Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

INTERMOUNTAIN INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energys Intermountain Industrial Assessment Center (IIAC) at the University of Utah has been providing eligible small- and medium-sized manufacturers with no-cost plant assessments since 2001, offering cost-effective recommendations for improvements in the areas of energy efficiency, pollution prevention, and productivity improvement.

MELINDA KRAHENBUHL

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

The University of Dayton (UD) performed energy assessments, trained students and supported USDOE objectives. In particular, the UD Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) performed 96 industrial energy assessment days for mid-sized manufacturers. The average identified and implemented savings on each assessment were $261,080 per year and $54,790 per year. The assessments served as direct training in industrial energy efficiency for 16 UD IAC students. The assessments also served as a mechanism for the UD IAC to understand manufacturing energy use and improve upon the science of manufacturing energy efficiency. Specific research results were published in 16 conference proceedings and journals, disseminated in 22 additional invited lectures, and shared with the industrial energy community through the UD IAC website.

J. Kelly Kissock; Becky Blust

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

3

INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since its establishment in 1990, San Diego State Universitys Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) has served close to 400 small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in Southern California. SDSU/IACs efforts to transfer state-of-the-art technologies to industry have increased revenues, cultivated creativity, improved efficiencies, and benefited the environment. A substantial benefit from the program has been the ongoing training of engineering faculty and students. During this funding cycle, SDSU/IAC has trained 31 students, 7 of the graduate. A total of 92 assessments and 108 assessment days were completed, resulting in 638 assessment recommendations.

ASFAW BEYENE

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

Dr. Diane Schaub

2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Assessment Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on Google Bookmark Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on Delicious Rank Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) on AddThis.com... Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) Learn More Learn how companies have benefited from IAC assessments. Search the IAC Database for recommendations and savings achieved.

6

Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency March...

7

UAIEE and Industrial Assessment Centers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UAIEE and IACs UAIEE and IACs Michael B Muller IAC Field Manager Rutgers University 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 Industrial Assessment Centers * Started in 1976 * Currently 26 Centers across the US * Almost 15,000 Assessments * Assessments in all 50 States * Over 111,000 Recommendations * Continues to Grow yearly by: * 400 assessments * 3,000 recommendations 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 IAC Assessments of Small and Medium Manufacturers 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 Industrial Assessment Centers * ABET Accredited Engineering Universities * Director must be a teaching faculty member

8

Industrial Assessment Center  

SciTech Connect

This project involved providing technical assistance to help small and medium size industries in Wisconsin to reduce operating costs by managing energy, waste and productivity. The project helped save 525 companies on average about $40,000 per year. Under the direction of Dr. Saxena, more than twenty undergraduate and ten graduate students were trained in energy, waste, and productivity management.

Umesh K. Saxena

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

9

University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents all activity of the University of Miami Industrial Assessment Center (MIIAC) grant awarded by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP). This grant was coordinated through a collaborative effort with the Center for Advanced Energy Systems (CAES) located at Rutgers University in New Jersey (www.caes.rutgers.edu) which acted as the programs Field Manager. The grants duration included fiscal years 2003-2006 (September 2002 August 2006), and operated under the direction of Dr. Shihab Asfour, Director (MIIAC). MIIACs main goal was to provide energy assessments for local manufacturing firms. Energy consumption, productivity enhancement, and waste management were the focus of each assessment. Energy savings, cost savings, implementation costs, and simple payback periods were quantified using scientific methodologies and techniques. Over the four-year period of the grant, the total number of industrial assessments conducted was 91, resulting in 604 assessment recommendations and the following savings: 73,519,747 kWh, 435,722 MMBTU, and $10,024,453 in cost savings. A total of 16 undergraduate and graduate students were trained on energy assessment. Companies in over 40 different zip codes were assessed.

Asfour, Shihab, S.

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

10

Industrial Assessment Centers Train Future Energy-Savvy Engineers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Assessment Centers Train Future Energy-Savvy Engineers Industrial Assessment Centers Train Future Energy-Savvy Engineers Industrial Assessment Centers Train Future Energy-Savvy Engineers April 12, 2013 - 11:06am Addthis Sandina Ponte, a member of the University of Missouri's Industrial Assessment Center, inspects equipment at a manufacturing facility during an energy audit. | Photo courtesy of University of Missouri IAC. Sandina Ponte, a member of the University of Missouri's Industrial Assessment Center, inspects equipment at a manufacturing facility during an energy audit. | Photo courtesy of University of Missouri IAC. Cassie Mills Communications Associate in the Advanced Manufacturing Office What does this project do? The Industrial Assessment Centers provide students with real-world experience performing energy audits for small- and medium-sized

11

Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story June 16, 2011 - 6:05pm Addthis Tony Simon Tony Simon Rob Penney Senior Energy Engineer, WSU Energy Program How does it work? Assessments are performed by one of 26 local teams of engineering faculty and students. Assessments include a site visit where students take engineering measurements as a basis for recommendations. The team performs a detailed analysis for specific recommendations with cost, performance and payback time estimates. Earlier this year, we told you about Matan Moram and Vitelio Silva, two alumni of their university's Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC), which are part of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's

12

Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency Industrial Assessment Centers Help Students, Communities Learn About Energy Efficiency March 9, 2011 - 10:42am Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Assessments are performed by one of 26 local teams of engineering faculty and students. Assessments include a site visit where students take engineering measurements as a basis for recommendations. The team performs a detailed analysis for specific recommendations with cost, performance and payback time estimates. The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is part of the Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. A program of the ITP, the

13

Advanced Manufacturing Office: Industrial Assessment Centers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacting the nearest IAC Center. Hire an IAC alumnus with real-world problem-solving skills. Locate additional incentives and resources. Small- and medium-sized manufacturers may...

14

Implementation of Industrial Assessment Center Energy and Waste Management Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Industrial Assessment Center at Texas A&M University is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and involves students in the analysis of nearby Texas manufacturers. Through these analyses, the Industrial Assessment Center determines means by which the industries may reduce their energy consumption and waste production to reduce production costs. The energy conservation and waste reduction projects are studied by the students and formally presented in a technical report detailing the associated costs and savings. The report is sent to the company which then is responsible for the implementation of the projects, including funding. Case studies of three successful assessments are provided, and were chosen due to management cooperation and the implementation of a diverse group of energy conservation and waste management recommendations.

King, J. D.; Eggebrecht, J. A.; Heffington, W. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center--Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Report for the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center for the period of 9/1/2002 through 11/30/2006, although we were still gathering data through 02/16/2007. During this period, our Industrial Assessment Center completed 109 energy assessments for manufacturing firms in our area, offered 3 Save Energy Workshops, taught 26 students (9 graduate and 17 undergraduate) energy management savings techniques and offered an Energy Management Graduate class three times. These 109 energy assessments made a total of 738 energy savings recommendations, 33 waste reduction recommendations, and 108 productivity improvement recommendations. These combined recommendations would save client companies more than $87,741,221.16, annually at the then current energy costs. If all of these recommendations were implemented separately, the implementation cost would have been $34,113,482.10 or a Simple Payback Period, SPP=4.7 months. Between 9 months and 12 months after the assessment, we surveyed the manufacturing firms to find out what they implemented. They had implemented approximately 50 percent of our recommendations at an annual saving of $25,867,613.18. The three Save Energy Workshops had an average attendance of twelve individuals. The three graduate Energy Management courses had an average attendance of eleven students.

Dr. Theodore A. Kozman

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project benefited the public by assisting manufacturing plants in the United States to save costly energy resources and become more profitable. Energy equivalent to over 75,000 barrels of oil was conserved. The Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) visited 96 manufacturing plants and spent 101 days in those plants during the contract period from August 9, 2002, through November 30, 2006. Recommended annual energy savings for manufacturers were 37,400,000 kWh (127,600 MMBtusite basis) of electricity and 309,000 MCF (309,000 MMBtu) of natural gas. Each manufacturer subsequently was surveyed, and based on these surveys reportedly implemented 79% of the electricity savings and 36% of the natural gas savings for an overall energy savings of 48% of recommended. Almost 800 (798) projects were recommended to manufacturers, and they accomplished two-thirds of the projects. Cost savings recommended were $12.3 million and implemented savings were $5.7 million or 47%. During the contract period our average time between site visit and report submittal averaged 46 days; and decreased from 48 days in 2003 to 44 days in 2006. Serving clients well and promptly has been a priority. We visited five ESA overflow clients during FY 06. The Texas A&M University IAC pioneered the presentation of air pollution information in reports, and includes NOx and CO2 reductions due to energy savings in all reports. We also experimented with formal PowerPoint BestPractices presentations called Lunchtime/Showtime in each plant and with delivering electronic versions of the report. During the period of the contract, the director served on the Texas Industries of the Future (IOF) Refining and Chemicals Committee, which oversaw the showcases in 2003 and 2006. The assistant director was the Executive Director of the International Energy Technology Conference held annually. The director and assistant director became qualified specialists in the Process Heating Assessment Scoping Tool and the Steam System Scoping Tool, respectively. Research was performed relating to energy conservation and IAC needs, resulting in a paper presented at the ACEEE meeting in 2005, and an internet software tool through the Texas IOF office.

Heffington, Warren M.; Eggebrecht, James A.

2007-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency provides an unequaled opportunity for manufacturing companies to reduce operating costs. Energy efficiency improvements not only lead to reduced energy costs, they can lead to even greater improved productivity and decreased waste. However, many cost-effective projects are not being implemented. Manufacturing companies have indicated that this is often due not to a lack of funds but rather to a lack of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program. In addition to significant energy savings, the IAC program produces a steady stream of energy engineers who are in high demand as plant energy managers, energy efficiency consultants, and energy efficient design engineers. This paper proposes a strategy for expanding the IAC program in both size and scope to better meet the workforce and energy assessment needs of US manufacturers. The expansion would be accomplished by establishing Centers of Excellence at current IAC locations, and then partnering with other universities, community colleges, and trade schools to create satellite centers to educate students at all technical levels. This would provide additional assistance to industrial customers over larger regions than is currently possible. Further partnerships with other organizations that already service manufacturing facilities would take advantage of existing infrastructure to enable the most efficient distribution of energy efficiency services.

Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE's Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Program: Results and Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy efficiency is foundational to the creation of a clean energy economy. Recent studies have speculated on the size of job creation opportunities in the clean energy field, but many of those studies have not adequately involved companies in the energy efficiency industry. The DOEs IAC program is an important federal effort which provides a steady stream of top young engineers into energy efficiency careers, helps small/medium sized manufacturers save energy and copes with the enormous recent increases in fuel costs; and develops energy efficiency expertise in faculty at our top engineering schools. Workforce issues in energy are big and getting bigger. IAC program helps with the ITP goals of establishing relevant Intellectual Capital and developing certified practitioners.

Nimbalker, S.; Martin, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Impact of the Texas A&M University- Kingsville's Industrial Assessment Center in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was established at Texas A&M University-Kingsville in November 1993 by the U. S. Department of Energy. The Center is managed by the University City Science Center, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the period of November, 93 through July, 96 the Center conducted 65 energy audits of small and medium sized manufacturing plants in South Texas. The Center's chief purpose is to serve the energy and waste related needs of small and medium sized manufacturers. The findings were reported to the manufacturers, together with estimates of their savings, implementation costs, and payback periods. By the end of July, 1996, the center had performed 65 industrial survey and had recommended over 388 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) and 53 Waste Minimization Opportunities (WMOs). During this time, the IAC estimated energy savings totaled 158,906 MMBtu/year (7.6 percent of total energy usage) for a total savings of over $1.89 million (9.3 percent of total energy costs). The waste assessment audits have estimated a total of $1.14 million in waste reductions costs (10.5 percent of total waste related costs). This paper describes the Center, its mission, and its impact in South Texas. The estimated average savings per plant including energy and waste reductions was approximately $81,030/yr.

Medina, M. A.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Farahmand, K.; Bhalavat, M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Final Technical Report for Industrial Assessment Center at West Virginia University  

SciTech Connect

The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program at West Virginia University (WVU), which is funded by the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), has provided a unique opportunity to enhance efficient energy utilization in small to medium-sized manufacturers. It has also provided training to engineering students in the identification and analysis of efficient energy use in each aspect of the manufacturing process and associated supporting elements. The outcomes of the IAC Program at WVU have assisted the manufacturers and the students in having a heightened sensitivity to industrial energy conservation, waste reduction, and productivity improvement, as well as a better understanding of the technical aspects of manufacturing processes and the supporting elements through which efficient energy utilization can be enhanced. The IAC at WVU has conducted 101 energy assessments from 2002 until 2006. The focus of the industrial assessments has been on energy savings. It has been the IACs interest to strongly focus on energy savings and on waste minimization and productivity improvements that strictly have an impact on energy. The IAC at WVU was selected as the Center of the year in 2005 from amongst 26 centers and has obtained a ranking within the top 5 in the previous few years. From 2002 to 2006, the total recommended energy savings produced by the IAC at WVU is 1,214,414 MMBtu, of which the electricity accounts for 93,826,067 kWh (equivalent to 320,226 MMBtu) and natural gas for 871,743 MMBtu. The balance is accounted for in savings in other fuels, mainly coal and wood. This results in an average recommended energy savings of 928,971 kWh from electricity and 8,631 MMBtu from natural gas per facility. The total CO2 emissions saved from 2002 to 2006 is 154,462 tons, with an average of 1,529.3 tons per facility. The average recommended energy cost savings per facility is $135,036. The overall implementation rate of the assessment recommendations is 60.6% for the 101 industrial assessments conducted since 2002. The implemented recommendations resulted in total energy savings of 62,328,006 kWh from electricity, 295,241 MMBtu from natural gas, and 43,593 MMBtu from other fuels, totaling 551,557 MMBtu. The average implemented energy savings per industrial facility is 5,461 MMBtu and the average implemented energy cost savings is $ 59,879. The average implemented energy and productivity cost savings exceeds the program average of $ 60,000 per assessment. The IAC at WVU has produced a variety of energy efficiency recommendations in areas of industrial energy consumption such as Boilers and Steam systems (19), Air Compressors (15), HVAC (4), Chillers (12), Furnaces and Ovens (17), Motors (8), Lighting (20), Insulation (3), CHP and Cogeneration (4), and Process Equipment (7). The project has benefited the public by enabling the reduction of CO2 emissions by 89,726 tons due to the implemented energy saving recommendations at 101 small and medium sized manufacturing facilities. Since CO2 is a green house gas, its reduction will improve the quality of the environment significantly. The reduction in operating costs for the manufacturing facilities in terms of energy cost savings will increase the manufacturing facilities profits and improve their competitive edge, thus causing possible expansion in the manufacturing activities, leading to increase in good paying jobs.

Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The industrial Center at Mississippi State University  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippi State University Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) is one of 26 centers supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at universities across the country. The Mississippi State University IAC in existence since 1994 provides plant assessments at no cost to eligible small and mid-sized manufacturers categorized in Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Codes 20-39. Client eligibility is based on gross sales below $100 million, fewer than 500 employees at the plant, annual utility bills more than $100,000 and less than $2 million, and no in-house professional staff to perform an assessment. IAC assessment benefits include no cost to the clients, increased profitability and competitiveness, confidentiality, non-regulatory, nonobligatory, and student involvement.

b.K. Hodge; Mary C. Emplaincourt

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Assessments Lynn Price Staff Scientist China Energy Group Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Definition and overview of key components - International experience - Chinese situation and recommendations - US-China collaboration Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Analysis of the use of energy and potential for energy efficiency in an industrial facility * Current situation * Recommendations for improving energy efficiency * Cost-benefit analysis of recommended options * An action plan for realizing potential savings Types of Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments - Preliminary or walk-through - Detailed or diagnostic Audit criteria

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Industry Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Industry Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data...

24

Geothermal industry assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

EA-1055; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) for The Proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes Washington State University College of Engineering and Architecture  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

55; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) for The Proposed 55; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) for The Proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes Washington State University College of Engineering and Architecture Table of Contents ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS 1. DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3. DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 No Action Alternative 4. THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 4.1 Site Description 4.2 Air Quality 4.3 Surface/Ground Water Quality 4.4 Soil 4.5 Sensitive Resources 5. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources 5.1.2 Erosion/Run-Off 5.1.3 Demolition/Construction Waste Disposal 5.1.3.1 Conventional Wastes

26

Verizon, Save Energy Now (SEN) Data Center Assessment Summary  

SciTech Connect

This assessment summary describes how the industrial Technologies Program helped Verizon to find ways to improve the efficiency of its data center by performing a Save Energy Now energy assessment.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Lucasfilm, Save Energy Now (SEN) Data Center Assessment Summary  

SciTech Connect

This assessment summary describes how the industrial Technologies Program helped Lucasfilm to find ways to improve the efficiency of its data center by performing a Save Energy Now energy assessment.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

UAIEE and Industrial Assessment Centers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

中国工业节能减排大学联盟与 中国工业节能减排大学联盟与 美国工业评估中心 Michael B Muller 工业评估中心项目管理员 拉特格斯大学 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 工业评估中心 * 成立于 1976 * 目前共有 26 所工业评估中心遍布美国 * 共进行约 15,000次能效评估 * 在全美国50州都进行评估 * 提出超过 111,000 条建议 * 每年持续增长: * 400 次能效评估 * 3,000 条建议 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 工业评估中心对 中小型企业进行评估 5月5-6日,2011|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州

29

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass and Biofuels Industry Development

30

DOE Selects 26 Universities to Assess Industrial Energy Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26 Universities to Assess Industrial Energy Efficiency 26 Universities to Assess Industrial Energy Efficiency DOE Selects 26 Universities to Assess Industrial Energy Efficiency July 24, 2006 - 4:32pm Addthis Smart use of energy key to America's industrial and manufacturing competitiveness WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced the selection of 26 universities across the country for negotiation of award to set up and operate regional Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC). The centers will employ faculty and students to assist small-to-medium sized American manufacturing plants to use energy more efficiently. Based on DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program requirement, anticipated funding could be up to $6 million over the next two years (FY'07 and FY'08).

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

32

Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing Research Program, Center for Housing Innovation, University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center  

SciTech Connect

This research program addresses the need to increase the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers have responsibility for the program: the Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The two organizations provide complementary architectural, systems engineering, and industrial engineering capabilities. In 1989 we worked on these tasks: (1) the formation of a steering committee, (2) the development of a multiyear research plan, (3) analysis of the US industrialized housing industry, (4) assessment of foreign technology, (5) assessment of industrial applications, (6) analysis of computerized design and evaluation tools, and (7) assessment of energy performance of baseline and advanced industrialized housing concepts. The current research program, under the guidance of a steering committee composed of industry and government representatives, focuses on three interdependent concerns -- (1) energy, (2) industrial process, and (3) housing design. Building homes in a factory offers the opportunity to increase energy efficiency through the use of new materials and processes, and to increase the value of these homes by improving the quality of their construction. Housing design strives to ensure that these technically advanced homes are marketable and will meet the needs of the people who will live in them.

Brown, G.Z.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

VPI Corporation: Industrial Energy Assessment Helps Manufacturer Start Saving $7,000 in Less Than a Year  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at VPI Coporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Industrial Ecology offers an introduction to the topic commences with an exploration of the prerequisites for achieving sustainable development,...

35

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... ROI is a not-for-profit entity dedicated to promoting industrial ecology, particularly in developing countries. This website contains a collection of...

36

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 18, 2010 ... The University of California - Irvine offers programs on recycling electronic waste. http://greenmat.soceco.uci.edu/ The Program in Industrial...

37

Industrial energy management information center | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy management information center energy management information center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

38

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

about the Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments program and its implementation in China. session2industrytrackpriceen.pdf session2industrytrackpricecn.pdf More...

39

CenterPoint Energy - Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy - Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer CenterPoint Energy - Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer Program CenterPoint Energy - Commercial and Industrial Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Home Weatherization Insulation Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Standard Offer: 20% of the annual incentive budget. Retro-Commissioning: up to $10,000 with matching customer contribution with simple payback in three years. Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Standard Offer Lighting (Fluorescent, HID, CFL): $120/kW; $0.04/kWh

40

Industrial Assessments and Why Your Plant Should Have One  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "in-depth" assessment of a plant site and its facilities, services and manufacturing operations can help you make your plant cleaner, more productive and more energy efficient. This paper discusses the components of a successful assessment, what you can expect, and how you can benefit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Industrial Assessment Center Program, its track record and its approach, are described in some detail -including the criteria for receiving an assessment through the Program. The authors also identify and describe other good sources of industrial assessment assistance- such as utilities, state offices, trade and professional associations and local engineering schools. Also described are ways to use your in-house staff and, if you are a multi-plant company, peer reviews to conduct assessments. To further help you with the assessment process, a variety of tools and programs that you can easily access are described. The paper also provides information on a range of related resources including: programs which focus on specific technologies like motors or steam/compressed air; databases with specific assessment recommendations by Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Code that you can access; self assessment workbooks and manuals; programs which offer grants (on a competitive basis) for new demonstrations of clean industrial technologies; software programs; guidelines, and more.

Glaser, C. J.; Demetrops, J. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towers, Heritage Park Towers, Glades Park Towers and the University Village & Innovation Village South · Apartments Community Council · Heritage Park Community Council · Glades Community Council · Towers Community and Assistant Directors are also located here. Heritage Park Towers (HPT) Area Office-HP 89: Location: Heritage

42

printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasifier [18] Metal Chemical symbol Measurementdetection limit (mgfl) TCLP result (mgfl) STLC (mgfl.d,. nonedetected. The testsfollowed the EPA's toxicity characteristicsleachateprocedure(TCLP). If the concentration in the MTCI gasifierhas been tested for toxicity using EPA's toxicity characteristicsleachateprocedure (TCLP

43

Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Industrial waste needs assessment. Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January of 1992 a team was put together to begin the process of assessing the industrial waste needs of the Tennessee Valley. The team consisted of representatives from the various TVA Resource Group organizations. This initial team recommended as a starting point in the process a two-phase market research effort. A second team was then commissioned to conduct the first phase of this market research effort. The first phase of that marketing effort is now complete. This report contains an analysis of the data obtained through interviews of more than 168 individuals representing a similar number of organizations. A total of 37 TVA Resource Group employees were involved in the contact process from various organizations. In addition, the appendices provide summaries of the data used in designing the process and the reports of the Contact Coordinators (who were responsible for a series of visits). As a result of the data analysis, the Review Team makes the following recommendations: 1. Publish this report and distribute to the new management within TVA Resource Group as well as to all those participating as contacts, visitors, and contact coordinators. 2. The Resource Group management team, or management teams within each of the respective organizations within Resource Group, appoint Phase 2 assessement teams for as many of the problem areas listed in Table III as seem appropriate. We further recommend that, where possible, cross-organizational teams be used to examine individual problem areas. 3. Make this report available within Generating and Customer Groups, especially to the Customer Service Centers. 4. Establish a process to continue follow up with each of the contacts made in this assessment.

Radel, R.J.; Willis, M.P. [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Contact Information - Industrial : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BESC Industry Contact Information BESC Industry Contact Information To learn more about BESC's industry program please contact Renae Speck, Director of Technology Transfer and Partnerships for BESC, (865-576-4680), Renae Speck). Renae Speck Renae Speck, PhD spends fifty percent of her time as a Senior Commercialization Manager in the Office of Technology Transfer in the Partnership Directorate and fifty percent of her time as the Manager of Technology Transfer and Partnerships for the BioEnergy Science Center. As a Senior Commercialization Manager, Renae is responsible for portfolio management and commercialization of intellectual property created by researchers and staff in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Divisions as well as any intellectual property created by Oak Ridge National Laboratory staff that is funded by the BioEnergy Science Center

46

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San Jos McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Manpower Assessment of the Geothermal Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors were asked to estimate the net employment gains in the geothermal industry from 1980 to 1985 and 1990. Method was by survey. Response rates were high, so the estimates here likely reflect industry knowledge and outlooks at the start of the most active construction decade of the U.S. geothermal industry. An untitled table following Table IV-1 is of great interest because it breaks out employment requirement estimates for different phases/aspects of project development, i.e., exploration and resource assessment, exploratory drilling, production drilling, power plant construction, feed system (field piping) construction, field operation and maintenance, power plant operation and maintenance, and transmission line construction. Estimates like these are rare in the U.S. geothermal literature. While these estimates are dated, they comprise an historical economic baseline from which improvements in labor use in the geothermal industry might be constructed. (DJE 2005)

None

1979-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

Moraine Molded Plastics, Inc.: Industrial Energy Assessment Finds Opportunities to Save $24,000 in Annual Operating Costs  

SciTech Connect

Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at the Moraine Molded Plastics by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Road User Assessment System Pilot to someone by E-mail Road User Assessment System Pilot to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle (EV) Road User Assessment System Pilot on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

50

Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect

The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Clean Energy Application Centers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Industrial Distributed Energy Search Search Help Industrial Distributed Energy EERE...

