,81,80,80,80,80,79,79,79,70,70,70,753,10955,10971,11105,10958,10958,10838,10709,10709,10723,9758,7.2,0.6,0.7

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",971,969,991,956,936,930,829,827,837,983,981,981,945,993,997,2216,3386,11295,9366,9289,9219,9461,9452,9770,9909,8.1,6.8,7.4

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22260,22148,22517,22401,21639,21759,21885,21894,22734,23029,23310,23345,23575,22833,22757,22378,21948,21916,21990,21986,22396,22395,22347,22258,22298,88.3,72.6,73.1

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11557,11901,11685,11650,11547,11639,11432,10719,10458,10543,10175,10129,10073,9885,9069,8988,9090,9217,9181,8925,8936,8853,8830,8854,8806,88.4,78.5,74

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20538,20562,20767,20831,20360,19600,19621,19570,19675,18970,18602,18587,18409,18221,17182,16757,16284,16215,15980,15727,15490,15429,15405,15311,15179,99.4,93.7,94.3

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3209,2568,2570,2483,2340,2232,2190,2179,2163,2186,2189,2274,2237,2235,2265,2257,4945,4943,4943,4943,4907,4871,4871,4829,4912,38.7,39.9,50.7

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7913,7911,7810,7834,7647,7675,7011,6959,7056,7007,6722,6667,6154,6112,6043,5963,5944,5894,5765,5663,5651,5645,5637,5584,5586,99.7,97.3,90.6

  20. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8480,7915,7807,8939,8713,8741,8741,6998,6771,5611,5389,5323,5384,5388,5434,5434,5642,5642,5643,5556,5478,5235,5235,5125,4944,80.9,76.3,80.9

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",1121,1121,1121,1134,1132,1118,1125,1121,1116,1121,1121,1121,1105,1128,2290,2294,2292,2715,2705,2698,2692,2692,2692,2793,2821,80.2,27.1,25.4

  2. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",6094,5912,6359,6321,6345,6344,6324,6324,6223,5692,5348,5398,5463,5250,5250,5299,5294,5183,5077,5078,4940,4967,4967,4950,4947,93.8,78,75.5

  3. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",10989,10736,10739,11022,11032,11871,11784,12056,12046,11927,11386,11902,11675,11572,15807,17679,29587,29987,30061,32149,31567,32323,30163,31177,31020,44.4,28,27.2

  4. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",26941,26706,27265,26158,25398,25376,25405,25345,24553,23822,23984,24036,23650,23478,22015,21182,21020,21054,20923,20597,19691,20041,20043,19990,20049,89.9,91.8,88.3

  5. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",5516,5292,5217,4908,4912,4852,4691,4668,4634,4622,4673,4561,4659,4677,4679,4676,4657,4733,4208,4485,4487,4476,4476,4497,4476,99.2,79.4,81.2

  6. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11134,20779,21072,20120,20179,20356,20340,20012,20147,19312,27713,27547,27304,27081,26301,27083,26768,26630,27279,27365,26347,26388,26388,26939,25365,92.3,61,35.3

  7. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",17045,16951,17148,16487,16015,16187,15913,14495,14648,13992,13460,13463,13387,12941,13438,12861,12622,12931,13092,12928,12546,12348,12348,12308,12284,94.6,76.2,70.9

  8. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11175,10973,10888,10892,10846,10683,10491,10502,9971,9839,9805,10298,10357,10354,10337,10293,10449,10537,10526,10445,10165,10132,10132,11235,11235,91.7,76.1,70.4

  9. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",39,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,455,4921,4921,4887,4887,13394,25251,33781,33825,34060,33699,32710,32509,32505,32423,32526,36.3,1,0.1

  10. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20836,21039,21280,22227,22082,22100,22062,21730,21019,20787,20406,19402,19103,18246,17717,17682,17627,17431,17165,16693,16152,16131,16118,16162,14909,94.8,92.1,91.3

  11. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",3450,3480,3428,3130,2994,3042,2911,2826,2889,2759,2618,2650,2752,2712,2710,2763,2791,2795,2822,2818,2831,2543,2543,2519,2517,100,82.6,87.4

  12. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",20490,20635,20635,20474,20761,20211,20249,19770,19768,19120,19044,19011,19137,18600,17893,17253,17546,18212,17253,16144,16334,16076,16076,16121,16848,92,96.9,97.6

  13. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",29113,28705,28463,27389,26533,25140,25005,24569,24991,24033,23587,22629,38903,38940,65384,65293,65209,64858,64768,64425,63351,63214,63213,61420,61261,79.8,24.5,25.8

