Sample records for inductively coupled plasma-atomic

  1. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braymen, Steven D. (Ames, IA)

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  2. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  3. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chan, George C. Y. (Bloomington, IN); Hieftje, Gary M. (Bloomington, IN)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  4. NEW METHOD FOR REMOVAL OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCES FOR BERYLLIUM ASSAY USING INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S; Matthew Nelson, M; Linda Youmans, L; Maureen Bernard, M

    2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Beryllium has been used widely in specific areas of nuclear technology. Frequent monitoring of air and possible contaminated surfaces in U.S Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is required to identify potential health risks and to protect DOE workers from beryllium-contaminated dust. A new method has been developed to rapidly remove spectral interferences prior to beryllium (Be) measurement by inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The ion exchange separation removes uranium (U), thorium (Th), niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), zirconium (Zr), tungsten (W), iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), cerium (Ce), erbium (Er) and titanium (Ti). A stacked column consisting of Diphonix Resin{reg_sign} and TEVA Resin{reg_sign} reduces the levels of the spectral interferences so that low level Be measurements can be performed accurately. If necessary, an additional anion exchange separation can be used for further removal of interferences, particularly chromium. The method has been tested using spiked filters, spiked wipe samples and certified reference material standards with high levels of interferences added. The method provides very efficient removal of spectral interferences with very good accuracy and precision for beryllium on filters or wipes. A vacuum box system is employed to reduce analytical time and reduce labor costs.

  5. Determination of platinum and palladium in geologic samples by ion exchange chromatography with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.J.; Biggs, W.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative procedure to the classical fire assay method for determining Pt and Pd in sulfide ores, concentrates, and furnace mattes is presented. A suitable amount of sample is digested with aqua regla and filtered and any remaining gangue is digested with a mixture of HF and HClO/sub 4/. The solution is filtered and the residue fused with sodium peroxide granules. The fused salts are dissolved in a dilute HCl acid solution and all three solutions combined. The resultant solution is passed through a Bio-Rad AG 50W-X8 cation exchange resin in the H/sup +/ form. The chlorocomplex anions of Pt and Pd are not retained by the cation exchange resin while the base metal cations are efficiently removed from the eluent. Pt and Pd concentrations are subsequently determined with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Preliminary experiments showing the method's potential expandability to Au are included.

  6. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  7. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Chan, Shi-Kit (Washington, DC); Van Hoven, Raymond L. (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  8. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur P. (Ames, IA); Jaselskis, Edward J. (Ames, IA)

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remote from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer.

  9. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

  10. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrographic study of Fe in bitumens derived from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)); Biggs, W.R. (Chevron Research Co., Richmond, CA (US))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on bitumens extracted from tar sands from various locations (Utah, California, Kentucky, and Alberta) that were examined by size exclusion chromatography with on-line element-specific detection to study the Fe concentration as a function of size. In most cases, the resulting profiles exhibit unimodal distributions at relatively large molecular size with very similar times for maximum elution. specifically, Sunnyside (Utah) and McKittrick (California) tar-sand bitumens exhibited very intense maxima consistent with extremely high bulk Fe contents. Arroyo Grande (California) exhibited an additional maximum at very large molecular size. This size behavior of the Fe appears to correlate with the large molecular size Ni and V components eluted under the same conditions.

  11. Inductively coupled plasma chemistry examinations with visible acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Kirk

    to be a powerful tool for plasma chemistry research. Introduction Inductively coupled plasma optical emission

  12. Miniaturization of Inductively Coupled Plasma Sources Y. Yin, J. Messier, and J. Hopwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miniaturization of Inductively Coupled Plasma Sources Y. Yin, J. Messier, and J. Hopwood Department associated with the miniaturization of planar inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are investigated" unless the plasma dimensions are determined more precisely by subtracting the sheath width from

  13. Standard test method for determination of impurities in plutonium: acid dissolution, ion exchange matrix separation, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP/AES) analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  14. Coupling effects in inductive discharges with radio frequency substrate biasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) operated in neon at 27.12 MHz with capacitive substrate biasing (CCP) at 13.56 MHz are investigated by phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy, voltage, and current measurements. Three coupling mechanisms are found potentially limiting the separate control of ion energy and flux: (i) Sheath heating due to the substrate biasing affects the electron dynamics even at high ratios of ICP to CCP power. At fixed CCP power, (ii) the substrate sheath voltage and (iii) the amplitude as well as frequency of plasma series resonance oscillations of the RF current are affected by the ICP power.

  15. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

  16. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  17. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rayson, Gary D. (Las Cruces, NM); Shen, Yang (Las Cruces, NM)

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  18. Improvements in Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenITLaboratory in Inductively Coupled Plasma

  19. Effect of capacitive coupling in a miniature inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell simulations with a Monte Carlo collision algorithm (PIC-MCC) have been conducted to investigate the effect of capacitive coupling in a miniature inductively coupled plasma source (mICP) by using two models: an inductive model and a hybrid model. The mICP is 3 mm in radius and 6 mm in height with a three-turn planar coil, where argon plasma is sustained. In the inductive model, the coil is assumed to be electrostatically shielded, and thus the discharge is purely inductive coupling. In the hybrid model, we assume that the different turns of the coil act like electrodes in capacitive discharge to include the effect of capacitive coupling. The voltage applied to these electrodes decreases linearly from the powered end of the coil towards the grounded end. The numerical analysis has been performed for rf frequencies in the range of 100-1000 MHz, and the power absorbed by the plasma in the range of 5-50 mW at a fixed pressure of 500 mTorr. The PIC-MCC results show that potential oscillations at the plasma-dielectric interface are not negligible, and thus the major component of the absorbed power is caused by the axial motion of electrons in the hybrid model, although almost all of the power absorption is due to the azimuthal motion of electrons in the inductive model. The effect of capacitive coupling is more significant at lower rf frequencies and at higher absorbed powers under the calculation conditions examined. Moreover, much less coil currents are required in the hybrid model.

  20. Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

  1. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Sang-Heon, E-mail: ssongs@umich.edu, E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Yang, Yang, E-mail: yang-yang@amat.com [Applied Materials Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, M/S 81312, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States); Chabert, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.chabert@lpp.polytechnique.fr [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Kushner, Mark J., E-mail: mjkush@umich.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  2. A Microfabricated Inductively-Coupled Plasma Generator Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the supplied power. This mechanism of RF plasma generation is referred to as capacitive coupling. Electrodeless generation7 . The inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) is one type of electrodeless discharge that is now widelyA Microfabricated Inductively-Coupled Plasma Generator J. Hopwood Department of Electrical

  3. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the {open_quotes}Fassel{close_quotes} TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  4. Transport of dust particles in inductively coupled discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, H.H.; Ventzek, P.L.G.; Hoekstra, R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination by particulates, or ``dust``, in plasma processing reactors decreases the yield of microelectronic components. In low temperature plasmas, such as those used in etching or deposition reactors to fabricate semiconductor devices, the particles can form to appreciable densities. These particles can be trapped or expelled from the reactor, depending on which forces dominate their transport. Quantities that affect dust motion in Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) discharges are the charge of the dust particles (electrostatic forces), momentum transfer with ions (viscous ion-drag forces), temperature gradients from heated electrodes (thermophoretic forces), and gas flow (fluid drag forces). The authors have developed a 2-D Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the trajectories of dust particles in ICP reactors. The model may have an arbitrary number and variety of dust species, and different gas mixtures may be used. The self-consistent electric fields, ion energy distributions, and species densities are imported from a companion Monte Carlo-fluid hybrid model. A semi-analytic model is used to determine the dust charge as well as the momentum transfer cross sections between dust and ions. The electrode topography can also affect the trapping locations of dust. Grooves on the electrodes perturb electrical forces and heated washers can change the thermophoretic forces; hence the spatial dust density varies from the case with a smooth, nonheated electrode. These effects on particle trapping will be presented. Other factors on trapping locations, such as dust particle size and varying power flow with time, will also be discussed.

  5. SELECTIVE SIGNAL TRANSMISSION TO INLAID MICROCOILS BY INDUCTIVE COUPLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jayne

    field, this problem has been approached by implanting and inductively powering a signal generator inside: (574) 631-4393, email: bernstein.1@nd.edu ABSTRACT Inductive links are widely used to power medical as a trans- cutaneous transformer, since its primary and secondary coils are physically separated

  6. Rapid Wireless Capacitor Charging Using a Multi-Tapped Inductively-Coupled Secondary Coil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Patrick P.

    This paper presents an inductive coupling system designed to wirelessly charge ultra-capacitors used as energy storage elements. Although ultra-capacitors offer the native ability to rapidly charge, it is shown that standard ...

  7. Temporal phenomena in inductively coupled chlorine and argon-chlorine discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corr, C.S.; Steen, P.G.; Graham, W.G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Reproducible modulations in low-pressure, inductively coupled discharges operating in chlorine and argon-chlorine mixtures have been observed and studied. Changes in the light output, floating potential, negative ion fraction, and charged particle densities were observed. Here we report two types of unstable operational modes in an inductively coupled discharge. On the one hand, when the discharge was matched, to minimize reflected power, instabilities were observed in argon-chlorine plasmas over limited operating conditions of input power and gas pressure. The instability window decreased with increasing chlorine content and was observed for chlorine concentrations between 30% and 60% only. However, when operating at pressures below 5 mTorr and the discharge circuit detuned to increase the reflected power, modulations were observed in a pure chlorine discharge. These modulations varied in nature from a series of sharp bursts to a very periodic behavior and can be controlled, by variation of the matching conditions, to produce an apparent pulsed plasma environment.

  8. Comparison of Solution-Based versus Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Larval Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Solution-Based versus Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry otoliths of larvae. Herein, we evaluate the abilities of solution-based (SO) and laser ablation (LA

  9. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  10. Independent control of electron energy and density using a rotating magnetic field in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, Takahiro; Ohta, Masayuki; Ito, Tsuyohito; Okada, Shigefumi [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and on the electron density are investigated with the aim of controlling the radical composition of inductively coupled plasmas. By adjusting the RMF frequency and generation power, the desired electron density and electron energy shift are obtained. Consequently, the amount and fraction of high-energy electrons, which are mostly responsible for direct dissociation processes of raw molecules, will be controlled externally. This controllability, with no electrode exposed to plasma, will enable us to control radical components and their flux during plasma processing.

  11. UV and IR laser ablation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.R.; Koppenaal, D.W.; Farmer, O.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation particle plume compositions are characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS). This study evaluates the mass response characteristics peculiar to ICP/MS detection as a function of laser fluence and frequency. Evaluation of the ICP/MS mass response allows deductions to be made concerning how representative the laser ablation produced particle plume composition is relative to the targeted sample. Using a black glass standard, elemental fractionation was observed, primarily for alkalis and other volatile elements. The extent of elemental fractionation between the target sample and the sampled plume varied significantly as a function of laser fluences and IR and UV laser frequency.

  12. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, S J C; Endo, A; Janssen, R M J; Ferrari, L; Diener, P; Baryshev, A M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1...2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8+-0.2.

  13. Effect of bias application to plasma density in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyuk; Lee, Woohyun; Park, Wanjae; Whang, Ki-Woong [Plasma Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent control of the ion flux and energy can be achieved in a dual frequency inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. Typically, the plasma density is controlled by the high-frequency antenna radio-frequency (RF) power and the ion energy is controlled by the low-frequency bias RF power. Increasing the bias power has been known to cause a decrease in the plasma density in capacitively coupled discharge systems as well as in ICP systems. However, an applied axial magnetic field was found to sustain or increase the plasma density as bias power is increased. Measurements show higher electron temperatures but lower plasma densities are obtained in ordinary ICP systems than in magnetized ICP systems under the same neutral gas pressure and RF power levels. Explanations for the difference in the behavior of plasma density with increasing bias power are given in terms of the difference in the heating mechanism in ordinary unmagnetized and magnetized ICP systems.

  14. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P. [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France)] [LPP, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Paris XI, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Godyak, V. [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States) [RF Plasma Consulting, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Michigan Institute for Plasma Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  15. Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathur, Mahendra P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekmann, James M. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

  16. E?H mode transition density and power in two types of inductively coupled plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yin-chang; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Yu; Xu, Liang; Wang, Pi; Cao, Jin-xiang, E-mail: jxcao@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    E???H transition power and density were investigated at various argon pressures in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in a cylindrical interlaid chamber. The transition power versus the pressure shows a minimum transition power at 4?Pa (?/?=1) for argon. Then the transition density hardly changes at low pressures (?/??1), but it increases clearly when argon pressure exceeds an appropriate value. In addition, both the transition power and transition density are lower in the re-entrant configuration of ICP compared with that in the cylindrical configuration of ICP. The result may be caused from the decrease of stochastic heating in the re-entrant configuration of ICP. This work is useful to understand E???H mode transition and control the transition points in real plasma processes.

  17. Double layer formation in the expanding region of an inductively coupled electronegative plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plihon, N; Chabert, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Double-layers (DLs) were observed in the expanding region of an inductively coupled plasma with $\\text{Ar}/\\text{SF}\\_6$ gas mixtures. No DL was observed in pure argon or $\\text{SF}\\_6$ fractions below few percent. They exist over a wide range of power and pressure although they are only stable for a small window of electronegativity (typically between 8\\% and 13\\% of $\\text{SF}\\_6$ at 1mTorr), becoming unstable at higher electronegativity. They seem to be formed at the boundary between the source tube and the diffusion chamber and act as an internal boundary (the amplitude being roughly 1.5$\\frac{kT\\_e}{e}$)between a high electron density, high electron temperature, low electronegativity plasma upstream (in the source), and a low electron density, low electron temperature, high electronegativity plasma downstream.

  18. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A., E-mail: mfam1g08@ecs.soton.ac.uk; Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B. [Nano Research Group, Electronics and Computer Science, Faculty of Physical and Applied Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  19. Low-frequency, self-sustained oscillations in inductively coupled plasmas used for optical pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffer, J.; Encalada, N.; Huang, M.; Camparo, J. [Physical Sciences Laboratories, The Aerospace Corporation 2310, E. El Segundo Blvd., El Segundo, California 90245 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated very low frequency, on the order of one hertz, self-pulsing in alkali-metal inductively-coupled plasmas (i.e., rf-discharge lamps). This self-pulsing has the potential to significantly vary signal-to-noise ratios and (via the ac-Stark shift) resonant frequencies in optically pumped atomic clocks and magnetometers (e.g., the atomic clocks now flying on GPS and Galileo global navigation system satellites). The phenomenon arises from a nonlinear interaction between the atomic physics of radiation trapping and the plasma's electrical nature. To explain the effect, we have developed an evaporation/condensation theory (EC theory) of the self-pulsing phenomenon.

  20. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Joe Saetveit

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 {micro}g L{sup -1} or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 {micro}L injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  1. Atlas of Atomic Spectral Lines of Neptunium Emitted by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeKalb, E.L. and Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230-700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data. The Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program has been charged with the task of developing optical spectroscopic methods to analyze the composition of spent nuclear fuels. Such materials are highly radioactive even after prolonged 'cooling' and are chemically complex. Neptunium (Np) is a highly toxic by-product of nuclear power generation and is found, in low abundance, in spent nuclear fuels. This atlas of the optical emission spectrum of Np, as produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopic source, is part of a general survey of the ICP emission spectra of the actinide elements. The ICP emission spectrum of the actinides originates almost exclusively from the electronic relaxation of excited, singly ionized species. Spectral data on the Np ion emission spectrum (i.e., the Np II spectrum) have been reported by Tomkins and Fred [1] and Haaland [2]. Tomkins and Fred excited the Np II spectrum with a Cu spark discharge and identified 114 Np lines in the 265.5 - 436.3 nm spectral range. Haaland, who corrected some spectral line misidentifications in the work of Tomkins and Fred, utilized an enclosed Au spark discharge to excite the Np II spectrum and reported 203 Np lines within the 265.4 - 461.0 nm wavelength range.

  2. argon plasma atomic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observed in a complex plasma are presented. The experiments are performed with an argon plasma which is produced under microgravity conditions using a capacitively-coupled rf...

  3. Testing of inductively coupled Eddy current position sensor of diverse safety rod in sodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayashree, R.; Veeraswamy, R.; Nashine, B. K.; Dash, S. K.; Sharma, P.; Rajan, K. K.; Vijayakumar, G.; Rao, C. B.; Sosamma, S.; Kalyanasundaram, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Kalpakkam - 603 102 (India)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is 500 MWe sodium cooled reactor under construction at Kalpakkam (India)). To improve the reliability of shutdown, Diverse Safety Rods (DSRs) are used in-addition to normal Control and Safety rods. During reactor operating condition, the DSR is parked above the active core and held in its top position by an electromagnet. In the event of a scram signal from the safety logic, the electromagnet holding the DSR is de-energised. Hence the DSR is released into the active core and at the end of travel DSR gets deposited in its bottom position. Because of the mechanical constraints, hard wired connectivity is not permitted from the DSR subassembly to the instrumentation outside the reactor. Hence an inductively coupled Eddy Current Position Sensor (ECPS) has been conceptualized to detect that the DSR has reached its bottom most position and to measure the drop time. Results of feasibility study on laboratory model have been reported earlier. Testing of a 1:1 scale engineering model of ECPS is reported in this paper. Results obtained from the high temperature sodium testing of ECPS indicate a clearly measurable change in pick up voltage with sensitivity of 11 % at 675 Hz. The ECPS is in advanced stage of implementation in DSRDM of PFBR. (authors)

  4. High Resolution Studies of the Origins of Polyatomic Ions in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jill Wisnewski Ferguson

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Traditionally, the plasma is sampled via a sampler cone. A supersonic jet develops behind the sampler, and this region is pumped down to a pressure of approximately one Torr. A skimmer cone is located inside this zone of silence to transmit ions into the mass spectrometer. The position of the sampler and skimmer cones relative to the initial radiation and normal analytical zones of the plasma is key to optimizing the useful analytical signal [1]. The ICP both atomizes and ionizes the sample. Polyatomic ions form through ion-molecule interactions either in the ICP or during ion extraction [l]. Common polyatomic ions that inhibit analysis include metal oxides (MO{sup +}), adducts with argon, the gas most commonly used to make up the plasma, and hydride species. While high resolution devices can separate many analytes from common interferences, this is done at great cost in ion transmission efficiency--a loss of 99% when using high versus low resolution on the same instrument [2]. Simple quadrupole devices, which make up the bulk of ICP-MS instruments in existence, do not present this option. Therefore, if the source of polyatomic interferences can be determined and then manipulated, this could potentially improve the figures of merit on all ICP-MS devices, not just the high resolution devices often utilized to study polyatomic interferences.

  5. Mode transition in CF{sub 4} + Ar inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Gao, Fei; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The E to H mode transitions are studied by a hairpin probe and optical emission spectroscopy in inductively coupled CF{sub 4} + Ar plasmas. Electron density, optical emission intensity of Ar, and the voltage and current are measured during the E to H mode transitions. It is found that the electron density and plasma emission intensity increase continuously at low pressure during the E to H mode transition, while they jump up discontinuously at high pressure. Meanwhile, the transition threshold power and ?P (the power interval between E and H mode) increase by increasing the pressure. When the ratio of CF{sub 4} increases, the E to H mode transition happens at higher applied power, and meanwhile, the ?P also significantly increases. Besides, the effects of CF{sub 4} gas ratio on the plasma properties and the circuit electrical properties in both pure E and H modes were also investigated. The electron density and plasma emission intensity both decrease upon increasing the ratio of CF{sub 4} at the two modes, due to the stronger electrons loss scheme. The applied voltages at E and H modes both increase as increasing the CF{sub 4} gas ratio, however the applied current at two modes behave just oppositely with the gas ratio.

  6. Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien [Ames Laboratory

    2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

  7. On anomalous temporal evolution of gas pressure in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, B. H.; Chang, H. Y. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal measurement of gas pressure in inductive coupled plasma revealed that there is an interesting anomalous evolution of gas pressure in the early stage of plasma ignition and extinction: a sudden gas pressure change and its relaxation of which time scales are about a few seconds and a few tens of second, respectively, were observed after plasma ignition and extinction. This phenomenon can be understood as a combined result between the neutral heating effect induced by plasma and the pressure relaxation effect for new gas temperature. The temporal measurement of gas temperature by laser Rayleigh scattering and the time dependant calculations for the neutral heating and pressure relaxation are in good agreement with our experimental results. This result and physics behind are expected to provide a new operational perspective of the recent plasma processes of which time is very short, such as a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition/etching, a soft etch for disposal of residual by-products on wafer, and light oxidation process in semiconductor manufacturing.

  8. Arsenic speciation in soil using high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, D.A.; Yaeger, J.S.; Parish, K.J.; Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Gowdy, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Mohrman, G.B.; Besmer, M.G. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, CO (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed to identify and quantify As(III), As(V), and organoarsenic compounds in soil samples from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) by high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP/MS). The soils were extracted using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) and sonication. The percentages of As(III), As(V), and organoarsenic species extracted from soil samples were 30, 50, and 100 respectively. The arsenic species were not altered during the extraction process. They were separated by reversed-phase, ion-pairing, HPLC using a microbore Inertsil-ODS{trademark} column. The HPLC column effluent was introduced into an ICP/MS system using a direct injection nebulizer (DIN). Detection limits of less than 1 pg were readily obtained for each arsenic species. Internal standards are recommended to increase accuracy and precision. Soil samples spiked with arsenic oxide, sodium arsenate, dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), and chlorovinyl arsenious acid (CVAA) were extracted, identified and quantified with the HPLC/ICP/MS system. The soil samples were analyzed in support of the analytical needs of a thermal desorption treatability study being conducted at the RMA.

  9. Comparison of plasma chemistries for inductively coupled plasma etching of InGaAlP alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, J.; Lee, J.W.; Abernathy, C.R.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Hobson, W.S. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two plasma chemistries, i.e., CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar and Cl{sub 2}/Ar, were compared for the etching of InGaP, AlInP, and AlGaP under inductively coupled plasma (ICP) conditions. While the etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar discharges appears to be ion driven, Cl{sub 2}/Ar discharges showed an additional strong chemical enhancement. The highest etch rate ({approximately}1 {mu}m/min) for InGaP was achieved at high ICP source power ({ge}750 W) with the Cl{sub 2}/Ar chemistry. Cl{sub 2}/Ar discharges provided very smooth surfaces in all three materials with root-mean-square roughness measured by atomic force microscopy around 2 nm. This result may be due to the efficient ion-assisted product desorption in this chemistry. The etched near-surface region of InGaP ({approximately}100 {Angstrom}) with Cl{sub 2}/Ar maintained almost the same stoichiometry as that of the unetched control. By contrast, the CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma chemistry produced somewhat rougher surfaces and depletion of phosphorous (P) from the surface of InGaP. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  10. Comparison of various interpretation methods of the electric probe measurements in inductively coupled Ar and O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo Seo, Min; Keun Bae, Min; Chung, T. H., E-mail: thchung@dau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-pressure inductively coupled argon and oxygen discharges, the plasma density and electron temperature and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) were obtained by using a cylindrical electric probe. The plasma densities were determined by various methods to interpret the probe current-voltage characteristic curve: the EEDF integration, the electron saturation current, the ion current at the floating potential, and the orbital-motion-limited (OML) ion current. Quite a good agreement exists between the plasma densities determined by various classical methods. Although the probe technique has some limitation in electronegative plasmas, the plasma densities determined from OML theory compare well with those measured by the ion saturation current at the floating potential in the oxygen discharges. In addition, the EEDFs of inductively coupled Ar and oxygen plasmas are observed to be nearly Maxwellian at the pressure range of 1-40 mTorr.