52

Data Center Industry Leaders Reach Consensus on Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data centers rise, owners and operators have focused on the energy efficiency of the data center as a whole, frequently using energy efficiency metrics. However, the metrics are...

53

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Clean Energy Application Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this topic. DOE's Regional Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs), formerly called the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Regional Application Centers (RACs), promote and assist in...

54

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health,...

55

Plant Wide Assessment for SIFCO Industries, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sifco Industries carreid out a plant wide energy assessment under a collaborative program with the U.S. Department of Energy during October 2004 to September 2005. During the year, personnel from EIS, E3M, DPS, BuyCastings.Com, and Sifco plant facilities and maintenance personnel, as a team collected energy use, construction, process, equipment and operational information about the plant. Based on this information, the team identified 13 energy savings opportunities. Near term savings opportunities have a total potential savings of about $1,329,000 per year and a combined simple payback of about 11 months. Implementation of these recommendations would reduce CO2 emissions by about 16,000,000 pounds per year, which would reduce overall plant CO2 emissions by about 45%. These totals do not include another $830,000 per year in potential savings with an estimated 9-month payback, from converting the forging hammers from steam to compressed air.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi et. al.

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Assessing process-centered software engineering environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-centered software engineering environments (PSEEs) are the most recent generation of environments supporting software development activities. They exploit an representation of the process (called the process model that specifies ... Keywords: CASE, enabling technology, process modeling languages, process-centered software engineering environments, software process

Vincenzo Ambriola; Reidar Conradi; Alfonso Fuggetta

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Plant-Wide Assessment Report for Shaw Industries, Plant #78; Aiken, SC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plant-wide energy assessment sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy was conducted at Shaw Industries Group, plant #78 in Aiken, SC. The assessment team consisted of Georgia Tech faculty from the Energy & Environmental Management Center and Shaw personnel from plant #78 and the corporate energy group. The purpose of this assessment was to uncover as many opportunities for saving energy usage and costs using techniques that have been established as best practices in the energy engineering field. In addition, these findings are to be shared with similar plants in Shaw Industries Group to multiply the lessons learned. The findings from this assessment are included in this report.

Michael Brown PE, CEM; Matt Soderlund; Bill Meffert PE; Paolo Baldisserotto; Jerry Zolkowski PE, CEM

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Data Center Industry Leaders Agreement on Energy Efficiency Guiding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

real estate resources Congregation resources Corporate real estate resources Data center resources Entertainment venue resources Federal agency resources Grocery &...

59

Data Center Industry Leaders Agreement on Energy Efficiency Guiding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Leaders Agreement on Energy Efficiency Industry Leaders Agreement on Energy Efficiency Guiding Principles, February 1, 2010 Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

60

Final Environmental Assessment, Burleigh County Wind Energy Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1542 August 2005 Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Burleigh County Wind Energy Center Burleigh County, North Dakota Final Burleigh County Wind, LLC BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE Central Power Electric Cooperative, Inc. Introduction 1-1 Burleigh County Wind Energy Center Environmental Assessment CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION The Burleigh County Wind Energy Center is a wind generation project proposed by FPL Energy Burleigh County Wind, LLC (Burleigh County Wind). The proposed project would produce up to 50 megawatts (MW) of electricity, averaged annually. The proposed project is located in Burleigh County, North Dakota, approximately 3 miles south and 2 miles east of the town of Wilton, North Dakota (Figures 1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market for Industrial Energy Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market forL ABORATORY System Assessment Standards: Defining the Marketemployer. System Assessment Standards: Defining the Market

Sheaffer, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Assessment of Industrial-Sector Load Shapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The load shapes of industrial-sector customers are becoming increasingly important for utility forecasting, marketing, and demand-side management planning and evaluation activities. This report analyzes load shapes for various industry segments and investigates the transfer of these load shapes across service territories. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders may download this report at http://my.primen.com/Applications/DE/Community/index.asp .

1993-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

63

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Title Smart Grid as a Driver for Energy-Intensive Industries: A Data Center Case Study Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6104E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ganti, Venkata, and Girish Ghatikar Conference Name Grid-Interop 2012 Date Published 12/2012 Conference Location Irving, TX Keywords data centers, market sectors, technologies Abstract The Smart Grid facilitates integration of supply- and demand-side services, allowing the end-use loads to be dynamic and respond to changes in electricity generation or meet localized grid needs. Expanding from previous work, this paper summarizes the results from field tests conducted to identify demand response opportunities in energy-intensive industrial facilities such as data centers. There is a significant opportunity for energy and peak-demand reduction in data centers as hardware and software technologies, sensing, and control methods can be closely integrated with the electric grid by means of demand response. The paper provides field test results by examining distributed and networked data center characteristics, end-use loads and control systems, and recommends opportunities and challenges for grid integration. The focus is on distributed data centers and how loads can be "migrated" geographically in response to changing grid supply (increase/decrease). In addition, it examines the enabling technologies and demand-response strategies of high performance computing data centers. The findings showed that the studied data centers provided average load shed of up to 10% with short response times and no operational impact. For commercial program participation, the load-shed strategies must be tightly integrated with data center automation tools to make them less resource-intensive.

64

Tools for Assessing Building Energy Use in Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This presentation will cover a brief history of building energy measures savings potential for industrial plants and briefly characterize building energy measures and their savings identified over approximately the past 15 years in energy audits. The nature and extent of building energy assessment tools will then be profiled, and the beneficial use of an appropriate subset of these tools for assessing energy savings in buildings at industrial plants will be described. Possible future tools that may be useful will also be mentioned.

Martin, M.; MacDonald, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Marion Industrial Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Consumers Power, Inc. (CPI), proposes to construct a new distribution substation under the existing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Albay-Lebanon transmission line near the city of Albany in Linn County, Oregon. BPA is proposing to grant a new Point of Delivery to CPI at this substation. The purpose of the project is to serve the developing industrial needs in the Marion Industrial Park and on the 550 acres of nearby land within CPI`s service area that are zoned for residential use. CPI prepared, and the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) has approved a Borrower`s Environmental Report (BER) which addresses this action along with several other proposed projects in the CPI service area. Portions of this BER are summarized in this brief EA. BPA is preparing its own EA since Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidelines require additional environmental concerns to be addressed than are required by REA`s NEPA guidelines.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Marion Industrial Substation Project : Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Consumers Power, Inc. (CPI), proposes to construct a new distribution substation under the existing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Albay-Lebanon transmission line near the city of Albany in Linn County, Oregon. BPA is proposing to grant a new Point of Delivery to CPI at this substation. The purpose of the project is to serve the developing industrial needs in the Marion Industrial Park and on the 550 acres of nearby land within CPI's service area that are zoned for residential use. CPI prepared, and the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) has approved a Borrower's Environmental Report (BER) which addresses this action along with several other proposed projects in the CPI service area. Portions of this BER are summarized in this brief EA. BPA is preparing its own EA since Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidelines require additional environmental concerns to be addressed than are required by REA's NEPA guidelines.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of industry needs for oil shale research and development  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-one industry people were contacted to provide input on oil shale in three subject areas. The first area of discussion dealt with industry's view of the shape of the future oil shale industry; the technology, the costs, the participants, the resources used, etc. It assessed the types and scale of the technologies that will form the industry, and how the US resource will be used. The second subject examined oil shale R D needs and priorities and potential new areas of research. The third area of discussion sought industry comments on what they felt should be the role of the DOE (and in a larger sense the US government) in fostering activities that will lead to a future commercial US oil shale shale industry.

Hackworth, J.H.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review team established by the Department of Energy conducted an assessment of the US biomass power industry. The review team visited with more than 50 organizations representing all sectors of the biomass power industry including utilities, independent power producers, component manufacturers, engineering and construction contractors, agricultural organizations, industrial users, and regulatory organizations. DOE solicited industry input for the development of the Biomass Power Division`s Five Year Plan. DOE believed there was a critical need to obtain industry`s insight and working knowledge to develop the near- and long-term plans of the program. At the heart of this objective was the desire to identify near-term initiatives that the program could pursue to help accelerate the further development of biomass power projects.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: All Modular Industry Growth Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Project Summary Full Title: All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Project ID: 139 Principal Investigator: Donald Hanson Purpose A comprehensive economic model of energy markets, primarily used to simulate a wide range of technology and policy issues. Performer Principal Investigator: Donald Hanson Organization: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Address: 9700 S. Cass Ave. Argonne, IL 60439 Telephone: 630-252-5061 Email: dhanson@anl.gov Additional Performers: Peter Balash, NETL; John Marano, NETL Sponsor(s) Name: Peter Balash Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Telephone: 412-386-5753 Email: Peter.Balash@NETL.DOE.GOV Period of Performance Start: January 2001 Project Description

70

Final Environmental Assessment East Altamont Energy Center Application for Certification (01-AFC-4) Alameda County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER FINAL STAFF ASSESSMENT / ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ....................................................................................................3 RESPONSE TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS.......................................................4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT .....................................................................................5 AIR QUALITY ...........................................................................................................5.1

71

Small Distributed Generation Applications in the Industrial Sector: A Screening Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a screening assessment of small distributed generation applications in the industrial sector.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the study, Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration in Pennsylvania, performed by Synergic Resources Corporation for the Pennsylvania Governor's Energy Council. The study could well be the most comprehensive statewide evaluation of industrial cogeneration yet conducted. Although a multitude of estimates of cogeneration potential have surfaced in recent years, this study examined cogeneration opportunities in much greater detail for the following factors: 1. Sales of cogenerated electricity to all major utilities were valued using the estimated PURPA rates based on the Public Utility Commission rules. The demonstrated effects of the wide variation of expected PURPA utility purchase rates on industry-specific economical cogeneration potential further underscores the significance of these rates; 2. Industrial energy consumption (including the use of feedstocks and internally generated fuels) reflected the most accurate data available at both the state and national levels; 3. Pennsylvania-specific forecasts of industrial growth for each major manufacturing industry were incorporated; 4. Forecasts of fuel and electricity price changes were also state-specific rather than national or regional; 5. Discounted cash flow economic analyses were performed for cases in which existing combustion systems both did and did not require replacement as well as for expansions of existing industrial plants and new plants for the years 1985, 1990, and 2000; 6. Emerging technologies such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed and applied to determine likely levels of market penetration; 7. Sensitivity of cogeneration feasibility with respect to alternative; 8. Ownership and financing arrangements (such as utility and third party ownership) as well as changes in forecasts of PURPA and retail electricity rates, fuel prices, industrial growth rates, and cogeneration technology capital costs and operating characteristics were examined; 9. To more accurately assess the potential for additional cogeneration development, a detailed survey was conducted identifying all existing cogenerators in Pennsylvania; 10. Case study economic analyses were performed for 30 companies to further illustrate cogeneration feasibility; and 11. Barriers to and opportunities for greater industrial cogeneration were identified and a booklet to market cogeneration to industry was developed.

Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Proposed center for advanced industrial processes. Washington State University, College of Engineering and Architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE proposes to authorize Washington State University (WSU) to proceed with the detailed design, construction, and equipping of the proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes (CAIP). The proposed project would involve construction of a three story building containing laboratories, classrooms, seminar rooms, and graduate student and administrative office space. Existing buildings would be demolished. The proposed facility would house research in thermal/fluid sciences, bioengineering, manufacturing processes, and materials processing. Under the {open_quotes}no-action{close_quotes} DOE would not authorize WSU to proceed with construction under the grant. WSU would then need to consider alternatives for proceeding without DOE funds. Such alternatives (including delaying or scaling back the project), would result in a postponement or slight reduction in the minor adverse environmental, safety and health Impacts of the project evaluated in this assessment. More importantly, these alternatives would affect the important environmental, safety, health, and programmatic benefits of the projects. The surrounding area is fully urbanized and the campus is intensely developed around the proposed site. The buildings scheduled for demolition do not meet State energy codes, are not air conditioned, and lack handicapped access. Sensitive resources (historical/archeological, protected species/critical habitats, wetlands/floodplains, national forests/parks/trails, prime farmland and special sources of water) would not be affected as they do not occur on or near the proposed site. Cumulative impacts would be small. The proposed action is not related to other actions being considered under other NEPA reviews. There is no conflict between the proposed action and any applicable Federal, State, regional or local land use plans and policies.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry. Besides electricity, the industry also consumeslargest electricity-consuming food industry in Californialargest electricity-consuming food industry in California

Galitsky, Christina; Radspieler, Anthony; Worrell, Ernst; Healy, Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Impact of Electricity Deregulation on Industrial Assessment Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores many of the changes in typical industrial assessment recommendations, which have resulted from deregulation of the electric and gas industries. While anticipating that energy efficiency would almost always be a good idea, changes in rate structures and indeed the very nature of how energy is purchased can put some energy efficiency technologies outside of normal economically acceptable ranges. A major focus will be changes in and the elimination of time-of-use rates for electricity. An entire generation of DSM'ers (people working in "Demand-Side Management") worked under the principle that there was economic benefit to load leveling. Time-of-use rates are changing throughout the country and in many cases disappearing. Bulk purchase of electricity has even resulted in cases where, with minimum consumption requirements, industrial plants need to find ways to increase their electrical use to avoid penalties. Energy storage devices including thermal energy storage must be re-examined in terms of this new paradigm. There are applications where they are advisable, but for different reasons then demand management. Another area of particular interest is fuel selection, multiply fuel capability, and contracting. An industrial assessment at two neighboring plants can result in entirely different recommendations based on how energy is purchased and billed. In many cases, an industrial plant may be better off spending resources on energy purchasing agents as opposed to anything like an energy efficiency project. Onsite generation of power and the changing rationales for its adoption has also experienced big changes. Energy security is becoming a strong motivation for industrial plants, options are increased, and third party funding is also starting to appear. Intermediate solutions like gas driven compressors bring these two areas together and leave industrial clients with more options but often more confusion than ever before. Finally, the paper discusses some of the new challenges facing an industrial assessment team in terms of information gathering. It is becoming necessary to examine many possible energy purchase options and each has ramifications on energy efficiency projects. Use of the Internet, computer tools and other information sources is presented.

Kasten, D. J.; Muller, M. R.; Pavlovic, F.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security personnel to understand local intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACT SHEET: Fusion Center Assessment emergency response, public health and private sector security officials to better protect their communities. Fusion centers provide interdisciplinary expertise on Fusion Center Assessment: A mature, fully functioning national network of fusion centers is critical

77

The Evolution of the Federal Monitoring and Assessment Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is a federal emergency response asset whose assistance may be requested by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident. It is an interagency organization with representation from the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), the Department of Defense (DoD), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and other federal agencies. FRMAC, in its present form, was created in 1987 when the radiological support mission was assigned to the DOEs Nevada Operations Office by DOE Headquarters. The FRMAC asset, including its predecessor entities, was created, grew, and evolved to function as a response to radiological incidents. Radiological emergency response exercises showed the need for a coordinated approach to managing federal emergency monitoring and assessment activities. The mission of FRMAC is to coordinate and manage all federal radiological environmental monitoring and assessment activities during a nuclear or radiological incident within the United States in support of state,local, tribal governments, DHS, and the federal coordinating agency. Radiological emergency response professionals with the DOEs national laboratories support the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), the Aerial MeasuringSystem (AMS), and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS). These teams support the FRMAC to provide: ? Atmospheric transport modeling ? Radiation monitoring ? Radiological analysis and data assessments ? Medical advice for radiation injuries In support of field operations, the FRMAC provides geographic information systems, communications, mechanical, electrical, logistics, and administrative support. The size of the FRMAC is tailored to the incident and is comprised of emergency response professionals drawn from across the federal government. State and local emergency response teams may also integrate their operations with FRMAC, but are not required to.

NSTec Aerial Measurement System

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cover photo courtesy of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical CenterHealthcare Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is one in a series of volumes published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide information of general interest regarding environmental issues associated with specific industrial sectors. A listing of available Sector Notebooks is included on the following page. The Notebook will orient readers from a wide audience to the environmental responsibilities and challenges facing health service providers including major medical centers, ambulatory healthcare clinics, dental offices, doctors offices and veterinary clinics. The Notebook will be especially useful in educating those in industry as well as government and the general public who are unfamiliar with the complex environmental regulations that apply to the healthcare industry. With references for more detailed information, the Notebook will nicely complement new resources on compliance, environmental management systems, pollution prevention, and the nascent on-line healthcare environmental resource center. Obtaining copies: Electronic versions of all Sector Notebooks are available on EPAs web site at www.epa.gov/compliance/sectornotebooks.html.

Healthcare Industry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE/EA-0965 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65 65 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CANCER RESEARCH CENTER INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE PREPARED BY U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY, CHICAGO FIELD OFFICE PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT D I V I S I O N AUGUST 1994 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product. process, or service by trade name, trademark,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Bates solar industrial process steam application environmental impact assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is planned to install 34,440 square feet of linear parabolic trough solar collectors at a new corrugator plant for making corrugated boxes. The system is to operate in parallel with a fossil fuel boiler. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the solar energy system on the existing environment and to determine whether or not a more detailed environmental impact statement is needed. The environmental assessment is based on actual operational data obtained on the collector, fluid, and heat transport system. A description of the design of the solar energy system and its application is given. Also included is a discussion of the location of the new plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and of the surrounding environment. Environmental impacts are discussed in detail, and alternatives to the solar industrial process steam retrofit application are offered. It is concluded that the overall benefits from the solar industrial process heat system outweigh any negative environmental factors. Benefits include reduced fossil fuel demand, with attending reductions in air pollutants. The selection of a stable heat transfer fluid with low toxicity and biodegradable qualities minimizes environmental damage due to fluid spills, personal exposure, and degradation byproducts. The collector is found to be aesthetically attractive with minimal hazards due to glare. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Program on Technology Innovation: Decision-Centered Guidelines for the Design of Human System Interfaces for Electric Power Industry Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision-centered guidelines support improved user decision making across a broad range of electric power industry application areas. The guidelines will aid in the design of user-centered human-system interfaces (HSIs), while increasing the beneficial uses of new technologies for electric power generation, transmission, and distribution (GTD) systems. Decision-centered guidelines are applicable to system designs involving new technology that will transform current user tasks, responsibilities, ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Economizers and Coolerado Evaporative Cooling for Data Centers: Technical Assessments for the Data Center Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the reliance that business has on uninterrupted communications, data centers are required to provide the highest level of reliability. Yet, this emphasis on reliability allows many opportunities for increasing the energy efficiency of data centers. In a typical data center, about 40% of the energy is used for cooling systems. The conventional methods of removing heat from a data center involve either a direct-expansion (DX) computer room air conditioner (CRAC) or a chilled-water plant to ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

National Wind Technology Center: A Proven and Valued Wind Industry Partner (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fact sheet gives an overview of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE`s needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included.

Bickford, D.F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processesfrom refrigeration equipment used in industrial processes

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Center for Productivity Innovation's Student Project with Industry Program at the University of Tennessee, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A robust graduate engineering education experience requires students to learn the fundamental subject knowledge, to develop their ability to apply what they know to actual projects, and to contribute to the current body of knowledge by writing theses ... Keywords: Student Projects with Industry, engineering education, graduate research and education, industrial engineering, industry-university interaction

Rapinder Sawhney, Sima Maleki, Joseph Wilck, Pedraum Hashemian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment  

SciTech Connect

For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Biopower Technical Assessment: State of the Industry and the Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of the state of the biopower industry and the technology for producing electricity and heat from biomass. Biopower (biomass-to-electricity generation), a proven electricity generating option in the United States and with about 11 GW of installed capacity, is the single largest source of non-hydro renewable electricity. This 11 GW of capacity encompasses about 7.5 GW of forest product industry and agricultural industry residues, about 3.0 GW of municipal solid waste-based generating capacity and 0.5 GW of other capacity such as landfill gas based production. The electricity production from biomass is being used and is expected to continue to be used as base load power in the existing electrical distribution system. An overview of sector barriers to biopower technology development is examined in Chapter 2. The discussion begins with an analysis of technology barriers that must be overcome to achieve successful technology pathways leading to the commercialization of biomass conversion and feedstock technologies. Next, an examination of institutional barriers is presented which encompasses the underlying policies, regulations, market development, and education needed to ensure the success of biopower. Chapter 3 summarizes biomass feedstock resources, characteristics, availability, delivered prices, requirements for processing, and the impediments and barriers to procurement. A discussion of lessons learned includes information on the California biomass energy industry, lessons from commercial biopower plants, lessons from selected DOE demonstration projects, and a short summary of the issues considered most critical for commercial success is presented in Chapter 4. A series of case studies, Chapter 5, have been performed on the three conversion routes for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) applications of biomass--direct combustion, gasification, and cofiring. The studies are based on technology characterizations developed by NREL and EPRI. Variables investigated include plant size and feed cost, and both cost of electricity and cost of steam are estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis. The economic basis for cost estimates is given. Environmental considerations are discussed in Chapter 6. Two primary issues that could create a tremendous opportunity for biomass are global warming and the implementation of Phase II of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990 (CAAA). The environmental benefits of biomass technologies are among its greatest assets. Global warming is gaining greater salience in the scientific community and among the general population. Biomass use can play an essential role in reducing greenhouse gases, thus reducing the impact on the atmosphere. Cofiring biomass and fossil fuels and the use of integrated biomass gasification combined cycle systems can be an effective strategy for electric utilities to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases. The final chapter reviews pertinent Federal government policies. U.S. government policies are used to advance energy strategies such as energy security and environmental quality. Many of the benefits of renewable energy are not captured in the traditional marketplace economics. Government policies are a means of converting non-economic benefits to an economic basis, often referred to as ''internalizing'' of ''externalities.'' This may be accomplished by supporting the research, development, and demonstration of new technologies that are not funded by industry because of projected high costs or long development time lines.

Bain, R. L.; Amos, W. P.; Downing, M.; Perlack, R. L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Highlights of Biopower Technical Assessment: State of the Industry and the Technology  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of the Biopower Technical Assessment, which reviews the state of the biopower industry and the technology for producing electricity and heat from biomass.

Bain, R. L.; Amos, W. P.; Downing, M.; Perlack, R. L.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide emission reductions in industry in the EU. Europeanissues: Annual survey of industries. Central StatisticalDesiccated coconut industry of Sri- Lankas opportunities

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Dr. Warren M. Heffington, Director, Texas A&M University Industrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Dr. Warren M. Heffington, Director, Texas A&M University Industrial Assessment Center On the eve of his retirement, after 25 years of distinguished...

94

DC Pro Software Tool Suite, Data Center Fact Sheet, Industrial Technologies Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how DOE's Data Center Energy Profiler (DC Pro) Software Tool Suite and other resources can help U.S. companies identify ways to improve the efficiency of their data centers.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the paper, glass or ceramics industry) making it difficulttechnology in the ceramic manufacturing industry. industries: iron and steel, non-ferrous metals, chemicals (including fertilisers), petroleum refining, minerals (cement, lime, glass and ceramics) and

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the iron and steel industry: a global model. Energy, 30,report of the world steel industry 2005. International Irontrends in the iron and steel industry. Energy Policy, 30,

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Services-Led Industrialization in India: Assessment and Lessons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues In Indias Service-Led Growth, ICRIER Working PaperIndia: A Case of Finance - Led Industrialization? JournalSustainability of Services-led Growth: An Input-Output

Singh, Nirvikar

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of industrial attitudes toward generic research needs in tribology  

SciTech Connect

Based on extended discussions during visits with 27 companies representing 13 different parts of the tribology industry (such as bearings, lubricants, coatings, powerplants), it is apparent that only a tiny fraction of the large sums publicly reported as R and D expenditures by industry are used to fund generic tribology research. For example, of the greater than $2 B expenditures reported for R and D in the lubricants sector for 1982, the estimated total for generic tribology research was $12 M. This was the largest expenditure in any sector of the tribology industry and one-third of the total of $36 M. In the automotive industry out of a reported expenditure of $4 B, the estimated generic tribology research was $3 M. In some segments of the tribology industry, for example coatings and filters, there were no expenditures on generic research. There was little tendency to improve the state of the art of the tribology industry through long-term investment in generic R and D in ways that would foster innovation and productivity of energy conservation technology. Expenditures were oriented to development of specific commercial and military products, or to basic research focused on unspecified far term results, although useful spin-off of military developments into commercial fields sometimes occurs. There was a broad consensus in the companies visited that existing research results were not always made easily accessible to potential users in industry. The implication was that industry might benefit more if a larger fraction of the funds were devoted to putting the research results into a form design and development engineers could more readily apply. The need for a more effective presentation of research results was expressed with greater urgency at the smaller companies, but there seemed to be a broad consensus on the need for improvement. Recommendations are given.