  14. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",337,329,329,265,260,257,259,258,259,258,261,260,261,262,778,783,775,904,901,899,902,911,911,908,882,78.9,23,51.8

  15. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",22062,20601,20626,19999,19430,19131,18824,18372,18162,18087,17547,17045,15817,15761,15608,15312,15316,15293,14764,14300,13764,14055,14020,13652,13661,79.5,80.6,83.9

  16. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",27376,27070,27037,26375,26498,26322,26243,24511,24303,24046,23828,24166,24132,24191,23841,25190,25236,25274,24277,24278,24254,24243,24242,24243,24173,91.5,86.9,88.5

  17. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",11981,10625,10590,11740,11719,11698,11698,11711,11975,10890,10164,10164,10172,10188,14475,14505,14495,14491,14492,14495,14510,14448,14448,14435,14435,95.9,71,73.6

  18. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",14377,13358,13464,13408,13098,12998,12975,11767,12911,12877,12405,12523,12335,12246,12211,12086,11862,11866,11866,11536,11264,10909,10747,10504,10545,89.8,73.4,83.8

  19. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",7233,7279,7278,7333,6931,6713,6450,6142,6137,6241,6086,6088,6083,6050,6048,6012,6018,6045,5966,5971,5864,5842,5842,5817,5800,97.1,86.8,85.5

  20. Table 5. Electric power industry generation by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "megawatthours" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",523,597,168,754,1759,867,1080,1317,489,827,1121,1409,865,0,2781,1189273,3549008,3222785,7800149,2668381,9015544,8075919,8334852,9518506,9063595,0,0,0

  1. Table 4. Electric power industry capability by primary energy source, 1990 throu

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "megawatts" "Item", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Electric utilities",8,8,8,7,7,7,7,8,8,6,7,9,9,7,6,7,7,441,441,442,148,148,148,162,263,0.5,0.4,0.4 "Hydroelectric",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,1,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,1,1,1,0.2,0,0

  2. HTR-100 industrial nuclear power plant for generation of heat and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandes, S.; Kohl, W.

    1987-11-01

    Based on their proven high-temperature reactor (HTR) with pebble-bed core, Brown, Boveri and Cie/Hochtemperatur-Reaktorbau have developed an HTR-100 plant that combines favorable capital costs and high availability. Due to the high HTR-specific standards and passive safety features, this plant is especially well suited for siting near the end user. The safety concept permits further operation of the plant or decay heat removal via the operational heat sinks in the event of maloperation and design basis accidents having a higher probability of occurrence. In the event of hypothetical accidents, the decay heat is removed from the reactor pressure vessel by radiation, conduction, and convection to a concrete cooling system operating in natural convection. As an example of the new HTR-100 plant concept, a twin-block plant design for extraction of industrial steam is presented.

  3. United States Electricity Industry Primer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States Electricity Industry Primer provides a high-level overview of the U.S. electricity supply chain, including generation, transmission, and distribution; markets and ownership structures, including utilities and regulatory agencies; and system reliability and vulnerabilities.

  4. Electric Power Monthly

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Monthly > Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Electric Power Monthly Back Issues Monthly Excel files zipped 2010 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2009 January February March April May June July August September October November December 2008 January February March March Supplement April May June July August September October November December 2007 January February March April May June July August September October November

  5. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  6. Electric power 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-01

    Subjects covered include: power industry trends - near term fuel strategies - price/quality/delivery/opportunity; generating fleet optimization and plant optimization; power plant safety and security; coal power plants - upgrades and new capacity; IGCC, advanced combustion and CO{sub 2} capture technologies; gas turbine and combined cycle power plants; nuclear power; renewable power; plant operations and maintenance; power plant components - design and operation; environmental; regulatory issues, strategies and technologies; and advanced energy strategies and technologies. The presentations are in pdf format.

  7. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  8. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  9. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  10. Electric Power Annual 2014

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric industry sales to ultimate customers statistics by state State Sales to ultimate customers (million kWh) Revenue (thousand dollars) Customers Alabama 90,494 8,386,390 ...

  11. Electric Power Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Monthly Appendix C Technical notes This appendix describes how the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects, estimates, and reports electric power data in the EPM. Data quality The EPM is prepared by the Office of Electricity, Renewables & Uranium Statistics (ERUS), Energy Information Administration (EIA), U. S. Department of Energy. Quality statistics begin with the collection of the correct data. To assure this,

  12. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  13. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  14. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry Section 1101 of the U.S. Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT)1 calls for a report on the current trends in the workforce of (A) skilled technical personnel that support energy technology industries, and (B) electric power and transmission engineers. It also requests that the Secretary make recommendations (as appropriate) to meet the future labor requirements. Workforce Trends in the Electric Utility Industry

  15. Annual Power Electric

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric Power Annual Update Revision Data for 2014 updated: February 16, 2016 February ... Table 8.11.A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region Table 8.11.B. ...