  11. Investigation of magnetic-pole-enhanced inductively coupled nitrogen-argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan, F.; Zakaullah, M. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khan, A. W.; Saeed, A. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus Islamabad, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presented the features of the mixed mode and H mode in magnetic pole enhanced, inductively coupled Ar-N{sub 2} plasmas using RF-compensated Langmuir probe measurements. To fully characterize plasma parameters and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), the gas pressure and argon content were varied. It was observed that with increasing the nitrogen content and gas pressure, the critical RF power to sustain H mode increases; this increase was more prominent for pure nitrogen discharge at higher pressure. The electron number density (n{sub e}) shows increasing trend with increasing RF power, while at higher gas pressures, the electron number density decreases at fixed RF power. Mostly, the EEPFs show a Maxwellian distribution even at low RF power (for higher argon content in the discharge) and at moderate RF power (for higher or pure nitrogen content in the discharge) for pressures of 15-60 mTorr. With increasing the nitrogen content in the mixture, the low energy part of the EEPF is more Druyvesteyn with a distorted high energy tail at low RF power. At fixed RF power, the slope of EEPF changes sharply with increasing pressure. It was observed that in hybrid mode, the EEPF at higher gas pressure (75 mTorr) in a pure nitrogen discharge shows a flat hole near the average electron energy of 3 eV and changes to Maxwellian distribution in H mode. The skin depth versus RF power shows that the skin depth is smaller than the critical dimension of the chamber, regardless of the gas type and the gas pressure.

  12. Plasma dynamics in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Anurag; Lee, Sehan [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Y., E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Langmuir probe, time resolved measurements of plasma parameters were carried out in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The discharge was sustained in an argon gas environment at a pressure of 10 mTorr. The low frequency (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}) was pulsed at 1 kHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency (P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz}) was maintained in the CW mode. All measurements were carried out at the center of the discharge and 20?mm above the substrate. The results show that, at a particular condition (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}?=?200 W and P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz?}=?600 W), plasma density increases with time and stabilizes at up to ?200 ?s after the initiation of P{sub 2} {sub MHz} pulse at a plasma density of (2?×?10{sup 17} m{sup ?3}) for the remaining duration of pulse “on.” This stabilization time for plasma density increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz} and becomes ?300 ?s when P{sub 2} {sub MHz} is 600 W; however, the growth rate of plasma density is almost independent of P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. Interestingly, the plasma density sharply increases as the pulse is switched off and reaches a peak value in ?10 ?s, then decreases for the remaining pulse “off-time.” This phenomenon is thought to be due to the sheath modulation during the transition from “pulse on” to “pulse off” and partly due to RF noise during the transition period. The magnitude of peak plasma density in off time increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. The plasma potential and electron temperature decrease as the pulse develops and shows similar behavior to that of the plasma density when the pulse is switched off.

  13. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer – Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  14. {sup 99}Tc bioassay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, L.A.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means of analyzing {sup 99}Tc in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Historically, {sup 99}Tc analysis was based on the radiometric detection of the 293 keV E{sub Max} beta decay product by liquid scintillation or gas flow proportional counting. In a urine matrix, the analysis of{sup 99}Tc is plagued with many difficulties using conventional radiometric methods. Difficulties originate during chemical separation due to the volatile nature of Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} or during radiation detection due to color or chemical quenching. A separation scheme for {sup 99}Tc detection by ICP-MS is given and is proven to be a sensitive and robust analytical alternative. A comparison of methods using radiometric and mass quantitation of {sup 99}Tc has been conducted in water, artificial urine, and real urine matrices at activity levels between 700 and 2,200 dpm/L. Liquid scintillation results based on an external standard quench correction and a quench curve correction method are compared to results obtained by ICP-MS. Each method produced accurate results, however the precision of the ICP-MS results is superior to that of liquid scintillation results. Limits of detection (LOD) for ICP-MS and liquid scintillation detection are 14.67 and 203.4 dpm/L, respectively, in a real urine matrix. In order to determine the basis for the increased precision of the ICP-MS results, the detection sensitivity for each method is derived and measured. The detection sensitivity for the {sup 99}Tc isotope by ICP-MS is 2.175 x 10{sup {minus}7} {+-} 8.990 x 10{sup {minus}9} and by liquid scintillation is 7.434 x 10{sup {minus}14} {+-} 7.461 x 10{sup {minus}15}. A difference by seven orders of magnitude between the two detection systems allows ICP-MS samples to be analyzed for a period of 15 s compared to 3,600 s by liquid scintillation counting with a lower LOD.

  15. Radical kinetics in an inductively-coupled plasma in CF4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.P.; Abada, H.; Chabert, P. [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Graves, D.B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency discharges in low pressure fluorocarbon gases are used for anisotropic and selective etching of dielectric materials (SiO2 and derivatives), a key step in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Plasmas in these gases are capable not only of etching, but also of depositing fluorocarbon films, depending on a number of factors including the ion bombardment energy, the gas composition and the surface temperature: this behavior is indeed responsible for etch selectivity between materials and plays a role in achieving the desired etched feature profiles. Free radical species, such as CFx and fluorine atoms, play important but complex roles in these processes. We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), with time and space resolution in pulsed plasmas, to elucidate the kinetics of CF and CF2 radicals, elucidating their creation, destruction and transport mechanisms within the reactor. Whereas more complex gas mixtures are used in industrial processes, study of the relatively simple system of a pure CF4 plasma is more appropriate for the study of mechanisms. Previously the technique was applied to the study of single-frequency capacitively-coupled 'reactive ion etching' reactors, where the substrate (placed on the powered electrode) is always bombarded with high-energy CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. In this case it was found that the major source of CFx free radicals was neutralization, dissociation and backscattering of these incident ions, rather than direct dissociation of the feedstock gas. Subsequently, an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) in pure CF4 was studied. This system has a higher plasma density, leading to higher gas dissociation, whereas the energy of ions striking the reactor surfaces is much lower (in the absence of additional RF biasing). The LIF technique also allows the gas temperature to be measured with good spatial and temporal resolution. This showed large gas temperature gradients within the ICP reactor, which must be taken into account in reactive species transport. In the ICP reactor we saw significant production of CF and CF2 radicals at the reactor top and bottom surfaces, at rates that cannot be explained by the neutralization of incident CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. These two species are also lost at very high rates in the gas phase. We postulate that these two phenomena are caused by electron-impact excitation of these radicals into low-lying metastable levels. The metastable molecules produced (that are invisible to LIF) diffuse to the reactor walls where they are quenched back to their ground state. In the afterglow the gas cools rapidly and contracts, causing gas convection. Whereas the density of the more reactive species decays monotonically in the afterglow, the density of CF2 initially increases. This is partly due to the gas contraction, bringing back CF2 (which is a relatively stable species) from the outer regions of the reactor, and partly due to chemical reactions producing CF2, as it is more thermodynamically stable than the other radical species such as CF and CF3.

  16. Plasma power measurement and hysteresis in the E-H transition of a rf inductively coupled plasma system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daltrini, A. M.; Moshkalev, S. A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, Center for Semiconductor Components, P.O. Box 6061, Campinas SP 13083-870 (Brazil); Morgan, T. J. [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06457 (United States); Piejak, R. B.; Graham, W. G. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen's University Belfast BT 7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation of the argon plasma behavior near the E-H transition in an inductively coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell is reported. Electron density and temperature, ion density, argon metastable density, and optical emission measurements have been made as function of input power and gas pressure. When plotted versus plasma power, applied power corrected for coil and hardware losses, no hysteresis is observed in the measured plasma parameter dependence at the E-H mode transition. This suggests that hysteresis in the E-H mode transition is due to ignoring inherent power loss, primarily in the matching system.

  17. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M. [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)] [Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Chemistry Service, SS 17bis km 18.910, 67100 Assergi (Aq) (Italy)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  18. A study on the maximum power transfer condition in an inductively coupled plasma using transformer circuit model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations between the external discharge parameters (the driving frequency ? and the chamber dimension R) and plasma characteristics (the skin depth ? and the electron-neutral collision frequency ?{sub m}) are studied using the transformer circuit model [R. B. Piejak et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 1, 179 (1992)] when the absorbed power is maximized in an inductively coupled plasma. From the analysis of the transformer circuit model, the maximum power transfer conditions, which depend on the external discharge parameters and the internal plasma characteristics, were obtained. It was found that a maximum power transfer occurs when ??0.38R for the discharge condition at which ?{sub m}/??1, while it occurs when ???(2)?(?/?{sub m})R for the discharge condition at which ?{sub m}/??1. The results of this circuit analysis are consistent with the stable last inductive mode region of an inductive-to-capacitive mode transition [Lee and Chung, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063510 (2006)], which was theoretically derived from Maxwell's equations. Our results were also in agreement with the experimental results. From this work, we demonstrate that a simple circuit analysis can be applied to explain complex physical phenomena to a certain extent.

  19. Prolactin-stimulated ornithine decarboxylase induction in rat hepatocytes: Coupling to diacylglycerol generation and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, A.R.; Buckley, D.J. (Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, MO (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trophic effects of prolactin (PRL) in rat liver have been linked to activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Since alterations in PKC activity imply its activation by 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG), we tested whether PRL treatment stimulated DAG generation coupled to induction of a growth response in primary hepatocytes. Addition of PRL to hepatocyte cultures significantly increased ({sup 3}H)-glycerol incorporation into DAG within 5 minutes which was followed by a loss of cytosolic PKC activity by 10 minutes. Prolactin also significantly enhanced radiolabel incorporation into triacylglycerol and phospholipids within 10 minutes and induced ODC activity at 6 hours. Therefore, prolactin-stimulated alterations in PKC activity are preceded by enhanced DAG generation. Moreover, these events appear to be coupled to PRL-stimulated entry of hepatocytes into cell cycle.

  20. Investigations into the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Sally M.

    2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an elemental analytical instrument capable of determining nearly all elements in the periodic table at limits of detection in the parts per quadrillion and with a linear analytical range over 8-10 orders of magnitude. Three concentric quartz tubes make up the plasma torch. Argon gas is spiraled through the outer tube and generates the plasma powered by a looped load coil operating at 27.1 or 40.6 MHz. The argon flow of the middle channel is used to keep the plasma above the innermost tube through which solid or aqueous sample is carried in a third argon stream. A sample is progressively desolvated, atomized and ionized. The torch is operated at atmospheric pressure. To reach the reduced pressures of mass spectrometers, ions are extracted through a series of two, approximately one millimeter wide, circular apertures set in water cooled metal cones. The space between the cones is evacuated to approximately one torr. The space behind the second cone is pumped down to, or near to, the pressure needed for the mass spectrometer (MS). The first cone, called the sampler, is placed directly in the plasma plume and its position is adjusted to the point where atomic ions are most abundant. The hot plasma gas expands through the sampler orifice and in this expansion is placed the second cone, called the skimmer. After the skimmer traditional MS designs are employed, i.e. quadrupoles, magnetic sectors, time-of-flight. ICP-MS is the leading trace element analysis technique. One of its weaknesses are polyatomic ions. This dissertation has added to the fundamental understanding of some of these polyatomic ions, their origins and behavior. Although mainly continuing the work of others, certain novel approaches have been introduced here. Chapter 2 includes the first reported efforts to include high temperature corrections to the partition functions of the polyatomic ions in ICP-MS. This and other objections to preceeding papers in this area were addressed. Errors in the measured T{sub gas} values were found for given errors in the experimental and spectroscopic values. The ionization energy of the neutral polyatomic ion was included in calculations to prove the validity of ignoring more complicated equilibria. Work was begun on the question of agreement between kinetics of the plasma and interface and the increase and depletion seen in certain polyatomic ions. This dissertation was also the first to report day to day ranges for T{sub gas} values and to use a statistical test to compare different operating conditions. This will help guide comparisons of previous and future work. Chapter 4 was the first attempt to include the excited electronic state 2 in the partition function of ArO{sup +} as well as the first to address the different dissociation products of the ground and first electronic levels of ArO{sup +}. Chapter 5 reports an interesting source of memory in ICP-MS that could affect mathematical corrections for polyatomic ions. For future work on these topics I suggest the following experiments and investigations. Clearly not an extensive list, they are instead the first topics curiosity brings to mind. (1) Measurement of T{sub gas} values when using the flow injection technique of Appendix B. It was believed that there was a fundamental difference in the plasma when the auto-sampler was used versus a continuous injection. Is this reflected in T{sub gas} values? (2) The work of Chapter 3 can be expanded and supplemented with more trials, new cone materials (i.e. copper, stainless steel) and more cone geometries. Some of this equipment is already present in the laboratory, others could be purchased or made. (3) T{sub gas} values from Chapter 3 could be correlated with instrument pressures during the experiment. Pressures after the skimmer cone were recorded for many days but have yet to be collated with the measured T{sub gas} values. (4) The work in Chapter 5 could be expanded to include more metals. Does the curious correlation between measured T{sub gas} and element boili

  1. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenITLaboratory in Inductively Coupledfor

  2. Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

  3. Development and evaluation of high resolution quadrupole mass analyzer and an inductively coupled plasma-Mach disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amad, Ma'an Hazem

    1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    By definition a plasma is an electrically conducting gaseous mixture containing a significant concentration of cations and electrons. The Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) is an electrodeless discharge in a gas at atmospheric pressure. This discharge is an excellent one for vaporizing, atomizing, and ionizing elements. The early development of the ICP began in 1942 by Babat and then by Reed in the early 1960s. This was then followed by the pioneering work of Fassel and coworkers in the late 1960s. Commercial ICP spectrometers were introduced in the mid 1970s. A major breakthrough in the area of ICP took place in the early 1980s when the ICP was shown to be an excellent ion source for mass spectrometry.

  4. On the possibility of the multiple inductively coupled plasma and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Lee, Yun-Seong, E-mail: leeeeys@kaist.ac.kr; Chang, Hong-Young [Low-temperature Plasma Laboratory, Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); An, Sang-Hyuk [Agency of Defense Development, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-151 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we attempted to determine the possibility of multiple inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes. Experiments were performed with the one and two coils to measure plasma and electrical parameters, and a circuit simulation was performed to measure the current at each coil in the 2-coil experiment. Based on the result, we could determine the possibility of multiple ICP sources due to a direct change of impedance due to current and saturation of impedance due to the skin-depth effect. However, a helicon plasma source is difficult to adapt to the multiple sources due to the consistent change of real impedance due to mode transition and the low uniformity of the B-field confinement. As a result, it is expected that ICP can be adapted to multiple sources for large-area processes.

  5. Low-temperature growth of gallium nitride films by inductively coupled-plasma-enhanced reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Chih-Jui; Chau-Nan Hong, Franklin, E-mail: hong@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium nitride (GaN) films were grown on sapphire substrate by reactive magnetron sputtering. Inductively coupled-plasma (ICP) source was installed between the substrate holder and the sputtering target to increase the plasma density and the degree of ionization of nitrogen gas. Liquid Ga and Ar/N{sub 2} were used as the sputtering target and sputtering gases, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that the authors could grow high quality GaN crystallites at 500?°C. However, the crystalline GaN (0002) peak remained even by lowering the growth temperature down to 300?°C. The N:Ga ratio of the film grown at 500?°C was almost 1:1, and the nitrogen composition became higher toward the 1:1 N:Ga ratio with increasing the growth temperature. The high degree of ionization induced by ICP source was essential to the growth of high crystalline quality GaN films.

  6. Cl{sub 2}-based dry etching of the AlGaInN system in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Hyun; Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Donovan, S.M.; Pearton, S.J. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Shul, R.J.; Han, J. [Sandia National Labs., NM (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cl{sub 2}-based Inductively Coupled Plasmas with low additional dc self- biases(-100V) produce convenient etch rates(500-1500 A /min) for GaN, AlN, InN, InAlN and InGaN. A systematic study of the effects of additive gas(Ar, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}), discharge composition and ICP source power and chuck power on etch rate and surface morphology has been performed. The general trends are to go through a maximum in etch rate with percent Cl{sub 2} in the discharge for all three mixtures, and to have an increase(decrease) in etch rate with source power(pressure). Since the etching is strongly ion-assisted, anisotropic pattern transfer is readily achieved. Maximum etch selectivities of approximately 6 for InN over the other nitrides were obtained.

  7. The PERC{trademark} process: Existing and potential applications for induction coupled plasma technology in hazardous and radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blutke, A.S.; Vavruska, J.S.; Serino, J.F. [Plasma Technology, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Technology, Inc. (PTI), a Santa Fe, New Mexico corporation has developed the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC){trademark} treatment process as a safe and environmentally clean alternative to conventional thermal destruction technologies. The PERC{trademark} treatment process uses as its heat source an advanced Induction Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch connected to a reaction chamber system with an additional emission control system. For example, organic-based gas, liquid, slurry, and/or solid waste streams can be converted into usable or even salable products while residual emissions are reduced to an absolute minimum. In applications for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste streams, the PERC system could be used for destruction of the hazardous organic constituents and/or significant waste volume reduction while capturing the radioactive fraction in a non-leachable form. Like Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) arc plasma systems, ICP torches offer sufficient energy to decompose, melt and/or vitrify any waste stream. The decision for an arc plasma or an IC plasma system has to be made on a case by case evaluation and is highly dependent on the specific waste stream`s form and composition. Induction coupled plasma technology offers one simple, but significant difference compared to DC or AC arc plasma systems: the ICP torch is electrodeless. To date, enormous research effort has been spent to improve the lifetime of electrodes and the effectiveness of related cooling systems. Arc plasma systems are established in research laboratories worldwide and are approaching a broad use in commercial applications. ICP technology has been improved relatively recently, but nowadays offers complete new and beneficial approaches in the field of waste conversion and treatment.

  8. Apparatus and method for reducing inductive coupling between levitation and drive coils within a magnetic propulsion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for reducing inductive coupling between levitation and drive coils within a magnetic levitation system. A pole array has a magnetic field. A levitation coil is positioned so that in response to motion of the magnetic field of the pole array a current is induced in the levitation coil. A first drive coil having a magnetic field coupled to drive the pole array also has a magnetic flux which induces a parasitic current in the levitation coil. A second drive coil having a magnetic field is positioned to attenuate the parasitic current in the levitation coil by canceling the magnetic flux of the first drive coil which induces the parasitic current. Steps in the method include generating a magnetic field with a pole array for levitating an object; inducing current in a levitation coil in response to motion of the magnetic field of the pole array; generating a magnetic field with a first drive coil for propelling the object; and generating a magnetic field with a second drive coil for attenuating effects of the magnetic field of the first drive coil on the current in the levitation coil.

  9. Inductively Coupled Plasma etching of amorphous silicon nanostructures over nanotopography using C4F8/SF6 chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Drouin, Dominique; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; 10.1016/j.mee.2013.02.099

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etching of amorphous silicon (a-Si) nanostructures using a continuous C4F8/SF6 plasma over nanotopography in silicon dioxide (SiO2) is investigated. The coil power of the ICP system is used to tune the a-Si etch rate from 20 to 125 nm/min. The etch rates of a-Si, SiO2 and electroresist are measured depending on the SF6 ratio, platen power and chamber pressure and used to optimize the a-Si:SiO2 etch selectivity. The results on nanostructures show that the presence of an insulating etch-stop layer affects the passivation ratio required to achieve vertical sidewalls. A low pressure is also necessary in order to etch the silicon nanostructure embedded into the oxide nanotrenches to form a highly conformable a-Si nanowire. We argue that both of these behaviors could be explained by surface charging effects. Finally, etching of 20 nm a-Si nanowires that cross 15 nm trenches in oxide with vertical sidewalls and a 4.3:1 a-Si:SiO2 etch selectivity is demonstrated. This etching process ...

  10. The effect of ultrafast laser wavelength on ablation properties and implications on sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaHaye, N. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Kulkarni, P. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio 45213 (United States)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the role of femtosecond (fs) laser wavelength on laser ablation (LA) and its relation to laser generated aerosol counts and particle distribution, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) signal intensity, detection limits, and elemental fractionation. Four different NIST standard reference materials (610, 613, 615, and 616) were ablated using 400 nm and 800 nm fs laser pulses to study the effect of wavelength on laser ablation rate, accuracy, precision, and fractionation. Our results show that the detection limits are lower for 400 nm laser excitation than 800 nm laser excitation at lower laser energies but approximately equal at higher energies. Ablation threshold was also found to be lower for 400 nm than 800 nm laser excitation. Particle size distributions are very similar for 400 nm and 800 nm wavelengths; however, they differ significantly in counts at similar laser fluence levels. This study concludes that 400 nm LA is more beneficial for sample introduction in ICP-MS, particularly when lower laser energies are to be used for ablation.

  11. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation—An alternate approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M., E-mail: mainak@ter-india.org; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC, Sector-25, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 025 (India)] [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29, GIDC, Sector-25, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 025 (India); Kraus, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85740 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85740 Garching (Germany); Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382 428 (India)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (?100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard.

  12. RAPID DETERMINATION OF 237 NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN WATER BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.; Culligan, B.; Nichols, S.; Noyes, G.

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in water samples was developed for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via peak tailing. The method provide enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then moving Pu to DGA resin for additional removal of uranium. The decontamination factor for uranium from Pu is almost 100,000 and the decontamination factor for U from Np is greater than 10,000. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation method. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long and short-lived Pu isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 20 samples (including QC samples) in 4 to 6 hours, and can also be used for emergency response. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, and {sup 239}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  13. DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  14. Standard test method for determination of impurities in nuclear grade uranium compounds by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of 67 elements in uranium dioxide samples and nuclear grade uranium compounds and solutions without matrix separation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3) if these compounds are treated and converted to the same uranium concentration solution. 1.2 The elements boron, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and iron can be determined using different techniques. The analyst's instrumentation will determine which procedure is chosen for the analysis. 1.3 The test method for technetium-99 is given in Annex A1. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish ...

  15. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C. [Physical Sciences Laboratories, The Aerospace Corporation, P.O. Box 92957, Los Angeles, California 90009 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  16. Inductively Coupled Plasma and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Etching of InGaAlP Compound Semiconductor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Hobson, W.S.; Hong, J.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future generations of sophisticated compound semiconductor devices require the ability for submicron scale patterning. The situation is being complicated since some of the new devices are based on a wider diversity of materials to be etched. Conventional IUE (Reactive Ion Etching) has been prevalent across the industry so far, but has limitations for materials with high bond strengths or multiple elements. IrI this paper, we suggest high density plasmas such as ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) and ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma), for the etching of ternary compound semiconductors (InGaP, AIInP, AlGaP) which are employed for electronic devices like heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) or high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), and photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. High density plasma sources, opeiating at lower pressure, are expected to meet target goals determined in terms of etch rate, surface morphology, surface stoichiometry, selectivity, etc. The etching mechanisms, which are described in this paper, can also be applied to other III-V (GaAs-based, InP-based) as well as III-Nitride since the InGaAIP system shares many of the same properties.