Sibley, L.B.; Zlotnick, M.; Levinson, T.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Industrial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Industrial Dataset Summary Description The Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC) Database is a collection of all the publicly available data from energy efficiency assessments conducted by IACs at small and medium-sized industrial facilities. Source Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Centers Date Released September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated September 20th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords assessment energy efficiency Industrial manufacturing small and medium-sized Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon copy_of_iac_database.xls (xls, 28.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Standards Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Daily Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset

100

Assessment of water resources for nuclear energy centers  

SciTech Connect

Maps of the conterminous United States showing the rivers with sufficient flow to be of interest as potential sites for nuclear energy centers are presented. These maps show the rivers with (1) mean annual flows greater than 3000 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, 12,000 to 24,000, and greater than 24,000 cfs; (2) monthly, 20-year low flows greater than 1500 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 1500 to 3000, 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, and greater than 12,000 cfs; and (3) annual, 20-year low flows greater than 1500 cfs, with the flow rates identified for ranges of 1500 to 3000, 3000 to 6000, 6000 to 12,000, and greater than 12,000 cfs. Criteria relating river flow rates required for various size generating stations both for sites located on reservoirs and for sites without local storage of cooling water are discussed. These criteria are used in conjunction with plant water consumption rates (based on both instantaneous peak and annual average usage rates) to estimate the installed generating capacity that may be located at one site or within a river basin. Projections of future power capacity requirements, future demand for water (both withdrawals and consumption), and regions of expected water shortages are also presented. Regional maps of water availability, based on annual, 20-year low flows, are also shown. The feasibility of locating large energy centers in these regions is discussed.

Samuels, G.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect  

SciTech Connect

Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A Final Environmental Assessment March 2003 Department of Energy, Sandia Site Office Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque New Mexico Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Environmental Assessment March 2003 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Purpose and Need for Agency Action.......................................................................................1 2.0 No Action and Proposed Action Alternatives............................................................................3 2.1 No Action Alternative .................................................................................................3

103

Market Assessment of Power Quality Problems and Mitigation Options in the Telecommunications Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses a specific market segment, the telecommunications industry, and provides a detailed assessment of power conditioning technologies and other solutions to power quality problems that could be economically justified.

1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012 M. Leventhal and S. Tegen Technical Report NRELTP-7A30-57512 June 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S....

105

Biomass power industry: Assessment of key players and approaches for DOE and industry interaction. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of the US biomass power industry. The topics of the report include current fuels and the problems associated with procuring, transporting, preparing and burning them, competition from natural gas projects because of the current depressed natural gas prices, need for incentives for biomass fueled projects, economics, market potential and expansion of US firms overseas.

None

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Nondestructive Evaluation: Assessment of NDE Technologies and Practices in Other Industries, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of technical information collected on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies that are used in other industries. The purpose of this report is to assess NDE technologies used in other industries to determine if they could be useful for nuclear inspection applications.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

Assessment of industry needs for oil shale research and development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-one industry people were contacted to provide input on oil shale in three subject areas. The first area of discussion dealt with industry`s view of the shape of the future oil shale industry; the technology, the costs, the participants, the resources used, etc. It assessed the types and scale of the technologies that will form the industry, and how the US resource will be used. The second subject examined oil shale R&D needs and priorities and potential new areas of research. The third area of discussion sought industry comments on what they felt should be the role of the DOE (and in a larger sense the US government) in fostering activities that will lead to a future commercial US oil shale shale industry.

Hackworth, J.H.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry  

SciTech Connect

Not all industrial facilities have the staff or theopportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack ofknowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an importantbarrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking programs in the U.S. andabroad have shown to improve knowledge of the energy performance ofindustrial facilities and buildings and to fuel energy managementpractices. Benchmarking provides a fair way to compare the energyintensity of plants, while accounting for structural differences (e.g.,the mix of products produced, climate conditions) between differentfacilities. In California, the winemaking industry is not only one of theeconomic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, witha considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed the firstbenchmarking tool for the California wine industry called "BEST(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery". BEST Wineryenables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practicereference winery. Besides overall performance, the tool enables the userto evaluate the impact of implementing efficiency measures. The toolfacilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on theestimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. The tool willraise awareness of current energy intensities and offer an efficient wayto evaluate the impact of future efficiency measures.

Galitsky, Christina; Radspieler, Anthony; Worrell, Ernst; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power in US industry. Energy Policy, 29, pp. 1243-1254.Paris. IEA, 2004: Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Finlandand steel industry. Energy Policy, 30, pp. 827-838. Kim, Y.

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Industrial Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities Industrial Facilities October 8, 2013 - 10:14am Addthis The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) encourages Federal agencies requiring assistance with implementing energy-efficiency measures in their industrial facilities to hire a U.S. Department of Energy Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) for assessment services. The following resources can be used to plan and implement industrial facility energy-efficiency projects. Technical Publications: The Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) website offers fact sheets, handbooks, and self-assessment manuals covering steam system efficiency, fundamentals of compressed air systems, motor systems management, and other topics. Tools: The AMO website offers valuable software tools for evaluating

111

DOE/EA-1652: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Technology Testing Center (August 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Technology Testing Center Boston, Massachusetts August 2009 DOE/EA-1652 Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401-3393 NREL - ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER, BOSTON, M.A. FINAL EA, AUGUST 2009 i Table of Contents SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES ................................ 1 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ....................................................................................................................... 2

112

EA-565; Environmental Assessment AND (FONSI) Center For Energy Studies Arkansas Technical University Russellville, Arkansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

65; Environmental Assessment AND (FONSI) Center For Energy 65; Environmental Assessment AND (FONSI) Center For Energy Studies Arkansas Technical University Russellville, Arkansas TABLE OF CONTENTS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CENTER FOR ENERGY STUDIES ARKANSAS TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY 1.0 NEED FOR THE PROPOSAL 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 Proposed Action 2.2 No-Action 3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND NO-ACTION ALTERNATIVE 3.1 Construction Impacts 3.2 Operations Impacts 3.3 Decommissioning Impacts 3.4 Cumulative Impact 3.5 Long-Term Effects of Facility Construction and Operation 3.6 Environmental Effects of the No-action Alternative 4.0 RELATIONSHIP OF THE PROPOSED ACTION TO ANY APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, REGIONAL OR LOCAL LAND USE PLANS AND POLICIES LIKELY TO BE AFFECTED. 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL PERMIT REQUIREMENTS

113

Environmental Assessment for The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H center with Green Building Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H Center The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies DOE/EA 1571 Franklin County, Ohio December 2006 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Ohio State 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies Franklin County, OH TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Ohio 4-H Building with Green Building Technologies Franklin County, Ohio SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

114

World-Class Energy Assessments: Industrial Action Plans for Greater and More Durable Energy Cost Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes recommendations for improving the impact of industrial energy assessments. This initiative responds to the observation that less than half of recommended energy improvements are implemented as a result of traditional assessment methods. The need to rethink energy assessment strategies coincides with industrys greater interest in controlling its energy costs. The Alliance to Save Energy conducted three roundtables at different U.S. locations during the first half of 2006. These events solicited feedback from 80 people, including energy assessment practitioners, representatives from energy consuming facilities, and government and utility program personnel. All participants in this discussion are interested in promoting industrial energy efficiency and recognize the pivotal role of energy assessments in achieving their goals. The recommendations address the considerations prior to, during, and after an energy assessment. Among this documents leading conclusions is that the assessment experience need not be confined to a reportit can become a relationship between the assessor and the client facility. Manufacturers across the U.S. are struggling with volatile energy costs. While many industrial decision makers anticipate a solution in the form of lower energy prices, others are investigating the merits of efficient practices that reduce unnecessary energy consumption.

Russell, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE PLANT-WIDE ENERGY ASSESSMENT RESULTS RELATED TO THE U. S. AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Forty-nine plant-wide energy efficiency assessments have been undertaken under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Industrial Technologies Program. Plant-wide assessments are comprehensive, systematic investigations of plant energy efficiency, including plant utility systems and process operations. Assessments in industrial facilities have highlighted opportunities for implementing best practices in industrial energy management, including the adoption of new, energy-efficient technologies and process and equipment improvements. Total annual savings opportunities of $201 million have been identified from the 40 completed assessments. Many of the participating industrial plants have implemented efficiency-improvement projects and already have realized total cost savings of more than $81 million annually. This paper provides an overview of the assessment efforts undertaken and presents a summary of the major energy and cost savings identified to date. The paper also discusses specific results from assessments conducted at four plants in the automotive manufacturing operations and supporting industries. These particular assessments were conducted at facilities that produce engine castings, plastic films used for glass laminates, forged components, and at a body spray painting plant.

Kelly Kissock, Arvind Thekdi, Len Bishop

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Electronics Quality/Reliability Center: Lessons learned from partnering with industry  

SciTech Connect

The government electronics community faces the exciting challenge of entering into new of types of partnerships with the commercial electronics industry. Past interactions have been based primarily on the needs of government. Future interactions will be based more on the needs of industry, particularly its need to be competitive in commercial products. The most successful groups will be those most adept at forming this new type of ``win-win`` partner. Fortunately, both government and industry want to make these new partnerships successful. The government is driven by the necessity of establishing a common government/commercial manufacturing base and the desire to support US competitiveness. Industry is driven by the need to partner with government to remain competitive. Unfortunately, there are no detailed guides available to help government electronics groups and their sponsors in the Administration and Congress cross this uncharted terrain. The purpose of this paper is to share some ``lessons learned`` from the experiences of a government electronics group that has been active in establishing these new types of partnerships with industry. It is our hope that by sharing these lessons we will make it easier for other government groups to work with the commercial industry.

Dellin, T.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and...

118

Empirical results from using custom-made software project control centers in industrial environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One means for institutionalizing project control, systematic quality assurance, and management support on the basis of measurement and explicit models is the establishment of so-called Software Project Control Centers. Nowadays many companies develop ... Keywords: case study, cost, effectiveness, spcc

Marcus Ciolkowski; Jens Heidrich; Frank Simon; Mathias Radicke

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center, Assessment of the Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking Training and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent, periodic evaluations of training programs at the EPRI Nondestructive Evaluation Center ensure fulfillment of utility needs and regulatory requirements for qualified personnel. A recent assessment recommended lengthening trainee time spent in hands-on practice with flawed BWR pipe samples.

1988-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

120

Catalogue and Assessment of Industry Maintenance Best Practices for Substation Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have been maintaining substation equipment reliably since the industry's inception, but now many are facing increased challenges to reduce operating and maintenance costs without adversely affecting service levels. In this setting, utilities may benefit from knowing what programs and techniques their peers have implemented. To that end, EPRI conducted a series of industry surveys assessing key substation equipment maintenance practices. As utilities consider modifying their maintenance programs...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Exploration of Innovation and An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Prepared by Margaret Taylor, K. Sydny Fujita, Larry Dale, and James McMahon For the European Council for an Energy Efficient Economy March 29, 2012 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL - 5689E An Exploration of Innovation and Energy Efficiency in an Appliance Industry Abstract This report provides a starting point for appliance energy efficiency policy to be informed by an understanding of: the baseline rate and direction of technological change of product industries; the factors that underlie the outcomes of innovation in these industries; and the ways the innovation system might respond to any given intervention. The report provides an overview of the dynamics of energy efficiency policy and innovation in the appliance

122

Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milling industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantcement mak- ing - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantre- fineries - An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant

Bernstein, Lenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

124

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Solar Resource & Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP); Aurora, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in Colorado, near Denver International Airport, SolarTAC is a private, member-based, 74-acre outdoor facility where the solar industry tests, validates, and demonstrates advanced solar technologies. SolarTAC was launched in 2008 by a public-private consortium, including Midwest Research Institute (MRI). As a supporting member of SolarTAC, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has established a high quality solar and meteorological measurement station at this location. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

125

Industry and government perspectives on First Nations' participation in the British Columbia environmental assessment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research was conducted with West Moberly First Nations, Halfway First Nation and the Treaty 8 Tribal Association (located in northeastern British Columbia, Canada) on effective engagement in environmental assessment processes. As part of this research, we examined the perspectives of a subset of resource industry proponents and their consultants, as well as staff from the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office on their experiences with the requirement to consult with Canada's indigenous peoples. Research into the perspectives of industry proponents and consultants is almost non-existent, yet industry and governments are key participants within environmental assessments. This research found that industry proponents were disenfranchised by the British Columbia environmental assessment process and its mechanisms for consulting with First Nations, and that they sought changes to that process. Their concerns and their implications are documented and some recommendations are offered for addressing those concerns. Understanding industry and government views on First Nations engagement could suggest not only potential improvements in EA processes that facilitate all parties but provide common grounds for mutually engaging to resolve challenges.

Booth, Annie L., E-mail: annie@unbc.ca; Skelton, Norm W.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

A Summary of the Experience of Two Mexican Industrial Energy Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) began a program in Mexico to promote energy efficient products and services. Faculty and students at two universities were trained to perform assessments to identify energy-conserving opportunities at small and medium-sized manufacturers. Recommendations included improving combustion equipment, such as boilers; process equipment, such as motors and air compressors; and buildings and grounds, such as lighting or heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. On average, the cost savings recommended from the assessments were approximately 13% of the annual energy costs for the plants and manufacturers implemented approximately 50% of the recommended cost savings. Initial feedback indicates that there is a great potential for future assessments in the Mexico City and Monterrey areas.

Paroby, R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

129

Review of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project, September 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Centered Assessment of the Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Disposition Project September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Results .................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................ 7

130

Environmental Assessment Center for Molecular Electronics University of Missouri, St. Louis, June 1994  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31; Environmental Assessment Center for Molecular Electronics University of 31; Environmental Assessment Center for Molecular Electronics University of Missouri, St. Louis, June 1994 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.2 Operation Impacts 5.3 Environmental Impacts of Alternatives 5.4 Compliance with Regulations 6.0 RELATIONSHIP OF THE PROPOSED ACTION TO OTHER ACTIONS 7.0 RELATIONSHIP OF THE PROPOSED ACTION TO ANY APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, REGIONAL OR LOCAL LAND USE PLANS AND POLICIES LIKELY TO BE AFFECTED

131

The United States Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment: Key Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the findings of the U. S. Industrial Electric Motor Systems Market Opportunities Assessment. The Market Assessment was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy. The project's principal objectives were to create a detailed portrait of the inventory of motor systems currently in use in US industrial facilities, estimate motor system energy use and potential for energy savings. The research and analysis to support these objectives consisted primarily of on-site motor system inventories of a probability sample of 254 manufacturing facilities nationwide. In addition to characterizing the motor systems in use, the research effort also gathered detailed information on motor system management and purchasing practices. This paper presents key findings from the Market Assessment in regard to patterns of motor energy use, saturation of energy efficiency measures such as efficient motors and adjustable speed drives, and motor system purchase and maintenance practices.

Rosenberg, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment for University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation Solar Technology Center (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation SOLAR TECHNOLOGY CENTER January 2009 Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact DOE/EA-1622 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 This Environmental Assessment was prepared on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation with contractual assistance from Ninyo & Moore, Inc. and MBP Consulting, LLC. Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center

133

Construction of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action of granting a site use permit to construct and operate a conference center on an approximately 70-acre tract of land on the Savannah River Site (SRS). While the proposed action requires an administrative decision by DOE, this EA reviews the linked action of physically constructing and operating a conference center. The SRS is a DOE-owned nuclear production facility encompassing approximately 200,000 acres in southwestern South Carolina. The proposed conference center would have an area of approximately 4,000 square feet, and would infrequently accommodate as many as 150 people, with the average being about 20 people per day. In addition to the No-Action alternative, under which the Research Foundation would not require the 70-acre tract of SRS land for a conference center, this EA considers site preservation. Under Site Preservation only minimal activities necessary to the SRS mission would occur, thereby establishing the lower limits of environmental consequences. A review conducted under the SRS permitting process identified no other forms of possible site development. Similarly, SRS areas identified in the Nuclear Complex Reconfiguration Site Proposal (DOE, 199la) do not include the conference center site area in proposed weapons complex reconfiguration activities. As a consequence, this EA does not consider other forms of possible site development as alternatives. The potential environmental consequences associated with the action of constructing and operating a conference center include impacts to cultural resources and impacts from construction activities, primarily related to land clearing (5 to 10 acres) and providing access to the site.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessment of selected conservation measures for high-temperature process industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy conservation projects involving high-temperature processes in various stages of development are assessed to quantify their energy conservation potential; to determine their present status of development; to identify their research and development needs and estimate the associated costs; and to determine the most effective role for the Federal government in developing these technologies. The program analyzed 25 energy conserving processes in the iron and steel, aluminium, copper, magnesium, cement, and glassmaking industries. A preliminary list of other potential energy conservation projects in these industries is also presented in the appendix. (MCW)

Kusik, C L; Parameswaran, K; Nadkarni, R; O'Neill, J K; Malhotra, S; Hyde, R; Kinneberg, D; Fox, L; Rossetti, M

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Preliminary assessment of energy conservation opportunities at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is encouraging energy efficiency in its buildings and facilities as part of an overall strategy to meet the requirements of the Executive Order on Energy Efficiency and the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992. NASA requested technical assistance from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a site visit, examine selected buildings and facilities, and suggest appropriate and economically acceptable energy efficiency measures and future actions at NASA`s Goddard Space Flight Center. PNL was also tasked to investigate the current and future demand-side management (DSM) programs offered by the servicing electric utility that would be applicable for the site. The information for this assessment was collected during site visits to the Goddard Space Flight Center during September and October 1992. The assessment addresses energy supply and cost, estimated energy distribution and use, and cost-effective options to reduce energy consumption at the center. Applicable utility DSM programs are also identified. A recommended strategy is identified to undertake a more comprehensive long-term energy reduction program at the site. A model approach is also given for the site to develop a partnership with the serving electric utility to implement a ``custom`` site-wide DSM program incorporating the several incentives offered by the utility to governmental agencies.

Hoffman, L. [L. Hoffman and Associates, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Parker, G.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

138

Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 31, 2002 May 31, 2002 DOE/EA 1378 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICAflJT IMPACT For the NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER Site Operations and Short-Term and Long-Term Improvement Programs Golden, Colorado AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) to evaluate potential impacts of site operations and short-term and long-term improvement programs. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads the national research effort to develop clean, competitive, and reliable renewable energy and power delivery technologies for the 21st century. The mission of EERE's Wind Energy Program is to help the

139

Environmental Assessment for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT CENTER FOR INTEGRATED NANOTECHNOLOGIES AT SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES/NEW MEXICO The United States Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Sandia Site Office, has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The EA analyzes the potential effects of a proposal to construct and operate a CINT Core Facility and establish a Gateway to Sandia Facility. The CINT Core Facility would be constructed on a 20-acre DOE-owned parcel of land on the west side of Eubank Boulevard, north of the entrance to Kirtland Air Force Base. The Gateway to Sandia Facility would be established in existing space within the existing

140

Review of international geothermal activities and assessment of US industry opportunities: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to review and assess international developments in the geothermal energy field and to define business opportunities for the US geothermal industry. The report establishes data bases on the status of worldwide geothermal development and the competitiveness of US industry. Other factors identified include existing legislation, tax incentives, and government institutions or agencies and private sector organizations that promote geothermal exports. Based on the initial search of 177 countries and geographic entities, 71 countries and areas were selected as the most likely targets for the expansion of the geothermal industry internationally. The study then determined to what extent their geothermal resource had been developed, what countries had aided or participated in this development, and what plans existed for future development. Data on the energy, economic, and financial situations were gathered.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Review of international geothermal activities and assessment of US industry opportunities: Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a study initiated to review and assess international developments in the geothermal energy field and to define business opportunities for the US geothermal industry. The report establishes data bases on the status of worldwide geothermal development and the competitiveness of US industry. Other factors identified include existing legislation, tax incentives, and government institutions or agencies and private sector organizations that promote geothermal exports. Based on the initial search of 177 countries and geographic entities, 71 countries and areas were selected as the most likely targets for the expansion of the geothermal industry internationally. The study then determined to what extent their geothermal resource had been developed, what countries had aided or participated in this development, and what plans existed for future development. Data on the energy, economic, and financial situations were gathered.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE/EA-0767 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF AN INDUSTRIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

767 767 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF AN INDUSTRIAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILL AT PORTSMOUTH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT PIKETON, OHIO OCTOBER 1995 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE MAST ~P . L...~ I OOTRlSUTiON· O F THIS OOCl,lJlOO IS lIUi&fJtID Ct( OSTI Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Piketon. Ohio October 1995 Prepared by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY SYSTEMS. INC. Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities P. O. Box 628 Piketon. Ohio 45661 for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Under Contract DE-AC05-840R21400 DOE/EA-0767 TABLE OF CONTENTS FIGURES AND TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

143

Preliminary assessment of the gaseous fuels aftermarket conversion industry. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the report is to provide information to be used in assessing the potential impacts of EPA's proposed Gaseous Fuels and Clean Fuel Fleet rulemakings on the aftermarket conversion industry. Therefore, the report will focus on issues germane to determining these impacts (such as financial profiles of companies involved, future trends in industry development and sales, and costs of complying with conversion requirements) rather than assessing the viability of current technologies or the emissions benefits of alternative fuels. Moreover, the report focuses on conversions to CNG and LPG as conversions to these fuels are most viable at this time, even though EPA's proposed conversion regulations could potentially apply to any fuel (e.g., liquid natural gas).

Not Available

1992-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nondestructive Evaluation: Assessment of NDE Technologies and Practices in Other Industries, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of technical information collected on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies that are used in other industries and research into new NDE technologies. The purpose of this report is to assess these NDE technologies to determine if they could be useful for nuclear inspection applications. In addition, this study also evaluates some NDE technologies that are currently being researched by universities and other research ...

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Member Survey on Steel Crossarms: Industry Issues Regarding Degradation, Inspection, Life Assessment and Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a survey to obtain information on industry issues related to steel crossarm degradation and failures, and utility practices regarding inspection, life assessment, and mitigation. Survey results will help improve understanding of crossarm issues to be addressed, and provide guidance for further research on degradation modes, inspection technologies, and mitigation techniques.A web-based survey tool was used to construct a set of focused questions to ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

147

EA-0921; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research 21; Environmental Assessment and FONSI Ambulatory Research and Education Center, Oregon Health Sciences University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Project Description 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operations Activities 3.3 No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS 5.1 Construction 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources 5.1.1.1 Historic/Archeological Resources 5.1.1.2 Federal/State-Listed or Proposed Protected Species or Critical Habitats 5.1.1.3 Flood Plains/Wetlands 5.1.1.4 National Forest, Parks, Trails, etc. 5.1.1.5 Prime Farmland 5.1.1.6 Special Sources of Water

148

Assessment of a 200-kW Fuel Cell at the U.S. Army Natick Research Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry is showing renewed interest in distributed generation, with a particular interest in fuel cells. This on-going project will provide long-term data on performance and operating characteristics of an ONSI 200-kW phosphoric acid fuel cell at the U.S. Army RD&E Center in Natick, Massachusetts.

1997-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dose assessment for management alternatives for NORM-contaminated equipment within the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contamination of drilling and production equipment by naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is a growing concern for the petroleum industry and regulators. Large volumes of NORM-contaminated scrap metal are generated by the industry each year. The contamination generally occurs as surface contamination on the interior of water-handling equipment. The source of this contamination is accumulation of by-product wastes, in the form of scale and sludge contaminated with NORM that are generated by extraction processes. The primary radionuclides of concern in petroleum industry NORM-wastes are radium-226 (Ra-226), and radium-228 (Ra-228). These isotopes are members of the uranium-238 and thorium-232 decay series, respectively. The uranium and thorium isotopes, which are naturally present in the subsurface formations from which hydrocarbons are extracted, are largely immobile and remain in the subsurface. The more soluble radium can become mobilized in the formation water and be transported to the surface in the produced water waste stream. The radium either remains in solution or precipitates in scale or sludge deposits, depending on water salinity and on temperature and pressure phase changes. NORM-containing scale consists of radium that has coprecipitated with barium, calcium, or strontium sulfates, and sludge typically consists of radium-containing silicates and carbonates. This assessment is limited to the evaluation of potential radiological doses from management options that specifically involve recycle and reuse of contaminated metal. Doses from disposal of contaminated equipment are not addressed. Radiological doses were estimated for workers and the general public for equipment decontamination and smelting. Results of this assessment can be used to examine policy issues concerning the regulation and management of NORM-contaminated wastes generated by the petroleum industry.