  16. Electric Power Annual 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Annual 2014 February 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Electric Power Annual This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. U.S.

  17. Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial...

  18. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  19. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  20. Technology opportunities in a restructured electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehl, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the Strategic Research & Development (SR&D) program of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The intent of the program is to anticipate and shape the scientific and technological future of the electricity enterprise. SR&D serves those industry R&D needs that are more exploratory, precompetitive, and longer-term. To this end, SR&D seeks to anticipate technological change and, where possible, shape that change to the advantage of the electric utility enterprise and its customers. SR&D`s response to this challenge is research and development program that addresses the most probable future of the industry, but at the same time is robust against alternative futures. The EPRI SR&D program is organized into several vectors, each with a mission that relates directly to one or more EPRI industry goals, which are summarized in the paper. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Electric power annual 1995. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding U.S. electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy. In the private sector, the majority of the users of the Electric Power Annual are researchers and analysts and, ultimately, individuals with policy- and decisionmaking responsibilities in electric utility companies. Financial and investment institutions, economic development organizations interested in new power plant construction, special interest groups, lobbyists, electric power associations, and the news media will find data in the Electric Power Annual useful. In the public sector, users include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals with regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities for Federal, State, and local governments. The Congress and other legislative bodies may also be interested in general trends related to electricity at State and national levels. Much of the data in these reports can be used in analytic studies to evaluate new legislation. Public service commissions and other special government groups share an interest in State-level statistics. These groups can also compare the statistics for their States with those of other jurisdictions.

  2. NSTX Electrical Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Ilic; E. Baker; R. Hatcher; S. Ramakrishnan; et al

    1999-12-16

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been designed and installed in the existing facilities at Princeton Plasma Physic Laboratory (PPPL). Most of the hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, and power systems originally used for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used with suitable modifications to reflect NSTX needs. The design of the NSTX electrical power system was tailored to suit the available infrastructure and electrical equipment on site. Components were analyzed to verify their suitability for use in NSTX. The total number of circuits and the location of the NSTX device drove the major changes in the Power system hardware. The NSTX has eleven (11) circuits to be fed as compared to the basic three power loops for TFTR. This required changes in cabling to insure that each cable tray system has the positive and negative leg of cables in the same tray. Also additional power cabling had to be installed to the new location. The hardware had to b e modified to address the need for eleven power loops. Power converters had to be reconnected and controlled in anti-parallel mode for the Ohmic heating and two of the Poloidal Field circuits. The circuit for the Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) System had to be carefully developed to meet this special application. Additional Protection devices were designed and installed for the magnet coils and the CHI. The thrust was to making the changes in the most cost-effective manner without compromising technical requirements. This paper describes the changes and addition to the Electrical Power System components for the NSTX magnet systems.

  3. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  4. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  5. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  6. Electric power annual 1989. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication presents a summary of electric utility statistics at the national, regional and state levels. The Industry At A Glance'' section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance; a review of key statistics for the year; and projections for various aspects of the electric power industry through 2010. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; electricity sales, revenue and average revenue per kilowatthour sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; and electric power transactions. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. 24 figs., 57 tabs.

  7. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  8. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  9. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. The industrial role in the changing electric industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, B.

    1994-12-31

    Armco is a large customer on the West Penn Power, Ohio Power, and Ohio Edison systems. Two of the three utilities are considered low cost providers, one as a high cost provider. Even though all three utilities provide the same product in the same region of the country, the established regulatory system for setting rates has resulted in a price disparity between these suppliers that is economically unjustified. Deregulation and retail wheeling would correct this efficiency problem to the benefit of the ratepayers. Armco, along with many other energy intensive industrials, has a long history of involvement in traditional utility matters. Typically, this role has had two phases: First, at the local level, a partnership with the utility on the efficient transmission and distribution of energy into our facilities and involvement with the utility on the customer side of the meter with projects that affect power consumption and quality in the plant. The second phase is in the regulatory world. Typically, Armco is one of many adversaries jockeying for adoption of a particular revenue requirement and method of cost allocation in PUC hearings. At the state level, Armco has successfully appealed several PUC decisions that could adversely affect business. Armco management continues to support industrial positions at the federal level through trade associations such as ELCON. Armco`s role in the changing electric power industry is discussed.