  17. Velocity distribution function of sputtered gallium atoms during inductively coupled argon plasma treatment of a GaAs surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despiau-Pujo, Emilie; Chabert, Pascal; Ramos, Raphaeel; Cunge, Gilles; Sadeghi, Nader [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A GaN laser diode at 403.3 nm is used to measure the velocity distribution function (vdf) of Ga atoms sputtered from a radio-frequency biased GaAs substrate in a low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) argon discharge. To investigate both perpendicular (V{sub z} normal to wafer) and longitudinal (V{sub x} parallel to wafer) velocity components, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements are performed in the z direction and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in the x direction. The longitudinal vdf of Ga sputtered atoms is very close to a Lorentzian function with V{sub x} comprised between 0 and 7500 m s{sup -1}, while the perpendicular velocities V{sub z} can reach 10 000 m s{sup -1}. Experimental results are compared to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Ar{sup +} ion sputtering of GaAs under 200 eV bombardment. MD predictions and experiments are in fairly good agreement, which confirms the existence of products sputtered from the surface with kinetic energies larger than 10 eV. In etching processes dominated by physical bombardment, these energetic atoms could alter passivation layers on sidewalls and be responsible for defects observed in nanodevices. The best fit of the Doppler-broadened LIF and AAS profiles with the vdfs predicted by sputtering theory allows one to estimate the surface binding energy of Ga atoms in GaAs, E{sub b}, to be around 3 eV.

  18. Analysis and design of resonant inductively coupled circuits : application to benefit denial solutions for the retail industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rony, Amaury

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ProTeqt develops benefit denial solutions that are electromagnetically deactivated. A magnetic field from the deactivation tablet inductively heats an enabler that provides the proper force to disengage the locking mechanism. ...

  19. RAPID DETERMINATION OF ACTINIDES IN URINE BY INDUCTIVELY-COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY AND ALPHA SPECTROMETRY: A HYBRID APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Jones, V.

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid separation method that allows separation and preconcentration of actinides in urine samples was developed for the measurement of longer lived actinides by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry; a hybrid approach. This method uses stacked extraction chromatography cartridges and vacuum box technology to facilitate rapid separations. Preconcentration, if required, is performed using a streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation. Similar technology has been applied to separate actinides prior to measurement by alpha spectrometry, but this new method has been developed with elution reagents now compatible with ICP-MS as well. Purified solutions are split between ICP-MS and alpha spectrometry so that long- and short-lived actinide isotopes can be measured successfully. The method allows for simultaneous extraction of 24 samples (including QC samples) in less than 3 h. Simultaneous sample preparation can offer significant time savings over sequential sample preparation. For example, sequential sample preparation of 24 samples taking just 15 min each requires 6 h to complete. The simplicity and speed of this new method makes it attractive for radiological emergency response. If preconcentration is applied, the method is applicable to larger sample aliquots for occupational exposures as well. The chemical recoveries are typically greater than 90%, in contrast to other reported methods using flow injection separation techniques for urine samples where plutonium yields were 70-80%. This method allows measurement of both long-lived and short-lived actinide isotopes. 239Pu, 242Pu, 237Np, 243Am, 234U, 235U and 238U were measured by ICP-MS, while 236Pu, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm were measured by alpha spectrometry. The method can also be adapted so that the separation of uranium isotopes for assay is not required, if uranium assay by direct dilution of the urine sample is preferred instead. Multiple vacuum box locations may be set-up to supply several ICP-MS units with purified sample fractions such that a high sample throughput may be achieved, while still allowing for rapid measurement of short-lived actinides by alpha spectrometry.

  20. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  1. Doubly fed induction machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load including an energy converter device having a doubly fed induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer coupled to the energy converter device to control the flow of power or energy through the doubly fed induction machine.

  2. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  3. aqueous wastes wet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low...

  4. atomic spectrometry update: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry CERN Preprints Summary: 1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low...

  5. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Yoon, Y. S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  6. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: Examinations of the origins of polyatomic ions and advances in the sampling of particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, Travis

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation provides a general introduction to Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) sampling, with an examination of analytical challenges in the employment of this technique. It discusses the origin of metal oxide ions (MO+) in LA-ICP-MS, as well as the effect of introducing helium and nitrogen to the aerosol gas flow on the formation of these polyatomic interferences. It extends the study of polyatomic ions in LA-ICP-MS to metal argide (MAr+) species, an additional source of possible significant interferences in the spectrum. It describes the application of fs-LA-ICP-MS to the determination of uranium isotope ratios in particulate samples.

  7. Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching in ICl- and IBr-Based Chemistries: Part II. InP, InSb, InGaP and InGaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, C.R.; Cho, H.; Hahn, Y.B.; Hays, D.C.; Hobson, W.S.; Jung, K.B.; Lambers, E.S.; Pearton, S.J.; Shul, R.J.

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric study of Inductively Coupled Plasma etching of InP, InSb, InGaP and InGaAs has been carried out in IC1/Ar and IBr/Ar chemistries. Etch rates in excess of 3.1 prrdmin for InP, 3.6 prnh-nin for InSb, 2.3 pm/min for InGaP and 2.2 ~rrdmin for InGaAs were obtained in IBr/Ar plasmas. The ICP etching of In-based materials showed a general tendency: the etch rates increased substantially with increasing the ICP source power and rf chuck power in both chemistries, while they decreased with increasing chamber pressure. The IBr/Ar chemistry typically showed higher etch rates than IC1/Ar, but the etched surface mophologies were fairly poor for both chemistries.

  8. Standard test method for the determination of impurities in plutonium metal: acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This Test Method covers the determination of 58 trace elements in plutonium (Pu) metal. The Pu sample is dissolved in acid, and the concentration of the trace impurities are determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). 1.2 This Test Method is specific for the determination of trace impurities in Pu metal. It may be applied to other types of Pu materials, such as Pu oxides, if the samples are dissolved and oxidized to the Pu(IV) state. However, it is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the performance of other matrices. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this method to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use of this standard.

  9. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas: I. Without silicon etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique (UMR 5588), Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble, and CNRS, BP 87, 38402 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser absorption at 355 nm is used to monitor the time variations of the Cl{sub 2} density in high-density industrial inductively coupled plasma. This technique is combined with the measurement of the gas temperature from the Doppler width of the 811.5 nm line of argon, added as a trace gas and with the measurement of the total gas pressure with a Baratron gauge. These measurements permit to estimate the mole fractions of Cl{sub 2} and Cl species in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas in a waferless reactor. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall coatings on the Cl and Cl{sub 2} mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that under otherwise identical plasma conditions, the Cl mole fraction is completely different when the plasma is operated in SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl coated reactors, because the homogeneous recombination probability of Cl atoms is strongly surface dependant. The Cl atom mole fraction reached at 100 W radiofrequency power in SiOCl coated reactor (80%) is much higher than that obtained at 900 W in a ''clean'' AlF reactor (40%). A simple zero-dimensional model permits to provide the recombination coefficient of Cl atoms, {gamma}{sub rec}: 0.005 on SiOCl film and about 0.3 on the other three coatings. It is proposed to get benefit of this very high sensitivity of Cl{sub 2} dissociation rate to the wall coating for the control of the chamber wall status from the Cl{sub 2} density measurements in standard conditions.

  10. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Luan

    1995-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  11. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar plasma discharge: Effect of O{sub 2} on the plasma kinetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pateau, Amand [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniére 44322 Nantes, France and ST Microelectronics, 10 rue Thals de Milet, 37071 Tours (France); Rhallabi, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.rhallabi@univ-nantes.fr; Fernandez, Marie-Claude [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniére 44322 Nantes (France); Boufnichel, Mohamed; Roqueta, Fabrice [ST Microelectronics, 10 rue Thales de Milet, 37071 Tours (France)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A global model has been developed for low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures. This model is based on a set of mass balance equations for all the considered species, coupled with the discharge power balance equation and the charge neutrality condition. The present study is an extension of the kinetic global model previously developed for SF{sub 6}/Ar ICP plasma discharges [Lallement et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 025001 (2009)]. It is focused on the study of the impact of the O{sub 2} addition to the SF{sub 6}/Ar gas mixture on the plasma kinetic properties. The simulation results show that the electron density increases with the %O{sub 2}, which is due to the decrease of the plasma electronegativity, while the electron temperature is almost constant in our pressure range. The density evolutions of atomic fluorine and oxygen versus %O{sub 2} have been analyzed. Those atomic radicals play an important role in the silicon etching process. The atomic fluorine density increases from 0 up to 40% O{sub 2} where it reaches a maximum. This is due to the enhancement of the SF{sub 6} dissociation processes and the production of fluorine through the reactions between SF{sub x} and O. This trend is experimentally confirmed. On the other hand, the simulation results show that O(3p) is the preponderant atomic oxygen. Its density increases with %O{sub 2} until reaching a maximum at almost 40% O{sub 2}. Over this value, its diminution with O{sub 2}% can be justified by the high increase in the loss frequency of O(3p) by electronic impact in comparison to its production frequency by electronic impact with O{sub 2}.

  12. Effects of radio-frequency driving power, gas pressure, and nitrogen seeding on the transition dynamics in argon inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razzak, M. Abdur; Takamura, Shuichi; Uesugi, Yoshihiko [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kanazawa University 2-40-20 Kodatsuno, Ishikawa 920-8667 (Japan)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influences of rf driving power, neutral gas pressure, and nitrogen seeding on the electrostatic-to-electromagnetic (E-H) mode transition dynamics in radio-frequency argon inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) in a pressure range of 50-100 kPa are investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The E-H mode transition dynamics and its characteristic transition time scale are investigated by observing the high-speed imaging (13 500 fps) as well as the temporal change of plasma loading impedance. The experimental results reveal that the E-H mode transition time is not fixed at any operating conditions rather it depends on some important parameters such as the rf driving power, neutral gas pressure, gas type. It is found that the E-H mode transition time depends on the unique parameter E{sub {theta}}/p; the so-called effective induced electric field, rather than the independent parameter: the rf power or neutral gas pressure. It is also found that longer E-H mode transition time is required to ignite the high-pressure Ar-N{sub 2} plasmas with a 2.5%-10% N{sub 2} seeding than that of pure Ar plasmas with the same operating conditions. The experimental results are compared with that of the recently developed theoretical models, and a good agreement is found between them.

  13. Comparative study of GaN mesa etch characteristics in Cl{sub 2} based inductively coupled plasma with Ar and BCl{sub 3} as additive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawal, Dipendra Singh, E-mail: dsrawal15@gmail.com; Arora, Henika; Sehgal, Bhupender Kumar; Muralidharan, Rangarajan [Solid State Physics Laboratory, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN thin film etching is investigated and compared for mesa formation in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of Cl{sub 2} with Ar and BCl{sub 3} gas additives using photoresist mask. Etch characteristics are studied as a function of ICP process parameters, viz., ICP power, radio frequency (RF) power, and chamber pressure at fixed total flow rate. The etch rate at each ICP/RF power is 0.1–0.2??m/min higher for Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture mainly due to higher Cl dissociation efficiency of Ar additive that readily provides Cl ion/radical for reaction in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} mixture. Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixture also leads to better photoresist mask selectivity. The etch-induced roughness is investigated using atomic force microscopy. Cl{sub 2}/Ar etching has resulted in lower root-mean-square roughness of GaN etched surface in comparison to Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching due to increased Ar ion energy and flux with ICP/RF power that enhances the sputter removal of etch product. The GaN surface damage after etching is also evaluated using room temperature photoluminescence and found to be increasing with ICP/RF power for both the etch chemistries with higher degree of damage in Cl{sub 2}/BCl{sub 3} etching under same condition.

  14. Wafer heating mechanisms in a molecular gas, inductively coupled plasma: in situ, real time wafer surface measurements and three-dimensional thermal modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, M. J.; Graves, D. B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report measurements and modeling of wafer heating mechanisms in an Ar/O{sub 2} inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The authors employed a commercially available on-wafer sensor system (PlasmaTemp developed by KLA-Tencor) consisting of an on-board electronics module housing battery power and data storage with 30 temperature sensors embedded onto the wafer at different radial positions. This system allows for real time, in situ wafer temperature measurements. Wafer heating mechanisms were investigated by combining temperature measurements from the PlasmaTemp sensor wafer with a three-dimensional heat transfer model of the wafer and a model of the ICP. Comparisons between pure Ar and Ar/O{sub 2} discharges demonstrated that two additional wafer heating mechanisms can be important in molecular gas plasmas compared to atomic gas discharges. The two mechanisms are heating from the gas phase and O-atom surface recombination. These mechanisms were shown to contribute as much as 60% to wafer heating under conditions of low bias power. This study demonstrated how the 'on-wafer' temperature sensor not only yields a temperature profile distribution across the wafer, but can be used to help determine plasma characteristics, such as ion flux profiles or plasma processing temperatures.

  15. A comparison of continuous pneumatic nebulization and flow injection-direct injection nebulization for sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dilute nitric acid blanks and solutions containing Ni, Cd, Pb, and U (including two laboratory waste samples) were analyzed eighteen times over a two-month period using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two different sample introduction techniques were employed: flow injection-direct injection nebulization (FI-DIN) and continuous pneumatic nebulization (CPN). Using comparable instrumental measurement procedures, FI-DIN analyses were 33% faster and generated 52% less waste than CPN analyses. Instrumental limits of detection obtained with FI-DIN and CPN were comparable but not equivalent (except in the case of Pb) because of nebulizer-related differences in sensitivity (i.e., signal per unit analyte concentration) and background. Substantial and statistically significant differences were found between FI-DIN and CPN Ni determinations, and in the case of the laboratory waste samples, there were also small but statistically significant differences between Cd determinations. These small (2 to 3%) differences were not related to polyatomic ion interference (e.g., {sup 95}Mo{sup 16}O{sup +}), but in light of the time savings and waste reduction to be realized, they should not preclude the use of FI-DIN in place of CPN for determination of Cd, Pb, U and chemically.

  16. Inductively coupled plasma etching of Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} in CF{sub 4}/Ar and Cl{sub 2}/Ar discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, S.-L.; Lee, C.-H.; Chang, S.-J.; Lin, Y.-M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Cheng Shiu University, 840 Chengcing Road, Niaosong, Kaohsiung 833, Taiwan (China); Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta Hseuh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta Hseuh Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we report the experimental realization of SiGe/Si materials using CF{sub 4}/Ar and Cl{sub 2}/Ar mixed-gas inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process. The effects of process parameters such as gas combination and gas species on etch rates and selectivities were investigated. It was found that samples in CF{sub 4} gas result in a faster etching rate than those obtained in Cl{sub 2} gas, which are responsible for a lower boiling point for Si-based fluoride. The lower boiling point provides more chemically active Si and SiGe materials. Moreover, the selectivity of 1.5 between Si{sub 0.3}Ge{sub 0.7}/Si by ICP technology was found and higher than that obtained previously by reactive ion etching reported in the literature. Based on these etch characteristics, the application of the ICP process to the device fabrication of SiGe doped-channel field-effect transistors was conducted. The devices using ICP mesa have excellent pinch-off characteristics with relatively low leakage current, small output conduction in the saturated region, and low knee voltage.

  17. Effects of magnetic flux density and substrate bias voltage on Ni films prepared on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koda, Tatsunori [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, 2-1-1, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 7315193 (Japan); Toyota, Hiroshi, E-mail: h.toyota.za@it-hiroshima.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, 2-1-1, Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 7315193 (Japan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors fabricated Ni films on a flexible substrate material using unbalanced magnetron sputtering assisted by inductively coupled plasma. The effects of magnetic flux density B{sub C} and substrate DC bias voltage V{sub S} on the Ni film structures were investigated. For V{sub S}?=??40?V, the average surface grain size D{sub G} measured by atomic force microscopy for B{sub C}?=?0, 3, and 5?mT was 88.2, 95.4, and 104.4?nm, respectively. In addition, D{sub G} increased with V{sub S}. From x-ray diffraction measurements, the (111) and (200) peaks were clearly visible for the fabricated Ni films. The ratio of the integrated intensities of I(111)/I(200) increased with V{sub S}. For V{sub S}?=??40?V and B{sub C}?=?3?mT, a film resistivity ? of 8.96?×?10{sup ?6} ? cm was observed, which is close to the Ni bulk value of 6.84?×?10{sup ?6} ? cm. From these results, the authors determined that the structure of the fabricated Ni films on the flexible substrate material was affected by the values of B{sub C} and V{sub S}.

  18. Periodic patterning stem cells and induction of skin appendages: p-ERK-dependent mes-enchymal condensation is coupled with Turing mechanism to convert stripes to spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maini, Philip K.

    ABSTRACTS 931 Periodic patterning stem cells and induction of skin appendages: p-ERK-dependent mes patterns remains unknown. Using the feather model, here we show ERK activity-dependent mesenchymal cell chemotaxis toward initial peaks is essential for completing pattern formation. Adding ERK inhibitors produced

  19. Influence of the reactor wall composition on radicals' densities and total pressure in Cl{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas: II. During silicon etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Ramos, R. [Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique (UMR 5588), Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble, and CNRS, BP 87, 38402 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Laboratoire des Technologies de la Microelectronique, CNRS, 17 rue des Martyrs (c/o CEA-LETI), 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor dedicated to silicon etching in chlorine-based chemistry, the density of Cl{sub 2} molecules and the gas temperature are measured by means of laser absorption techniques, the density of SiCl{sub x} (x{<=}2) radicals by broadband absorption spectroscopy, the density of SiCl{sub 4} and ions by mass spectrometry, and the total gas pressure with a capacitance gauge. These measurements permit us to estimate the mole fractions of Cl, SiCl{sub 4}, and etch product radicals when etching a 200 mm diameter silicon wafer. The pure Cl{sub 2} plasma is operated in well prepared chamber wall coating with a thin film of SiOCl, AlF, CCl, or TiOCl. The impact of the chemical nature of the reactor wall's coatings on these mole fractions is studied systematically. We show that the reactor wall coatings have a huge influence on the radicals densities, but this is not only from the difference on Cl-Cl recombination coefficient on different surfaces. During silicon etching, SiCl{sub x} radicals sticking on the reactor walls are etched by Cl atoms and recycled into the plasma by forming volatile SiCl{sub 4}. Hence, the loss of Cl atoms in etching the wall deposited silicon is at least as important as their wall recombination in controlling the Cl atoms density. Furthermore, because SiCl{sub 4} is produced at high rate by both the wafer and reactor walls, it is the predominant etching product in the gas phase. However, the percentage of redeposited silicon that can be recycled into the plasma depends on the amount of oxygen present in the plasma: O atoms produced by etching the quartz roof window fix Si on the reactor walls by forming a SiOCl deposit. Hence, the higher the O density is, the lower the SiCl{sub 4} density will be, because silicon is pumped by the reactor walls and the SiOCl layer formed is not isotropically etched by chlorine. As a result, in the same pure Cl{sub 2} plasma at 20 mTorr, the SiCl{sub x} mole fraction can vary from 18% in a SiOCl-coated reactor, where the O density is the highest, to 62% in a carbon-coated reactor, where there is no O. In the latter case, most of the Cl mass injected in the reactor is stored in SiCl{sub 4} molecules, which results in a low silicon etch rate. In this condition, the Cl mass balance is verified within 10%, and from the silicon mass balance we concluded that SiCl{sub x} radicals have a high surface loss probability. The impact of the reactor wall coating on the etching process is thus important, but the mechanisms by which the walls control the plasma chemistry is much more complicated than a simple control through recombination reaction of halogen atoms on these surfaces.

  20. Characterization of Nickel and Vanadium compounds in tar sand bitumen by petroporphyrin quantitation and size exclusion chromatography coupled with element specific detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Jones, E.L.; Bennett, J.A.; Biggs, W.R.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tar sands represent a tremendous untapped resource for transportation fuels. In the United States alone, over 60 billion barrels of bitumen are estimated to be in place. In order to use this bitumen, it must be somehow separated from the sand. The resulting bitumen is of low quality, and generally will require at least some refining. Typical refinery upgrading methods include fluid catalytic cracking, thermal visbreaking, and residuum hydroconversion. Most of these methods utilize metals-sensitive catalyst. The metals bound in the bitumen are deleterious to catalytic processing, causing rapid deactivation through poisoning and pore mouth plugging. Like heavy crude oil residua, tar sand bitumens have high concentrations of Ni and V. The types of complexes of Ni and V have been studied for heavy crude oils, and can be placed in two broad categories: the metallopetroporphyrins and the metallononporphyrins. The metallopetroporphyrins have been studied extensively. For understanding the behavior of the metals in processing, size exclusion chromatography coupled with element specific detection by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (SEC-HPLC-ICP) has been applied to several heavy crude oils, residua, and processed products along with separated fractions of feeds and products. These results have shown general important size-behavior features of the metallopetroporphyrins and metallo-nonporphyrins associated with individual feed characteristics. Because of the importance of the metals in a downstream process methods, the authors have applied several of the metallopetroporphyrin and metallo-nonporphyrin examination technique to extracted bitumen from selected tar sands.

  1. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  2. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Donald E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  3. Use of Electrodeposition for Sample Preparation and Rejection Rate Prediction for Assay of Electroformed Ultra High Purity Copper for 232Th and 238U Prior to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP/MS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Day, Anthony R.; Farmer, Orville T.; Hossbach, Todd W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Mintzer, Esther E.; Seifert, Allen; Smart, John E.; Warren, Glen A.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 76Ge has driven the need for ultra-low background Ge detectors shielded by electroformed copper of ultra-high radiopurity (<0.1µBq/kg). Although electrodeposition processes are almost sophisticated enough to produce copper of this purity, to date there are no methods sensitive enough to assay it. Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) can detect thorium and uranium at femtogram levels, but in the past, this assay has been hindered by high copper concentrations in the sample. Electrodeposition of copper samples removes copper from the solution while selectively concentrating thorium and uranium contaminants to be assayed by ICP/MS. Spiking 232Th and 238U into the plating bath simulates low purity copper and allows for the calculation of the electrochemical rejection rate of thorium and uranium in the electroplating system. This rejection value will help to model plating bath chemistry.

  4. Inductive tuners for microwave driven discharge lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF powered electrodeless lamp utilizing an inductive tuner in the waveguide which couples the RF power to the lamp cavity, for reducing reflected RF power and causing the lamp to operate efficiently.

  5. Induction machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owen, Whitney H. (Ogden, UT)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  6. [Frontiers in Bioscience, 5, a10-17, May 1, 2000] UV-OZONE ASHING OF CELLS AND TISSUES FOR SPATIALLY RESOLVED TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Abstract 2. Introduction 3. Materials and methods 3.1. UV/ozone oven 3.2. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analysis 3.3. Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) 3

  7. Biomaterials 21 (2000) 1429}1438 Synthesis of biomimetic Ca-hydroxyapatite powders at 373C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oven drying at 803C. There was observed, surprisingly, no decomposition of HA into the undesired -TCP- transform infra-red spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic

  8. Supporting Information Dry deposition fluxes and deposition velocities of seven trace metal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    significant digits (Fang et al., 2007a, b). 2. Chemical analysis The samples were placed in an oven one night-MS (Perkin Elmer Sciex ELAN DRC ) analysis of arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma - atomic

  9. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} multi-density layer structure as a moisture permeation barrier deposited by radio frequency remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hyunsoo [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Display Co. Ltd., Tangjeong, Chungcheongnam-Do 336-741 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Heeyoung [Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hagyoung; Ham, Giyul; Shin, Seokyoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nano-scale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition have been used for thin film encapsulation of organic light emitting diode. In this study, a multi-density layer structure consisting of two Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers with different densities are deposited with different deposition conditions of O{sub 2} plasma reactant time. This structure improves moisture permeation barrier characteristics, as confirmed by a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) test. The lowest WVTR of the multi-density layer structure was 4.7 × 10{sup ?5} gm{sup ?2} day{sup ?1}, which is one order of magnitude less than WVTR for the reference single-density Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. This improvement is attributed to the location mismatch of paths for atmospheric gases, such as O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, in the film due to different densities in the layers. This mechanism is analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection, and angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results confirmed that the multi-density layer structure exhibits very good characteristics as an encapsulation layer via location mismatch of paths for H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} between the two layers.