Blunt, D.L.; Smith, K.P.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries: Main Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Environmental Assessment for Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45 45 E E N N V V I I R R O O N N M M E E N N T T A A L L A A S S S S E E S S S S M M E E N N T T F F O O R R C C L L E E A A N N U U P P A A N N D D C C L L O O S S U U R R E E O O F F T T H H E E E E N N E E R R G G Y Y T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y E E N N G G I I N N E E E E R R I I N N G G C C E E N N T T E E R R FINAL March 2003 U.S. Department of Energy NNSA Service Center Oakland, CA Environmental Assessment for Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center i TABLE OF CONTENTS Acronyms ..........................................................................................................................................v Glossary...........................................................................................................................................vi 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................

152

EA-0896; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center For Nuclear Medicine Research In Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West 6; Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) Center for Nuclear Medicine Research in Alzheimer's Disease Health Sciences Center - West Virginia University TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 DOCUMENT SUMMARY 1.1. Description 1.2 Alternatives 1.3 Affected Environment 1.4 Construction Impacts 1.5 Operating Impacts 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION 3.1 Description of the Proposed Action 3.2.1 Construction Activities 3.2.2 Operation Activities 3.3 The No Action Alternative 3.4 Site Alternatives 4.0 THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 5.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Sensitive Resources

153

Using best available scientific information in assessing the involvement of energy industries at Superfund sites  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress is currently reauthorizing the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund). Enacted in 1980, CERCLA has been criticized for its costly and time-consuming requirements, unfairness, need for better scientific information, and lack of progress in reducing health and environmental risks. This paper describes the development of a database of energy-industry involvement at Superfund sites, using the best available scientific information. It illustrates the difficulties in reporting, compiling, and assessing data as currently managed under CERCLA. It also presents analytical results, indicating the number of sites at which there has been energy-industry involvement (roughly one-fourth to one-third of all Superfund sites), and for these sites, the numbers of energy companies that are potentially responsible parties (about 500 individual companies), the estimated cleanup costs (an average of $18 million per site), and the volumetric shares of hazardous waste contributed by energy companies (up to one-third of the volume at sites with energy-industry involvement). Such results provide a basis for evaluating impacts of Superfund changes on energy companies.

Elcock, D.; Puder, M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

First National Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 10 First National Technology First National Technology Center Center The Nature of the Grid - Industrial Age Power - Normal Course Voltage Interruptions: 2-3 seconds Lights and...

156

First Year Analysis of Industrial Energy Conservation/Management of the Texas A&M University- Kingsville Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center was established at Texas A&M University-Kingsville (formerly Texas A&I University) in November 1993 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Center is managed by the University City Science Center, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the 1993-94 academic year, the Center conducted 15 energy audits of small and medium sized manufacturing plants in South Texas. The SIC code of the plants audited ranged from 20 to 39. The Center's chief purpose is to serve the energy-related needs of small and medium sized manufacturers. These needs relate specifically to energy used in manufacturing processes but also include other aspects of a manufacturer's energy use. The Center analyzes operating characteristics and energy requirements of manufacturing plants; to identify, quantify, and recommend specific opportunities to conserve energy and/or utilize alternate energy sources. The findings are reported to the manufactures, together with estimates of their savings, implementation costs, and payback periods. In addition, the Center provides students with hands-on experience in the fields of energy auditing, energy management, and energy utilization in industry. During its first year of operation the A&M-K EADC recommended 89 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs). The estimated energy savings totaled 30,598 MMBtu/yr that translated to savings of $464,245 (include operation modifications cost reductions, such as demand shifting). The estimated implementation costs totaled $309,669 yielding a simple payback period of 8 months. The energy savings represented 6.3 % of the total energy used at these plants; while the cost savings represented 8.8 % of the total energy cost. This paper describes the Center, its mission in South Texas, and its operation. The ECOs are classified in three groups: electrical, natural gas, and operation modification. These are discussed in detail.

Medina, M. A.; Elkassabgi, Y.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assessment And Testing of Industrial Devices Robustness Against Cyber Security Attacks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research),like any organization, needs to achieve the conflicting objectives of connecting its operational network to Internet while at the same time keeping its industrial control systems secure from external and internal cyber attacks. With this in mind, the ISA-99[0F1] international cyber security standard has been adopted at CERN as a reference model to define a set of guidelines and security robustness criteria applicable to any network device. Devices robustness represents a key link in the defense-in-depth concept as some attacks will inevitably penetrate security boundaries and thus require further protection measures. When assessing the cyber security robustness of devices we have singled out control system-relevant attack patterns derived from the well-known CAPEC[1F2] classification. Once a vulnerability is identified, it needs to be documented, prioritized and reproduced at will in a dedicated test environment for debugging purposes. CERN - in collaboration ...

Tilaro, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Assessment for The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H center with Green Building Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Golden Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 December 27, 2006 DOE/EA 1571 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Ohio State University (OSU) 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies in Franklin County, Ohio. Based on action by the U.S. Congress, DOE has funding available to support the construction phase of two features within the Ohio 4-H Center designed for energy efficiency: 1) A hybrid geothermal/cooling tower heating, ventilating, and cooling (HVAC) system, and,

159

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

160

Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review Report Review Report Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities May 2011 August 2011 Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Table of Contents Background ................................................................................................................................................... 1 Results ........................................................................................................................................................... 2 Conduct of the FCA ......................................................................................................................... 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

What is the Industrial Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Together with our industry partners, we strive to: Together with our industry partners, we strive to: * Accelerate adoption of the many energy-efficient technologies and practices available today * Conduct vigorous technology innovation to radically improve future energy diversity, resource efficiency, and carbon mitigation * Promote a corporate culture of energy efficiency and carbon management What Is the Industrial Technologies Program ? The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is the lead federal agency responsible for improving energy efficiency in the largest energy-using sector of the country. Industrial Sector National Initiative Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. Standards Training Information Assessments * Website * Information Center * Tip Sheets * Case studies * Webcasts * Emerging

162

Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

Moreira, A.M.M., E-mail: anamariainforme@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil); Guenther, W.M.R. [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Doutor Arnaldo 715, Sao Paulo 01246-904 (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

Shaw, Thomas E.

164

Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A utility survey and market assessment on repowering in the electric power industry  

SciTech Connect

Section 1 of this report provides a background about the DOE High Performance Power Systems (HIPPS) program. There are two kinds of HIPPS cycles under development. One team is led by the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, the other team is led by the United Technologies Research Center. These cycles are described. Section 2 summarizes the feedback from the survey of the repowering needs of ten electric utility companies. The survey verified that the utility company planners favor a repowering for a first-of-a-kind demonstration of a new technology rather than an all-new-site application. These planners list the major factor in considering a unit as a repowering candidate as plant age: they identify plants built between 1955 and 1965 as the most likely candidates. Other important factors include the following: the need to reduce operating costs; the need to perform major maintenance/replacement of the boiler; and the need to reduce emissions. Section 3 reports the results of the market assessment. Using the size and age preferences identified in the survey, a market assessment was conducted (with the aid of a power plant data base) to estimate the number and characteristics of US generating units which constitute the current, primary potential market for coal-based repowering. Nearly 250 units in the US meet the criteria determined to be the potential repowering market.

Klara, J.M. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Weinstein, R.E. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States); Wherley, M.R. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Airflow Management and Micro-Servers: Technical Assessments for the Data Center Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper describes two efficient technologies that were presented to the Data Center Interest Group, which meets monthly to explore emerging technologies that improve the efficiency of data centers. The first topic covered in this white paper, airflowmanagement techniques, includes a suite of techniques used to improve the efficiency of systems used to cool data centers by optimizing the flow of conditioned air. These proven techniques are commercially available and ready for deployment in ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sen, R.K. [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Sen, R.K. (Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Assessing the impact of regulation and deregulation on the rail and trucking industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Many Class I railroads disappeared and severe competition bankrupted many small carriers in the trucking industry. Larger trucking carriers gained market dominance. Real wages in the trucking industry fell. The ...

Lowtan, Donavan M. (Donavan Mahees), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Technology Delivery Plant-Wide Assessment at PPG Industries, Natrium, WV  

SciTech Connect

PPG and West Virginia University performed a plantwide energy assessment at the PPGs Natrium, WV chemical plant, an energy-intensive manufacturing facility producing chlor-alkali and related products. Implementation of all the assessment recommendations contained in this report could reduce plant energy consumption by 8.7%, saving an estimated 10,023,192 kWh/yr in electricity, 6,113 MM Btu/yr in Natural Gas, 401,156 M lb/yr in steam and 23,494 tons/yr in coal and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 241 mm lb/yr. The total cost savings would amount to approximately $2.9 mm/yr. Projects being actively implemented will save $1.7 mm/yr; the remainder are undergoing more detailed engineering study.

Lester, Stephen R.; Wiethe, Jeff; Green, Russell; Guice, Christina; Gopalakrishnan, Bhaskaran; Turton, Richard

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective informative and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects - the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry.

Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formating information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.

Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Assessment of the Aviation Weather Center Global Forecasts of Mesoscale Convective Systems*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the precision of location and top height of mesoscale convective systems, as forecast by the Aviation Weather Center (AWC). The examination was motivated by the Mediterranean Israeli Dust Experiment (MEIDEX) on the space ...

Baruch Ziv; Yoav Yair; Karin Presman; Martin Fllekrug

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

First Year Analysis of Industrial Energy Conservation in Texas A&M's Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University's Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) performed 15 energy audits of small- to medium-size manufacturing plants during its first year. The EADC program is funded by the United States Department of Energy and managed by the University City Science Center, a non-profit organization, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The purpose of the EADC is to identify and recommend specific opportunities to conserve energy. In addition, the EADC may identify and recommend opportunities to reduce operating costs, but which do not conserve any energy. The EADC accomplishes its mission through careful analysis of the relationship between the energy utilized and the operating characteristics of the plants. The EADC recommended 109 energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) in 15 energy audits, an average of seven ECOs per audit. The 109 recommendations are divided into four groups: Electrical Energy ECOs, Natural Gas ECOs, Non-Energy Saving ECOs, and Opportunity ECOs. This paper will briefly discuss the EADC method of energy auditing and reporting, the four groups of ECOs in detail, and the implementation of the ECOs.

Grubb, M. K.; Heffington, W. M.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 7: Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

191 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 191 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 7: Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits u Technology Tracking............................................................................................................................................ 192 u Methods of Estimating Benefits.............................................................................................................................. 192 u Deriving the ITP Cost/Benefit Curve ...................................................................................................................... 193 Methodology for Technology Tracking and Assessment of Benefits

177

Technology Assessment: NREL Provides Know-How for Highly Energy-Efficient Data Centers (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NREL leads the effort to change how energy is used worldwide by helping identify and eliminate barriers to energy efficiency and clean energy technology deployment. The laboratory takes a portfolio approach that explores the full range of technology options for developing and implementing innovative energy performance solutions. The Research Support Facility (RSF) data center is a prime example of NREL's capabilities and expertise in energy efficiency. But, more important, its features can be replicated. NREL provides custom technical assistance and training for improved data center performance to help our customers realize cost savings.

Not Available

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improved motors for utility applications. Volume 2. Industry assessment study. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Auxiliary drive motor failures in electric utility applications result in large repair costs and, energy replacement costs. In order to assess the motor reliability experience of the utility industry and identify specific problem areas, information or more than 4800 motors at 132 generating units owned by 56 utilities was collected. The computerized database encompasses all fuel sources, geographic factors and motor manufacturers. Analysis of the data, field interviews with utilities across the country and technical judgment were used to identify the major factors influencing motor reliability. In total, 1221 failures were reported which represents a rate of 4.6% failure per motor per year. Several utilities reported experience as good as 1 or 2% and others as poor as 12%. Although all manufacturers can supply reliable equipment for most applications, failures of specific components in certain specific applications appear to be associated with specific manufacturers. However, overall, 22% of all reported failures were attributed to winding failure and 13% to sleeve bearings. Numerous examples of misapplication were discovered such as the horizontal motor which was vertically mounted by an OEM, inadequately balanced hydraulic thrust loads in a packaged motor/pump system and inappropriate enclosure specified for a motor located outdoors.The internal procedures and practices of those utilities which had particularly low failure rate experience included such factors as, stringent specifications, objective purchasing policies, adequate record keeping and preventative maintenance programs. Auxiliary large drive motor failures are estimated to cost the average utility over $350,000 per unit per year for alternate energy source during outages. Future cooperative efforts by the manufacturers, the A and E firms, the OEM's and the utilities could significantly reduce this value.

Mighdoll, P.; Bloss, R.P.; Hayashi, F.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NSF/SRC Engineering Research Center for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing Integrated ESH Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Industrial Interactions Cu CVD process Continue analysis of ESH & Manufacturing metrics Improve model Semiconductor Manufacturing 2 Strategic Plan Time Line Reuse and Recycle Chemicals recycle and reuse Water recycle and reuse Abatement and Discharge Control Novel plasma reactor abatement Waste water treatment CMP

Rubloff, Gary W.

180

Assessment of On-Site Power Opportunities in the Industrial Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify the potential for on-site power generation in the U.S. industrial sector with emphasis on nine industrial groups called the ''Industries of the Future'' (IOFs) by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Through its Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), the DOE has teamed with the IOFs to develop collaborative strategies for improving productivity, global competitiveness, energy usage and environmental performance. Total purchases for electricity and steam for the IOFs are in excess of $27 billion annually. Energy-related costs are very significant for these industries. The nine industrial groups are (1) Agriculture (SIC 1); (2) Forest products; (3) Lumber and wood products (SIC 24); (4) Paper and allied products (SIC 26); (5) Mining (SIC 11, 12, 14); (6) Glass (SIC 32); (7) Petroleum (SIC 29); (8) Chemicals (SIC 28); and (9) Metals (SIC 33): Steel, Aluminum, and Metal casting. Although not currently part of the IOF program, the food industry is included in this report because of its close relationship to the agricultural industry and its success with on-site power generation. On-site generation provides an alternative means to reduce energy costs, comply with environmental regulations, and ensure a reliable power supply. On-site generation can ease congestion in the local utility's electric grid. Electric market restructuring is exacerbating the price premium for peak electricity use and for reliability, creating considerable market interest in on-site generation.

Bryson, T.

2001-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment of the Incentives, Disincentives, and Alternatives for Steel Industry CO2 Reduction  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the third element of a trilogy of studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies on the consumption of energy and the emissions of carbon dioxide in the U.S. steel industry

Paul T. Leuchte; DR. John Stubbles; Professor Fruehan

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

First Year Analysis of Industrial Energy Conservation in Texas A&M's Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University's Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) performed 15 energy audits of small- to medium-size manufacturing plants during its first year. The purpose of the EADC is to identify and recommend specific opportunities to conserve energy. In addition, the EADC may identify and recommend opportunities to reduce operating costs, but which do not conserve any energy. The EADC accomplishes its mission through careful analysis of the relationship between the energy utilized and the operating characteristics of the plants. The EADC recommended 109 energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) in 15 energy audits, an average of seven ECOs per audit. The 109 recommendations are divided into four groups: Electrical Energy ECOs, Natural Gas ECOs, Non-Energy Saving ECOs, and Opportunity ECOs. This paper will briefly discuss the EADC method of energy auditing and reporting, the four groups of ECOs in detail, and the implementation of the ECOs.

Grubb, M. K.; Heffington, W. M.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (IAC) teams. The Industrial Technologies Program completed 200 SENAs at U.S. industrial plants3/20/09 Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings of $485 million Industrial Energy Efficiency The ORNL Industrial Energy Efficiency Team supports DOE's Best

185

Assessing the Control Systems Capacity for Demand Response in California Industries  

SciTech Connect

California's electricity markets are moving toward dynamic pricing models, such as real-time pricing, within the next few years, which could have a significant impact on an industrial facility's cost of energy use during the times of peak use. Adequate controls and automated systems that provide industrial facility managers real-time energy use and cost information are necessary for successful implementation of a comprehensive electricity strategy; however, little is known about the current control capacity of California industries. To address this gap, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in close collaboration with California industrial trade associations, conducted a survey to determine the current state of controls technologies in California industries. This,study identifies sectors that have the technical capability to implement Demand Response (DR) and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). In an effort to assist policy makers and industry in meeting the challenges of real-time pricing, facility operational and organizational factors were taken into consideration to generate recommendations on which sectors Demand Response efforts should be focused. Analysis of the survey responses showed that while the vast majority of industrial facilities have semi- or fully automated control systems, participation in Demand Response programs is still low due to perceived barriers. The results also showed that the facilities that use continuous processes are good Demand Response candidates. When comparing facilities participating in Demand Response to those not participating, several similarities and differences emerged. Demand Response-participating facilities and non-participating facilities had similar timings of peak energy use, production processes, and participation in energy audits. Though the survey sample was smaller than anticipated, the results seemed to support our preliminary assumptions. Demonstrations of Auto-Demand Response in industrial facilities with good control capabilities are needed to dispel perceived barriers to participation and to investigate industrial subsectors suggested of having inherent Demand Response potential.

Ghatikar, Girish; McKane, Aimee; Goli, Sasank; Therkelsen, Peter; Olsen, Daniel

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

186

Assessment of New Motor Technologies and their Applications: Evaluation of an advanced circulator pump for residential, commercial and industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric pumps are the workhorses behind several industrial processes that help transfer liquids, gases and slurries from one location to another. From simple water pumping systems to sophisticated oil refineries, electric pumps are used in many different areas. Electric pumps are also used in various capacities in the commercial and residential sectors from hot water circulation systems to pool pumps. This technical update provides an assessment of a new circulator pump technology that uses ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Low-income energy policy in a restructuring electricity industry: an assessment of federal options  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies both the low-income energy services historically provided in the electricity industry and those services that may be affected by industry restructuring. It identifies policies that are being proposed or could be developed to address low- income electricity services in a restructured industry. It discusses potential federal policy options and identifies key policy and implementation issues that arise when considering these potential federal initiatives. To understand recent policy development at the state level, we reviewed restructuring proposals from eight states and the accompanying testimony and comments filed in restructuring proceedings in these states.

Baxter, L.W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Virginia Center for Coal+Energy Research VirginiaPolytechnicInstituteandStateUniversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established a reliable set of benchmarks for Virginia's coal, gas and oil, and electricity industries. Future. Assessment of Virginia Coalfield Region Capability to Support an Electric Power Generation Industry. Carl E- sponded well to the changing chal- lenges faced by Virginia's coal and en- ergy industries. The center

189

Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information source on industry trends, market activity and business practices of companies involved in energy-information on market activity of 63 companies that have national or regional operations in the energy-

Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry and market trends in the energy-efficiency servicestrends, market activity and business practices of companies involved in energy-trend likely understates the shift away from performance-contracting arrangements in the energy efficiency services market

Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Frequency Response Adequacy and Assessment: Global Industry Practices and Potential Impact of Changing Generation Mix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry, the North American Reliability Corporation (NERC) and the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have expressed concerns about frequency response of the North American power system, which has declined over the past few decades. The industry is concerned about having adequate primary frequency control (governing), automatic generation control (AGC), operating reserve and ramping resources to meet frequency response needs, in light of the changing generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Frequency Response Adequacy and Assessment: Global Industry Practices and Potential Impact of Changing Generation Mix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry, the North American Reliability Corporation (NERC), and the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have expressed concerns about frequency response of the North American power system, which has supposedly declined over the past few decades. In light of the changing generation mix due to increasing penetration of variable generation and planned retirement of fossil-fired generation, the industry is concerned about having adequate primary frequency control ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Industry Survey and Assessment of Available Corrosion Mitigation Technologies: 20th Century State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the findings of searching various industry databases and soliciting information from suppliers regarding available corrosion detection of mitigation technologies. The focus of the search was for methods that can mitigate, detect, or monitor corrosion on pipe-type cable systems; methods appropriate for submarine cables were also considered. Special attention was given to new corrosion technologies or the application of different technologies from associated industries. Information w...

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER  

SciTech Connect

The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

Fatuzzo, M. [Physics Deparment, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 45207 (United States); Melia, F., E-mail: fatuzzo@xavier.edu, E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Math Program, and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-temperature industrial process heat: technology assessment and introduction rationale  

SciTech Connect

Three specific topics of interest to DOE are addressed: to establish the significance and identify the role of high-temperature process heat in the nation's energy economy; to identify the role of solar thermal power in these high-temperature industrial applications in terms of possible markets and economic potential; and to recommend programmatic approaches for these solar thermal high-temperature process heat activities, including proposed content for initial Request for Proposals (RFPs) to accomplish such activities. The scope of the work required to accomplish these three purposes included the following: review of US industrial energy requirements, survey of current DOE low-temperature Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program, examination of high-temperature solar thermal electric systems already developed or under development by DOE and industry, and coordination with the high-energy user segments of industry (i.e., cement, chemical and petroleum) to find additional markets for some or all of the systems or components being developed in the DOE solar thermal electric program. Statistical data are presented identifying energy allocations to process heat and defining DOE's involvement. Three current fossil fuel process heat system examples are provided and the corresponding solar potential is identified.

1978-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

High-temperature industrial process heat: technology assessment and introduction rationale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three specific topics of interest to DOE are addressed: to establish the significance and identify the role of high-temperature process heat in the nation's energy economy; to identify the role of solar thermal power in these high-temperature industrial applications in terms of possible markets and economic potential; and to recommend programmatic approaches for these solar thermal high-temperature process heat activities, including proposed content for initial Request for Proposals (RFPs) to accomplish such activities. The scope of the work required to accomplish these three purposes included the following: review of US industrial energy requirements, survey of current DOE low-temperature Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program, examination of high-temperature solar thermal electric systems already developed or under development by DOE and industry, and coordination with the high-energy user segments of industry (i.e., cement, chemical and petroleum) to find additional markets for some or all of the systems or components being developed in the DOE solar thermal electric program. Statistical data are presented identifying energy allocations to process heat and defining DOE's involvement. Three current fossil fuel process heat system examples are provided and the corresponding solar potential is identified.

Not Available

1978-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessment of factors affecting industrial electricity demand. Final report (revision version)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Chapter 2, we identify those factors affecting the industrial product mix - taste, relative output prices, and relative input prices - and isolate several determinants which have not been adequately accounted for to date in industrial electricity demand forecasts. We discuss how the lower energy prices of foreign producers affect domestic producers and how the growth in the number of substitutes for intermediate products such as steel and aluminum with plastics and composites affects the composition of production and, hence, the demand for electricity. We also investigate how the changing age structure of the population brought on by the baby boom could change the mix of outputs produced by the industrial sector. In Chapter 3, we review the history of the 1970s with regard to changes in output mix and the manufacturing demand for electricity, and with regard to changes in the use of electricity vis-a-vis the other inputs in the production process. In Chapter 4, we generate forecasts using two models which control for efficiency changes, but in different ways. In this chapter we present the sensitivity of these projections using three sets of assumptions about product mix. The last chapter summarizes our results and draw from those results implications regarding public policy and industrial electricity demand. Two appendices present ISTUM2 results from selected electricity intensive industries, describes the ISTUM and ORIM models.

None

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Technology assessment of offshore industry. The United States offshore industry. Current status, trends and forecast 1976-2000. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume One presents a description of the current status of the U.S. offshore industry together with developing trends in the industry and an examination of the various forces that influence development. A 25 year forecast of offshore industry development is included. Also included is a description of the U.S. commercial ocean fishing industry and a 25 year forecast of industry development.

Durfee, J.H.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A comparison of methods for assessing penetrating trauma on retrospective multi-center data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective: TraumaSCAN-Web (TSW) is a computerized decision support system for assessing chest and abdominal penetrating trauma which utilizes 3D geometric reasoning and a Bayesian network with subjective probabilities obtained from an expert. The goal ... Keywords: Artificial intelligence, Computer-assisted diagnosis, Gunshot wounds, Penetrating trauma, Stab wounds

Bilal A. Ahmed; Michael E. Matheny; Phillip L. Rice; John R. Clarke; Omolola I. Ogunyemi

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An Assessment of carbon reduction technology opportunities in the petroleum refining industry.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The refining industry is a major source of CO{sub 2} emissions in the industrial sector and therefore in the future can expect to face increasing pressures to reduce emission levels. The energy used in refining is impacted by market dictates, crude quality, and environmental regulations. While the industry is technologically advanced and relatively efficient opportunities nevertheless exist to reduce energy usage and CO{sub 2} emissions. The opportunities will vary from refinery to refinery and will necessarily have to be economically viable and compatible with each refiner's strategic plans. Recognizing the many factors involved, a target of 15-20% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions from the refining sector does not appear to be unreasonable, assuming a favorable investment climate.

Petrick, M.

1998-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

National Skills Assessment of the U.S. Wind Industry in 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A robust workforce is essential to developing domestic wind power projects, including manufacturing, siting, operations, maintenance, and research capabilities. The purpose of our research is to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected workforce needs as the industry grows, and how existing and new programs can meet the wind industry's future education and training needs. Results presented in this report provide the first published investigation into the detailed makeup of the wind energy workforce, educational infrastructure and training needs of the wind industry. Insights from this research into the domestic wind workforce will allow the private sector, educational institutions, and federal and state governmental organizations to make workforce-related decisions based on the current employment and training data and future projections in this report.

Levanthal, M.; Tegen, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Oklahoma, industry consumes about 35% of the total energy consumed. While it is true that much work has been done in the larger companies, most small to medium sized companies have yet to undertake a substantial energy management program. Often they simply do not understand the savings possible or the techniques available. Recognizing this, a program was developed to acquaint Oklahoma industry with the potential savings allowable through energy management techniques. The program is entitled 'Oklahoma Industrial Energy; Management Program' and is located at Oklahoma State University. This paper describes past, on-going, and proposed activities of this Program and assesses their impact. Included are industrial energy management conferences, closed circuit television short courses on selected energy management topics, energy auditing, industrial energy audits (through the Oklahoma Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center) , energy and water management research, and two courses currently being offered.

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Goa, India Risk Assessment of Surface Miner for Estonian Oil Shale Mining Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with risk assessment of a high-selective oil-shale mining technology using surface miner Wirtgen 2500SM. This study addresses risk associated with productivity and cutting quality on example of Estonian oil shale deposit in areas with complicated layering conditions. The risk assessment method allows choosing relevant technology with friendly environment and economic value. For risk estimation the event tree is used. The results of the risk assessment are of practical interest for different purposes. 1

S. Sabanov; J-r. Pastarus; O. Nikitin; E. Vli

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Engaging With the Public? Assessing the Online Presence and Communication Practices of the Nanotechnology Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines whether the nanotechnology industry is engaging in the wider social debate surrounding it, through an analysis of its online communication practices. This is an important topic to study, given the nascent nature of the technology ... Keywords: cybermapping, hyperlink analysis, nanotechnology, online networks, science communication, social risk

Robert Ackland; Rachel Gibson; Wainer Lusoli; Stephen Ward

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Energy-efficient manufactured housing in Chicago: Part 1, Industry assessment and business concept paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) is exploring the feasibility of manufactured housing in the City of Chicago. This preliminary analysis focusses on the potential for establishing a manufactured housing plant in Chicago from two perspectives: as an economic development and job creation venture, as well as a possible element in meeting the Chicago area's needs for affordable housing.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental assessment for Kelley Hot Spring geothermal project: Kelley Hot Spring Agricultural Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental impacts of an integrated swine production unit are analyzed together with necessary ancillary operations deriving its primary energy from a known geothermal reservoir in accordance with policies established by the National Energy Conservation Act. This environmental assessment covers 6 areas designated as potentially feasible project sites, using as the basic criteria for selection ground, surface and geothermal water supplies. The six areas, comprising +- 150 acres each, are within a 2 mile radius of Kelley Hot Springs, a known geothermal resource of many centuries standing, located 16 miles west of Alturas, the county seat of Modoc County, California. The project consists of the construction and operation of a 1360 sow confined pork production complex expandable to 5440 sows. The farrow to finish system for 1360 sows consists of 2 breeding barns, 2 gestation barns, 1 farrowing and 1 nursery barn, 3 growing and 3 finishing barns, a feed mill, a methane generator for waste disposal and water storage ponds. Supporting this are one geothermal well and 1 or 2 cold water wells, all occupying approximately 12 acres. Environmental reconnaissance involving geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation, fauna, air and water quality, socioeconomic, archaelogical and historical, and land use aspects were carefully carried out, impacts assessed and mitigations evaluated.

Neilson, J.A.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Needs for Concrete Research in the Energy Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to compile information on issues pertaining to the degradation of concrete structures in the energy industry and to provide guidance in areas where research and development efforts might be needed. The state of these structures, known as concrete degradation, the life management approach, and challenges with new structures are discussed. In each case, a set of suggestions for further research is proposed. Finally, a set of recommendations for the overall needs of short-, m...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

212

Pollution prevention at industrial laundries: Assessment observations and waste reduction options  

SciTech Connect

The sources of pollution within industrial laundries must be identified and solutions found which reduce or eliminate the generation of the wastes through source reduction, reuse and recycling. Pollution prevention should be generally divided into laundry site activities and customer site activities. The report presents several options for reducing solid and hazardous waste generation. Opportunities to reduce the volume of non-hazardous solid wastes through better supplier partnerships also exist. Some options for reducing those wastes are also presented.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessing Power Quality Impacts and Solutions for the California Food Processing Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern food processing equipment can easily be impacted by very brief voltage reductions, commonly known as voltage sags, originating from utility distribution and transmission systems. Even minor voltage sags can lead to unscheduled process downtime, delayed client orders, loss of clients, and lost revenue. This project, sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), analyzed the impact of power quality on the California food processing industry and made recommendations for short-term and long-ter...

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Assessment of industry views on international business prospects for solar thermal technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a review of solar thermal industry viewpoints on their prospects for developing international business. The report documents the industry's current involvement in foreign markets, view of foreign competition in overseas applications, and view of federal R and D and policy requirements to strengthen international business prospects. The report is based on discussions with equipment manufacturers and system integrators who have a product or service with potential international demand. Interviews with manufacturers and system integrators were conducted by using a standard format for interview questions. The use of a standard format for questions provided a basis for aggregating similar views expressed by US companies concerning overseas business prospects. A special effort was made to gather responses from the entire solar thermal industry, including manufacturers of line-focus, point-focus, and central receiver systems. General, technical, economic, institutional, and financial findings are provided in this summary. In addition, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) recommendations are provided (based upon advice from the Solar Thermal Review Panel) for activities to improve US solar thermal business prospects overseas.

Easterling, J.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Fort Irwin National Training Center integrated resource assessment. Volume 1: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most difficult problems encountered at federal sites in reducing energy consumption in a cost-effective manner revolve around understanding where energy is being used and what technologies can be employed to decrease energy use. Many large federal sites have one or two meters to track electric energy use for several thousand buildings and numerous industrial processes. Even where meters are available on individual buildings or family housing units, the meters are not consistently read. When the federal energy manager has been able to identify high energy users, the energy manager may not have the background, training, or resources to determine the most cost-effective options for reducing this energy use. This limitation can lead to selection of suboptimal projects that prevent the site from achieving full life-cycle cost savings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has been tasked by the U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is assisting FEMP in this effort. This is part of a model program that PNL has developed to provide a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities. The program (1) identifies the building groups and end uses using the most energy (not just having the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a road map to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites.

Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

n April, the Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center will mark 27 years of helping manufacturers across Colorado and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in electricity, natural gas, propane, and coal consumed at the plants. On average, about 55 percent at rural Colorado K-12 schools to generate a little power and a lot of interest in wind energy. CSU, training students to become the next generation of energy engineers. Dr. T he mechanical engineering

217

Colorado State University Industrial Assessment Center Report CO0564 1 AR No. 1 -Repair Compressed Air Leaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= $1,060/yr Estimated Peak Electric Demand Savings = 46 kW-mo./yr Estimated Peak Electric Demand Cost energy consumption and peak demand charges since less power will be required to operate the compressed). The rated capacity at the maximum operating pressure of 100 psi is 291 actual cubic feet per minute (acfm

218

The U. S. Department of Energy's Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) planning process  

SciTech Connect

On September 2, 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy's Nevada operations office (DOE/NV) was tasked by the under secretary to develop a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) capability for response to major radiological emergencies. Prior to this time, each DOE region responded to a major radiological accident in their region. The DOE/NV's basic role is to coordinate the use of DOE's assets countrywide and provide the management nucleus of a FRMAC. Six working groups plus a management panel were established to assist in the implementation of the FRMAC response capability, and an interim FRMAC operation plant was published 9 months later. The paper discusses working groups, galileo planning, exercises, FRMAC planning products and future FRMAC activities.

Brown, H.U.; Boardman, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

David Grant Medical Center energy use baseline and integrated resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Mobility Command (AMC) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROs) at the David Grant Medical Center (DGMC). This report describes the methodology used to identify and evaluate the EROs at DGMC, provides a life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis for each ERO, and prioritizes any life-cycle cost-effective EROs based on their net present value (NPV), value index (VI), and savings to investment ratio (SIR or ROI). Analysis results are presented for 17 EROs that involve energy use in the areas of lighting, fan and pump motors, boiler operation, infiltration, electric load peak reduction and cogeneration, electric rate structures, and natural gas supply. Typical current energy consumption is approximately 22,900 MWh of electricity (78,300 MBtu), 87,600 kcf of natural gas (90,300 MBtu), and 8,300 gal of fuel oil (1,200 MBtu). A summary of the savings potential by energy-use category of all independent cost-effective EROs is shown in a table. This table includes the first cost, yearly energy consumption savings, and NPV for each energy-use category. The net dollar savings and NPV values as derived by the life-cycle cost analysis are based on the 1992 federal discount rate of 4.6%. The implementation of all EROs could result in a yearly electricity savings of more than 6,000 MWh or 26% of current yearly electricity consumption. More than 15 MW of billable load (total billed by the utility for a 12-month period) or more than 34% of current billed demand could also be saved. Corresponding natural gas savings would be 1,050 kcf (just over 1% of current consumption). Total yearly net energy cost savings for all options would be greater than $343,340. This value does not include any operations and maintenance (O&M) savings.

Richman, E.E.; Hoshide, R.K.; Dittmer, A.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Electric Power Research Institute Les Silverman, Director, McKinsey & Company Steve Specker, President

223

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy Efficient Data Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficient Data Centers Energy Efficient Data Centers Title Energy Efficient Data Centers Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-54163 Year of Publication 2004 Authors Tschudi, William F., Tengfang T. Xu, Dale A. Sartor, Jonathan G. Koomey, Bruce Nordman, and Osman Sezgen Call Number LBNL-54163 Abstract Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to Californias economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to Californias industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commissions PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research roadmap defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency.

225

DOSE ASSESSMENT OF THE FINAL INVENTORIES IN CENTER SLIT TRENCHES ONE THROUGH FIVE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), this study evaluates the performance of waste disposed in Slit Trenches 1-5 by calculating exposure doses and concentrations. As of 8/19/2010, Slit Trenches 1-5 have been filled and are closed to future waste disposal in support of an ARRA-funded interim operational cover project. Slit Trenches 6 and 7 are currently in operation and are not addressed within this analysis. Their current inventory limits are based on the 2008 SA and are not being impacted by this study. This analysis considers the location and the timing of waste disposal in Slit Trenches 1-5 throughout their operational life. In addition, the following improvements to the modeling approach have been incorporated into this analysis: (1) Final waste inventories from WITS are used for the base case analysis where variance in the reported final disposal inventories is addressed through a sensitivity analysis; (2) Updated K{sub d} values are used; (3) Area percentages of non-crushable containers are used in the analysis to determine expected infiltration flows for cases that consider collapse of these containers; (4) An updated representation of ETF carbon column vessels disposed in SLIT3-Unit F is used. Preliminary analyses indicated a problem meeting the groundwater beta-gamma dose limit because of high H-3 and I-129 release from the ETF vessels. The updated model uses results from a recent structural analysis of the ETF vessels indicating that water does not penetrate the vessels for about 130 years and that the vessels remain structurally intact throughout the 1130-year period of assessment; and (5) Operational covers are included with revised installation dates and sets of Slit Trenches that have a common cover. With the exception of the modeling enhancements noted above, the analysis follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA (WSRC, 2008) and the 2008 SA (Collard and Hamm, 2008). Infiltration flows through the vadose zone are identical to the flows used in the 2008 PA, except for flows during the operational cover time period. The physical (i.e., non-geochemical) models of the vadose zone and aquifer are identical in most cases to the models used in the 2008 PA. However, the 2008 PA assumed a uniform distribution of waste within each Slit Trench (WITS Location) and assumed that the entire inventory of each trench was disposed of at the time the first Slit Trench was opened. The current analysis considers individual trench excavations (i.e., segments) and groups of segments (i.e., Inventory Groups also known as WITS Units) within Slit Trenches. Waste disposal is assumed to be spatially uniform in each Inventory Group and is distributed in time increments of six months or less between the time the Inventory Group was opened and closed.

Collard, L.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

2011-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Operating Experience and Economic Assessment of Commercial and Industrial Cool Storage Systems - TVA Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems offer utilities a means to change the energy use patterns of both residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) customers by moving water-heating and space-conditioning loads from peak to offpeak periods. Benefits from investments in these systems include reduced capital investment in new generating capacity, reduced operating costs, and reduced risk associated with load growth projections and future environmental legislation. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to evaluate the performance of and quantify the potential economic benefits of C&I cool storage systems. The paper is organized into three major sections. Section one discusses the empirical data gathered from TVA's C&I Cool Storage Demonstration conducted during the summer of 1984. Section two discusses TVA's methodology For quantifying the potential economic benefits of these systems. Finally, the results are summarized with regard to future program activities.

Sieber, R. E.; Dahmus, A. B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

FIERAsystem: A Fire Risk Assessment Model for Light Industrial Building Fire Safety Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. The current report describes the framework for the new model, individual submodels used for calculations, and the information that the model provides to the design engineer or building official. The framework that FIERAsystem uses to conduct a hazard analysis and the process used to perform a risk analysis are also discussed in the report. 2. FRAMEWORK OF FIERAsystemMODEL The FIERAsystem model allows the user to perform a number of fire protection engineering calculations in order to evaluate fire protection systems in industrial buildings. At start-up, FIERAsystem provides several calculation options, which allow the user to: use standard engineering correlations, run individual submodels, conduct a hazard analysis, or conduct a risk analysis

N. Kashef; A. Torvi; G. Reid; Noureddine Benichou; Ahmed Kashef; David Torvi; George Hadjisophocleous; Irene Reid

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

EPRI Report on Solid Material Disposition: Evaluation to Assess Industry Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2005, the NRC staff requested Commission approval for publication of a proposed rule in the Federal Register to amend 10CFR Part 20 to include criteria for controlling the disposition of solid materials. This report provides an initial analysis of whether or not methods of solid material assessment, currently practiced at nuclear power facilities, would be sufficient to meet the disposition limits in the proposed rule.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

non-energy benefits, U.S. steel industry (Worrell et al.improvements in U.S. iron and steel industry (Worrell et al.for the U.S. iron and steel industry in 1994 (Figure 1).

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potentials in the Iron and steel Industry in China. Reportfor the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guidein the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. Report LBNL-41724.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

St. Louis, Missouri. Energy Technology Support Unit (ETSU),de Beer, 1997. "Energy Efficient Technologies in Industry -and MAIN, 1993. Energy Technology in the Cement Industrial

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel prices differ between industries andelectricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the iron and steel industryprice of electricity paid by the iron and steel industry in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and fuel efficiency improvements in the cement industryprice of electricity paid by the cement industry in 2009 isElectricity Conservation Supply Curve for the Cement Industry .

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

President Obama Highlights Energy Department Efficiency Training Centers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Energy Department Efficiency Training Highlights Energy Department Efficiency Training Centers That Save U.S. Manufacturers $5.6 Billion President Obama Highlights Energy Department Efficiency Training Centers That Save U.S. Manufacturers $5.6 Billion February 23, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - During a visit to the University of Miami to highlight his administration's all-out, all-of-the-above approach to American energy, President Obama today touted the Energy Department's cost-cutting Industrial Assessment Program. The program supports university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs) across the country, which provide students with critical skills and training to conduct energy assessments in a broad range of facilities, while producing real cost savings for small to mid-size manufacturers. To date, these assessments have helped save over

235

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy, Proceedings of the ACEEE 2003 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry. Washington, DC: American

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy performance Communicate energy efficiency Industrial energy management information center Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector An effective energy...

239

Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries: Main Report and Appendices (CD-ROM)  

SciTech Connect

The main report on this CD assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical, and petroleum refining industries, and estimates the potential for energy savings from implementation of steam system performace and efficiency improvements. The Appendices on this CD provide supporting information for the analyses and provides and recommendations for assessing the effectiveness of the U.S. Department of Energy BestPractices Steam Program.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofCost of Conserved Final Energy (US$/GJ) Final CCE includingwithout including non-energy benefits, U.S. steel industry (

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceNew Energy and Industrial Technology Development (NEDO).

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Energy Technologies Division, LawrenceEnvironmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrenceof Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plantguide policy makers in designing better sector-specific energy

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Save Energy Now (SEN) Assessment Helps Expand Energy Management Program at Shaw Industries: Flooring Company Saves $872,000 Annually by Improving Steam System Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study describes how the Shaw Industries plant #20 in Dalton, Georgia, achieved annual savings of $872,000 and 93,000 MMBtu after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

Not Available

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Energy efficient data centers  

SciTech Connect

Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case study findings, and participation in data center industry meetings and workshops. Industry partners enthusiastically provided valuable insight into current practice, and helped to identify areas where additional public interest research could lead to significant efficiency improvement. This helped to define and prioritize the research agenda. The interaction involved industry representatives with expertise in all aspects of data center facilities, including specialized facility infrastructure systems and computing equipment. In addition to the input obtained through industry workshops, LBNL's participation in a three-day, comprehensive design ''charrette'' hosted by the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) yielded a number of innovative ideas for future research.

Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessing the technical, economic and policy-centered feasibility of a proposed satellite communication system for the developing world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite communication systems remain one of the most under utilized development mediums in less industrialized countries. This research proposes to establish a low cost satellite communications system tailored specifically ...

Samuels, Ayanna Terehas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Industrial Energy Efficiency Assessments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

工业能效评估 工业能效评估 蒲思琳 资深科学家 中国能源研究室 能效分析处 环境能源技术部 劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室 第二届中美能效论坛 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 工业能效评估 - 定义和关键要素 - 国际经验 - 中国实际情况和建议 - 中美合作 第二届中美能效论坛 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 2011年5月5-6日|劳伦斯伯克利国家实验室,伯克利市,加州 工业能效评估 - 分析工厂中能源使用情况和节能潜力

248

Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA: Personal Computing Industry Center, working paper.flows in the wind energy industry. Peterson Institute, WPin the Global Wind Energy Industry Jason Dedrick, Syracuse

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

250

Human Health Risk Assessment for Petroleum Refining Industry of the Remaining Air Toxics after MACT I Emissions Reductions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Inhalation risks on human health for hazardous air pollutants emitted from MACT I petroleum refining industry were determined using EPA HEM-3 Program. Methodology included compiling (more)

Roa, Nadia C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry LBNL-Agreements on Energy Efficiency- Danish Experiences.Cooperation to Improve Energy Efficiency Through Voluntary

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking Industrial Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions.and L. Price. 1999. Energy Efficiency and Carbon DioxideGalitsky. 2004. Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities

Sathaye, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Cost-Benefit Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining in the Kraft Pulp and Paper Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of liquid fuels and chemicals via gasification of kraft black liquor and woody residues (''biorefining'') has the potential to provide significant economic returns for kraft pulp and paper mills replacing Tomlinson boilers beginning in the 2010-2015 timeframe. Commercialization of gasification technologies is anticipated in this period, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are in most cases already commercially established today in the ''gas-to-liquids'' industry. These conclusions are supported by detailed analysis carried out in a two-year project co-funded by the American Forest and Paper Association and the Biomass Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. This work assessed the energy, environment, and economic costs and benefits of biorefineries at kraft pulp and paper mills in the United States. Seven detailed biorefinery process designs were developed for a reference freesheet pulp/paper mill in the Southeastern U.S., together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. Commercial (''Nth'') plant levels of technology performance and cost were assumed. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which would be refined to vehicle fuels at existing petroleum refineries), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or LPG substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. Compared to installing a new Tomlinson power/recovery system, a biorefinery would require larger capital investment. However, because the biorefinery would have higher energy efficiencies, lower air emissions, and a more diverse product slate (including transportation fuel), the internal rates of return (IRR) on the incremental capital investments would be attractive under many circumstances. For nearly all of the cases examined in the study, the IRR lies between 14% and 18%, assuming a 25-year levelized world oil price of $50/bbl--the US Department of Energy's 2006 reference oil price projection. The IRRs would rise to as high as 35% if positive incremental environmental benefits associated with biorefinery products are monetized (e.g., if an excise tax credit for the liquid fuel is available comparable to the one that exists for ethanol in the United States today). Moreover, if future crude oil prices are higher ($78/bbl levelized price, the US Department of Energy's 2006 high oil price scenario projection, representing an extrapolation of mid-2006 price levels), the calculated IRR exceeds 45% in some cases when environmental attributes are also monetized. In addition to the economic benefits to kraft pulp/paper producers, biorefineries widely implemented at pulp mills in the U.S. would result in nationally-significant liquid fuel production levels, petroleum savings, greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and criteria-pollutant reductions. These are quantified in this study. A fully-developed pulpmill biorefinery industry could be double or more the size of the current corn-ethanol industry in the United States in terms of annual liquid fuel production. Forest biomass resources are sufficient in the United States to sustainably support such a scale of forest biorefining in addition to the projected growth in pulp and paper production.

Eric D. Larson; Stefano Consonni; Ryan E. Katofsky; Kristiina Iisa; W. James Frederick

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

DOE/EA-1583: Final Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center/Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (October 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER / NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVE NO. 3 FINAL Site-wide Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact October 2008 U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar Street, Suite 150 Casper WY 82601 DOE/EA-1583 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center / Naval Petroleum Reserve No.3 Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS.................................................................................................vii SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................ix 1.0 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................................1

255

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

256

Industrial Energy Use Indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy use indices and associated coefficients of variation are computed for major industry categories for electricity and natural gas use in small and medium-sized plants in the U.S. Standard deviations often exceed the average EUI for an energy type, with coefficients of variation averaging 290% for 8,200 plants from all areas of the continental U.S. Data from milder climates appears more scattered than that from colder climates. For example, the ratio of the average of coefficient of variations for all industry types in warm versus cold regions of the U.S. generally is greater than unity. Data scatter may have several explanations, including climate, plant area accounting, the influence of low cost energy and low cost buildings used in the south of the U.S. This analysis uses electricity and natural gas energy consumption and area data of manufacturing plants available in the U.S. Department of Energys national Industrial Assessment Center database.

Hanegan, A.; Heffington, W. M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Condition and Power Transfer Assessment of CenterPoint Energy's Polk-Garrott Pipe-Type Cable Circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes distributed fiber optic temperature sensing (DFOTS) on pipe-type cable circuits and the results of modifying and implementing EPRI's Dynamic Thermal Circuit Rating (DTCR) system on CenterPoint's Polk-Garrott pipe-type cable circuit in Houston, Texas.

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

EA-1055: Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Proposed Center for Advanced Industrial Processes Washington State University College of Engineering and Architecture

259

High Tech and Industrial Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Tech and Industrial Systems Group High Tech and Industrial Systems Group Some of the largest energy users in today's economy are high tech buildings and industrial systems. They operate up to 24 hours per day with energy intensities much greater than typical commercial or residential buildings, and they are essential to the national economy. High-tech buildings, such as laboratories, cleanrooms, data centers, and hospitals, are characterized by large base-loads, continuous operation, and high energy-use intensities. These buildings crosscut many industries and institutions. Group activities and products include: benchmarking surveys and metrics, case study reports, technology development, technology demonstrations, assessment and profiling tools, best practice guides, workshops, training guides, and development of other strategies.