  10. Fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled-plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the ZnO/GaN heterojunction light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shr-Jia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Kao, Jiann-Shiun; Chen, Fu-Rong; Tsai, Chuen-Horng [Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China); Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu, 300 Taiwan (China); Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 30013 Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports fabrication of n-ZnO photonic crystal/p-GaN light emitting diode (LED) by nanosphere lithography to further booster the light efficiency. In this article, the fabrication of ZnO photonic crystals is carried out by nanosphere lithography using inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching with CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar plasma on the n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs. The CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar mixed gas gives high etching rate of n-ZnO film, which yields a better surface morphology and results less plasma-induced damages of the n-ZnO film. Optimal ZnO lattice parameters of 200 nm and air fill factor from 0.35 to 0.65 were obtained from fitting the spectrum of n-ZnO/p-GaN LED using a MATLAB code. In this article, we will show our recent result that a ZnO photonic crystal cylinder has been fabricated using polystyrene nanosphere mask with lattice parameter of 200 nm and radius of hole around 70 nm. Surface morphology of ZnO photonic crystal was examined by scanning electron microscope.

  11. Computer Science Induction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Ulrich

    Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Supervision Regulations Progression Regulations Computer Science Induction to Postgraduate Research Studies Ulrich Berger Head of Postgraduate Research Department of Computer Science Swansea

  12. A 1.12pJ/b Resonance Compensated Inductive Transceiver with a Fault-Tolerant Network Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    . An inductive-coupling transceiver is used for cross-layer communication, and it adopts a resonance compensatorA 1.12pJ/b Resonance Compensated Inductive Transceiver with a Fault-Tolerant Network Controller of Korea jerald@eeinfo.kaist.ac.kr Abstract--A low-energy inductive coupling link with a low energy fault

  13. Filters With Inductance Cancellation Using Printed Circuit Board Transformers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neugebauer, Timothy C.

    Capacitor parasitic inductance often limits the high-frequency performance of filters for power applications. However, these limitations can be overcome through the use of specially-coupled magnetic windings that effectively ...

  14. CHAPTER 7. BERYLLIUM ANALYSIS BY NON-PLASMA BASED METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekechukwu, A

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common method of analysis for beryllium is inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). This method, along with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), is discussed in Chapter 6. However, other methods exist and have been used for different applications. These methods include spectroscopic, chromatographic, colorimetric, and electrochemical. This chapter provides an overview of beryllium analysis methods other than plasma spectrometry (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or mass spectrometry). The basic methods, detection limits and interferences are described. Specific applications from the literature are also presented.

  15. Progress in Induction Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J

    2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will be a broad survey of progress in induction technology over the past four years. Much work has been done on accelerators for hydrodynamic test radiography and other applications. Solid-state pulsers have been developed which can provide unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format and accelerating voltage for both ion and electron induction machines. Induction linacs can now be built which can operate with MHz repetition rates. Solid-state technology has also made possible the development of fast kickers for precision control of high current beams. New insulator technology has been developed which will improve conventional induction linacs in addition to enabling a new class of high gradient induction linacs.

  16. Hybrid-secondary uncluttered induction machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An uncluttered secondary induction machine (100) includes an uncluttered rotating transformer (66) which is mounted on the same shaft as the rotor (73) of the induction machine. Current in the rotor (73) is electrically connected to current in the rotor winding (67) of the transformer, which is not electrically connected to, but is magnetically coupled to, a stator secondary winding (40). The stator secondary winding (40) is alternately connected to an effective resistance (41), an AC source inverter (42) or a magnetic switch (43) to provide a cost effective slip-energy-controlled, adjustable speed, induction motor that operates over a wide speed range from below synchronous speed to above synchronous speed based on the AC line frequency fed to the stator.

  17. Induction melter apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Jay A [Idaho Falls, ID; Richardson, John G [Idaho Falls, ID; Raivo, Brian D [Idaho Falls, ID; Soelberg, Nicholas R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  18. Linear induction accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttram, M.T.; Ginn, J.W.

    1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear induction accelerator includes a plurality of adder cavities arranged in a series and provided in a structure which is evacuated so that a vacuum inductance is provided between each adder cavity and the structure. An energy storage system for the adder cavities includes a pulsed current source and a respective plurality of bipolar converting networks connected thereto. The bipolar high-voltage, high-repetition-rate square pulse train sets and resets the cavities. 4 figs.

  19. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, Douglas R. (1620 Adelita Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Frost, Charles A. (1039 Red Oaks Loop NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Kahle, Philip M. (528 Longwood Loop NE., Rio Rancho, NM 87124); Kelley, J. Bruce (13200 Blue Corn Maiden Trail NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Stanton, Suzanne L. (2805 Palo Alto NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part.

  20. Control of power to an inductively heated part

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, D.R.; Frost, C.A.; Kahle, P.M.; Kelley, J.B.; Stanton, S.L.

    1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for induction hardening a part to a desired depth with an AC signal applied to the part from a closely coupled induction coil includes measuring the voltage of the AC signal at the coil and the current passing through the coil; and controlling the depth of hardening of the part from the measured voltage and current. The control system determines parameters of the part that are functions of applied voltage and current to the induction coil, and uses a neural network to control the application of the AC signal based on the detected functions for each part. 6 figs.

  1. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  2. On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamareddine, Fairouz

    On Automating Inductive and Non-Inductive Termination Methods Fairouz Kamareddine and Francois of the function which satis es a notion of terminal prop- erty and then verifying that this construction processPre can only deal with the termination proofs that are inductive. There are however many functions

  3. Low inductance connector assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann; Carlson, Douglas S

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A busbar connector assembly for coupling first and second terminals on a two-terminal device to first and second contacts on a power module is provided. The first terminal resides proximate the first contact and the second terminal resides proximate the second contact. The assembly comprises a first bridge having a first end configured to be electrically coupled to the first terminal, and a second end configured to be electrically coupled to the second contact, and a second bridge substantially overlapping the first bridge and having a first end electrically coupled to the first contact, and a second end electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  4. Performance Optimization Criteria for Pulsed Inductive Plasma Acceleration Kurt A. Polzin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choueiri, Edgar

    Performance Optimization Criteria for Pulsed Inductive Plasma Acceleration Kurt A. Polzin and Edgar Y. Choueiri Electric Propulsion and Plasma Dynamics Laboratory (EPPDyL) Mechanical and Aerospace A model of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters consisting of a set of coupled circuit equations and a one

  5. Properties of On-Chip Inductive Current Loops Andrey V. Mezhiba and Eby G. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    dimensions. This linear behavior can be used to simplify the inductance extraction and circuit analysis the interconnects are tightly coupled, the current return path is typically not known prior to the circuit analysis@ece.rochester.edu, friedman@ece.rochester.edu Abstract The variation of inductance with circuit length is investigated

  6. Harmonic control of multiple-stator induction machines for voltage regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holloway, Jack Wade, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small, one to a few horsepower, three-phase induction machines with three sets of electrically-isolated, magnetically-coupled stator winding circuits are described. A voltage inverter is developed and used to drive one set ...

  7. Low inductance busbar assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holbrook, Meghan Ann (Manhattan Beach, CA)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A busbar assembly for electrically coupling first and second busbars to first and second contacts, respectively, on a power module is provided. The assembly comprises a first terminal integrally formed with the first busbar, a second terminal integrally formed with the second busbar and overlapping the first terminal, a first bridge electrode having a first tab electrically coupled to the first terminal and overlapping the first and second terminals, and a second tab electrically coupled to the first contact, a second bridge electrode having a third tab electrically coupled to the second terminal, and overlapping the first and second terminals and the first tab, and a fourth tab electrically coupled to the second contact, and a fastener configured to couple the first tab to the first terminal, and the third tab to the second terminal.

  8. Superconducting inductive displacement detection of a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a superconducting inductive technique to measure the displacement of a micromechanical resonator. In our scheme, a type I superconducting microsphere is attached to the free end of a microcantilever and approached to the loop of a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometer. A local magnetic field as low as 100??T, generated by a field coil concentric to the SQUID, enables detection of the cantilever thermomechanical noise at 4.2?K. The magnetomechanical coupling and the magnetic spring are in good agreement with image method calculations assuming pure Meissner effect. These measurements are relevant to recent proposals of quantum magnetomechanics experiments based on levitating superconducting microparticles.

  9. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and electrode diameter were conducted.

  10. Accounting & Finance (BAcc) Induction 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    Accounting & Finance (BAcc) Induction 2014 Monday 15 September 2014 Induction Programme: 0945] Welcome from the Business School and Accounting & Finance 1000 The Accountancy Degrees 1015 Programme & 3 on Level 4 Accounting & Finance Bldg Tuesday 16 September 2014 Advising Session Lunch (provided

  11. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    problems 20 2.3.1 Classes 20 2.3.2 Types of classi cation problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Li`ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Course;#12;APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li#12;ege

  12. Applied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    .3.2 Types of classification problems 20 2.3.3 Learning and test sets 21 2.3.4 Decision or classificationApplied inductive learning Louis Wehenkel University of Liâ??ege Faculty of Applied Sciences Courseâ??e'' #12; #12; APPLIED INDUCTIVE LEARNING COURSE NOTES : OCTOBER 2000 LOUIS A. WEHENKEL University of Li

  13. Induction Linac Pulsers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faltens, Andris

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulsers used in most of the induction linacs evolved from the very large body of work that was done in the U.S. and Great Britain during the development of the pulsed magnetron for radar. The radar modulators started at {approx}100 kW and reached >10 MW by 1945. A typical pulse length was 1 {mu}s at a repetition rate of 1,000 pps. A very comprehensive account of the modulator development is Pulse Generators by Lebacqz and Glasoe, one of the Radiation Laboratory Series. There are many permutations of possible modulators, two of the choices being tube type and line type. In earlier notes I wrote that technically the vacuum tube pulser met all of our induction linac needs, in the sense that a number of tubes, in series and parallel if required, could produce our pulses, regulate their voltage, be useable in feed-forward correctors, and provide a low source impedance. At a lower speed, an FET array is similar, and we have obtained and tested a large array capable of >10 MW switching. A modulator with an electronically controlled output only needs a capacitor for energy storage and in a switched mode can transfer the energy from the capacitor to the load at high efficiency. Driving a full size Astron induction core and a simulated resistive 'beam load' we achieved >50% efficiency. These electronically controlled output pulses can produce the pulses we desire but are not used because of their high cost. The second choice, the line type pulser, visually comprises a closing switch and a distributed or a lumped element transmission line. The typical switch cannot open or stop conducting after the desired pulse has been produced, and consequently all of the initially stored energy is dissipated. This approximately halves the efficiency, and the original cost estimating program LIACEP used this factor of two, even though our circuits are usually worse, and even though our inveterate optimists often omit it. The 'missing' energy is that which is reflected back into the line from mismatches, the energy left in the accelerator module's capacitance, the energy lost in the switch during switching and during the pulse, and the energy lost in the pulse line charging circuit. For example, a simple resistor-limited power supply dissipates as much energy as it delivers to the pulse forming line, giving a factor if two by itself, therefore efficiency requires a more complicated charging system.

  14. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holladay, Gale (Livermore, CA); Wilt, Michael J. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  15. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  16. Mass Spectrometer: Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will be deployed in conjunction with the Neptune and can be used with the supplementary laser ablation unit to provide elemental concentrations at extremely small ablation spot...

  17. Mass Spectrometer: Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP-MS), Multi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific communities. In addition, EMSL has initiated the process to purchase a custom laser ablation unit with an image size of 1 micron that in combination with the Neptune...

  18. argon inductively coupled: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The elements are listed in Table 1. These elements can also be determined in uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH), uranium hexafluoride (UF6), triuranium octoxide (U3O8) and...

  19. Nonlinear effects in inductively coupled plasmasa... A. I. Smolyakovb)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolyakov, Andrei

    at the second harmonic and mean ponderomotive potential as well as generation of the electric current the particle thermal velocity becomes com- parable with the wave phase velocity, the resonant wave­ particle to the wave period, so that the resonant condi- tion is kvth vth / , where vth is the particle thermal ve

  20. Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of trace element evidence to different materials (e.g., glass panes, metals, plastics, tapes) of forensic interest. Short validation studies to investigate the potential...

  1. Apparatus and method for reducing inductive coupling between levitation and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni Alumni PARC/I-CARESAnalysisAntibodyScience|Contract

  2. Operating an induction melter apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roach, Jay A.; Richardson, John G.; Raivo, Brian D.; Soelberg, Nicholas R.

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods of operation are provided for a cold-crucible-induction melter for vitrifying waste wherein a single induction power supply may be used to effect a selected thermal distribution by independently energizing at least two inductors. Also, a bottom drain assembly may be heated by an inductor and may include an electrically resistive heater. The bottom drain assembly may be cooled to solidify molten material passing therethrough to prevent discharge of molten material therefrom. Configurations are provided wherein the induction flux skin depth substantially corresponds with the central longitudinal axis of the crucible. Further, the drain tube may be positioned within the induction flux skin depth in relation to material within the crucible or may be substantially aligned with a direction of flow of molten material within the crucible. An improved head design including four shells forming thermal radiation shields and at least two gas-cooled plenums is also disclosed.

  3. The acquisition of inductive constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Charles, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human learners routinely make inductive inferences, or inferences that go beyond the data they have observed. Inferences like these must be supported by constraints, some of which are innate, although others are almost ...

  4. Noise performance of magneto-inductive cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltshire, M. C. K., E-mail: michael.wiltshire@imperial.ac.uk; Syms, R. R. A. [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Magneto-inductive (MI) waveguides are metamaterial structures based on periodic arrangements of inductively coupled resonant magnetic elements. They are of interest for power transfer, communications and sensing, and can be realised in a flexible cable format. Signal-to-noise ratio is extremely important in applications involving signals. Here, we present the first experimental measurements of the noise performance of metamaterial cables. We focus on an application involving radiofrequency signal transmission in internal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), where the subdivision of the metamaterial cable provides intrinsic patient safety. We consider MI cables suitable for use at 300 MHz during {sup 1}H MRI at 7 T, and find noise figures of 2.3–2.8?dB/m, together with losses of 3.0–3.9?dB/m, in good agreement with model calculations. These values are high compared to conventional cables, but become acceptable when (as here) the environment precludes the use of continuous conductors. To understand this behaviour, we present arguments for the fundamental performance limitations of these cables.

  5. Helix coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  6. Helix coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  7. The Automation Of Proof By Mathematical Induction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan

    This paper is a chapter of the Handbook of Automated Reasoning edited by Voronkov and Robinson. It describes techniques for automated reasoning in theories containing rules of mathematical induction. Firstly, inductive reasoning is defined and its...

  8. Physics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Physics Safety Induction OCTOBER 2012 FACULTY OF SCIENCES #12;The University of Western Australia · Be safe · Report anything unsafe #12;The University of Western Australia Physics Occupational Safety Sharma ­ ICRAR · Nikita Kostylev ­ Student Representative #12;The University of Western Australia School

  9. INDUCTION MOTOR FAULT DIAGNOSTIC AND MONITORING METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    INDUCTION MOTOR FAULT DIAGNOSTIC AND MONITORING METHODS by Aderiano M. da Silva, B.S. A Thesis;i Abstract Induction motors are used worldwide as the "workhorse" in industrial applications material. However, induction motor faults can be detected in an initial stage in order to prevent

  10. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces. 6 figs.

  11. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Dymond, Jr., Lauren E. (North Potomac, MD); Gitsevich, Aleksandr (Montgomery Village, MD); Grimm, William G. (Silver Spring, MD); Kipling, Kent (Gaithersburg, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Ola, Samuel A. (Silver Spring, MD); Simpson, James E. (Gaithersburg, MD); Trimble, William C. (Columbia, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  12. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD); Dolan, James T. (Frederick, MD); Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Leng, Yongzhang (Damascus, MD)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  13. Ultrastrong coupling in two-resonator circuit QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Baust; E. Hoffmann; M. Haeberlein; M. J. Schwarz; P. Eder; J. Goetz; F. Wulschner; E. Xie; L. Zhong; F. Quijandria; D. Zueco; J. -J. Garcia Ripoll; L. Garcia-Alvarez; G. Romero; E. Solano; K. G. Fedorov; E. P. Menzel; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on ultrastrong coupling between a superconducting flux qubit and a resonant mode of a system comprised of two superconducting coplanar stripline resonators coupled galvanically to the qubit. With a coupling strength as high as 17% of the mode frequency, exceeding that of previous circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments, we observe a pronounced Bloch-Siegert shift. The spectroscopic response of our multimode system reveals a clear breakdown of the Jaynes-Cummings model. In contrast to earlier experiments, the high coupling strength is achieved without making use of an additional inductance provided by a Josephson junction.

  14. Monitoring transients in low inductance circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guilford, R.P.; Rosborough, J.R.

    1985-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring transients in low inductance circuits and to a probe utilized to practice said method and apparatus. More particularly, the instant invention relates to methods of and apparatus for monitoring low inductance circuits, wherein the low inductance circuits include a pair of flat cable transmission lines. The instant invention is further directed to a probe for use in monitoring pairs of flat cable transmission lines.

  15. Low inductance power electronics assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S.; Korich, Mark D.; Chou, Cindy; Tang, David; Carlson, Douglas S.; Barry, Alan L.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A power electronics assembly is provided. A first support member includes a first plurality of conductors. A first plurality of power switching devices are coupled to the first support member. A first capacitor is coupled to the first support member. A second support member includes a second plurality of conductors. A second plurality of power switching devices are coupled to the second support member. A second capacitor is coupled to the second support member. The first and second pluralities of conductors, the first and second pluralities of power switching devices, and the first and second capacitors are electrically connected such that the first plurality of power switching devices is connected in parallel with the first capacitor and the second capacitor and the second plurality of power switching devices is connected in parallel with the second capacitor and the first capacitor.

  16. Induction slag reduction process for making titanium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous process for preparing titanium comprising fluorinating titanium ore, and reducing the formed alkaline earth fluotitanate with an alkaline earth metal in an induction slag reactor.

  17. Six-phase induction machine operating as a stand-alone self-excited induction generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    -excited induction generator and supplying various loads under different conditions are presented. Firstly generators are particularly used in small and isolated power plants based on wind turbine or hydroelectricSix-phase induction machine operating as a stand- alone self-excited induction generator Kamel

  18. Couple lectromcanique des machines rluctance Vernier excites commutation lectronique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    reluctance machines including a stator field winding. A Fourier series analysis of electric and magnetic'un point de l'entrefer par rapport au stator (rad . ou 0). B induction magnétique (T). C couple angulaire rotor/stator (rad.). u03B8(03B1) différence de potentiel magnétique scalaire stator/ rotor (A). u0

  19. university-logo Induction Week: Welcome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehn, Philipp

    university-logo Induction Week: Welcome Alex Lascarides TH E U N I V E R S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H September, 2012 Alex Lascarides PhD Induction Week #12;university-logo Welcome People Alex Lascarides;university-logo What the IGS does for PhD students Admissions and funding Supervisory arrangements Monitoring

  20. Thermoacoustic couple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining acoustic power density level and its direction in a fluid using a single sensor are disclosed. The preferred embodiment of the apparatus, which is termed a thermoacoustic couple, consists of a stack of thin, spaced apart polymeric plates, selected ones of which include multiple bimetallic thermocouple junctions positioned along opposite end edges thereof. The thermocouple junctions are connected in series in the nature of a thermopile, and are arranged so as to be responsive to small temperature differences between the opposite edges of the plates. The magnitude of the temperature difference, as represented by the magnitude of the electrical potential difference generated by the thermopile, is found to be directly related to the level of acoustic power density in the gas.

  1. Element of an inductive coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An element for an inductive coupler in a downhole component comprises magnetically conductive material, which is disposed in a recess in annular housing. The magnetically conductive material forms a generally circular trough. The circular trough comprises an outer generally U-shaped surface, an inner generally U-shaped surface, and two generally planar surfaces joining the inner and outer surfaces. The element further comprises pressure relief grooves in at least one of the surfaces of the circular trough. The pressure relief grooves may be scored lines. Preferably the pressure relief grooves are parallel to the magnetic field generated by the magnetically conductive material. The magnetically conductive material is selected from the group consisting of soft iron, ferrite, a nickel iron alloy, a silicon iron alloy, a cobalt iron alloy, and a mu-metal. Preferably, the annular housing is a metal ring.

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tocco Induction Heating...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Tocco Induction Heating Div of Ohio Crankshaft Co - OH 42 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TOCCO INDUCTION HEATING, DIV. OF OHIO CRANKSHAFT CO. (OH.42 ) Eliminated from consideration...

  3. axial view inductively: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    View of Induction Reasoning for First-Order Logic Physics Websites Summary: , The Alan Turing Centenary Conference (2012)" 12;A Unified View of Induction Reasoning for First in...

  4. Kron`s reduction method applied to the time stepping finite element analysis of induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degeneff, R.C.; Gutierrez, M.R.; Salon, S.J.; Burow, D.W. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Electric Power Engineering Dept.] [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Electric Power Engineering Dept.; Nevins, R.J. [Martin Marietta Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)] [Martin Marietta Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of large induction motors during transient as well as steady state running conditions is of significant interest to the power industry. A variety of analytical predictive tools are employed to aid the design and predict their operation under transient and steady state conditions. One of the most powerful method for investigating the transient behavior of induction machines is a coupled time stepping finite element analysis which can combine electromagnetic fields, circuits and mechanical systems. Due to the complexity of the finite element induction machine model and the resulting large number of describing equations, the computation time required for such programs to solve practical problems becomes a major limitation. This becomes even more of a concern when different design options or operating scenarios are evaluated. This paper presents a strategy to reduce the required running time in order to make a parametric study of induction machines such as the assessment of different design options feasible. This is accomplished by reducing the number of finite element equations that must be solved while maintaining the same level of accuracy of solutions. This method is based on Kron`s network reduction work for linear systems and has successfully been applied to large lumped parameter model of transformers. This paper illustrates the reduction method by comparing the flux density in the air gap for a complete FEM model of an induction machine to that of the reduced model. The results are essentially identical with a reduction in computational time of approximately 71%.

  5. Chemical and Radiochemical Analysis of Consolidated Sludge Samples from the K East Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmore, Monte R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Thornton, Brenda M.; Gano, Susan R.

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Consolidated sludge samples described in this report were collected from the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool in March and April 1999. Material for the samples was collected from both the basin floor and fuel canisters within the basin. Analyses persented include weight percent solids determination, uranium analysis by kinetic phosphorescence (KPA), plutonium isotope analysis by alpha energy analysis (AEA), gross beta analysis, gamma energy analysis (GEA), and metals analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  6. SENSORLESS INDUCTION MOTOR CONTROL USING STATISTICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is replaced by npM so that the dynamic model of the induction motor is then uSa = RSiSa + LS d dtiSa + M d dti

  7. Synchronous Machine Modeling Notes2 1.0 Inductances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    i i LLLLLL LLLLLL LLLLLL LLLLLL LLLLLL LLLLLL (1) We saw there are four blocks: · L11 (stator-stator inductances) · L12 (stator-rotor inductances) · L21 (rotor-stator inductances) · L22 (rotor-rotor inductances the reluctance seen by the flux from the main field winding F, linking with itself, to determine whether LF

  8. Coupling coefficients for coupled-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors derive simple, analytic formulas for the field coupling coefficients in a two-section coupled-cavity laser using a local field rate equation treatment. They show that there is a correction to the heuristic formulas based on power flow calculated by Marcuse; the correction is in agreement with numerical calculations from a coupled-mode approach.

  9. Principle of Mathematical Induction (PMI) Statement of the Principle of Mathematical Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singman, David

    Principle of Mathematical Induction (PMI) Statement of the Principle of Mathematical Induction Let you have a subset S of N which you wish to prove is all of N. If you use PMI, the proof can be written as follows. Outline of a proof by PMI Proof. We prove this result using PMI. Let S = . . . (describe the set

  10. Internal Heat Transfer Coefficient Determination in a Packed Bed From the Transient Response Due to Solid Phase Induction Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geb, David; Zhou, Feng; Catton, Ivan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Solid Phase Induction Heating Nonintrusive measurementsgeneration rate via induction heating. The fluid temperaturetechnique, induction heating, bypass effect, channeling

  11. Polished Downhole Transducer Having Improved Signal Coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods to improve signal coupling in downhole inductive transmission elements to reduce the dispersion of magnetic energy at the tool joints and to provide consistent impedance and contact between transmission elements located along the drill string. A transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools is disclosed in one embodiment of the invention as including an annular core constructed of a magnetically conductive material. The annular core forms an open channel around its circumference and is configured to form a closed channel by mating with a corresponding annular core along an annular mating surface. The mating surface is polished to provide improved magnetic coupling with the corresponding annular core. An annular conductor is disposed within the open channel.

  12. Induction linacs for heavy ion fusion research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new features of employing an induction linac as a driver for inertial fusion involve (1) transport of high-current low-emittance heavy ion beams, (2) multiple independently-focussed beams threading the same accelerator structure, and (3) synthesis of voltage waveforms to accomplish beam current amplification. A research program is underway at LBL to develop accelerators that test all these features with the final goal of producing an ion beam capable of heating matter to approx. 70 eV. This paper presents a discussion of some properties of induction linacs and how they may be used for HIF research. Physics designs of the High Temperature Experiment (HTE) and the Multiple Beam Experiment (MBE) accelerators are presented along with initial concepts of the MBE induction units.

  13. Detailed computation of hot-plasma atomic spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pain, Jean-Christophe; Blenski, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present recent evolutions of the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG which combines statistical modelings of levels and lines with fine-structure calculations. The code now includes the Partially-Resolved-Transition-Array model, which allows one to replace a complex transition array by a small-scale detailed calculation preserving energy and variance of the genuine transition array and yielding improved high-order moments. An approximate method for studying the impact of strong magnetic field on opacity and emissivity was also recently implemented. The Zeeman line profile is modeled by fourth-order Gram-Charlier expansion series, which is a Gaussian multiplied by a linear combination of Hermite polynomials. Electron collisional line broadening is often modeled by a Lorentzian function and one has to calculate the convolution of a Lorentzian with Gram-Charlier distribution for a huge number of spectral lines. Since the numerical cost of the direct convolution would be prohibitive, we propose, in order to obtain t...

  14. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  15. Inductive gas line for pulsed lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Alger, T.W.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas laser having a metal inlet gas feed line assembly shaped as a coil, to function as an electrical inductance and therefore high impedance to pulses of electric current applied to electrodes at opposite ends of a discharge tube of a laser, for example. This eliminates a discharge path for the laser through the inlet gas feed line. A ferrite core extends through the coil to increase the inductance of the coil and provide better electric isolation. By elimination of any discharge breakdown through the gas supply, efficiency is increased and a significantly longer operating lifetime of the laser is provided.

  16. Cooling a quantum circuit via coupling to a multiqubit system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai A. Macovei

    2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The cooling effects of a quantum LC circuit coupled inductively with an ensemble of artificial qubits are investigated. The particles may decay independently or collectively through their interaction with the environmental vacuum electromagnetic field reservoir. For appropriate bath temperatures and the resonator's quality factors, we demonstrate an effective cooling well below the thermal background. In particular, we found that for larger samples the cooling efficiency is better for independent qubits. However, the cooling process can be faster for collectively interacting particles.

  17. High School Science Teacher Induction in Texas: Implications for Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivey, Toni Ann

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    principals' perceptions of teacher induction. Analyses indicated that high school principals had an overwhelmingly narrow focus of mentoring and provided mentor teachers with little support or training. Findings indicated that induction activities...

  18. Excitation and control of a high-speed induction generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englebretson, Steven Carl

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigates the use of a high speed, squirrel cage induction generator and power converter for producing DC electrical power onboard ships and submarines. Potential advantages of high speed induction generators ...

  19. Semantic Taxonomy Induction from Heterogenous Evidence Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Semantic Taxonomy Induction from Heterogenous Evidence Rion Snow Computer Science Department­ tic taxonomies. Previous algorithms for taxonomy induction have typically focused on independent over heterogenous relationships to optimize the entire structure of the taxonomy, using knowl­ edge

  20. Semantic Taxonomy Induction from Heterogenous Evidence Computer Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Semantic Taxonomy Induction from Heterogenous Evidence Rion Snow Computer Science Department- tic taxonomies. Previous algorithms for taxonomy induction have typically focused on independent over heterogenous relationships to optimize the entire structure of the taxonomy, using knowl- edge

  1. advanced induction machine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adjustable speed generationDynamic Phasor Modeling of the Doubly-Fed Induction Machine in Generator Operation Emmanuel 617 373 8970 Abstract-- The doubly-fed induction machine used...

  2. Inductive Effect of Alkyl Chains on Alcohol Dehydration at Bridge...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inductive Effect of Alkyl Chains on Alcohol Dehydration at Bridge-Bonded Oxygen Vacancies of TiO2(110). Inductive Effect of Alkyl Chains on Alcohol Dehydration at Bridge-Bonded...

  3. Magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnalagadda, Aparna S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the design process for magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations. Two styles of magnetic induction systems - magnet-through-coil and magnet-across-coils - were analyzed. ...

  4. ACTIONS AND PARTIAL ACTIONS OF INDUCTIVE CONSTELLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, Victoria

    ACTIONS AND PARTIAL ACTIONS OF INDUCTIVE CONSTELLATIONS VICTORIA GOULD AND CHRISTOPHER HOLLINGS structure of a semigroup can be recovered from a partial order it possesses. Date: August 13, 2009. 2000 and FEDER, and also FCT post-doctoral grant SFRH/BPD/34698/2007. 1 #12;2 VICTORIA GOULD AND CHRISTOPHER

  5. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janos, A.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Yamada, M.

    1985-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The inductively formed spheromak configuration (S-1) can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. The method described eliminates the restriction to pulsed spheromak plasmas or the use of electrodes for steady-state operation, and, therefore, is a reactor-relevant formation and sustainment method.

  6. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  7. Voltage regulation in linear induction accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parsons, William M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvement in voltage regulation in a Linear Induction Accelerator wherein a varistor, such as a metal oxide varistor, is placed in parallel with the beam accelerating cavity and the magnetic core. The non-linear properties of the varistor result in a more stable voltage across the beam accelerating cavity than with a conventional compensating resistance.

  8. Induction Motors Bearing Failures Detection and Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    using the mains current and the rotor speed measurement. The proposed approach is based on the stator current Park patterns. Induction motor stator currents are measured, recorded and used for Park patterns detection and diagnosis process. Experimental tests with artificial bearing damages results show

  9. Voltage regulation in linear induction accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parsons, W.M.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvement in voltage regulation in a linear induction accelerator wherein a varistor, such as a metal oxide varistor, is placed in parallel with the beam accelerating cavity and the magnetic core is disclosed. The non-linear properties of the varistor result in a more stable voltage across the beam accelerating cavity than with a conventional compensating resistance. 4 figs.

  10. Steady-state inductive spheromak operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janos, Alan C. (E. Windsor, NJ); Jardin, Stephen C. (Princeton, NJ); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inductively formed spheromak plasma can be maintained in a highly stable and controlled fashion. Steady-state operation is obtained by forming the plasma in the linked mode, then oscillating the poloidal and toroidal fields such that they have different phases. Preferably, the poloidal and magnetic fields are 90.degree. out of phase.

  11. Ising interaction between capacitively-coupled superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiko Satoh; Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Kosuke Kakuyanagi; Koichi Semba; Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Shiro Saito

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, we propose a scheme to generate a controllable Ising interaction between superconducting flux qubits. Existing schemes rely on inducting couplings to realize Ising interactions between flux qubits, and the interaction strength is controlled by an applied magnetic field On the other hand, we have found a way to generate an interaction between the flux qubits via capacitive couplings. This has an advantage in individual addressability, because we can control the interaction strength by changing an applied voltage that can be easily localized. This is a crucial step toward the realizing superconducting flux qubit quantum computation.

  12. Niobium Silicon alloys for Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvo, M; Monfardini, A; Benoit, A; Boudou, N; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Dumoulin, L; Goupy, J; Sueur, H Le; Marnieros, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying the properties of Niobium Silicon amorphous alloys as a candidate material for the fabrication of highly sensitive Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), optimized for very low optical loads. As in the case of other composite materials, the NbSi properties can be changed by varying the relative amounts of its components. Using a NbSi film with T_c around 1 K we have been able to obtain the first NbSi resonators, observe an optical response and acquire a spectrum in the band 50 to 300 GHz. The data taken show that this material has very high kinetic inductance and normal state surface resistivity. These properties are ideal for the development of KID. More measurements are planned to further characterize the NbSi alloy and fully investigate its potential.

  13. Three tooth kinematic coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three tooth kinematic coupling based on having three theoretical line contacts formed by mating teeth rather than six theoretical point contacts. The geometry requires one coupling half to have curved teeth and the other coupling half to have flat teeth. Each coupling half has a relieved center portion which does not effect the kinematics, but in the limit as the face width approaches zero, three line contacts become six point contacts. As a result of having line contact, a three tooth coupling has greater load capacity and stiffness. The kinematic coupling has application for use in precision fixturing for tools or workpieces, and as a registration device for a work or tool changer or for optics in various products.

  14. Running surface couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. D. Odintsov; A. Wipf

    1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the renormalization group improved effective action and running surface couplings in curved spacetime with boundary. Using scalar self-interacting theory as an example, we study the influence of the boundary effects to effective equations of motion in spherical cap and the relevance of surface running couplings to quantum cosmology and symmetry breaking phenomenon. Running surface couplings in the asymptotically free SU(2) gauge theory are found.

  15. The design evaluation of inductive power-transformer for personal rapid transit by measuring impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Kyung-Hee [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Song [Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Soo-Hyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contact-less inductive power transformer (IPT) uses the principle of electromagnetic induction. The concept of the IPT for vehicles such as the personal rapid transit (PRT) system is proposed and some suggestions for power collector design of IPT to improve power transfer performance are presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to recommend the concept of IPT for vehicles such as the PRT system and also to present some propositions for the power collector design of the IPT, which is to improve the power transfer performance. Generally, there are diverse methods to evaluate transfer performance of the traditional transformers. Although the principle of IPT is similar to that of the general transformer, it is impossible to apply the methods directly because of large air gap. The system must be compensated by resonant circuit due to the large air gap. Consequently, it is difficult to apply numerical formulas to the magnetic design of IPT systems. This paper investigates the magnetic design of a PRT system using three-dimensional magnetic modeling and measurements of the pick-up coupling coefficient and its impedances. In addition, how the use of Litz wire and leakage inductance is related will be observed through experiment and simulation.

  16. Translation-coupling systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  17. Segmented ceramic liner for induction furnaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorin, A.H.; Holcombe, C.E.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-fibrous ceramic liner for induction furnaces is provided by vertically stackable ring-shaped liner segments made of ceramic material in a light-weight cellular form. The liner segments can each be fabricated as a single unit or from a plurality of arcuate segments joined together by an interlocking mechanism. Also, the liner segments can be formed of a single ceramic material or can be constructed of multiple concentric layers with the layers being of different ceramic materials and/or cellular forms. Thermomechanically damaged liner segments are selectively replaceable in the furnace. 5 figs.

  18. The model coupling toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, J. W.; Jacob, R. L.; Foster, I.; Guo, J.

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of coupled earth system models has raised an important question in parallel computing: What is the most effective method for coupling many parallel models to form a high-performance coupled modeling system? We present our solution to this problem--The Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). We explain how our effort to construct the Next-Generation Coupler for NCAR Community Climate System Model motivated us to create this toolkit. We describe in detail the conceptual design of the MCT and explain its usage in constructing parallel coupled models. We present preliminary performance results for the toolkit's parallel data transfer facilities. Finally, we outline an agenda for future development of the MCT.

  19. Inductive Inference for Solving Divergence in Knuth-Bendix Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, M.; Jantke, K.; Proceedings of Analogical and Inductive Inference '89, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 397 pp 288-303 Springer [More Details

    Thomas,M. Jantke,K. Proceedings of Analogical and Inductive Inference '89, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 397 pp 288-303 Springer

  20. ac induction motors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    242 EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of different lengths, Mathematics Websites Summary: of different lengths, and...

  1. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Studies for Making Glass Ceramic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performed in a pilot-scale (14 scale) cold crucible induction meter (CCIM). Melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling were measured on...

  2. Novel Manufacturing Technologies for High Power Induction and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Power Induction and Permanent Magnet Electric Motors 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  3. Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic baseline and induction studies- Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho...

  4. A generalized approach to planar induction heating magnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard Yi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an efficient numerical simulation technique of magnetoquasistatic electromagnetic fields for planar induction heating applications. The technique is based on a volume-element discretization, integral ...

  5. Understanding the Inductances We have identified six different inductances (or reactances) for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ) Once we obtain Ld and Lq, together with the rotor winding self inductances LF, LD, LG, and LQ the "phase a" stator current for a three-phase fault occurring at the machine terminals. This picture, drawn neglecting the stator transients (since they are very fast), is given below: #12;2 Subtransient period

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase: induction and inhibition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres, Janet Lee

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and toxic potency of halogenated biphenyls. The usefulness of zerovalent nickel catalysis of aryl-aryl coupling in the synthesis of trifluoromethyl-substituted biphenyls was investigated. Although yields were low, this method proved to be effective... as probes for structure-activity studies. However, these compounds are difficult to synthesize by traditional methods. Their synthesis by zerovalent nickel catalytic coupling, as first described by Semmelhack et al. (1971) and modified by Kende et al...

  7. REPORT OF THE INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA -MASS SPECTROMETRY (ICP-MS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three year Full Service Contract 1 CETAC Ultrasonic Nebulization Unit (Fig. 6) 1 Consumables Package 1

  8. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intensities for pure Ar plasmas focus on the dominant 104.8emitted from pure A r plasmas focus on the intensities ofdissertation work focuses on plasma and wafer diagnostics as

  9. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    deposition and chamber pressure effects on the ion currentsignificant change in ion current at the chamber wall is nottotal positive ion current to the chamber surfaces 33 ; and

  10. A Parametric Study of Electron Extraction from a Low Frequency Inductively Coupled RF-Plasma Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -cathode is closed only by the ion current to the cathode chamber wall. The extraction of electrons from the rf through this opening is larger than the ion saturation current to the chamber wall, then the maximum by the plasma density in the cathode chamber, the ion Bohm velocity at the sheath edge and the surface area

  11. TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operation of an electric vehicle's power system. The 1.30power source Figure 1. Roadway-powered system for electric vehicles.

  12. THE NOTRE DAME INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA -MASS SPECTROMETRY (ICP-MS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PQII STE ICP-MS, Electrothermal Vaporization, and Laser Ablation units The report supercedes STE, LaserProbe (tuned to 266 nm, but with 532 nm and 1046 nm capabilities), CETAC Ultrasonic

  13. TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power Pi - input power Ps - loop conductor power loss Pc -loop capacitor power loss Pf - pickupand source core power loss Pr - pickup capacitor power loss

  14. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U also achieved a representative value at high irradiance.Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablationvalue close to the representative level. Segregation during

  15. Etching kinetics and surface roughening of polysilicon and dielectric materials in inductively coupled plasma beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Yunpeng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma etching processes often roughen the feature sidewalls forming anisotropic striations. A clear understanding of the origin and control of sidewall roughening is extremely desirable, particularly at the gate level ...

  16. Modal S-matrix method for the optimum design of inductively direct-coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornemann, Jens

    . Arndt, Dr.-Ing., Sen.Mem.I.E.E.E., J. Bornemann, Dr.-Ing., D. Heckmann, Dipl.-lng., C. Piontek, Dipl.-lng., H. Semmerow, Dipl.-lng., and H. Schueler, Dipl.-lng. Indexing terms: Computer-aided design

  17. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are protected with a layer of polyimide coating and theplasma (ICP) chamber. Polyimide Coating Electronic Moduleprotected with a layer of polyimide coating and communicate

  18. TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pickup short circuit current Effective core loss currentPickup short circuit voltage, volts I - Input current, amps

  19. TEST OF THE PERFORMANCE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF A PROTOTYPE INDUCTIVE POWER COUPLING FOR ELECTRIC HIGHWAY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolger, J.G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V min. Trojan J 217 lead acid batteries, 14 84 max. Bridgea lead-acid battery pack consisting of 12, 6-V batteries in

  20. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3-dimensional heat transfer model of the wafer. Comparisonssensor wafer with a 3D heat transfer model of the wafer andTM sensor wafer with a 3D heat transfer model of the wafer.

  1. Coupling in the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelfand, N.M.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at the commencement of run Ib was far below expectations. After a frustrating period of several months, a low-{beta} quad downstream of the interaction point at B0 was found to be rolled. This rolled quadrupole coupled the horizontal and vertical motion of the Tevatron beams. It also made matching the beam from the Main Ring to the Tevatron impossible, resulting in emittance blow up on injection. The net result of the roll was a significant reduction in the Tevatron luminosity. When the roll in the quadrupole was corrected the performance of the Tevatron improved dramatically. This note will discuss the experimental data indicating the presence of coupling and subsequent calculations which show how coupling an affect the luminosity. It is not intended to exhaust a discussion of coupling, which hopefully will be understood well enough to be discussed in a subsequent note.

  2. Negative-coupling resonances in pump-coupled lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Carr; M. L. Taylor; I. B. Schwartz

    2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider coupled lasers, where the intensity deviations from the steady state, modulate the pump of the other lasers. Most of our results are for two lasers where the coupling constants are of opposite sign. This leads to a Hopf bifurcation to periodic output for weak coupling. As the magnitude of the coupling constants is increased (negatively) we observe novel amplitude effects such as a weak coupling resonance peak and, strong coupling subharmonic resonances and chaos. In the weak coupling regime the output is predicted by a set of slow evolution amplitude equations. Pulsating solutions in the strong coupling limit are described by discrete map derived from the original model.

  3. Computational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    machines in general, and induction motors in particular, temperature limits is a key factor affectingComputational analysis of temperature rise phenomena in electric induction motors Ying Huai Kraftwerkstechnik, PetersenstraÃ?e 30, 64287 Darmstadt, Germany b Faculty of Science and Engineering, Mads Clausen

  4. Modelling Inhibition in Metabolic Pathways Through Abduction and Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazos, Florencio

    Modelling Inhibition in Metabolic Pathways Through Abduction and Induction Alireza Tamaddoni abduction and induction can be used to understand the functional class of unknown enzymes or inhibitors. We show how we can model, within Abductive Logic Programming (ALP), inhibition in metabolic pathways

  5. Brazdil, P. and Gama, J., 1998 Constructive Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    1 Brazdil, P. and Gama, J., 1998 Constructive Induction on Continuous Spaces In Liu, H./Motada, H.: Feature Extraction Construction and Selection, A Data Mining Perspective. Chapter 18, pages S.289. ,,oblique") Probleme. + at2 at1 - H #12;11 Constructive Induction: "the application of a set of constructive

  6. Stator current demodulation for induction machine rotor faults diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with emphasis on stator current processing [1], [2]. It has been proven that mechanical and electrical faultsStator current demodulation for induction machine rotor faults diagnosis El Houssin El Bouchikhi of the stator currents. Hence, demodulation of the stator currents is of high interest for induction machines

  7. Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to ProgrammingLanguage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    Induction, Domains, Calculi: Strachey's Contributions to Programming­Language Engineering David A's contributions---inductive defini­ tion of semantics, semantic­domain definitions, and calculi for semantic description---are presented, and their consequences on languages research are described. Strachey's impact

  8. Improved Unsupervised POS Induction through Prototype Discovery Omri Abend1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappoport, Ari

    Rappoport1 1 Institute of Computer Science, 2 ICNC Hebrew University of Jerusalem {omria01|roiri|arir}@cs.huji.ac.il Abstract We present a novel fully unsupervised al- gorithm for POS induction from plain text, motivated and for multi-lingual systems (Jiang et al., 2009). Automatic induction of POS tags from plain text can greatly

  9. Induction accelerators for the phase rotator system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginato, Lou; Yu, Simon; Vanecek, Dave

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle of magnetic induction has been applied to the acceleration of high current beams in betatrons and a variety of induction accelerators. The linear induction accelerator (LIA) consists of a simple nonresonant structure where the drive voltage is applied to an axially symmetric gap that encloses a toroidal ferromagnetic material. The change in flux in the magnetic core induces an axial electric field that provides particle acceleration. This simple nonresonant (low Q) structure acts as a single turn transformer that can accelerate from hundreds of amperes to tens of kiloamperes, basically only limited by the drive impedance. The LIA is typically a low gradient structure that can provide acceleration fields of varying shapes and time durations from tens of nanoseconds to several microseconds. The efficiency of the LIA depends on the beam current and can exceed 50% if the beam current exceeds the magnetization current required by the ferromagnetic material. The acceleration voltage available is simply given by the expression V=A dB/dt. Hence, for a given cross section of material, the beam pulse duration influences the energy gain. Furthermore, a premium is put on minimizing the diameter, which impacts the total weight or cost of the magnetic material. The diameter doubly impacts the cost of the LIA since the power (cost) to drive the cores is proportional to the volume as well. The waveform requirements during the beam pulse makes it necessary to make provisions in the pulsing system to maintain the desired dB/dt during the useful part of the acceleration cycle. This is typically done two ways, by using the final stage of the pulse forming network (PFN) and by the pulse compensation network usually in close proximity of the acceleration cell. The choice of magnetic materials will be made by testing various materials both ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic. These materials will include the nickel-iron, silicon steel amorphous and various types of ferrites not only to determine the properties that are essential in this application but the energy losses in the magnetization process which directly impact the cost.