260

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Cement Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand Opportunities through 2030. Washington, DC: CCAP. Wang,cement industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Emission Paths to 2030. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceand steel industry for 2010-2030 is estimated to be 251 TWh,emission factors through 2030 were from the factors used in

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

average unit price of electricity and coal used inyear. The weighted average unit price of Bituminous coal,coal, and coke consumed in the steel industry in 2010 is used as the fuel price

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tonne CO2/MWh) Sintering Coke Making Iron Making Blastadopted in China include: Coke Dry Quenching (CDQ), Top-steel industry is coal and coke, the weighted average CO 2

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Surface data for fusion devices. Progress report on data compilation and assessment by the US, Japanese, and IAEA data centers  

SciTech Connect

Besides presenting data in a format useful to plasma modellers, these data collection activities also serve the function of disclosing gaps in the available data base. The IAEA review panel has pointed out that information on processes of electron ejection and reflection is sparse and is generally unsatisfactory for purposes of modelling sheath effects. The US and Japanese Data Centers recently held a joint workshop where it was concluded that data on trapping and reemission was in an unsatisfactory state. In this case the parameters used to record the phenomena are closely related to the model adopted to describe the process. Existing handbooks on materials are generally weak in the areas closely related to metallurgical properties. All three data centers continue to pursue different aspects of the data collection and review process with a close interaction to avoid significant overlap of activities.

Thomas, E.W.; Itoh, N.; Langley, R.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Center Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Center Research ... Supports Electric Utility Restructuring Winds of change in the U.S. power sector: factors listed in the left column have created a gap between the prices utilities must charge to recover their embedded costs and the lower rates they would have to charge in a competitive environment. Possible responses to these pressures are listed to the right. The electricity industry in the U.S. is being dramatically restructured by state regulatory commissions and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Efforts are underway to create a wholesale market for electricity, with wholesale prices to distributing utility companies no longer being regulated. Discussions in several states and at the FERC are aimed at revising the regulation of the structure, operation, and pricing of the

266

Industrial alliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is emerging from the Cold War era into an exciting, but challenging future. Improving the economic competitiveness of our Nation is essential both for improving the quality of life in the United States and maintaining a strong national security. The research and technical skills used to maintain a leading edge in defense and energy now should be used to help meet the challenge of maintaining, regaining, and establishing US leadership in industrial technologies. Companies recognize that success in the world marketplace depends on products that are at the leading edge of technology, with competitive cost, quality, and performance. Los Alamos National Laboratory and its Industrial Partnership Center (IPC) has the strategic goal to make a strong contribution to the nation`s economic competitiveness by leveraging the government`s investment at the Laboratory: personnel, infrastructure, and technological expertise.

Adams, K.V.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Oncology Center  

SciTech Connect

Efforts by the Hollings Cancer Center to earn a designation as a National Cancer Center are outlined.

Kraft, Andrew S.

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Publications » Newsletters Publications » Newsletters Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Newsletters on AddThis.com... Newsletters Read these government and industry newsletters to stay current with developments in alternative transportation technologies, including alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and regulated fleets. Government Newsletters

269

Poultry Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. poultry industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in poultry and egg production and processing. The poultry industry, which consists of poultry production for meat as well as egg production and processing, is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. food manufacturing industry. It is also an energy-intensive industry. In fact, a 2010 report by the USDA illustrates ...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Preliminary assessment report for Grubbs/Kyle Training Center, Smyrna/Rutherford County Regional Airport, Installation 47340, Smyrna, Tennessee. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Tennessee Army National Guard (TNARNG) property near Smyrna, Tennessee. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Grubbs/Kyle Training Center property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.; Stefano, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

Pawar, Rajesh J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are conducting combined energy and waste assessments for small and medium-size manufacturers. The Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center is field manager for the western region of the Industrial Assessment Center program. These case studies present results from three assessments of manufacturing plants in the metal fabrication industry. Primary processing operations include machining, painting, plating, and assembly. Energy conservation opportunities chiefly involved motor systems, compressed air systems, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Typically, pollution prevention opportunities involved the painting lines. For each of the three plants studied, processes are described; the specific energy conserving and waste-reducing measures are identified; the energy savings and waste reductions are quantified; and financial analyses are presented, including cost savings and paybacks. In addition, actual implementation results reported by the manufacturers are provided.

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential and costs of energy- efficiency improvements bypotentials and the cost of energy-efficiency measures andand Cost Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG Emissions Reduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy or CO2 tax Energy Audits and Assessments Emissionssuch as free or low-cost energy audits or tax exemptions forinvestments in wind energy, audit programs, benchmarking,

Price, Lynn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Voluntary Agreements for Energy Efficiency or GHG EmissionsReduction in Industry: An Assessment of Programs Around the World  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary agreements for energy efficiency improvement and reduction of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been a popular policy instrument for the industrial sector in industrialized countries since the 1990s. A number of these national-level voluntary agreement programs are now being modified and strengthened, while additional countries--including some recently industrialized and developing countries--are adopting these type of agreements in an effort to increase the energy efficiency of their industrial sectors.Voluntary agreement programs can be roughly divided into three broad categories: (1) programs that are completely voluntary, (2) programs that use the threat of future regulations or energy/GHG emissions taxes as a motivation for participation, and (3) programs that are implemented in conjunction with an existing energy/GHG emissions tax policy or with strict regulations. A variety of government-provided incentives as well as penalties are associated with these programs. This paper reviews 23 energy efficiency or GHG emissions reduction voluntary agreement programs in 18 countries, including countries in Europe, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) and discusses preliminary lessons learned regarding program design and effectiveness. The paper notes that such agreement programs, in which companies inventory and manage their energy use and GHG emissions to meet specific reduction targets, are an essential first step towards GHG emissions trading programs.

Price, Lynn

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1982. Energy and the Steel Industry, Brussels, Belgium:in the Canadian Steel Industry, Ottawa, Canada: CANMET.in the Iron and Steel Industry, in: Proceedings 1997 ACEEE

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cube assessment framework for B2C websites applied in a longitudinal study in the luxury fashion industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review of existing assessment frameworks for B2C websites over more than ten years reveals that they are all built bottom-up through an essentially empirical approach of recording functionalities/features without any theoretical construct ... Keywords: CUBE, assessment, branding, e-commerce, fashion, longitudinal, luxury, social media, web 2.0, website

Rina Hansen, Niels Bjrn-Andersen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Energy Consumption Trends Federal Partnership for Green Data Centers Resources Industrial...

279

Water reuse and recycle in the US steam-electric-generating industry - an assessment of current practice and potential for future applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study assesses the current and future potential for wastewater reuse and recycle by the steam-electric-generating industry in the United States. Fifty-three power plants employing one or more of the following reuse/recycle measures were identified by a literature search and interviews with reuse/recycle experts--cascading higher-quality wastewaters to lower-quality uses, recirculating ash sluice water, using cooling tower makeup or sidestream softening, treating and reclaiming wastewaters, using dry-cooling systems, and using municipal effluents as plant-intake water. Detailed case studies were performed on eight of the 53 plants surveyed.

Breitstein, L.; Tucker, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Enhanced Ride-Through for Industrial Power Supplies: Feasibility, Testing, Design, and Assessment of Future Intelligent Embedded Sol utions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the value and interest in characterizing end-use devices for their susceptibility to disturbances such as voltage sags and momentary interruptions increased, EPRI and its utility funders in power quality (PQ) began testing industrial power supplies (IPSs). Tests conducted by EPRI Solutions as a part of the EPRI System Compatibility Research Project in the mid-1990s indicated that the immunity of IPSs to these disturbances, like the immunity of personal computer (PC) power supplies (CPSs), could be imp...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE/EA-1616: Environmental Assessment for Carbon Research Center Project at Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility near Wilsonville, Alabama (DOE/EA-1616) (9/2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 16 CARBON RESEARCH CENTER PROJECT AT SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES' POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY NEAR WILSONVILLE, ALABAMA FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory SEPTEMBER 2008 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Carbon Research Center Project, Draft Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA- 1616) Location: Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility near Wilsonville, Alabama Contact: For further information about this Environmental Assessment, contact: Roy Spears, Document Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory

282

LANL: Superconductivity Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone Sitemap | Lab Home | Phone ABOUT LANL ContactsPhonebookPolicy CenterOrganizationMapsJobs Emergency NEWS LIBRARY JOBS Search Materials Physics & Applications: STC STC Home OUR FOCUS HTS Physics HTS Materials Development HTS Materials Processing Power Applications Electronic Materials FUTURE APPLICATIONS Biomedical Developments Magnetic Levitation Train MHD Ship CONTACTS Center Leader Ken Marken Program Administrator Brenda Espinoza Center Office Location: TA-03, Bdg. 0032, Rm. 141 Exploring technology at STC Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) The Superconductivity Technology Center (STC) coordinates a multidisciplinary program for research, development, and technology transfer in the area of high-temperature superconductivity. Our focus is on effective collaborations with American industry, universities, and other national laboratories to develop electric power and electronic device applications of high-temperature superconductors (HTS).

283

Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part I: solar energy - commercial and industrial  

SciTech Connect

This study concerns commercial and industrial solar applications, specifically solar water heating and solar air cooling. The study finds that solar domestic water heating and boiler make-up water preheating are technically feasible and, depending on the displaced energy source (electrical or various fuel types), economically justified; and that solar hot water installations could displace the equivalent of 189,842 barrels of fuel oil per year. However, solar cooling requires high performance collectors not currently manufactured in Jamaica, and feasibility studies indicate that solar cooling in the near term is not economically justified.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Dairy Industry: Industry Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Industry Brief provides an overview of the U.S. dairy industry and ways in which electric-powered processes and technologies can be used in milk production and processing. Because of the different processes involved, the characteristics of energy consumption at milk production and processing facilities vary by facility. Most energy used in milk production is in the form of diesel fuel, followed by electricity and then by petroleum products such as gasoline an...

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

UNCLASSIFIED Texas Gang Threat Assessment 2012 Texas Gang Threat Assessment 2012 A State Intelligence Estimate Produced by the Texas Fusion Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key analytic judgments of this assessment are: Gangs continue to represent a significant public safety threat to the State of Texas, and are responsible for a disproportionate amount of crime in our communities. Of incarcerated members of Tier 1 and Tier 2 gangs, more than half are serving a sentence for a violent crime, including robbery (25 percent), homicide (14 percent), and assault/terroristic threat (12 percent). The Tier 1 gangs in Texas are Tango Blast (estimated at 10,000 members), Texas Syndicate (4,500 members), Barrio Azteca (3,500 members), and Texas Mexican Mafia (6,000 members). These organizations pose the greatest gang threat to Texas due to their relationships with Mexican cartels, large membership numbers, high levels of transnational criminal activity, and organizational effectiveness. Mexican cartels continue to use gangs in Texas as they smuggle drugs, people, weapons, and cash across the border. Members of Tier 1 gangs have been recruited by the cartels to carry out acts of violence in both Texas and Mexico. The relationships between gangs and cartels have evolved over the past year, due in part to volatility and changes in cartel

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the Version 1 luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is lost in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IGATE-E is an industrial energy analysis tool. The tool is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, engineers, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using information from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE's Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool utilizes the DOE EIA-MECS energy survey data to validate bottom-up estimates and permits several statistical examinations.

Alkadi, N.; Starke, M.; Ma, O.; Nimbalkar, S.; Cox, D.; Dowling, K.; Johnson, B.; Khan, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Value Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Value centers identify the over-reaching themes, initiatives, and opportunities in alignment with the strategic goals of AOCS. Value Centers AOCS History and Governance about us aocs committees contact us division council fats governing board hist

291

Public health assessment for Rockwool Industries, Belton, Bell County, Texas, Region 6, CERCLIS number TXD066379645. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Rockwool Industries, Inc. (RWI) National Priorities List site is a 100 acre site one-mile east of downtown Belton in Bell County, Texas. The Facility manufactured two types of mineral wool insulation: Blow wool and batt wool. Three main contaminant source areas have been identified at the site. Source 1, in the middle portion of the site, includes contaminated soil associated with the South Shot Pile. Source 2, in the northern portion of the site, includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. Source 3, in the northwest portion of the site includes contaminated soils associated with the Cemetery Shot Pile. The primary waste types at the site include spent iron shot and baghouse dust. Secondary waste types include boiler blowdown water, stormwater runoff, recovered groundwater, and bricks. The Texas Department of Health (TDH) and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) evaluated the environmental information available for the site and identified several exposure situations for evaluation. These exposure situations include possible contact with site contaminants in the soil, surface water, sediment, and groundwater. The potential for exposure to site contaminants through the food chain was also examined. A brief review of the evaluation, organized by hazard category, is presented.

NONE

1999-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase  

SciTech Connect

Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS construct and Unified Command (UC) for management of a domestic incident. The NRP Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex (NUC) further provides requirements and protocols for coordinating federal government capabilities to respond to nuclear/radiological Incidents of National Significance (INS) and other radiological incidents. When a FRMAC is established, it operates under the parameters of NIMS as defined in the NRP. FRMAC and its operations have been modified to reflect NIMS/ICS concepts and principles and to facilitate working in a Unified Command structure. FRMAC is established at or near the scene of the incident to coordinate radiological monitoring and assessment and is established in coordination with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS); the coordinating agency; other federal agencies; and state, local, and tribal authorities. However, regardless of the coordinating agency designation, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) coordinates radiological monitoring and assessment activities for the initial phases of the offsite federal incident response through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) and FRMAC assets. Monitoring and assessment data are managed by FRMAC in an accountable, secure, and retrievable format. Monitoring data interpretations, including exposure rate contours, dose projections, and any requested radiological assessments are to be provided to the DHS; to the coordinating agency; and to state, local, and tribal government agencies.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and Contribution to California Agriculture William A. Matthews* University of California Agricultural Issues Center of California Agricultural Issues Center. #12; The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity

Hammock, Bruce D.

294

LANSCE | Lujan Neutron Scattering Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, National Office of Science Department of Energy, National Office of Science science.energy.gov Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration nnsa.energy.gov Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Logo Lujan Center Mission The Lujan Center delivers science by exploiting the unique characteristics of intense beams of pulsed neutrons for academia, national security, and industry. Lujan Center Vision The Lujan Center will operate a world class user program in the service of the nation. Lujan Center scientists will be recognized for their leadership and innovation in neutron scattering. Lujan Center at LANSCE The Lujan Center is one of five user facilities supported by the LANSCE accelerator which is stewarded. Funding to operate 10 instruments in a national user program is provided by the Department of Energy's Office of

295

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

297

Carolinas Energy Career Center  

SciTech Connect

Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; Established new training/laboratory resources; Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Industrial Relations : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The effective translation of BESC research results into applications testing and potential deployment is an implicit part of reaching DOE's bioenergy goals. The BESC member institutions recognize that a common strategy is important to the success of BESC. To promote the commercialization of new technologies, our plan is to: Maintain a single portal for information about available technologies. This web site will feature inventions and commercial opportunities in additoin to the information content related to the research program Provide a single point of contact for the licensing of new BESC inventions on behalf of our team (contact: Renae Speck) Provide opportunity for research institutions and private companies to become "BESC Affiliates"

299

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Industrial Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials Sustainability ... Ecology, Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases, and...

300

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Symbiosis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008... the enzyme producer Novozymes A/S, the oil refinery Statoil A/S, Bioteknisk Jordrens Soilrem A/S as well as the waste company Noveren I/S...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Industrial energy management information center | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip to main content ENERGY STAR logo Skip directly to page content Facebook Twitter YouTube Our Blog Search Search Energy Efficient Products Energy Efficient Products ENERGY STAR...

302

INDUSTRIAL PERFORMANCE CENTER Massachusetts Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Ordinance: (1) mandatory quadrennial (facetoface) ethics training for aldermen, aldermanic staff: · Quadrennial, facetoface ethics training is required for all aldermen, aldermanic staff, City Council

303

Research Facilities & Centers | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Clean Energy Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Centers BioEnergy Science Center Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Center For Structural Molecular Biology Climate Change Science Institute Joint Institute for Biological Sciences Manufacturing Demonstration Facility National Transportation Research Center Tools & Resources News and Awards Supporting Organizations Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers SHARE Facilities, Centers Welcome Industry, Academia Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities and capabilities together provide a unique environment for Clean Energy research. For example, as the lead institution for DOE's BioEnergy Science Center, ORNL is pioneering

304

Non-ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-ferrous Metals Industry Energy Management System Certification Details about China Quality Certification Center and Energy Management System certifications....

305

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Predicted costs of environmental controls for a commercial oil shale industry. Volume II. A subjective self-assessment of uncertainty in the predicted costs  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainties in Volume I without extensive additional engineering effort were identified and quantified. Substantial uncertainty was found in several critical variables, allowing a broad range of possible values. Calculations of the cost impact associated with such broad ranges, however, did not always result in significant differences. Seven major areas of pollution control activity were judged to warrant the assessment effort. Three of these areas were found to contain significant uncertainty and additional research is suggested. These areas are: H/sub 2/S removal from the retort gas stream (Stretford process); organic removal from process wastewaters (bio-oxidation or other alternatives); and slurry backfilling of spent Modified In Situ (MIS) retorts. The overall results of the assessment and analysis process are summarized in Table 1-1 in terms of total cost for pollution control. The distributions have been divided into three ranges in this table. A center range is given which contains 80% to 90% probability, and the costs outside this range with probabilities are given. The full distributions can be found in Section 5.0. The subjective probability distributions are a quantification of opinion. The probability of encountering costs below the low figure or above the high figure for each process and scenario is judged to be nearly zero.

Jovanovich, A.P.; Stone, M.L.; Taylor, G.C.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Boost Process Heating Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) can help industrial plants indentify opportunities to save energy.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glossary on AddThis.com... Glossary Use this comprehensive glossary to define terms commonly used in the alternative fuels and advanced vehicles industry. If you have questions about specific technologies or fuels, contact the Technical Response Service at 1-800-254-6735. Click on the appropriate letter. · A· B· C· D· E· F· G· H· I· J· K· L· M· N· O· P· Q· R· S· T· U· V· W· X· Y· Z·

310

An NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Program CCMC PROSPECTUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Program CCMC PROSPECTUS May 2005 CERAMIC ........................................................................................21 #12;PROSPECTUS, MAY 2005 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Ceramic and Composite Materials Center NSF Industry...................................................................................................................8 Industrial Advisory Board

311

NETL: Gasification: Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems - Systems and Industry Analyses Gasification Systems - Systems and Industry Analyses Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public Welfare Project Number: DE-FC26-08NT0004397 New Mexico State University The Arrowhead Center to Promote Prosperity and Public Welfare (PROSPER) of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) is conducting research analyzing the relationships between the fossil fuel energy sector and economic development issues in New Mexico. The project is a policy research and economic modeling initiative to enhance fossil fuel energy production and use in New Mexico in an environmentally progressive manner that contributes to the economic development of the state and creates a strong, vibrant economy that better serves the citizens of New Mexico. The project is engaging stakeholders in the research process and assessing (1) the impact

312

Energy Efficiency Improvement Techniques For Data Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data center industry is experiencing tremendous growth, and with that growth also comes increasing power consumption. The 2007 EPA report to Congress estimated that power consumption in the industry had doubled from 2001 to 2006 and would double again by 2011 if allowed to continue unabated. While efficiency of power supplies used in data center equipment has improved over time, power used by this equipment has increased, and the quantity of equipment being installed in data centers also is increasin...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Guardian Industries | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industries Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name Guardian Industries Place Auburn Hills, MI Website http://www.guardian.com/ References Results of NREL Testing (Glass Magazine)[1] Guardian News Archive[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Other Relationship Partnering Center within NREL Transportation Technologies and Systems Partnership Year 2002 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Guardian Industries is a company located in Auburn Hills, MI. References ↑ "Results of NREL Testing (Glass Magazine)" ↑ "Guardian News Archive" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Guardian_Industries&oldid=381719" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

314

User Facilities for Industry 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Satellite!Workshop!10!-!User!Facilities!for!Industry!101! Organizers:+Andreas+Roelofs+(CNM),+Jyotsana+Lal+(APS),+Katie+Carrado+Gregar+(CNM),+and+Susan+Strasser+ (APS)! ! In! order! to! increase! awareness! of! the! industrial! community! to! Argonne! National! Laboratory! user! facilities,!the!Advanced!Photon!Source!(APS),!the!Center!for!Nanoscale!Materials!(CNM)!and!the!Electron! Microscopy!Center!(EMC)!welcomed!industrial!scientists,!engineers!and!related!professionals!to!a!oneC day! workshop! to! learn! more! about! Argonne's! National! Laboratory! and! the! capabilities/techniques! available! for! their! use.! The! workshop! showcased! several! successful! industrial! user! experiments,! and! explained! the! different! ways! in! which! industrial! scientists! can! work! at! Argonne! or! with! Argonne!

315

DOE/EA-1673: Environmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment (July 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment July 2009 8-i CHAPTER 8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 8-1 8.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................... 8-1 8.3 AIR POLLUTANT DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................ 8-1 8.4 AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 8-3

316

In search of symbioses : an assessment of the relationships between two industrial estates and their adjacent communities in Trinidad, West Indies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After gaining independence in 1962, the government of Trinidad and Tobago chose to pursue economic development via industrialization, and specific to its case, through resource-based industrialization (RBI), that is, the ...

Peters, Kristal M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

High Technology and Industrial Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor clean room Semiconductor clean room High Technology and Industrial Systems EETD's research on high technology buildings and industrial systems is aimed at reducing energy consumed by the industrial sector in manufacturing facilities, including high technology industries such as data centers, cleanrooms in the such industries as electronics and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and laboratories, improving the competitiveness of U.S. industry. Contacts William Tschudi WFTschudi@lbl.gov (510) 495-2417 Aimee McKane ATMcKane@lbl.gov (518) 782-7002 Links High-Performance Buildings for High-Tech Industries Industrial Energy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

318

How Does Your Data Center Measure Up? Energy Efficiency Metrics and Benchmarks for Data Center Infrastructure Systems  

SciTech Connect

Data centers are among the most energy intensive types of facilities, and they are growing dramatically in terms of size and intensity [EPA 2007]. As a result, in the last few years there has been increasing interest from stakeholders - ranging from data center managers to policy makers - to improve the energy efficiency of data centers, and there are several industry and government organizations that have developed tools, guidelines, and training programs. There are many opportunities to reduce energy use in data centers and benchmarking studies reveal a wide range of efficiency practices. Data center operators may not be aware of how efficient their facility may be relative to their peers, even for the same levels of service. Benchmarking is an effective way to compare one facility to another, and also to track the performance of a given facility over time. Toward that end, this article presents the key metrics that facility managers can use to assess, track, and manage the efficiency of the infrastructure systems in data centers, and thereby identify potential efficiency actions. Most of the benchmarking data presented in this article are drawn from the data center benchmarking database at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The database was developed from studies commissioned by the California Energy Commission, Pacific Gas and Electric Co., the U.S. Department of Energy and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Ganguly, Srirupa; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Proceedings of second geopressured geothermal energy conference, Austin, Texas, February 23--25, 1976. Volume II. Resource assessment. [Geologic procedures for test- or industrial-site selection along Texas Gulf coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes techniques being used in the assessment of geopressured geothermal resources along the Texas Gulf Coast and defines geologic procedures for test- or industrial-site selection. These approaches have been proven in petroleum exploration and are applicable in geothermal exploration here in the Gulf basin and in other sedimentary basins.

Bebout, D.G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electrical energy (hydro, solar and wind), using thermal energy more realistically assesses the true nature for wind-energy systems that experience rapid changes in energy output. While based on gasENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN Report Summary 210-1 Life-Cycle Energy Costs and Greenhouse Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Argonne CNM: Industrial Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Industrial Users For Industrial Users The Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) has specific interest in growing the industrial user program and encourages researchers in industry to consider the capabilities and expertise we have to offer. As a CNM user, you have easy access to sophisticated scientific instrumentation geared toward nanoscience and nanotechnology. Moreover, our widely recognized staff researchers offer support in designing your experiments, using the equipment, and analyzing your data. Access to the CNM is through peer review of user proposals. Before you submit your first user proposal, we encourage you to contact any of our staff researchers, group leaders, the User Office, or division management to discuss the feasibility of your intended research using the expertise and facilities at the CNM. We are here to serve you as part of our user community and will be happy to address any questions you might have.