  10. First order theories for nonmonotone inductive definitions: recursively inaccessible and Mahlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    First order theories for nonmonotone inductive definitions: recursively inaccessible and Mahlo Gerhard J¨ager Abstract In this paper first order theories for nonmonotone inductive definitions theories of) several specific nonmonotone inductive definitions which are interesting in the context

  11. Peak thrust operation of linear induction machines from parameter identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Eastham, T.R.; Dawson, G.E. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various control strategies are being used to achieve high performance operation of linear drives. To maintain minimum volume and weight of the power supply unit on board the transportation vehicle, peak thrust per unit current operation is a desirable objective. True peak thrust per unit current through slip control is difficult to achieve because the parameters of linear induction machines vary during normal operation. This paper first develops a peak thrust per unit current control law based on the per-phase equivalent circuit for linear induction machines. The algorithm for identification of the variable parameters in induction machines is then presented. Application to an operational linear induction machine (LIM) demonstrates the utility of this algorithm. The control strategy is then simulated, based on an operational transit LIM, to show the capability of achieving true peak thrust operation for linear induction machines.

  12. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  13. Induction slag reduction process for purifying metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR); Fisher, II, George T. (Albany, OR); Hansen, Dennis A. (Corvallis, OR)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous method is provided for purifying and recovering transition metals such as neodymium and zirconium that become reactive at temperatures above about 500.degree. C. that comprises the steps of contacting the metal ore with an appropriate fluorinating agent such as an alkaline earth metal fluosilicate to form a fluometallic compound, and reducing the fluometallic compound with a suitable alkaline earth or alkali metal compound under molten conditions, such as provided in an induction slag metal furnace. The method of the invention is advantageous in that it is simpler and less expensive than methods used previously to recover pure metals, and it may be employed with a wide range of transition metals that were reactive with enclosures used in the prior art methods and were hard to obtain in uncontaminated form.

  14. Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat conductive materials. This heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Vacuum Induction Melting Unit Induction heating is a process wherein induced eddy currents heat field and circulating eddy currents are induced within the metals. Flow of eddy currents leads an AC current through a water cooled copper coil and a metallic charge is placed in a ceramic (or

  15. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Low-Oxygen Induction of Normally Cryptic psbA Genes in Cyanobacteria. Abstract: Microarray analysis indicated...

  16. Vacuum degeneracy of a circuit-QED system in the ultrastrong coupling regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Nataf; Cristiano Ciuti

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate theoretically the quantum vacuum properties of a chain of $N$ superconducting Josephson atoms inductively coupled to a transmission line resonator. We derive the quantum field Hamiltonian for such circuit-QED system, showing that, due to the type and strength of the interaction, a quantum phase transition can occur with a twice degenerate quantum vacuum above a critical coupling. In the finite-size case, the degeneracy is lifted, with an energy splitting decreasing exponentially with increasing values of $g^2 N^2$, where $g$ is the dimensionless vacuum Rabi coupling per artificial atom. We determine analytically the ultrastrong coupling asymptotic expression of the two degenerate vacua for an arbitrary number of artificial atoms and of resonator modes. In the ultrastrong coupling regime the degeneracy is protected with respect to random fluctuations of the transition energies of the Josephson elements.

  17. Circle diagram approach for self excited induction generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Carlin, P.W.; Osgood, R.M.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When an induction generator is connected to a utility line supply, the voltage and frequency at the terminal output are the same as the voltage and frequency of the utility line supply to which the generator is connected. The reactive power needed by the induction generator is supplied by the utility and the real power is returned to the utility. With a fixed frequency dictated by the utility, the induction machine starts generating above the synchronous speed. The range of speed is also limited by the slip. At a very high slip, the copper losses increases as the current increases. On the other hand, in an isolated operation, the induction generator operates in self-excitation mode. It determines its own voltage and frequency. These two quantities depend on the size of the AC capacitor, the induction machine parameters, the electrical load, and the speed of the generator. The operating speed of the induction generator is extended without generating excessive loss. This paper presents an analytical study by utilizing a circle diagram to illustrate the operation of the induction generator in isolated operation. The steady-state calculations are presented to support the analysis. Possible applications for the system in variable-speed generation are currently under investigation. The output can be directly connected to equipment that is non-sensitive to the frequency (a heater, battery charger, etc.) or can be connected to a converter to get a fixed-frequency AC output.

  18. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  19. Aggregation of induction machines for power system dynamic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taleb, M.; Akbaba, M.; Abdullah, E.A. (Univ. of Bahrain, Isa Town (Bahrain). Electrical Engineering Dept.)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a method for the aggregation of induction motor loads. Thevenin theorem along with some transient characteristics of induction machine are used in calculating the parameters of the equivalent machine. The dynamic response of the resultant machine differs from the sum of the dynamic responses of the individual machines. For a diversified group of induction machines, at least two separate aggregate machines are needed to represent the overall dynamic performance of the machines. To this end, a handy index for the classification (grouping) of machines is suggested. Comparison between the results obtained from the proposed method and corresponding ones obtained from some of the published methods is also presented.

  20. Dynamics of an Ion Coupled to a Parametric Superconducting Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dvir Kafri; Prabin Adhikari; Jacob M. Taylor

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting circuits and trapped ions are promising architectures for quantum information processing. However, the natural frequencies for controlling these systems -- radio frequency ion control and microwave domain superconducting qubit control -- make direct Hamiltonian interactions between them weak. In this paper we describe a technique for coupling a trapped ion's motion to the fundamental mode of a superconducting circuit. We do this by applying a carefully modulated external magnetic flux to the circuit. In conjunction with a non-linear element (Josephson junction), this gives the circuit an effective time-dependent inductance. We then show how to tune the external flux to generate a resonant coupling between circuit and ion's motional mode, and discuss the limitations of this approach compared to using a time-dependent capacitance.

  1. Graphene Coating Coupled Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Graphene Coating Coupled Emission A COMSET, A single sheet of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms, called of graphene and its unique properties, I will present amplification of surface graphene-Ag hybrid films which when graphene is used as the spacer layer in a conventional Ag- harnessed the nonlinear properties

  2. Coupled superconductors and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian D. Josephson

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the events leading to the discovery of coupled superconductors, the author's move in the 1970s to a perspective where mind plays a role comparable to matter, and the remarkable hostility sometimes encountered by those who venture into unconventional areas.

  3. Coupling Gammasphere and ORRUBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Manning, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J. C.; Matos, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Chipps, K. A. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hardy, S.; Shand, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jones, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kozub, R. L. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Lister, C. J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 and Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Peters, W. A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The coincident detection of particles and gamma rays allows the study of the structure of exotic nuclei via inverse kinematics reactions using radioactive ion beams and thick targets. We report on the status of the project to couple the highresolution charged-particle detector ORRUBA to Gammasphere, a high-efficiency, high-resolution gamma ray detector.

  4. An economical single to three phase converter for induction motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Zerega, Philp Van Uytandaele

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several different types of single to three phase converters for induction motors available today. However, many of the presently available phase converters suffer from disadvantages such as high cost or low performance. An economical...

  5. Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 years if operated 10 hours a day. The technology, however, is far from new. Nikola Tesla demonstrated induction lighting in the late 1890s around the same time that his rival,...

  6. Inductance cancellation techniques with application to EMI filters and components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierquet, Brandon J. (Brandon Joseph)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inherent parasitic effects in passive circuit components, such as the equivalent parallel capacitance of magnetic windings and the equivalent series inductance (ESL) of capacitors, become dominant factors limiting the ...

  7. Case-Analysis for Rippling and Inductive Proof 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan; Dixon, Lucas; Johansson, Moa

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rippling is a heuristic used to guide rewriting and is typically used for inductive theorem proving. We introduce a method to support case-analysis within rippling. Like earlier work, this allows goals containing if-statements to be proved...

  8. Inductive inference based on probability and Matthew Weber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osherson, Daniel

    Inductive inference based on probability and similarity Matthew Weber Princeton University Daniel in the Bayesian sense (Tentori et al., 2007), or as Weber acknowledges support from an NSF graduate research

  9. Development of magnetic induction machines for micro turbo machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KöÅŸ er, Hür, 1976-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the nonlinear analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of an axial-gap magnetic induction micro machine, which is a two-phase planar motor in which the rotor is suspended above the stator via mechanical ...

  10. An economical single to three phase converter for induction motors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Zerega, Philp Van Uytandaele

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several different types of single to three phase converters for induction motors available today. However, many of the presently available phase converters suffer from disadvantages such as high cost or low performance. An economical...

  11. A microfabricated ElectroQuasiStatic induction turbine-generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyn, J. Lodewyk (Jasper Lodewyk), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ElectroQuasiStatic (EQS) induction machine has been fabricated and has generated net electric power. A maximum power output of 192 [mu]W at 235 krpm has been measured under driven excitation of the six phases. Self ...

  12. acclimation induction temperatures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max- ima: all were significadylower in the 20"C-acclirnatedgroup(31.I > 4.5",and 40 Bennett, Albert F. 9 vol. 159, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2002 Induction of Preference...

  13. Modelling of transformations during induction hardening and tempering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaude-Fugarolas, Daniel

    There are many circumstances in industry where steel components are locally heated into the austenite phase field, and then quenched rapidly to produce a hardened region. Induction hardening is one such process used widely in the manufacture...

  14. Inductive Rules, Background Knowledge, and Skepticism Daniel Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel, Daniel

    Inductive Rules, Background Knowledge, and Skepticism Daniel Steel Department of Philosophy 503 S. Kedzie Hall Michigan State University East Lansing, MI 48823-1032 Email: steel@msu.edu #12;Abstract

  15. Nonresonant and Resonant Frequency-Selectable Induction-Heating Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, John I.

    This paper examines a scheme for developing frequency-selectable induction-heating targets for stimulating temperature-sensitive polymer gels. The phrase “frequency selectable” implies that each target has a frequency at ...

  16. Current Frequency Spectral Subtraction and its Contribution to Induction Machines Bearings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    transpose; [Ir] Rotor current vector; [Is] Stator current vector; [Lrr] Rotor windings self and mutual inductances; [Lrs] Mutual inductances between rotor windings and stator ones; [Lsr] Mutual inductances between stator windings and rotor ones ; [Lss] Stator windings self and mutual inductances; [Rr] Cage resistances

  17. Heat transfer enhancement resulting from induction electrohydrodynamic pumping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Bryan David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pump operated at various tilt angles with two working fluids. The main difference between this study and other work in EHD heat transfer enhancement is that the induction EHD pump is the only source of pumping as well as the basis for heat transfer... HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT RESULTING FROM INDUCTION ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC PUMPING A Thesis by BRYAN DAVID MARGO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  18. Heat transfer enhancement resulting from induction electrohydrodynamic pumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Bryan David

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT RESULTING FROM INDUCTION ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC PUMPING A Thesis by BRYAN DAVID MARGO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT RESULTING FROM INDUCTION ELECTROHYDRODYNAMIC PUMPING A Thesis by BRYAN DAVID MARGO Approved as to style and content by: Jamal Seyed- Yagoobi (Chair...

  19. An alternative isolated wind electric pumping system using induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.S.; Lyra, R.O.C.; Silva, S.R.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated variable speed variable frequency wind electric pumping system is proposed. Induction machines are used both in the generation unit as well as in the pumping unit and a static VAR compensator is used for providing the magnetizing currents of both machines. An indirect induction generator stator flux control strategy is adopted. System steady state and dynamic operation is studied basing on simulation and experimental results.

  20. Prototyping Energy Efficient Thermo-Magnetic & Induction Hardening for Heat Treat & Net Shape Forming Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aquil Ahmad

    2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Within this project, Eaton undertook the task of bringing about significant impact with respect to sustainability. One of the major goals for the Department of Energy is to achieve energy savings with a corresponding reduction in carbon foot print. The use of a coupled induction heat treatment with high magnetic field heat treatment makes possible not only improved performance alloys, but with faster processing times and lower processing energy, as well. With this technology, substitution of lower cost alloys for more exotic alloys became a possibility; microstructure could be tailored for improved magnetic properties or wear resistance or mechanical performance, as needed. A prototype commercial unit has been developed to conduct processing of materials. Testing of this equipment has been conducted and results demonstrate the feasibility for industrial commercialization.

  1. Design and Testing of Kinetic Inductance Detectors Made of Titanium Nitride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diener, P; Yates, S J C; Lankwarden, Y J Y; Baselmans, J J A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To use highly resistive material for Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), new designs have to be done, in part due to the impedance match needed between the KID chip and the whole 50 ohms readout circuit. Chips from two new hybrid designs, with an aluminum throughline coupled to titanium nitride microresonators, have been measured and compared to a TiN only chip. In the hybrid chips, parasitic temperature dependent box resonances are absent. The dark KID properties have been measured in a large set of resonators. A surprisingly long lifetime, up to 5.6 ms is observed in a few KIDs. For the other more reproducible devices, the mean electrical Noise Equivalent Power is 5.4 10-19 W.Hz1/2.

  2. Nickel and Sulfur Speciation of Residual Oil Fly Ashes from Two Electric Utility Steam-Generating Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath,K.; Schulz, R.; Toman, D.; Nyberg, C.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.; Zillioux, E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400- and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned 0.9 and 0.3 wt % S residual (No. 6 fuel) oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for Ni concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  3. Optimization of induction motor efficiency: Volume 2, Single-phase induction motors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchs, E.F.; Huang, H.; Vandenput, A.J.; Holl, J.; Appelbaum, J.; Zak, Z.; Erlicki, M.S.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimal design of the motor dimensions, the capacitance of the run capacitor, the winding distribution and the choice of the electrical steel are the most important sources for an improvement of the efficiency of modern single-phase induction motors for given performance and material cost constraints. The formulation of the techniques which realize this optimization is based on nonlinear programming approaches. The Method of Boundary Search Along Active Constraints is used for the optimal design of the motor dimensions of a commercially available 2 hp, 115 V single-phase induction motor. Based on the optimization results due to the above mentioned four optimization components, the relationships between efficiency, power factor, cost, active materials and the values of the capacitance of the run capacitor are studied and the limited validity of the model law is discussed. This report also explains why the Wanlass retrofit improves efficiency and details the advantages and disadvantages of such a retrofitting as compared with the operation in the standard configuration.

  4. Magnetic coupling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A quick connect/disconnect coupling apparatus is provided in which a base member is engaged by a locking housing through a series of interengagement pins. The pins maintain the shaft in a locked position. Upon exposure to an appropriately positioned magnetic field, pins are removed a sufficient distance such that the shaft may be withdrawn from the locking housing. The ability to lock and unlock the connector assembly requires no additional tools or parts apart from a magnetic key.

  5. Stability of Coupling Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkasale, Abhineeth

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, K. B. Nakshatrala Committee Members, Steve Suh J. N. Reddy Head of Department, Dennis O?Neal May 2011 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Stability of Coupling Algorithms. (May 2011) Abhineeth Akkasale, B.E., Bangalore... step. iv To Amma and Anna v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First and foremost, I thank Dr. Kalyana B. Nakshatrala for being an incredible advisor and for his time and patience in constantly guiding me through my research. I am indebted to him for his guidance...

  6. Quick torque coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luft, Peter A. (El Cerrito, CA)

    2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling for mechanically connecting modular tubular struts of a positioning apparatus or space frame, comprising a pair of toothed rings (10, 12) attached to separate strut members (16), the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12) mechanically interlocking in both an axial and circumferential manner, and a third part comprising a sliding, toothed collar (14) the teeth (22) of which interlock the teeth (18, 20) of the primary rings (10, 12), preventing them from disengaging, and completely locking the assembly together. A secondary mechanism provides a nesting force for the collar, and/or retains it. The coupling is self-contained and requires no external tools for installation, and can be assembled with gloved hands in demanding environments. No gauging or measured torque is required for assembly. The assembly can easily be visually inspected to determine a "go" or "no-go" status. The coupling is compact and relatively light-weight. Because of it's triply interlocking teeth, the connection is rigid. The connection does not primarily rely on clamps, springs or friction based fasteners, and is therefore reliable in fail-safe applications.

  7. Study on the Mechanical Instability of MICE Coupling Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Gou, Xing Long; Wu, Hong; Zheng, Shi Xian; Green, Michael A

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is one of the key equipment in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The coil has an inner radius of 750 mm, length of 281 mm and thickness of 104 mm at room temperature. The peak induction in the coil is about 7.3 T with a full current of 210 A. The mechanical disturbances which might cause the instability of the impregnated superconducting magnet involve the frictional motion between conductors and the cracking of impregnated materials. In this paper, the mechanical instability of the superconducting coupling magnet was studied. This paper presents the numerical calculation results of the minimum quench energy (MQE) of the coupling magnet, as well as the dissipated strain energy in the stress concentration region when the epoxy cracks and the frictional energy caused by 'stick-slip' of the conductor based on the bending theory of beam happens. Slip planes are used in the coupling coil and the frictional energy due to 'slow slip' at the interface of the slip planes was also investigated. The dissipated energy was compared with MQE, and the results show that the cracking of epoxy resin in the region of shear stress concentration is the main factor for premature quench of the coil.

  8. Bifurcation and control of chaos in Induction motor drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnendu Chakrabarty; Urmila Kar

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The induction motor controlled by Indirect Field Oriented Control (IFOC) is known to have high performance and better stability. This paper reports the dynamical behavior of an indirect field oriented control (IFOC) induction motor drive in the light of bifurcation theory. The speed of high performance induction motor drive is controlled by IFOC method. The knowledge of qualitative change of the behavior of the motor such as equilibrium points, limit cycles and chaos with the change of motor parameters and load torque are essential for proper control of the motor. This paper provides a numerical approach to understand better the dynamical behavior of an indirect field oriented control of a current-fed induction motor. The focus is on bifurcation analysis of the IFOC motor, with a particular emphasis on the change that affects the dynamics and stability under small variations of Proportional Integral controller (PI) parameters, load torque and k, the ratio of the rotor time constant and its estimate etc. Bifurcation diagrams are computed. This paper also attempts to discuss various types of the transition to chaos in the induction motor. The results of the obtained bifurcation simulations give useful guidelines for adjusting both motor model and PI controller parameters. It is also important to ensure desired operation of the motor when the motor shows chaotic behavior. Infinite numbers of unstable periodic orbits are embedded in a chaotic attractor. Any unstable periodic orbit can be stabilized by proper control algorithm. The delayed feedback control method to control chaos has been implemented in this system.

  9. Sealing coupling. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Rusnak, J.J.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a remotely operable releasable sealing coupling which provides fluid-tight joinder of upper and a lower conduit sections. Each conduit section has a concave conical sealing surface adjacent its end portion. A tubular sleeve having convex spherical ends is inserted between the conduit ends to form line contact with the concave conical end portions. An inwardly projecting lip located at one end of the sleeve cooperates with a retaining collar formed on the upper pipe end to provide swivel capture for the sleeve. The upper conduit section also includes a tapered lower end portion which engages the inside surface of the sleeve to limit misalignment of the connected conduit sections.

  10. Lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a monolithic lateral-coupled laser array comprised of at least two stripe laser cavities of different effective length in close parallel proximity to each other for coupling of radiation. The longer of the stripe laser cavities is cleaved to provide separate parts, and the parts are cleaved coupled to form one strip laser cavity lateral coupled to the shorter laser cavity. A separate stripe contact varies the relative currents supplied to each laser cavity, including the cleaved coupled cavities of the longer of the stripe laser cavities.

  11. Better couplings reduce pump maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test program conducted at the Tenneco Chalmette Refinery to find ways to improve pump reliability has provided evidence that curtailing pump vibration results in a significant reduction of pump repairs. It was further shown that vibration could be reduced by improving pump/motor alignment, regular lubrication practices and replacement of gear couplings with newer, advanced-design couplings. Extended field trials of two different types of couplings on operating motor/pump units in various parts of the refinery proved that both test couplings are capable of reducing vibration and cutting down on costly pump repairs, as compared with gear-type couplings used in the refinery. One coupling type reduced pump repairs by 70 percent, while the second type resulted in a 58-percent reduction. In a one-year long test program, urethane elastomer couplings increased pump life on ten test units by 406 percent when considering pump repairs directly related to coupling performance. Repairs not connected with coupling performance, such as electrical failure, acid attack on seals, lack of lubrication, etc., were not included in the calculations. Disc-type couplings under test on eight motor/pump units increased pump life by 142 percent, based on data related only to coupling performance.

  12. Recirculating induction accelerators as drivers for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, J.J.; Deadrick, F.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; Griffith, L.V.; Kirbie, H.C.; Neil, V.K.; Newton, M.A.; Paul, A.C.; Sharp, W.M.; Shay, H.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Bangerter, R.O.; Faltens, A.; Fong, C.G.; Judd, D.L.; Lee, E.P.; Reginato, L.L.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Godlove, T.F. (FM Technologies, Inc., 10529-B Braddock Rd., Fairfax, Virginia 22302 (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study of recirculating induction heavy ion accelerators as low-cost driver for inertial-fusion energy applications was recently completed. The projected cost of a 4 MJ accelerator was estimated to be about $500 M (million) and the efficiency was estimated to be 35%. The principal technology issues include energy recovery of the ramped dipole magnets, which is achieved through use of ringing inductive/capacitive circuits, and high repetition rates of the induction cell pulsers, which is accomplished through arrays of field effect transistor (FET) switches. Principal physics issues identified include minimization of particle loss from interactions with the background gas, and more demanding emittance growth and centroid control requirements associated with the propagation of space-charge-dominated beams around bends and over large path lengths. In addition, instabilities such as the longitudinal resistive instability, beam-breakup instability and betatron-orbit instability were found to be controllable with careful design.

  13. Controlled synthesis of nickel ferrite nanocrystals with tunable properties using a novel induction thermal plasma method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastien, Samuel; Braidy, Nadi [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnological Engineering, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel ferrite spinel nanopowders were synthesised using a solution spray radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma reactor over a wide range of compositions (Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4}, x???1), with metastable powders produced for x?=?0, 0.25, and 0.5. X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction coupled to Rietveld refinement show that this synthesis technique offers an excellent level of control over both the chemical and crystallographic composition of the nanopowder through the control of the input Fe/Ni ratio. The technique produces highly crystalline nanopowders without the need for post-synthesis annealing. A bulk Fe/Ni ratio ?2 yields a pure spinel Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} phase, whereas Fe/Ni ratio <2 results in the excess Ni partitioning to a secondary bunsenite (Ni{sub x},Fe{sub 1-x})O phase. Morphological analysis using transmission electron microscopy shows that two types of particles are produced in different parts of the reactor: a highly faceted powder with the truncated octahedron morphology and a smaller-sized random agglomerate. The faceted particles have a log-normal particle size distribution, with an average size of about 30?nm while the agglomerates have a characteristic length of ?3–5?nm.