322

Uranium Industry Annual, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

Not Available

1993-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Compressed Air Management Program: A Performance Assessment Approach to Improving Industrial Compressed Air System Operation and Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Management Program (CAMP) provides Pacific Gas and Electric's (PG&E's) large industrial customers with measurement-based performance assessments of their compressed air systems. Under this program, the customer's system is inspected and both short-term, high resolution, and longer-term measurements are taken of power and pressure. These data are used in developing a system simulation based on the US DOE's AIRMaster+ computer model. Model results and professional judgment are used to identify a cost-effective strategy for improving the system. Recommendations are provided to the customer along with technical support for implementing these recommendations. After improvements are complete, the performance measurements are repeated so that PG&E and its customers can judge the effectiveness of the recommendations. The program uses a standardized toolkit (all off-the-shelf components) along with software developed exclusively for this application, to accomplish the required measurements and efficiently analyze and reduce the data for use in the AIRMaster+ model.

Qualmann, R. L.; Zeller, W.; Baker, M.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

Liang Sai [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang, Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Yijian [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, Beijing 100037 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

End User Perspective - Industrial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid State Research Center Solid State Research Center DOE Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop End User Perspective - Industrial Consumer Electronics Power (< 20-50W) Department of Energy Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop Jerry Hallmark Manager Energy Technologies Lab Motorola Labs Solid State Research Center DOE Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop Outline * Energy & Power of Portable Devices * Fuel Cell Applications & Cost * Key Requirements & Challenges * Fuels for Portable Fuel Cells * Fuel Transportation Regulations and Standards * Methanol Fuel Cells - Direct Methanol Fuel Cells - Reformed Methanol Fuel Cells * Technical Challenges 2 Solid State Research Center DOE Fuel Cell Portable Power Workshop Portable Electronics Yearly Energy Usage  :KU 1990 1980  :KU

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biobutanol to someone Biobutanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Biobutanol Biobutanol is a 4-carbon alcohol (butyl alcohol) produced from the same feedstocks as ethanol including corn, sugar beets, and other biomass feedstocks. Butanol is generally used as an industrial solvent in products such as lacquers and enamels, but it also can be blended with other fuels

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on AddThis.com...

328

Motor Systems Assessment Training, Including Use of the Motor Systems Tool Suite  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Motor Systems Assessment Training Motor Systems Assessment Training Presented by: Gilbert McCoy, PE Washington State University Extension Energy Program (360) 956-2086 mccoyg@energy.wsu.edu 2 Motor Systems Assessment Training 3 Motor Systems Assessment Training Department of Energy Information Resources U.S. DOE Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) BestPractices Website www.eere.energy.gov/industry/bestpractices EERE Information Center (877) 337-3463 Or www.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter 4 Motor Systems Assessment Training Big Picture Perspectives: Industrial Motor Systems Industrial motor systems: � Are the single largest electrical end use category in the American economy � Account for 23% of U.S. electrical sales. 5 Motor Systems Assessment Training Ultimate

329

Industrial Assessment Report Your Address  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your own estimates of energy, waste, productivity, and cost savings. Please feel welcome to contact in this report, nor assume any liability for damages resulting from the use of any information, equipment, method or process disclosed in this report. Pollution prevention recommendations are not intended to deal

Tullos, Desiree

330

The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via real-time telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and satellite. Once inside the FRMAC, this information is transferred to the pertinent divisions for review, data storage, and eventual display on map products. The internet is also a powerful communications tool being utilized by the FRMAC. Using a secure internet connection, field team location and data collection can be viewed live-time by any computer attached to the internet. Similarly, survey information from our fixed-wing aircraft can be viewed while the mission is being flown. All accumulated data and maps generated in the FRMAC are disseminated on a web page through the secure FRMAC web site. Several new data communication processes are being investigated to aid the FRMAC. Each of these provides an important tool to efficiently collect, record and disseminate environmental measurements to FRMAC scientists and decision makers. The ultimate goal of these processes is to improve the flow of protection decisions and information to the public.

Craig Marianno and James Essex

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Help Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Advanced Simulation and Computing Los Alamos National Laboratory Advanced Simulation and Computing Menu Events Partnerships Help Center Events Partnerships Help Center Videos Advanced Simulation and Computing Program » Help Center Computing Help Center Help hotlines, hours of operation, training, technical assistance, general information Los Alamos National Laboratory Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. - noon, 1:00-5:00 p.m. Mountain time Telephone: (505) 665-4444 option 3 Fax: (505) 665-6333 E-mail: consult@lanl.gov 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Operations (to report a system or network problem: (505) 667-2919 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. - noon, 1:00-4:45 p.m. Pacific time High Performance Hotline (technical consulting) Telephone: (925) 422-4532

332

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

333

Industrial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Frequently used rubber linings in other industries...Application Lining Power industry Scrubber towers Blended chlorobutyl Limestone slurry tanks Blended chlorobutyl Slurry piping Blended chlorobutyl 60 Shore A hardness natural rubber Seawater cooling water

334

Industries Affected  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Industries affected by microbiologically influenced corrosion...generation: nuclear, hydro, fossil fuel,

335

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RenewableEnergyTechnologies Transportation AssessmentDepartmentofEnergy,IndustrialTechnologiesProgram,DepartmentofEnergy,IndustrialTechnologiesProgram,

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

EA-1843: Imperial Solar Energy Center West, California | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Imperial Solar Energy Center West, California EA-1843: Imperial Solar Energy Center West, California Summary This Environmental Impact Report Environmental Assessment (EIR...

337

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leonhard (eds. ), Energy Efficiency Improvements in ElectricC. Moore, 1997. Energy Efficiency and Advanced TechnologiesSummer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Washington,

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry, Government Policy and Future Opportunities. Fuel cells (FCs)are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several

339

Save Energy Now Energy Assessments What Are the Benefits for Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 19, 2009 February 19, 2009 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Don Kasten/Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

340

Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 6, 2008 November 6, 2008 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. 4 EERE Goals include * Dramatically reduce, or even end, dependence on foreign oil (Goal 1) * Increase the efficiency/ reduce the energy intensity of industry (Goal 6) ITP Goal Drive a 25% reduction in U.S. industrial energy intensity by 2017 in support of the Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE) (DOE) Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Industrial Distributed Energy: Combined Heat & Power (CHP) Richard Sweetser Senior Advisor DOE's Mid-Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center 32% Helping plants save energy today using efficient energy management practices and efficient new technologies Activities to spur widespread commercial use of CHP and other distributed generation solutions 10% Manufacturing Energy Systems 33% Industries of the Future R&D addressing top priorities in America's most energy-intensive industries and cross-cutting activities applicable to multiple industrial subsectors 25% Industrial Distributed Energy Industrial Technical Assistance DOE ITP FY'11 Budget: $100M Knowledge development and

342

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Lied Transplant Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Center Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources for Planning Center Activities Resources for Planning Center Activities       QuarkNet at Work - Resources Home QuarkNet is a teacher professional development effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy. Teachers work on particle physics experiments during a summer and join a cadre of scientists and teachers working to introduce some aspects of their research into their classrooms. This allows tomorrow's particle physicists to peek over the shoulder of today's experimenters. These resources are available for lead teachers and mentors at Quartnet Centers as they design activities for associate teacher workshops and follow-on activities. Important Findings from Previous Years Mentor Tips Associate Teacher Institute Toolkit

345

Egypt National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) Jump to: navigation, search Name Egypt National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Industrial Development Organization, Egypt Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) Sector Energy Focus Area Industry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.unido.org/index.php Country Egypt Northern Africa References Egypt National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC)[1] "The Egypt National Cleaner Production Center (ENCPC) is a joint initiative between the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MTI) and UNIDO. It is an integral part of the ministry network of Technology Transfer and Innovation Centers (ETTIC) supporting the modernization of Egyptian industry, and covering 10 industrial sectors. The ENCPC operates as a horizontal,

346

Industry @ ALS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Industry @ ALS Concrete Industry Benefits from Ancient Romans and the ALS Print Thursday, 17 October 2013 14:24 New insights into the Romans' ingenious concrete harbor structures emerging from ALS beamline research could move the modern concrete industry toward its goal of a reduced carbon footprint. Summary Slide Read more... Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity in Biochar Print Thursday, 12 September 2013 08:41 Using ALS Beamlines 10.3.2 and 8.3.2, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently investigating how biochar sorbs environmental toxins and which kinds of biochar are the most effective. The possibilities for widespread use have already launched entrepreneurial commercial ventures. Summary Slide

347

Design for energy efficiency: Energy efficient industrialized housing research program. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy has sponsored the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing research program (EEIH) to improve the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers share responsibility for this program: The Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. Additional funding is provided through the participation of private industry, state governments and utilities. The program is guided by a steering committee comprised of industry and government representatives. This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 activities and progress, and proposed activities for FY 1991 in Task 2.1 Design for Energy Efficiency. This task establishes a vision of energy conservation opportunities in critical regions, market segments, climate zones and manufacturing strategies significant to industrialized housing in the 21st Century. In early FY 1990, four problem statements were developed to define future housing demand scenarios inclusive of issues of energy efficiency, housing design and manufacturing. Literature surveys were completed to assess seven areas of influence for industrialized housing and energy conservation in the future. Fifty-five future trends were identified in computing and design process; manufacturing process; construction materials, components and systems; energy and environment; demographic context; economic context; and planning policy and regulatory context.

Kellett, R.; Berg, R.; Paz, A.; Brown, G.Z.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

HEADQUARTERS & CONVENTION CENTER FLOORPLANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Caf. Moscone West Convention. Center. Lobby. General Poster Session. Moscone West Convention. Center. Exhibit Hall. Employment Referral. Center.

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Connecticut Incentives and Laws Connecticut Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Promotion Archived: 08/31/2013 The Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT), with funding from the Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD), has established a Connecticut Hydrogen-Fuel Cell Coalition (Coalition). The Coalition works to enhance economic growth through the development, manufacture, and deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and associated fueling systems. Representatives from industry, government, academia, labor, and other stakeholders make up the Coalition. CCAT

350

Low-slope roofing research needs: An ORNL draft assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Low-Slope Roofing Research Needs Agenda is a resource document prepared by the Roofing Industry Research Advisory Panel. The document will aid the Panel in developing recommended research priorities and schedules for the Roof Research Center established by the US Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Roof Research Center provides the roofing industry with a unique test facility capable of careful, on-line measurements on whole roof systems under controlled, simulated in-service conditions. This type of systems testing, however, is not well-developed in the roofing industry where, customarily, careful measurements are not only made to assess individual material properties under design conditions and systems testing generally is limited to ''performance testing''; that is, exposing roof systems to typical or accelerated environments and observing or measuring the time intergrated effects on various components. This document discusses the capabilities of the center and roofing research issues.

Busching, H.W.; Courville, G.E.; Dvorchak, M.; McCorkle, J.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

SOUTHVIEWDR Center for Applied  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Geology Chemistry Biological Sciences Geology Lab Bookstore Reed Milledge Payne Memorial Hall SANFORD DR Center CAES Activity Center Visitors Center (Four Towers) Greenhouses Center for Applied Isotope Study

Hall, Daniel

352

Industrial Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System. October 15, 2012 Outfall from the Laboratory's Data Communications Center cooling towers Intermittent flow of discharged water from the Laboratory's Data...

353

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

354

Thermodynamics of information technology data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology (IT) data centers consume a significant amount of energy, and the rate of increase of this energy consumption is growing faster than consumption in several other major industries. Thus, government regulatory agencies, academicians, ...

R. Schmidt; M. Iyengar

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Center of Innovation for Energy (Georgia) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Energy (Georgia) The Center of Innovation for Energy (Georgia) Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General PublicConsumer Industrial Savings...

356

The Illinois Accelerator Research Center, or IARC, will  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Accelerator Research Center, or IARC, will provide a state-of-the-art facility for accelerator research, education and industrialization. Scientists and engineers from...

357

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Improve the Energy Efficiency of Fan Systems, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program Fan System Assessment Tool (FSAT) can help quantify energy consumption and savings opportunities in industrial fan systems.

Not Available

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy savings with discounts rates 10%, 20% and 30% in the U.S. iron and steel industryenergy savings with discounts rates 10%, 20% and 30% in the U.S. iron and steel industry.

Xu, T.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Feasibility Study of Fuel Cell Cogeneration in Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Up until now, most of the literature on fuel cell cogeneration describes cogeneration at commercial sites. In this study, a PC25C phosphoric acid fuel cell cogeneration system was designed for an industrial facility and an economic analysis was performed. The US DOE Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database was examined to determine what industry considers a good investment for energy saving measures. Finally, the results of the cogeneration analysis and database investigation were used to project the conditions in which the PC25C might be accepted by industry. Analysis of IAC database revealed that energy conservation recommendations with simple paybacks as high as five years have a 40% implementation rate; however, using current prices the simple payback of the PC25C fuel cell exceeds the likely lifetime of the machine. One drawback of the PC25C for industrial cogeneration is that the temperature of heat delivered is not sufficient to produce steam, which severely limits its usefulness in many industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of the system is highly dependent on energy prices. A five year simple payback can be achieved if the cost of electricity is $0.10/kWh or greater, or if the cost of the fuel cell decreases from about $3,500/kW to $950/kW. On the other hand, increasing prices of natural gas make the PC25C less economically attractive.

Phelps, S. B.; Kissock, J. K.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wisconsins Forest Products Industry Business Climate Status Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsins Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) is a non-profit, non-stock corporation with a mission of accelerating investments in energy efficient, environmentally friendly technologies into Wisconsin industry clusters. CTT was awarded its mission in February of 2002 by the Focus on Energy program, which identified the energy intensive, economically important industry clusters whose needs for advanced technology transfer could be served by the CTT. These clusters are Forest Products, Metal Casting, Food Processing, Printing, Glass, Biobased Products & Energy, Water & Wastewater, and Utilities. Technology roadmaps had been developed for each industry cluster through U.S. Department of Energy grants and by Focus on Energy. However, a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing industry clusters was still needed. CTT, in a joint effort with the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in Madison, initiated issue scoping sessions for the Forest Products cluster. One-on-one meetings with senior executives of Wisconsin forest products companies were conducted to assess the current state and future potentials of the industry group. The findings of these sessions document a litany of challenges facing the industry and are summarized at the end of this report. Many of these challenges and the potential for investments in new technologies were

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Industrial Geospatial Analysis Tool for Energy Evaluation (IGATE-E)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IGATE-E is an energy analysis tool for industrial energy evaluation. The tool applies statistical modeling to multiple publicly available datasets and provides information at the geospatial resolution of zip code using bottom up approaches. Within each zip code, the current version of the tool estimates electrical energy consumption of manufacturing industries based on each type of industries using DOE s Industrial Assessment Center database (IAC-DB) and DOE s Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey database (EIA-MECS DB), in addition to other commercially available databases such as the Manufacturing News database (MNI, Inc.). Ongoing and future work include adding modules for the predictions of fuel energy consumption streams, manufacturing process steps energy consumption, major energy intensive processes (EIPs) within each industry type among other metrics of interest. The tool provides validation against DOE s EIA-MECS state level energy estimations and permits several statistical examinations. IGATE-E is intended to be a decision support and planning tool to a wide spectrum of energy analysts, researchers, government organizations, private consultants, industry partners, and alike.

Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [DOE EERE; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Cox, Daryl [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Data centers and energy balance in Finland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid growth of computing during the last few decades has led to a significant increase in power consumption. With increasing operational costs, the data center industry has started to actively search for efficiency improvements to slow down the rising ... Keywords: free cooling,Data centers,energy balance

Tuomo Malkamaki; Seppo J. Ovaska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EA-0931: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment EA-0931: Final Environmental Assessment Center for Molecular Electronics University of Missouri, St. Louis This Environmental Assessment...

365

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation April The Transportation Center has organized a special Aviation Symposium focusing on important aviation industry topics, Professor of Transportation at Northwestern University and former Director of the Transportation Center

Bustamante, Fabián E.

366

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry: Impacts of Government Policies and Assessment of Future Opportunities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells (FCs) are considered essential future energy technologies by developed and developing economies alike. Several countries, including the United States, Japan, Germany, and South Korea have established publicly funded R&D and market transformation programs to develop viable domestic FC industries for both automotive and non-automotive applications. Important non-automotive applications include large scale and small scale distributed combined heat and electrical power, backup and uninterruptible power, material handling and auxiliary power units. The U.S. FC industry is in the early stages of development, and is working to establish sustainable markets in all these areas. To be successful, manufacturers must reduce costs, improve performance, and overcome market barriers to new technologies. U.S. policies are assisting via research and development, tax credits and government-only and government-assisted procurements. Over the past three years, the industry has made remarkable progress, bringing both stack and system costs down by more than a factor of two while improving durability and efficiency, thanks in part to government support. Today, FCs are still not yet able to compete in these markets without continued policy support. However, continuation or enhancement of current policies, such as the investment tax credit and government procurements, together with continued progress by the industry, appears likely to establish a viable domestic industry within the next decade.

Greene, David L [ORNL; Duleep, K. G. [ICF International; Upreti, Girish [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Oil Market Assessment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Logo Oil Market Assessment - September Logo Oil Market Assessment - September 12, 2001 EIA Home Page Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Rumors of scattered closures of U.S. refineries, pipelines, and terminals were reported, and Louisiana Offshore Oil Port operations were partially suspended. While the NYMEX and New York Harbor were temporarily closed, operations are expected to resume soon. Most, if not all petroleum industry infrastructure is expected to resume normal operations today or in the very near term. Prices at all levels (where markets were open) posted increases yesterday, but many prices fell today, as initial reactions

368

Center for Beam Physics, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1, 2011 June 1, 2011 EA-1848: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee To Fulcrum Sierra Biofuels, LLC For A Waste-To-Ethanol Facility In Mccarran, Storey County, Nevada June 1, 2011 EA-1858: Final Environmental Assessment Nippon Paper Industries USA Company Biomass Cogeneration Project, Port Angeles, Washington June 1, 2011 EA-1875: Final Environmental Assessment Jackson Laboratory Biomass Energy Center Project, Bar Harbor, Maine May 31, 2011 EA-1747: Final Environmental Assessment Surface Water Configuration Project at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado May 27, 2011 EA-1792: Draft Environmental Assessment University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine May 17, 2011 EA-1731: Final Environmental Assessment

370

Solar industrial process heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of the assessment reported is to candidly examine the contribution that solar industrial process heat (SIPH) is realistically able to make in the near and long-term energy futures of the United States. The performance history of government and privately funded SIPH demonstration programs, 15 of which are briefly summarized, and the present status of SIPH technology are discussed. The technical and performance characteristics of solar industrial process heat plants and equipment are reviewed, as well as evaluating how the operating experience of over a dozen SIPH demonstration projects is influencing institutional acceptance and economoc projections. Implications for domestic energy policy and international implications are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Lumsdaine, E.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Boeing Long Beach - Douglas Center Complex Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility...

372

Status and Prospects of the Global Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNLTM-2013222 Energy and Transportation Science Division Center for Transportation Analysis STATUS AND PROSPECTS OF THE GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL INDUSTRY AND PLANS FOR...

373

2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center 2013 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Industry American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)...

374

Siting industrial waste land disposal facilities in Thailand: A risk based approach  

SciTech Connect

The Thailand Industrial Works Department (IWD) has established a toxic industrial waste Central Treatment and Stabilization Center (CTSC) for textile dyeing and electroplating industries located in the Thonburi region of the Bangkok metropolitan area. Industrial waste is treated, stabilized, and stored at the CTSC. Although the IWD plans to ship the stabilized sludge to the Ratchaburi Province in western Thailand for burial, the location for the land disposal site has not been selected. Assessing the relative health risks from exposure to toxic chemicals released from an industrial waste land disposal site is a complicated, data-intensive process that requires a multidisciplinary approach. This process is further complicated by the unique physical and cultural characteristics exhibited by the rapidly industrializing Thai economy. The purpose of this paper is to describe the research approach taken and to detail the constraints to health risk assessments in Thailand. issues discussed include data availability and quality, effectiveness of control or mitigation methods, cultural differences, and the basic assumptions inherent in many of the risk assessment components.

Fingleton, D.J.; Habegger, L.; Peters, R.; Tomasko, D.; Liengcharernsit, W.; Hastings, P.; Boonraksa, C.; Phantumvanit, D.; Smith, K.; Carpenter, R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA); Thailand Development Research Inst., Bangkok (Thailand). Natural Resources and Environment Program; Environment and Policy Inst., Honolulu, HI (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Storage research in industry and universities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We review activities at universities and industrial research centers in the storage area, but also briefly mention topics such as processor design, operating systems, databases, and performance analysis. Our starting point is the Berkeley RAID proposal ...

Alexander Thomasian

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

KILLGORE CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LEASE AGREEMENT NO. DE-AC04-89-AL42 1 10 LEASE AGREEMENT NO. DE-AC04-89-AL42 1 10 KILLGORE CENTER AMENDMENT NO. 6 Lease Agreement No. DE-AC04-89-AL-42110, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Texas Tech University, dated October 1, 1989, as amended (amendments one, two, three, four, and five), is hereby further amended as follows: Article I1 of the base lease entitled, "TERM AND RENT," paragraph A., is hereby deleted and revised to read: A. The term of this Lease is extended for five years beginning October 1, 2009, and ending September 30, 2014. The annual rental for this term shall be as indicated in the following rate schedule determined as follows: 1. Approximately 6,680 square feet of office space. $ 58,280.00 2. Approximately 380 square feet of space in the foyer. $ 3,314.00

377

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (GPC) · Proposed by Devidovits (1994) is an upcoming technology-friendly and sustainable. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (cont'd) · Industrial byCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By

Saldin, Dilano

378

Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of the nation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly, industry is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, more sustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing global competitiveness. Technology will be essential for meeting these challenges. At some point, businesses are faced with investment in new capital stock. At this decision point, new and emerging technologies compete for capital investment alongside more established or mature technologies. Understanding the dynamics of the decision-making process is important to perceive what drives technology change and the overall effect on industrial energy use. The assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies can be useful for: (1) identifying R&D projects; (2) identifying potential technologies for market transformation activities; (3) providing common information on technologies to a broad audience of policy-makers; and (4) offering new insights into technology development and energy efficiency potentials. With the support of PG&E Co., NYSERDA, DOE, EPA, NEEA, and the Iowa Energy Center, staff from LBNL and ACEEE produced this assessment of emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies. The goal was to collect information on a broad array of potentially significant emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies and carefully characterize a sub-group of approximately 50 key technologies. Our use of the term ''emerging'' denotes technologies that are both pre-commercial but near commercialization, and technologies that have already entered the market but have less than 5 percent of current market share. We also have chosen technologies that are energy-efficient (i.e., use less energy than existing technologies and practices to produce the same product), and may have additional ''non-energy benefits.'' These benefits are as important (if not more important in many cases) in influencing the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed. The paper describes the Center's Least-Cost Energy Strategy, the Industrial Energy Productivity Project, and presents least-cost results for 1978 and for energy markets over the next two decades.

Hoffman, A. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

ARM - External Data Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govExternal Data Center External Data Center Order Data Description of External Data Streams Data Viewers and Plots (selected data sets) XDC Documentation External Data Center The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

CEBAF Center - Cavity Display  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CEBAF Center - Cavity Display Building Exterior 1st Floor Cafeteria Cavity Display CEBAF Center Auditorium Eating Area UserInternational Liaison Office 2nd Floor Computer Center...

382

Effectiveness of Repeat Angiographic Assessment in Patients Designated for Radioembolization Using Yttrium-90 Microspheres With Initial Extrahepatic Accumulation of Technitium-99m Macroaggregated Albumin: A Single Center's Experience  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of a workflow consisting of repeat assessment in patients planned for yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization in case of nontarget visceral technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc)-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) accumulation despite initial prophylactic coil embolization of nonhepatic arteries. Materials and Methods: In 341 patients with primary and secondary liver cancer, pretreatment hepatic angiograms, as well as single-photon emission computed tomography coregistered with magnetic resonance imaging scans, were obtained. Extrahepatic tracer deposition was identified in 33 patients (9.7%) necessitating repeat assessment. Images were reviewed to correlate the site of MAA accumulation with causative gastrointestinal vessels, and repeat angiograms served as reference standard. Results: At repeat angiography, the source of extrahepatic flow was identified and eliminated in 31 of 33 patients (93.9%). In 20 patients (60.6%), successful embolization of nontarget vessels was achieved, in 13 patients (39.4%), MAA was administered more distally. Afterward, extrahepatic MAA deposition was eliminated in 30 patients (90.9%). Conclusion: The algorithm of repeat assessment in case of extrahepatic MAA accumulation has proven highly effective to eliminate extrahepatic shunting, thus decreasing the risk of postradioembolization complications due to inadvertent visceral microsphere deposition.