  14. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductive coupler for downhole components. The inductive coupler includes an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  15. Iterative Solution of Maxwell's Equations for an Induction Motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shayak Bhattacharjee

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we use classical electromagnetism to analyse a three-phase induction motor. We first cast the motor as a boundary value problem involving two phenomenological time-constants. These are derived from the widely used equivalent circuit model of the induction motor. We then use an iterative procedure to evaluate these constants and obtain the motor performance equations. Our results depend only on the geometrical parameters of the motor and can be used to derive precise expressions for the excitation frequency and applied voltage needed to extract maximum performance from a given motor at any rotation speed.

  16. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and a tuning circuit connected to the input of the amplifier, wherein the tuning circuit is continuously variable and consists of solid state electrical components with no mechanically adjustable devices including a pair of diodes connected to each other at their respective cathodes with a control voltage connected at the junction of the diodes. Another oscillator includes an amplifier having an input and an output, a feedback network connected between the input of the amplifier and the output of the amplifier, the feedback network being configured to provide suitable positive feedback from the output of the amplifier to the input of the amplifier to initiate and sustain an oscillating condition, and transmission lines connected to the input of the amplifier with an input pad and a perpendicular transmission line extending from the input pad and forming a leg of a resonant "T", and wherein the feedback network is coupled to the leg of the resonant "T".

  17. Black hole temperature: Minimal coupling vs conformal coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazel, Mohamadreza, E-mail: m.fazel@ph.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Tehran, North Kargar Avenue, Teharn 14395-547 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirza, Behrouz, E-mail: b.mirza@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini, E-mail: sa.hosseinimansoori@ph.iut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we discuss the propagation of scalar fields in conformally transformed spacetimes with either minimal or conformal coupling. The conformally coupled equation of motion is transformed into a one-dimensional Schrödinger-like equation with an invariant potential under conformal transformation. In a second stage, we argue that calculations based on conformal coupling yield the same Hawking temperature as those based on minimal coupling. Finally, it is conjectured that the quasi normal modes of black holes are invariant under conformal transformation.

  18. Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical...

  19. Plasma conductivity at finite coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker Hassanain; Martin Schvellinger

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    By taking into account the full order(\\alpha'^3) type IIB string theory corrections to the supergravity action, we compute the leading finite 't Hooft coupling order(\\lambda^{-3/2}) corrections to the conductivity of strongly-coupled SU(N) {\\cal {N}}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma in the large N limit. We find that the conductivity is enhanced by the corrections, in agreement with the trend expected from previous perturbative weak-coupling computations.

  20. Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

  1. Pathbased Inductive Synthesis for Program Inversion Saurabh Srivastava

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Saurabh

    Park jfoster@cs.umd.edu Abstract In this paper, we investigate the problem of semi­automated in 14 programs such as compressors (e.g., Lempel­Ziv­Welch), encoders (e.g., UUEn­ code), and arithmetic for programs such as compressors or encoders. Counterexample­guided inductive syn­ thesis [33] requires

  2. Path-based Inductive Synthesis for Program Inversion Saurabh Srivastava

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauduri, Swarat

    Park jfoster@cs.umd.edu Abstract In this paper, we investigate the problem of semi-automated in 14 programs such as compressors (e.g., Lempel-Ziv-Welch), encoders (e.g., UUEn- code), and arithmetic for programs such as compressors or encoders. Counterexample-guided inductive syn- thesis [33] requires

  3. Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated implications@ucsd.edu; cconstable@ucsd.edu) [1] Currents induced in Earth by temporal variations in the external magnetic field have by harmonic Dst (``disturbance storm time'') excitation of the magnetospheric ring current in satellite

  4. Latent-Descriptor Clustering for Unsupervised POS Induction Michael Lamar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienenstock, Elie

    Latent-Descriptor Clustering for Unsupervised POS Induction Michael Lamar Department of Mathematics; Lamar et al., 2010; Reichart et al., 2010; Berg-Kirkpatrick et al., 2010). Some of these methods use papers advocate non- disambiguating models (Abend et al., 2010; Lamar et al., 2010): these assign

  5. An iterative study of time independent induction effects in magnetohydrodynamics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the magnetic Reynolds number, a strong limiting factor is the cost in power consumption P of 2 #12;the engines numerical approach to study magnetic induction in flows of an electrically conducting fluid submitted orders of the magnetic Reynolds number Rm. All electrical quantities such as potential, currents

  6. Applications of the Array Induction Tool in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zainalabedin, K.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Cao Minh, C.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its introduction in Saudi Arabia in 1993, the Array Induction Tool (AIT) has been run extensively in a wide variety of petrophysical environments. These include fresh mud, salty mud, high and low resistivity formations, hydrocarbon-bearing or water-bearing reservoirs in carbonates and clastics sequences. In some examples, the AIT was also run in conjunction with the Phasor Induction (PI) or Dual-Laterolog for comparison purpose. As with any resistivity device, the AIT`s primary product, an accurate Rt measurement, should not be overlooked. However, owing to the AIT`s multiple vertical resolutions and depths of investigation, the authors found that the tool yields additional information about the reservoirs that is not possible with older induction tools. The AIT improves the estimation of Rt in cases of thin laminations, complex invasion profiles or when the borehole correction is critical (wash-out, salty mud, high resistivity). In many instances, permeable beds that are invaded are much easier to identify with the AIT than with dual depths of investigation induction or laterolog tools. a typical case is the interpretation of annulus. Finally, they show the AIT characteristic response in a thing magnetic marker.

  7. An evaluation of inductance loop detectors for speed measurement accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Brian Patrick

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The lag time from the presence of a vehicle at an inductance loop to the actual detection of a vehicle varies. As the lag time varies so does the accuracy of speed measurement. Vehicle size, vehicle speed, detector type, detector sensitivity...

  8. MODULATED INDUCTANCE MAGNETOMETERS (1) By J. E. OPFER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    magnetometer circuit with its Thevenin equivalent circuit. The voltage generator for this circuit has an output plane vibrating near a long inductance element is described. The suitability of this magnetometer was supported in part by the U.S. Office of Naval Research. The magnetometer circuit is shown in figure 1

  9. A Parametric Spectral Estimator for Faults Detection in Induction Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    since their frequency resolution is limited and additional post-processing algorithms are required of bearing faults. Index Terms--Induction machine, faults detection, bearing faults, stator current that avoids the use of extra sensors since the stator currents are usually available and inexpensive

  10. Discontinuous Load Rating Problem for Induction Motors Gennady A. Leonov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonov, Gennady A.

    , is the parameter of influence of electromagnetic processes in a rotor on processes in the stator windings the influence of electromagnetic processes in a rotor on processes in the stator windings we assume in system (1Discontinuous Load Rating Problem for Induction Motors Gennady A. Leonov The transient processes

  11. Full expandable model of parallel self-excited induction generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    possibilities for incorporating advanced control to monitor and optimise a parallel installation of SEIGs and small induction motors. Typically, generators rated 15kVA are cost effective; but 100kVA [4] was found, the trend has changed from installing a few wind turbines to planning large wind farm installations

  12. THE CENTRE FOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS INDUCTION MEETINGS OCTOBER 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    Sciences Building) MSc in INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS MONDAY 3 OCTOBER 11 Social Sciences Building) Welcome Lunch for all new Applied Linguistics students WEDNESDAY 5 OCTOBERWELCOME TO THE CENTRE FOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS INDUCTION MEETINGS OCTOBER 2011 MA IN ENGLISH

  13. Indices to detect Hopf bifurcation in Induction motor drives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnendu Chakrabarty; Urmila Kar

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss of stability of induction motor controlled by Indirect Field Oriented Control (IFOC) is a matter of great concern of operators and design engineers. This paper reports indices to detect and predict stability problem such as system oscillations. Oscillations as a result of loss of stability, due to Hopf bifurcation, for different parameter values of IFOC motor are studied using the proposed indices.

  14. On Induction for SMT Solvers Andrew Reynolds and Viktor Kuncak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncak, Viktor

    On Induction for SMT Solvers Andrew Reynolds and Viktor Kuncak ´Ecole Polytechnique F´ed´erale de into SMT solving algorithms that is sound with respect to the interpretation of structures in SMT development repository. In addition its overall effectiveness, it has an advantage of accepting SMT-LIB input

  15. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Arntz, F.; /Diversified Tech., Bedford

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) The gradient of the SLIM-based technology is believed to be achievable in the same range as it is for the gradient of a modern rf-linac technology ({approx}100 MeV per meter). (2) The SLIM concept is based on the nsec TEM pulse mode operation with no laser or rf systems. (3) Main components of SLIM are not stressed while the energy is pumped into the induction system. Components can accept the hard environment conditions such as a radiation dose, mismatch, hard electromagnetic nose level, etc. Only for several nanoseconds the switch is OFF and produces a stress in the induction system. At that time, the delivery of energy to the beam takes place. (4) The energy in the induction system initially is storied in the magnetic field when the switch is ON. That fact makes another benefit: a low voltage power supplies can be used. The reliability of a lower voltage power supply is higher and they are cheaper. (5) The coreless SLIM concept offers to work in the MHz range of repetition rate. The induction system has the high electric efficiency (much higher than the DWA). (6) The array of lined up and activated SLIM cells is believed to be a solid state structure of novel accelerating technology. The electron-hole plasma in the high power solid state structure is precisely controlled by the electromagnetic process of a pulsed power supply.

  16. Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Journal of Philosophy, Inc. Implications of Personal Probability for Induction Author(s): Leonard J. Savage Source: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 64, No. 19, Sixty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division (Oct. 5, 1967), pp. 593-607 Published by: Journal of Philosophy, Inc

  17. Independence results for variants of sharply bounded induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziejczyk, Leszek

    formulas in Buss' original language of bounded arithmetic (with x/2 but not x/2y ), has recently been Buss' bounded arithmetic theory S2 has a rich structure of subtheories, all believed to be proper result for the full sharply bounded induction scheme, T0 2 , formulated in Buss' original language

  18. Ethanol Tolerance Caused by slowpoke Induction in Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Nigel

    Ethanol Tolerance Caused by slowpoke Induction in Drosophila Roshani B. Cowmeadow, Harish R in the ethanol response. Caenorhabditis elegans carrying mutations in this gene have altered ethanol sensitivity and Drosophila mutant for this gene are unable to acquire rapid tolerance to ethanol or anesthetics

  19. Vitrification and testing of a Hanford high-level waste sample. Part 1: Glass fabrication, and chemical and radiochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Bates, Derrick J.; Bredt, Paul; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, H D.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford radioactive tank waste will be separated into low-activity waste and high-level waste that will both be vitrified into borosilicate glasses. To demonstrate the feasibility of vitrification and the durability of the high-level waste glass, a high-level waste sample from Tank AZ-101 was processed to glass in a hot cell and analyzed with respect to chemical composition, radionuclide content, waste loading, and the presence of crystalline phases and then tested for leachability. The glass was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ? energy spectrometry, ? spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting. The WISE Uranium Project calculator was used to calculate the main sources of radioactivity to the year 3115. The observed crystallinity and the results of leachability testing of the glass will be reported in Part 2 of this paper.

  20. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  1. Models of radiofrequency coupling for negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavenago, M.; Petrenko, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell'Universita n.2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiofrequency heating for ICP (inductively coupled plasma) ion sources depends on the source operating pressure, the presence or absence of a Faraday shield, the driver coil geometry, the frequency used, and the magnetic field configuration: in negative ion source a magnetic filter seems necessary for H{sup -} survival. The result of single particle simulations showing the possibility of electron acceleration in the preglow regime and for reasonable driver chamber radius (15 cm) is reported, also as a function of the static external magnetic field. An effective plasma conductivity, depending not only from electron density, temperature, and rf field but also on static magnetic field is here presented and compared to previous models. Use of this conductivity and of multiphysics tools for a plasma transport and heating model is shown and discussed for a small source.

  2. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntz, Floyd; /Diversified Tech., Bedford; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac applications; for instance, it could be employed to both accelerate the beam and to stabilize the superbunch mode of operation in circular track machines.

  3. Electric Vehicle Induction Motor DSVM-DTC with Torque Ripple Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Electric Vehicle Induction Motor DSVM-DTC with Torque Ripple Minimization Farid Khoucha1 a sensorless DSVM-DTC of an induction motor that propels an electrical vehicle or a hybrid one. The drive uses, as demonstrated in experimental results. Keywords: Electric vehicle (EV), induction motor, Discrete Space Vector

  4. Design and Control of the Induction Motor Propulsion of an Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    Design and Control of the Induction Motor Propulsion of an Electric Vehicle B. Tabbache1,2 , A for presizing the induction motor propulsion of an Electric Vehicle (EV). Based on the EV desired performances for different induction motor-based EVs using a siding mode control technique. Index Terms--Electric Vehicle (EV

  5. Parameter estimation in induction motors: a comparison between the PE and the TS paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garatti, Simone

    - terized by a poly-phase stator windings besides a three-phase rotor windings. Feeding the windings,Rs) and the inductances (Lr,Ls) of the rotor and stator windings, and the mutual inductance M. In the model equations, induction motors have a fixed stator and a mobile rotor, but, differently from the others, they are charac

  6. H-G Diagram Based Rotor Parameters Identification for Induction Motors Thermal Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    technique. The process should be refined for a possible industrial application. Keywords: Induction motor, H at the stator slots. The actual trends for thermal monitoring of an induction motor is achieved without thermal-time processing of the induction motor state saturation and temperature for each operating point. The distinct

  7. Improved efficiency and precise temperature control of low-frequency induction-heating pure iron vapor source on ECR ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Y.; Takenaka, T.; Yano, K.; Kiriyama, R.; Kurisu, Y.; Nozaki, D.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Sato, F.; Iida, T. [Osaka Univ., 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo Univ., 2100 Kuzirai, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan); Osaka Univ., 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiply charged ions to be used prospectively are produced from solid pure material in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Recently a pure iron source is also required for the production of caged iron ions in the fullerene in order to control cells in vivo in bio-nano science and technology. We adopt directly heating iron rod by induction heating (IH) because it has non-contact with insulated materials which are impurity gas sources. We choose molybdenum wire for the IH coils because it doesn't need water cooling. To improve power efficiency and temperature control, we propose to the new circuit without previously using the serial and parallel dummy coils (SPD) for matching and safety. We made the circuit consisted of inductively coupled coils which are thin-flat and helix shape, and which insulates the IH power source from the evaporator. This coupling coils circuit, i.e. insulated induction heating coil transformer (IHCT), can be move mechanically. The secondary current can be adjusted precisely and continuously. Heating efficiency by using the IHCT is much higher than those of previous experiments by using the SPD, because leakage flux is decreased and matching is improved simultaneously. We are able to adjust the temperature in heating the vapor source around melting point. And then the vapor pressure can be controlled precisely by using the IHCT. We can control {+-}10K around 1500 Degree-Sign C by this method, and also recognize to controlling iron vapor flux experimentally in the extreme low pressures. Now we come into next stage of developing induction heating vapor source for materials with furthermore high temperature melting points above 2000K with the IHCT, and then apply it in our ECRIS.

  8. Development of Low-Voltage and Large-Current DC Power Supply with High-Frequency Transformer Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    Development of Low-Voltage and Large-Current DC Power Supply with High-Frequency Transformer-voltage and large-current DC power supply with a high-frequency transformer coupling. The power supply is simply·,Zü"gg"X·C~R,êC"_N^"X Keywords: DC power supply, low-voltage and large-current, high-frequency transformer, leakage inductance 1

  9. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  10. Running couplings in extra dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jisuke Kubo; Haruhiko Terao; George Zoupanos

    2000-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The regularization scheme dependence of running couplings in extra compactified dimensions is discussed. We examine several regularization schemes explicitly in order to analyze the scheme dependence of the Kaluza-Klein threshold effects, which cause the power law running, in the case of the scalar theory in five dimensions with one dimension compactified. It is found that in 1-loop order, the net difference in the running of the coupling among the different schemes is reduced to be rather small after finite renormalization. An additional comment concerns the running couplings in the warped extra dimensions which are found to be regularization dependent above TeV scale.

  11. Gear coupling effects on rotordynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Robert Warren

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Gear coupling model Disassembled gear coupling In-plane torque due to coupling being misaligned Forces on one tooth of spacer gear Forces on one tooth oi' rotor gear Shifting... Mancuso's test data with Clark's prediction using 8=0. 03, 0. 05. Bending moment versus misalignment for 6000 in. -lb Page 2 3 10 15 17 19 20 22 23 24 25 27 28 29 30 31 36 37 40 Figure 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33...

  12. Performances of Induction System for Nanosecond Mode Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An induction system comprises an array of single turn pulse transformers. Ferromagnetic cores of transformers are toroids that are stacked along the longitudinal core axis. Another name for this array is a fraction transformer or an adder. The primary and secondary windings of such a design have one turn. The step up mode is based on the number of primary pulse sources. The secondary windings are connected in series. Performances of such a system for the nanosecond range mode operation are different in comparison to the performances of traditional multi-turn pulse transformers, which are working on a 100+ nanosecond mode operation. In this paper, the author discusses which aspects are necessary to take into account for the high power nanosecond fractional transformer designs. The engineering method of the nanosecond induction system design is presented.

  13. High-energy interactions in Kinetic Inductance Detectors arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Addabbo, A; Goupy, J; Benoit, A; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Macias-Perez, J F; Monfardini, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of Cosmic Rays on the detectors are a key problem for space-based missions. We are studying the effects of such interactions on arrays of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), in order to adapt this technology for use on board of satellites. Before proposing a new technology such as the Kinetic Inductance Detectors for a space-based mission, the problem of the Cosmic Rays that hit the detectors during in-flight operation has to be studied in detail. We present here several tests carried out with KID exposed to radioactive sources, which we use to reproduce the physical interactions induced by primary Cosmic Rays, and we report the results obtained adopting different solutions in terms of substrate materials and array geometries. We conclude by outlining the main guidelines to follow for fabricating KID for space-based applications.

  14. Preliminary results from In-Duct Scrubbing Pilot Study testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Pennline, H.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost, moderate-removal-efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the Department of Energy for demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applied rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. In-Duct Scrubbing technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are (i) adequate mixing of sorbent with the flue gas for efficient reactant contact, (ii) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (iii) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is complete. This paper presents the IDS technology and the status of a jointly sponsored In-Duct Scrubbing Pilot Study that is being tested at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System.

  15. Degree design of coupled infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hover, Franz S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent asymptotic model of cascading failure in two-domain, coupled infrastructures is used to pose and solve a specific degree-distribution design problem. Low-order non-linear analysis exposes the mechanisms by which ...

  16. Running coupling for Wilson bermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juri Rolf; Ulli Wolff

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A non perturbative finite size scaling technique is used to study a running coupling in lattice Yang-Mills theory coupled to a bosonic Wilson spinor field in the Schr\\"odinger functional scheme. This corresponds to two negative flavours. The scaling behaviour in this case is compared to quenched results and to QCD with two flavours. The continuum limit is confronted with renormalized perturbation theory.

  17. MAC581 Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/grad-studies/fall2010.html)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    nebulization, dissolvation, laser ablation, B. Tuning dry and wet plasma, sensitivity, stability, oxide, normal ICP torch and shield torch, cool plasma, RF generators, load coil and chiller, membrane cones, interface housing and cooling, slide valves, expansion chamber vacuum and pumps, ion kinetic

  18. The determination of sulfur-containing surfactants with a high pressure liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobill, Jonathan Edward

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the blank millivolt intensities 78 17 Average millivolt intensities for the nickel standard solution 79 Table Page 18 Standard deviations of the nickel standard millivolt intensities 80 19 Slopes of the calibration lines calculated from the blank... widely used sulfur-containing surfactants. The alkylbenzenesulfonates 1 strongly absorb in the UV region and, therefore are easily monitored by UV detectors. Other surfactants, such as alkyl sulfates 2 [13-17], alpha olefin sulfonates 3 [16...

  19. FIRST STEP IN THEORETICAL APPROACH IN STUDY OF MARS AND TITAN ATMOSPHERES WITH AN INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA TORCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the titan atmosphere (CH4-N2) unlike the Mars atmosphere (CO2-N2). We observe the creation of solid], one can obtain the molar fraction versus temperature. The composition of Mars is assumed to be 97% CO22, CO2 - , N2O, N2O3, N2O4, N2O5, N2O+, N3, NCN, NO2, NO2 - , NO3, O3 and the electrons

  20. COMPARISON OF LEAD CONCENTRATION IN SURFACE SOIL BY INDUCTED COUPLED PLASMA/OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTROMETRY AND X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , where a secondary lead smelter had been operating for a long time, was investigated. The objective, since a secondary lead smelter had been operating for a long time in the village and some contaminated

  1. Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CombustionCombustion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Coupled Droplet Combustion . . . . . . . . . . . . Burning

  2. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kima, Jong Sung [Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-ro, Sucheon, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae [KEPCO E and C, Co., Ltd., 188, Kumi-ro, Seongnam, Kyounggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  3. A fabrication method for integrated filter elements with inductance cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perreault, David J.

    This paper outlines a fabrication method for integrated filter elements. An integrated filter element is a three- (or more) terminal device comprising a capacitor and coupled air-core magnetic windings, in which the magnetic ...

  4. Does Geometric Coupling Generates Resonances?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. C. Jardim; G. Alencar; R. R. Landim; R. N. Costa Filho

    2015-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Geometrical coupling in a co-dimensional one Randall-Sundrum scenario (RS) is used to study resonances of $p-$form fields. The resonances are calculated using the transfer matrix method. The model studied consider the standard RS with delta-like branes, and branes generated by kinks and domain-wall as well. The parameters are changed to control the thickness of the smooth brane. With this a very interesting pattern is found for the resonances. The geometrical coupling does not generate resonances for the reduced $p-$form in all cases considered.

  5. Injection efficiency in a cyclic induction accelerator with constant driving field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simukhin, N.; Chakhlov, V.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection efficeincy as a function of the accelerating voltage for injection currents of varying duration and amplitudes for the cyclic induction electron accelerator has been determined. (AIP)

  6. Experimental Observations and Numerical Prediction of Induction Heating in a Graphite Test Article

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jankowski, Todd A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Debra P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jurney, James D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freer, Jerry E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dougherty, Lisa M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stout, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The induction heating coils used in the plutonium casting furnaces at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are studied here. A cylindrical graphite test article has been built, instrumented with thermocouples, and heated in the induction coil that is normally used to preheat the molds during casting operations. Preliminary results of experiments aimed at understanding the induction heating process in the mold portion of the furnaces are reported. The experiments have been modeled in COMSOL Multiphysics and the numerical and experimental results are compared to one another. These comparisons provide insight into the heating process and provide a benchmark for COMSOL calculations of induction heating in the mold portion of the plutonium casting furnaces.

  7. Health Monitoring of Drive Connected Three-Phase Induction Motors ----- From Wired Towards Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Xin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    short circuits in the stator windings of operating motors,"turns in low voltage stator windings of 3-phase induction21 Stator Winding

  8. Vital Alert's C1000 mine and tunnel radios use magnetic induction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data...

  9. High density growth of T7 expression strains with auto-induction option

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F. William

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for promoting and suppressing auto-induction of transcription of cloned DNA in cultures of T7 expression strains are disclosed.