Dudeck, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.dudeck@med.ovgu.de; Wilhelmsen, Skadi; Ulrich, Gerhard; Loewenthal, David; Pech, Maciej; Amthauer, Holger; Ricke, Jens [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Developing a solar energy industry in Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper assesses Egypt's current energy infrastructure and its problems, the available solar energy resource, and the technologies required to harness this resource. After this assessment, an industry based on high ...

AbdelMessih, Sherife (Sherife Mohsen)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Technology Bulletins Technology Bulletins to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Technology Bulletins on AddThis.com... Technology Bulletins The Alternative Fuels Data Center provides technology bulletins to inform transportation industry decision makers about technological breakthroughs, issues, and news about alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. For more information, read: E15 Approved for Use in 2001 and Newer Vehicles Updated 2/11

385

LDRD final report for improving human effectiveness for extreme-scale problem solving : assessing the effectiveness of electronic brainstorming in an industrial setting.  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted comparing the effectiveness of individual versus group electronic brainstorming in order to address difficult, real world challenges. While industrial reliance on electronic communications has become ubiquitous, empirical and theoretical understanding of the bounds of its effectiveness have been limited. Previous research using short-term, laboratory experiments have engaged small groups of students in answering questions irrelevant to an industrial setting. The present experiment extends current findings beyond the laboratory to larger groups of real-world employees addressing organization-relevant challenges over the course of four days. Employees and contractors at a national security laboratory participated, either in a group setting or individually, in an electronic brainstorm to pose solutions to a 'wickedly' difficult problem. The data demonstrate that (for this design) individuals perform at least as well as groups in producing quantity of electronic ideas, regardless of brainstorming duration. However, when judged with respect to quality along three dimensions (originality, feasibility, and effectiveness), the individuals significantly (p<0.05) out-performed the group working together. When idea quality is used as the benchmark of success, these data indicate that work-relevant challenges are better solved by aggregating electronic individual responses, rather than electronically convening a group. This research suggests that industrial reliance upon electronic problem solving groups should be tempered, and large nominal groups might be the more appropriate vehicle for solving wicked corporate issues.

Dornburg, Courtney C.; Stevens, Susan Marie; Davidson, George S.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Industrial Demand Module Figure 7. Industrial Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Economic Subsectors Within the IDM Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Industrial Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Fuel Consuming Activities for the Energy-Intensive Manufacturing Subsectors Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The industrial demand module (IDM) forecasts energy consumption for fuels and feedstocks for nine manufacturing industries and six nonmanufactur- ing

387

A Practitioners' Review of Industrial Agent Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ERIM's1 Center for Electronic Commerce (CEC) hosted a two-day Workshop on Industrial Agents (WINA) in Ann Arbor, MI on Nov. 1213, 1998. Participation in the workshop was by invitation only, and was restricted to companies with whom ... Keywords: industrial applications, methods, software tools, workshop report

H. Van Dyke Parunak

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL JANUARY 10, 1996 FC9522 / 95DT3 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS ALLIED OIL & TOOL POWERJET SLOTTING TOOL Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer January 11, 1996 551103/9522:jb CONTENTS Page Summary .......................................................................................................................2 Introduction.....................................................................................................................2 Description of Operations...................................................................................................3 Figure 1 ..........................................................................................................5

389

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Walkway Lighting at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center, in Atlantic City, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a collaborative project to demonstrate a solid state lighting (SSL) general illumination product in an outdoor area walkway application. In the project, six light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were installed to replace six existing high pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires mounted on 14-foot poles on a set of exterior walkways and stairs at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center in Atlantic City, New Jersey, during December, 2007. The effort was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SSL Technology Gateway Demonstration that involved a collaborative teaming agreement between DOE, FAA and Ruud Lighting (and their wholly owned division, Beta LED). Pre- and post-installation power and illumination measurements were taken and used in calculations of energy savings and related economic payback, while personnel impacted by the new lights were provided questionnaires to gauge their perceptions and feedback. The SSL product demonstrated energy savings of over 25% while maintaining illuminance levels and improving illuminance uniformity. PNNL's economic analysis yielded a variety of potential payback results depending on the assumptions used. In the best case, replacing HPS with the LED luminaire can yield a payback as low as 3 years. The new lamps were quite popular with the affected personnel, who gave the lighting an average score of 4.46 out of 5 for improvement.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Industrial Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Industrial Demand Module Table 6.1. Industry Categories. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Table 6.2.Retirement Rates. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 15 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries (Table 6.1). The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting

391

Associations and Industry - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Associations and Industry, Research Programs, ==== Basic Metallurgy ==== ... FORUMS > ASSOCIATIONS AND INDUSTRY, Replies, Views, Originator, Last...

392

Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

394

Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and guidance service. Energy audits and analysis of specificfree comprehensive energy audits or industrial assessments.as a part of the Enterprise Energy Audit Programme (EEAP) of

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Reduce NOx and Improve Energy Efficiency, Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program NOx and Energy Assessment Tool (NxEAT) can help petroleum refining and chemical plants improve energy efficiency.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programs. The BSC conducts quadrennial reviews of the Clinical Center research to assess the quality for an ACGME accreditation review in 2013. Focusing on Improvement of Patient Care through Graduate Medical Assessment 2013 National Institutes of Health Clinical Center Strategic and Annual Operating Plan #12

397

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves storing thermal energy such as winter chill, summer heat, and industrial waste heat for future use in heat and/or cooling buildings or for industrial processes. Widespread development and implementation of STES would significantly reduce the need to generate primary energy in the United States. Recent data indicate that STES is technically suitable for providing 5% to 10% of the nation's energy, with major contributions in the commercial and industrial sectors and in district heating and cooling applications. This report describes aquifer characterization at the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The purpose of the testing is to provide design data for the University's use in modifying and expanding an existing ATES well field. The aquifer characterization work was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program) in cooperation with the University of Alabama as part of efforts to assess the use of chill ATES for space cooling.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

Christopher Hull

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

An assessment framework based on social perspectives and Analytic Hierarchy Process: A case study on sustainability in the Japanese concrete industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research introduces a framework for assessing concrete sustainability which is based upon the concept that technology is defined by stakeholders' perspectives and which applied Analytic Hierarchy Process to translate these perspectives into quantifiable ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process, Concrete, Construction, O31, O32, Sociology of technology, Sustainability

Michael Henry; Yoshitaka Kato

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

EA-1698: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment EA-1698: Final Environmental Assessment Baldwin Wind Energy Center The Baldwin Wind Energy Center (Project or Proposed Action) is a wind generation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EA-1542: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1542: Final Environmental Assessment Burleigh County Wind Energy Center The Burleigh County Wind Energy Center is a wind generation project proposed...

402

Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

N /A

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Biofuel Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Biofuel Incentives The North Dakota Industrial Commission's Renewable Energy Program provides matching grants and other forms of assistance to support research and

404

A Review of Recent RTO Benefit-Cost Studies: Toward More Comprehensive Assessments of FERC Electricity Restructuring Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of the electricity industrys evolution. To aidsome aspects of electricity industry restructuring throughbegan restructuring the U.S. electricity industry in 1996 by

Eto, Joseph H.; Lesieutre, Bernard C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery #12;2 Louisiana State University Health Sciences CenterDISASTER PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE TOOLKIT (Disaster-PAST) Methods to Enhance

406

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Center for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Focus on life cycle analyses for buildings, agriculture, transportation, renewable energy, and packaging. Source: Center for Sustainable...

407

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source Hydrogen H2 storage Hydrogen Stored Energy Point-of-use Chemical hydrogen storage #12;5 ChemicalChemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY

Carver, Jeffrey C.

408

Transforming the Freight Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming the Freight Industry From Regulation to Icommon-carrier freight industry was Competition to backwardjourneys. When the freight industry was deregulated, it was

Regan, Amelia

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Demographics and industry returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographics and Industry Returns By Stefano DellaVigna andand returns across industries. Cohort size fluc- tuationspredict profitability by industry. Moreover, forecast demand

Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Review of a State Industrial Efficiency Program: Texas Industries of the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The US DOE requested that applicants for state industrial program funds evaluate the impacts of their program. This review was conducted for activities 2001-August 2007. The evaluation looks at the program from a number of perspectives: Strategic Plan accomplishments; attendees at events; impacts of Best Practice trainings; and individual project outcomes. Since its inception, the program has organized 48 workshops, forums, roundtables and conferences, with a total of over 2,300 attendees. Some of the accomplishments are noted below: 59 out of the top 195 or 30 % of the largest industrial sites have staff that attended Texas IOF events. The goal was to reach 25 % of the largest industrial plants in Texas. Best Practice trainings are estimated to have saved 1.791 trillion Btus as a result of attendees going back to their plants, using the software, and implementing energy saving projects. The Texas IOF manual and calculator to help small and medium sized manufacturers assess energy savings opportunities has been used by the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center, which reports identifying savings of $660,000 at 9 facilities, with replication opportunity at another 13 sites. Fifteen percent of the sites that signed up in 2006 to participate in the US DOE Save Energy Now plant assessment program were from Texas. This is the largest number of any state. The program has been a successful two-way conduit for information on energy efficiency, from plants in Texas to US DOE headquarters and vice versa. This is demonstrated by the incorporation of the proposed Texas pilot project on plant certification into a national program now under development. The presentation will also cover outcomes from individual projects.

Ferland, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy efficient data centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the data centers power usage. Lighting accounts only 2% ofLighting HVAC - Chiller Plant The computer loads amount to 68% of the data center power usage.

Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Climate Analysis Center's User Information Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide variety of current climate products are being developed, produced, and disseminated to a diverse group of users by the Climate Analysis Center (CAC). The Climate Assessment Data Base (CADB), a major resource used to generate many of these ...

Frederick G. Finger; James D. Laver; Kenneth H. Bergman; Vernon L. Patterson

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Industry Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

idatech.com idatech.com info@idatech.com 63065 NE 18 th Street Bend, OR 97701 541.383.3390 Industry Perspective Biogas and Fuel Cell Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 11 - 13, 2012 Mike Hicks Chairman of the Board of Directors, FCHEA Treasurer of the Board of Directors, FCS&E Engineering Manager, Technology Development & Integration, IdaTech Outline 1. Critical Factors * Fuel Purity * Fuel Cost 2. Natural Gas - The Wild Card & Competition 3. IdaTech's Experience Implementing Biofuel Critical Factor - Fuel Purity All fuel cell system OEMs have fuel purity specifications * Independent of * Raw materials or feed stocks * Manufacturing process * Depends on * Fuel processor technology * Fuel cell technology - low temp PEM versus SOFC

414

Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center  

SciTech Connect

The program goal of the Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center (OAEMC) is to support advanced energy manufacturing and to create responsive manufacturing clusters that will support the production of advanced energy and energy-efficient products to help ensure the nation's energy and environmental security. This goal cuts across a number of existing industry segments critical to the nation's future. Many of the advanced energy businesses are starting to make the transition from technology development to commercial production. Historically, this transition from laboratory prototypes through initial production for early adopters to full production for mass markets has taken several years. Developing and implementing manufacturing technology to enable production at a price point the market will accept is a key step. Since these start-up operations are configured to advance the technology readiness of the core energy technology, they have neither the expertise nor the resources to address manufacturing readiness issues they encounter as the technology advances toward market entry. Given the economic realities of today's business environment, finding ways to accelerate this transition can make the difference between success and failure for a new product or business. The advanced energy industry touches a wide range of industry segments that are not accustomed to working together in complex supply chains to serve large markets such as automotive and construction. During its first three years, the Center has catalyzed the communication between companies and industry groups that serve the wide range of advanced energy markets. The Center has also found areas of common concern, and worked to help companies address these concerns on a segment or industry basis rather than having each company work to solve common problems individually. EWI worked with three industries through public-private partnerships to sew together disparate segments helping to promote overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible welds for batteries and high temperature heat exchangers. It also included a novel advanced weld trainer that EWI

Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publication acknowledgement Lujan Center monitors the number of papers published as a result of the use of our facilities. The Lujan Center's sponsoring agency, US...

417

Centers | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centers Centers SHARE Centers BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional (17 partners), multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences, mathematics and engineering) organization focused on the fundamental understanding and elimination of biomass recalcitrance. DOE Energy Frontier Research Centers The Energy Frontier Research Centers program aims to accelerate such transformative discovery, combining the talents and creativity of our national scientific workforce with a powerful new generation of tools for penetrating, understanding, and manipulating matter on the atomic and molecular scales. ORNL is also home to two DOE Energy Frontier Research Centers, the Fluid Interface, Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST)

418

DOE Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Information Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Center provides citizens a consolidated facility to obtain information and records related to the DOE's...

419

Solar Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

Boehm, Bob

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

The changing battery industry  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an economic and technological assessment of the electrical battery industry, highlighting major trends. Among those systems considered are lithium-based, sodium-sulfur nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, zinc-chloride, conductive polymer, and redox cells. Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and manganese dioxide-based batteries and direct solar power and fuel cells are discussed in relation to these new techniques. New applications, including electric vehicles, solar power storage, utility load leveling, portable appliances, computer power and memory backup, and medical implants are discussed. Predictions and development scenarios for the next twenty years are provided for the U.S. market.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ESCO Industry in China  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESCO Development in ESCO Development in China China-America EE Forum 2011.5.6, S.F Contents Fast development 1 Great potential 2 Opportunities & Challenges 3 Function of EMCA 4 China Energy Conservation project  Officially started in 1998;  It is a key international cooperation project in the field of energy conservation by Chinese government and World Bank/GEF;  The main purpose of the project is to promote Energy Performance Contracting (EPC) mechanism and develop ESCO industry in China Project progress-1 st phase 3 pilot ESCOs: Beijing Liaoning Shandong Phase I EC information Dissemination Center(ECIDC) Project progress-2 nd phase EMCA Phase II I& G New and Potential ESCOs Technical support Financial support Project Progress- 2 nd Phase EMCA---provide practical technical

422

Office of Industrial Technologies: Industry partnerships  

SciTech Connect

US industries are making progress in turning the vision of the future into reality: More effective competition in global markets, increased industrial efficiency, more jobs, reduced waste generation and greenhouse gas emissions (to 1990 levels), improved environment. DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies is catalyzing and supporting industry progress in many ways. This pamphlet gives an overview of OIT.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Industrial Hygiene  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Hygiene FAQS Industrial Hygiene FAQS STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency (1) Plan, observe, and evaluate contractor performance involving industrial hygiene activities to ensure the adequacy and effectiveness of contractor programs such as: * Technical performance (e.g., adequacy of technical practices) * Plans, policies, and procedures * Management controls * Worker training and qualification programs * Occurrence reporting and corrective actions * Occupational health programs FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph C 4 5 (2) Develop, review, and assess industrial hygiene documentation. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph D 4 5 (3) Resolve or facilitate the resolution of industrial hygiene issues.

424

NREL: Biomass Research - National Bioenergy Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Bioenergy Center National Bioenergy Center The National Bioenergy Center (NBC) was established in October 2000 to support the science and technology goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office. Headquartered at NREL, this virtual center unifies DOE's efforts to advance technology for producing renewable transportation fuels from biomass. A primary goal is to demonstrate the production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol by 2012. Collaborating with industrial, academic, and other governmental research, development, and commercialization efforts is central to achieving this goal. Mission The National Bioenergy Center's mission is to foster capability to catalyze the replacement of petroleum with transportation fuels from biomass by delivering innovative, cost-effective biofuels solutions.

425

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM FEBRUARY 12, 1996 FC9535/96ET3 RMOTC TEST REPORT NOVERFLO LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM (SMART CABLE) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer February 12, 1996 650200/9535:jb CONTENTS Page Summary 1 Introducation 1 NPR-3 Map 2 Description of Operations 3 1 st Test 3 2 nd Test 3 3 rd Test 4 4 th Test 5 Concluding Remarks 5 Acknowledgements 6 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Technical Report Noverflo Liquid Leak Detection System (Smart Cable) Summary As part of RMOTC's continuing mission to support and strengthen the domestic oil and gas industry by allowing testing by individual inventors and commercial companies to evaluate their products and technology, RMOTC

426

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial/Commercial Boiler Population. Report Submitted toCouncil of Industrial Boiler Owners, Burke, Virginia. [23]Assessment Case Study. Boiler Blowdown Heat Recovery Project

Kramer, Klaas Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t t r i b o l o g y Health and BioTribology A virtual center that brings together the skills and talents of multiple investigators and unique facilities from Argonne National Laboratory and three partnering universities to resolve critical friction, wear, and lubrication issues in Biomedical Implants, Alternative Energy Technologies, and Extreme Environments. The Center's tribology experts will work closely with industry, and with state and federal agencies through jointly funded research projects, to perform leading-edge research on the impact of materials, coatings, and fluids on energy efficiency, durability, and reliability. The work will culminate in the development of * Advanced models of the fundamental mechanisms responsible for friction and wear,

428

AMO Energy Resource Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Sign In Dashboard Home Add to Bookmark Turn on more accessible mode Skip to main content Turn off more accessible mode HOME | Help (new window) AMO Energy Resources Center HOME Tools AMO Home Tools to Manage your Energy Use DOE eGuide for ISO 50001 DOE eGuide Lite Industrial Facilities Scorecard Plant Energy Profiler (PEP) Project Opportunities Tracker EnPI V3.0 Webinars Past Webinar Titles (*Requires Login) Software Tool Updates the contents of this div will be replaced Steam System Modeler Tool: The new Steam System Modeler allows you to create up to a 3-pressure-header basic model of your current steam system. The tool includes a series of adjustable characteristics simulating technical or input changes, thereby demonstrating how each component impacts the others and what changes may best promote overall efficiency and stability of the system. The tool can be found under the "Steam" category.

429

Energy efficient data centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cogeneration can improve reliability and increase chiller efficiency (by using waste heat) for larger data centers.

Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Thermodynamics Research Center Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamics Research Center. Welcome. TRC supplies thermodynamic properties tables, thermophysical properties data, models, standards ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Thermodynamics Research Center - Thermophysical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamics Research Center. TRC supplies thermodynamic properties tables, thermophysical properties data, models, standards and ...

432

ORISE: Center for Science Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education ORAU Center for Science Education Completed in January 2009, the Center for Science Education was established to...

433

The University of Maryland Energy Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ElECTRoChEMiCAl ENERgy CoNvERSioN ANd SToRAgE Batteries Fluctuationsinrenewableenergy supply make new Energy Engineering works with industry to increase the efficiency of Heating, Ventilation, and AirThe University of Maryland Energy Research Center Join Us in Building a Sustainable Energy Future

Rubloff, Gary W.

434

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services Sep 17, 2013 NNSA, Republic of Korea Ministry Agree to Minimize Use of HEU in Nuclear Reactors Sep 3, 2013 NNSA Conducts...

435

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering...

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Alternative Fuels Data Center: Page Not Found Skip to Content Eere_header_logo U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Alternative Fuels Data Center Search Search Help Alternative Fuels Data Center Fuels & Vehicles Biodiesel | Diesel Vehicles

437

Energy efficient industrialized housing research program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the research work completed in five areas in fiscal year 1989. (1) The analysis of the US industrialized housing industry includes statistics, definitions, a case study, and a code analysis. (2) The assessment of foreign technology reviews the current status of design, manufacturing, marketing, and installation of industrialized housing primarily in Sweden and Japan. (3) Assessment of industrialization applications reviews housing production by climate zone, has a cost and energy comparison of Swedish and US housing, and discusses future manufacturing processes and emerging components. (4) The state of computer use in the industry is described and a prototype design tool is discussed. (5) Side by side testing of industrialized housing systems is discussed.

Berg, R.; Brown, G.Z.; Finrow, J.; Kellett, R.; McDonald, M.; McGinn, B.; Ryan, P.; Sekiguchi, Tomoko (Oregon Univ., Eugene, OR (USA). Center for Housing Innovation); Chandra, S.; Elshennawy, A.K.; Fairey, P.; Harrison, J.; Mazwell, L.; Roland, J.; Swart, W. (Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fermilab | Illinois Accelerator Research Center | Illinois Accelerator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

photo: IARC photo: IARC As envisioned, the Illinois Accelerator Research Center will provide approximately 83,000 square feet of technical, office and classroom space for scientists and industrial partners. The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) is a new accelerator research facility being built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. At the Illinois Accelerator Research Center, scientists and engineers from Fermilab, Argonne and Illinois universities will work side by side with industrial partners to research and develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security. Located on the Fermilab campus this 83,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility will house offices, technical and educational space to study

439

Plant Energy Profiler Tool for the Chemicals Industry (ChemPEP Tool), Software Tools for Industry, Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how the Industrial Technologies Program ChemPEP Tool can help chemical plants assess their plant-wide energy consumption.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of SRMs for use in the biofuel industry should receive ... A new effort on biofuels centered around alcohol mixtures and biodiesel (esters from ...

2011-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "industrial assessment center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Industrial Tools of the Trade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organized by R&D Applications Centers/Offices, this handbook provides TechCommentaries (including a description of a technology, technical considerations, economic considerations, applications, advantages), TechApplications (featuring case study information on an attractive technology), and Industry Briefs (describing a particular industry with data and trends on energy use, employment, revenue, manufacturing methods, demand-side management methods, trade associations, and information sources).

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Energy Plan to State Energy Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Energy Plan The Virginia Energy Plan assesses the commonwealth's primary energy sources and recommends actions to meet the following goals: make Virginia the energy capital of the East Coast by expanding traditional and alternative

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Quality Biofuel Quality Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Quality Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Quality Program The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) Biofuels Quality Program tests and assesses biofuel quality and quantity to resolve any

444

Classical approaches to predicting industrial noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting operational noise levels is an essential part of designing an industrial facility. Community noise levels are usually predicted for environmental assessment and licensing. In?plant noise levels are predicted

Frank H. Brittain

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Energy Programs of the Texas Industrial Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program are to assist Texas industry in using energy more efficiently through seminars, workshops, technical information exchange and other supportive programs with the goal of conserving at least 283.81 trillion BTU's of industrial energy in 1980. As the primary consumer of Texas' energy (54% of total, industry is a major focal point of the state's energy conservation effort. Although industry's overall record of energy conservation is good, such a large consumer must receive serious attention in any plan aimed at improving the overall efficiency of energy use in the state. The Texas Industrial Commission has been designated lead agency of the industrial conservation effort, and as such, created the Energy Utilization Department in the Fall of 1977. The multi-faceted department has established programs to accomplish its mission including: The Energy Search Center, an information access point for Texas manufacturers; a series of technical workshops and seminars; an annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference; the coordination of a university program for the training of industrial energy auditors; and organizational assistance in the establishment of regional energy conservation groups. Although manufacturers are encouraged to utilize the programs, they are designed primarily for small or medium-sized industries and low-technology operations where the employment of an energy specialist is economically impractical.

Heare, J.; dePlante, L. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

PNNL Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (Redirected from Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Name Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center Agency/Company /Organization Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Pathways analysis Website http://eioc.pnl.gov/ Country United States Northern America References Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [1] "Building upon...expertise in electricity transmission and distribution, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has invested in bringing together industry software, real-time grid data and advanced computation into a functional control room. This unique integrated energy operations capability was shaped with input from utilities and researchers across the

448

TARA Center Mae Daigaku Shokubutsu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooperative Research Center (Plasma Research Center) (Helium Building) (Rectifier Building) (Generator

Tanaka, Jiro

449

Understanding and reducing energy and costs in industrial cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial cooling remains one of the largest potential areas for electrical energy savings in industrial plants today. This is in spite of a relatively small amount of attention paid to it by energy auditors and rebate program designers. US DOE tool suites, for example, have long focused on combustion related systems and motor systems with a focus on pumps and compressors. A chilled water tool designed by UMass was available for some time but is no longer being supported by its designers or included in the government tool website. Even with the focus on motor systems, auditing programs like the DOE's Industrial Assessment Center program show dramatically less energy savings for electrical based systems than fossil fueled ones. This paper demonstrates the large amount of increased saving from a critical review of plant chilled water systems with both hardware and operational improvements. After showing several reasons why cooling systems are often ignored during plant energy surveys (their complexity, lack of data on operations etc.), three specific upgrades are considered which have become more reliable and cost effective in the recent past. These include chiller changeouts, right sizing of systems with load matching, and floating head pressures as a retrofit. Considerations of free cooling and improved cooling tower operations are shown as additional "big hitters. It is made clear that with appropriate measurements and an understanding of the cooling system, significant savings can be obtained with reasonable paybacks and low risk.

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.