  10. An Experimental Study of Waveguide Coupled Microwave Heating with Conventional Multicusp Negative Ion Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komppula, J; Koivisto, H; Laulainen, J; Tarvainen, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Negative ion production with conventional multicusp plasma chambers utilizing 2.45 GHz microwave heating is demonstrated. The experimental results were obtained with the multicusp plasma chambers and extraction systems of the RFdriven RADIS ion source and the filament driven arc discharge ion source LIISA. A waveguide microwave coupling system, which is almost similar to the one used with the SILHI ion source, was used. The results demonstrate that at least one third of negative ion beam obtained with inductive RF-coupling (RADIS) or arc discharge (LIISA) can be achieved with 1 kW of 2.45 GHz microwave power in CW mode without any modification of the plasma chamber. The co-extracted electron to H^- ratio and the optimum pressure range were observed to be similar for both heating methods. The behaviour of the plasma implies that the energy transfer from the microwaves to the plasma electrons is mainly an off-resonance process.

  11. Novel coupling scheme to control dynamics of coupled discrete systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snehal M. Shekatkar; G. Ambika

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new coupling scheme to control spatio-temporal patterns and chimeras on 1-d and 2-d lattices and random networks of discrete dynamical systems. The scheme involves coupling with an external lattice or network of damped systems. When the system network and external network are set in a feedback loop, the system network can be controlled to a homogeneous steady state or synchronized periodic state with suppression of the chaotic dynamics of the individual units. The control scheme has the advantage that its design does not require any prior information about the system dynamics or its parameters and works effectively for a range of parameters of the control network. We analyze the stability of the controlled steady state or amplitude death state of lattices using the theory of circulant matrices and Routh-Hurwitz's criterion for discrete systems and this helps to isolate regions of effective control in the relevant parameter planes. The conditions thus obtained are found to agree well with those obtained from direct numerical simulations in the specific context of lattices with logistic map and Henon map as on-site system dynamics. We show how chimera states developed in an experimentally realizable 2-d lattice can be controlled using this scheme. We propose this mechanism can provide a phenomenological model for the control of spatio-temporal patterns in coupled neurons due to non-synaptic coupling with the extra cellular medium. We extend the control scheme to regulate dynamics on random networks and adapt the master stability function method to analyze the stability of the controlled state for various topologies and coupling strengths.

  12. Plasma PhysicsPlasma Physics Atoms Beams and PlasmasAtoms Beams and Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    of plasma research and understanding their dynamics is cutting edge topic in physics Small instabilities

  13. ALD System UCLA Nanoelectronic Facility Fiji Thermal and Plasma Atomic Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    not be heated above that temperature. Center heater maximum temperature is 400o C, while outer heater should temperature of the chemical used. Maximum for the precursor heater jacket is 200o C. #12;ALD System UCLA steps shown in Figure 1. Step. 1: Put in a sample which is hydroxylated from exposure to air, oxygen

  14. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kenneth D. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  15. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  16. Synthetic Running Coupling of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey I. Alekseev

    2006-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a study of the analytic running coupling obtained from the standard perturbation theory results up to four-loop order, the QCD ``synthetic'' running coupling \\alpha_{syn} is built. In so doing the perturbative time-like discontinuity is preserved and nonperturbative contributions not only remove the nonphysical singularities of the perturbation theory in the infrared region but also decrease rapidly in the ultraviolet region. In the framework of the approach, on the one hand, the running coupling is enhanced at zero and, on the other hand, the dynamical gluon mass m_g arises. Fixing the parameter which characterize the infrared enhancement corresponding to the string tension \\sigma and normalization, say, at M_\\tau completely define the synthetic running coupling. In this case the dynamical gluon mass appears to be fixed and the higher loop stabilization property of m_g is observed. For \\sigma = (0.42 GeV)^2 and \\alpha_{syn}(M^2_\\tau) = 0.33 \\pm 0.01 it is obtained that m_g = 530 \\pm 80 MeV.

  17. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  18. Linear inductive voltage adders (IVA) for advanced hydrodynamic radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Boyes, J.D.; Johnson, D.L. [and others

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron beam which drifts through the multiple cavities of conventional induction linacs (LIA) is replaced in an IVA by a cylindrical metal conductor which extends along the entire length of the device and effectuates the addition of the accelerator cavity voltages. In the approach to radiography, the linear inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed electron diode with a millimeter diameter cathode electrode and a planar anode/bremsstrahlung converter. Both anode and cathode electrodes are immersed in a strong (15--50 T) solenoidal magnetic field. The electron beam cross section is approximately of the same size as the cathode needle and generates a similar size, very intense x-ray beam when it strikes the anode converter. An IVA driven diode can produce electron beams of equal size and energy as a LIA but with much higher currents (40--50 kA versus 4--5 kA), simpler hardware and thus lower cost. The authors present here first experimental validations of the technology utilizing HERMES 3 and SABRE IVA accelerators. The electron beam voltage and current were respectively of the order of 10 MV and 40 kA. X-ray doses of up to 1 kR {at} 1 m and spot sizes as small as 1.7 mm (at 200 R doses) were measured.

  19. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, G.R.

    1983-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A dc switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load is provided. The regulator basic circuit is a bridge arrangement of diodes and transistors. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. A dc power supply is connected to the input of the bridge and the output is connected to the load. A servo controller is provided to control the switching rate of the transistors to maintain a desired current to the load. The regulator may be operated in three stages or modes: (1) for current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned on and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned off, and load current flywheels through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays off, allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load.

  20. DC switching regulated power supply for driving an inductive load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, George R. (Norris, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A power supply for driving an inductive load current from a dc power supply hrough a regulator circuit including a bridge arrangement of diodes and switching transistors controlled by a servo controller which regulates switching in response to the load current to maintain a selected load current. First and second opposite legs of the bridge are formed by first and second parallel-connected transistor arrays, respectively, while the third and fourth legs of the bridge are formed by appropriately connected first and second parallel connected diode arrays, respectively. The regulator may be operated in three "stages" or modes: (1) For current runup in the load, both first and second transistor switch arrays are turned "on" and current is supplied to the load through both transistor arrays. (2) When load current reaches the desired level, the first switch is turned "off", and load current "flywheels" through the second switch array and the fourth leg diode array connecting the second switch array in series with the load. Current is maintained by alternating between modes 1 and 2 at a suitable duty cycle and switching rate set by the controller. (3) Rapid current rundown is accomplished by turning both switch arrays "off", allowing load current to be dumped back into the source through the third and fourth diode arrays connecting the source in series opposition with the load to recover energy from the inductive load. The three operating states are controlled automatically by the controller.

  1. Pole-phase modulated toroidal winding for an induction machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John Michael (Saline, MI); Ostovic, Vlado (Weinheim, DE)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A stator (10) for an induction machine for a vehicle has a cylindrical core (12) with inner and outer slots (26, 28) extending longitudinally along the inner and outer peripheries between the end faces (22, 24). Each outer slot is associated with several adjacent inner slots. A plurality of toroidal coils (14) are wound about the core and laid in the inner and outer slots. Each coil occupies a single inner slot and is laid in the associated outer slot thereby minimizing the distance the coil extends from the end faces and minimizing the length of the induction machine. The toroidal coils are configured for an arbitrary pole phase modulation wherein the coils are configured with variable numbers of phases and poles for providing maximum torque for cranking and switchable to a another phase and pole configuration for alternator operation. An adaptor ring (36) circumferentially positioned about the stator improves mechanical strength, and provides a coolant channel manifold (34) for removing heat produced in stator windings during operation.

  2. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Briscoe, Michael A.; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method of making an inductive coupler for downhole components. The method includes providing an annular housing, preferably made of steel, the housing having a recess. A conductor, preferably an insulated wire, is also provided along with a plurality of generally U-shaped magnetically conducting, electrically insulating (MCEI) segments. Preferably, the MCEI segments comprise ferrite. An assembly is formed by placing the plurality of MCEI segments within the recess in the annular housing. The segments are aligned to form a generally circular trough. A first portion of the conductor is placed within the circular trough. This assembly is consolidated with a meltable polymer which fills spaces between the segments, annular housing and the first portion of the conductor. The invention also includes an inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  3. Induction of linear tracks of DNA double-strand breaks by -particle irradiation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Induction of linear tracks of DNA double- strand breaks by -particle irradiation of cells Jan Stap1,4, Przemek M Krawczyk1,4, Carel H Van Oven1, Gerrit W Barendsen2, Jeroen Essers3, Roland Kanaar3 & Jacob describe a procedure for induction of easily recognizable linear arrays of DSBs in nuclei of adherent

  4. On the Three Forms of Non-Deductive Inferences: Induction, Abduction, and Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kikuchi, Makoto

    On the Three Forms of Non-Deductive Inferences: Induction, Abduction, and Design Makoto Kikuchi@kobe-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT Induction and abduction are well known non-deductive inferences. We shall propose that design-Based Reasoning, Case-Based Reasoning, Induc- tion, Abduction, Design, Channel Theory 1 Introduction In the late

  5. SDTC-EKF Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle B. Tabbache1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SDTC-EKF Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle B. Tabbache1,2 , A. Kheloui2 , M torque control of an induction motor based electric vehicle. In this case, stator flux and rotational for an electric vehicle control. Keywords: Sensorless Direct Torque Control (SDTC), Extented Kalman Filter (EKF

  6. Electric characteristics of a surface barrier discharge with a plasma induction electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alemskii, I. N.; Lelevkin, V. M.; Tokarev, A. V.; Yudanov, V. A. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Static and dynamic current-voltage and charge-voltage characteristics of a surface barrier discharge with a plasma induction electrode have been investigated experimentally. The dependences of the discharge current on both the gas pressure in the induction electrode tube and the winding pitch of the corona electrode, as well as of the discharge power efficiency on the applied voltage, have been measured.

  7. Field Weakening of Induction Motors in a Very Wide Region with Regard to Parameter Uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    ). Resistances of stator and rotor winding. Saturated mutual inductance. Stator and rotor stray inductance WR WSd* YSq ORS O F S RS' RR Lm Lo LS1 LR KL KR TR S Tm P 'd (P & VRS Components of stator current vector in the rotor flux oriented frame. Components of stator voltage vector in the rotor flux oriented

  8. Induction Machine Fault Detection Enhancement Using a Stator Current High Resolution Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    into stator winding short circuit, broken rotor bar, broken end-ring, rotor eccentricity, bearing faultsInduction Machine Fault Detection Enhancement Using a Stator Current High Resolution Spectrum El-Fault detection in squirrel cage induction machines based on stator current spectrum has been widely investi gated

  9. Induction welding and heat treatment of steel pipes: evolution of crystallographic texture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Induction welding and heat treatment of steel pipes: evolution of crystallographic texture detrimental to toughness P. Yan*1 , O¨. E. Gu¨ngo¨r2 , P. Thibaux2 and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia1 Steel welding using induction heating to produce pipelines is found to have lower toughness at the weld junction than

  10. Dynamic Phasor Modeling of the Doubly-Fed Induction Machine in Generator Operation Emmanuel Delaleau*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    Dynamic Phasor Modeling of the Doubly-Fed Induction Machine in Generator Operation Emmanuel at variable speed; second, the excitation power electronics converter feeding the rotor windings needs of the doubly- fed induction machine in generator operation using dynamic phasors. This concept is coming from

  11. Induction Motors Bearing Failures Detection and Diagnosis: Park and Concordia Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to metallurgical damage from interrupted electrical current flow. Increased noise and vibration are typicalInduction Motors Bearing Failures Detection and Diagnosis: Park and Concordia Transform Approaches with the problem of bearing failure detection and diagnosis in induction motors. Indeed, bearings deterioration

  12. Mechanical fault detection in induction motor drives through stator current monitoring -Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    vibrations lead to acoustic noise, noise monitoring is also a possible approach. However, these methods0 Mechanical fault detection in induction motor drives through stator current monitoring - Theory machines are a key element in many electrical systems. Amongst all types of electric motors, induction

  13. Fault Detection of Broken Rotor Bars in Induction Motor using a Global Fault Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    in induction motor. Stator voltage and current in an induction motor were measured and employed for computation of the input power of one stator phase. Waveforms of the instantaneous power and line current were subsequently-known that interruptions of a manufacturing process due to a mechanical problem induces a serious financial loss

  14. Induction Motor Stator Faults Diagnosis by a Current Concordia Pattern Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and diagnosis process can be achieved. The proposed fuzzy approach is based on the stator current Concordia information on the health state of induction motors is based on the processing of the stator line current [2Induction Motor Stator Faults Diagnosis by a Current Concordia Pattern Based Fuzzy Decision System

  15. Field-reversed configuration formation scheme utilizing a spheromak and solenoid induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    Field-reversed configuration formation scheme utilizing a spheromak and solenoid induction S. P FRC formation technique is described, where a spheromak transitions to a FRC with inductive current are suppressed; spheromaks with a lighter majority species, such as neon and helium, either display a terminal

  16. An Advanced Induction Machine Model for Predicting Inverter-Machine Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Patrick

    An Advanced Induction Machine Model for Predicting Inverter-Machine Interaction [31 [41 [51 [6] [7 saturntion d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d d Leakage inductance saturation as a function of flux- tion machine model specifically designed for use with inverter models to study machin

  17. EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of different lengths,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forster, T.E.

    EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis Number systems of Mathematics University of Bristol April 21, 2008 Richard.Pettigrew@bris.ac.uk Natural number systems and infinitesimal analysis #12;EA Systems Examples Induction and Recursion Length Measuring the Universe Analysis

  18. Induction Consolidation of Thermoplastic Composites Using Smart Susceptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsen, Marc R

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has focused on the area of energy efficient consolidation and molding of fiber reinforced thermoplastic composite components as an energy efficient alternative to the conventional processing methods such as autoclave processing. The expanding application of composite materials in wind energy, automotive, and aerospace provides an attractive energy efficiency target for process development. The intent is to have this efficient processing along with the recyclable thermoplastic materials ready for large scale application before these high production volume levels are reached. Therefore, the process can be implemented in a timely manner to realize the maximum economic, energy, and environmental efficiencies. Under this project an increased understanding of the use of induction heating with smart susceptors applied to consolidation of thermoplastic has been achieved. This was done by the establishment of processing equipment and tooling and the subsequent demonstration of this fabrication technology by consolidating/molding of entry level components for each of the participating industrial segments, wind energy, aerospace, and automotive. This understanding adds to the nation's capability to affordably manufacture high quality lightweight high performance components from advanced recyclable composite materials in a lean and energy efficient manner. The use of induction heating with smart susceptors is a precisely controlled low energy method for the consolidation and molding of thermoplastic composites. The smart susceptor provides intrinsic thermal control based on the interaction with the magnetic field from the induction coil thereby producing highly repeatable processing. The low energy usage is enabled by the fact that only the smart susceptor surface of the tool is heated, not the entire tool. Therefore much less mass is heated resulting in significantly less required energy to consolidate/mold the desired composite components. This energy efficiency results in potential energy savings of {approx}75% as compared to autoclave processing in aerospace, {approx}63% as compared to compression molding in automotive, and {approx}42% energy savings as compared to convectively heated tools in wind energy. The ability to make parts in a rapid and controlled manner provides significant economic advantages for each of the industrial segments. These attributes were demonstrated during the processing of the demonstration components on this project.

  19. Inflation with High Derivative Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Miao Li; Tower Wang; Yi Wang

    2006-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a class of generalized inflation models in which the inflaton is coupled to the Ricci scalar by a general $f(\\phi, R)$ term. The scalar power spectrum, the spectral index, the running of the spectral index, the tensor mode spectrum and a new consistency relation of the model are calculated. We discuss in detail the issues of how to diagonize the coupled perturbation equations, how to deal with an entropy-like source, and how to determine the initial condition by quantization. By studying some explicit models, we find that rich phenomena such as a blue scalar power spectrum, a large running of the spectral index, and a blue tensor mode spectrum can be obtained.

  20. Lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salzman, J.; Lang, R.; Yariv, A.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fabrication and operation of a lateral coupled cavity semiconductor laser that consists of two phase-locked parallel lasers of different lengths and with separate electrical contacts. Mode selectivity that results from the interaction between the two supermodes is investigated experimentally. Frequency selectivity and tunability are obtained by controlling the current to each laser separately. Highly stable single mode operation is also demonstrated.

  1. Pair extended coupled cluster doubles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Thomas M; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate and efficient description of strongly correlated systems remains an important challenge for computational methods. Doubly occupied configuration interaction (DOCI), in which all electrons are paired and no correlations which break these pairs are permitted, can in many cases provide an accurate account of strong correlations, albeit at combinatorial computational cost. Recently, there has been significant interest in a method we refer to as pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD), a variant of coupled cluster doubles in which the electrons are paired. This is simply because pCCD provides energies nearly identical to those of DOCI, but at mean-field computational cost (disregarding the cost of the two-electron integral transformation). Here, we introduce the more complete pair extended coupled cluster doubles (pECCD) approach which, like pCCD, has mean-field cost and reproduces DOCI energetically. We show that unlike pCCD, pECCD also reproduces the DOCI wave function with high accuracy. Moreoever, pEC...

  2. CD8+ T cell antiviral activity: mechanism of induction and the suppression of emerging feline immunodeficiency virus strains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Anagha

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present studies, the essential role of inducer cells for the induction of soluble anti-viral activity against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) was investigated. Induction of suppression of FIV replication was ...

  3. Fourier-based magnetic induction tomography for mapping resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic induction tomography is used as an experimental tool for mapping the passive electromagnetic properties of conductors, with the potential for imaging biological tissues. Our numerical approach to solving the inverse problem is to obtain a Fourier expansion of the resistivity and the stream functions of the magnetic fields and eddy current density. Thus, we are able to solve the inverse problem of determining the resistivity from the applied and measured magnetic fields for a two-dimensional conducting plane. When we add noise to the measured magnetic field, we find the fidelity of the measured to the true resistivity is quite robust for increasing levels of noise and increasing distances of the applied and measured field coils from the conducting plane, when properly filtered. We conclude that Fourier methods provide a reliable alternative for solving the inverse problem.

  4. Forward and reverse control system for induction motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, J.T.

    1987-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the direction of rotation of a rotor of an induction motor includes an array of five triacs with one of the triacs applying a current of fixed phase to the windings of the rotor and four of the triacs being switchable to apply either hot ac current or return ac current to the stator windings so as to reverse the phase of current in the stator relative to that of the rotor and thereby reverse the direction of rotation of the rotor. Switching current phase in the stator is accomplished by operating the gates of pairs of the triacs so as to connect either hot ac current or return ac current to the input winding of the stator. 1 fig.

  5. Element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An element for use in an inductive coupler for downhole components comprises an annular housing having a generally circular recess. The element further comprises a plurality of generally linear, magnetically conductive segments. Each segment includes a bottom portion, an inner wall portion, and an outer wall portion. The portions together define a generally linear trough from a first end to a second end of each segment. The segments are arranged adjacent to each other within the housing recess to form a generally circular trough. The ends of at least half of the segments are shaped such that the first end of one of the segments is complementary in form to the second end of an adjacent segment. In one embodiment, all of the ends are angled. Preferably, the first ends are angled with the same angle and the second ends are angled with the complementary angle.

  6. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  7. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  8. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  9. Induction barrier RF and applications in Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, W.; Wildman, D.; /Fermilab; Takagi, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two induction barrier rf systems have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab and installed in the Main Injector. They use the nanocrystal magnetic alloy called Finemet for the cavities and high voltage fast MOSFET switches for the modulators. Each system delivers {+-}10 kV square pulses at 90 kHz. They have been used for adiabatic beam stacking (beam compression), machine acceptance measurement and gap cleaning in the injection area for magnet protection, and will be tested for fast beam stacking for doubling the proton flux on the NuMI production target. The systems work reliably and cost much less than a resistive barrier rf system. Comparison with a similar system built at KEK reveals many similarities and also some important differences. This work is partially funded by the US-Japan collaborative agreement.

  10. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Total round-trip power loss, coupling efficiency and themicron. Total round-trip power loss and coupling efficiencythe total fractional power loss per round trip, the hole

  11. ATLAS Sensitivity to Anomalous WWV Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj.; Vranjes, N.; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the strategy in extracting information on triple gauge boson couplings in WW production and summarize the expected limits on WWV couplings from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

  12. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Barbara K. (Charleston, WV)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilized metal compounds retard vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  13. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Dublin, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  14. Coupling apparatus for a metal vapor laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, D.G.; Miller, J.L.

    1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling apparatus for a large bore metal vapor laser is disclosed. The coupling apparatus provides for coupling high voltage pulses (approximately 40 KV) to a metal vapor laser with a high repetition rate (approximately 5 KHz). The coupling apparatus utilizes existing thyratron circuits and provides suitable power input to a large bore metal vapor laser while maintaining satisfactory operating lifetimes for the existing thyratron circuits.

  15. Coupling Renewable Energy Supply with Deferrable Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papavasiliou, Anthony

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale Renewable Energy Integration . . . . . . . . . . .Impacts of Renewable Energy Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Coupling Renewable Energy with Deferrable

  16. Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle Bekhera Tabbache1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sensor Fault-Tolerant Control of an Induction Motor Based Electric Vehicle Bekheïra Tabbache1://www.lbms.fr Keywords Electric Vehicle (EV), Induction motor, Sensor fault, Fault-tolerant control (FTC), Direct torque a reconfigurable direct torque control of an induction motor-based electric vehicle. The proposed strategy concerns

  17. Abstract--The induction motor is well known as the workhorse of industry. The development of variable speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    and followed by the future trend and needs in section VII. State of the Art of Induction Motor Control Joachim. In this paper the historical and recent developments and major milestones in control of induction motors--Induction motor control I. INTRODUCTION EFORE the invention of variable frequency voltage and current source

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Introduction into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves: A Triple Bottom Line Analysis for the new Student Union Building Jordan Ho of a project/report". #12;APSC 262 An Introduction Into Induction and Natural Gas Stoves A triple-bottom line, 2011 #12;Page 2 of 21 ABSTRACT This report compares the attributes of induction and natural gas stoves

  19. OASIS4 coupling interface implementation on ETHZ'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4 coupling interface implementation on ETHZ' land-atmosphere coupled model E. Maisonnave WN 9 2010 at ETH, Zürich(Switzerland), I implement and validate an OASIS4 interface for a regional) and a land scheme (CLM, NCAR) model have been coupled with OASIS4, at low resolution on a MPP scalar machine

  20. load balancing tool for OASIS coupled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LUCIA, load balancing tool for OASIS coupled systems Eric Maisonnave, Arnaud Caubel TR-CMGC-14-63 #12;Table of contents 1. Description of an OASIS3-MCT-based coupled system..............................................................................................14 #12;This document focuses on how to optimize performances of an OASIS3-MCT-based coupled system

  1. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarkisian, Paul H. (Watertown, MA); Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Biermann, Wendell J. (Fayetteville, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  2. Gravitational Correction to Running of Gauge Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean P. Robinson; Frank Wilczek

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the contribution of graviton exchange to the running of gauge couplings at lowest non-trivial order in perturbation theory. Including this contribution in a theory that features coupling constant unification does not upset this unification, but rather shifts the unification scale. When extrapolated formally, the gravitational correction renders all gauge couplings asymptotically free.

  3. Variable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Thomas

    length path coupling theorem, we im- prove the upper bound on the mixing time of the Glauber dynamics . By a "coupling" for this chain, we will mean a joint stochastic process (Xt, Yt) on × such that eachVariable Length Path Coupling Thomas P. Hayes Eric Vigoda July 17, 2006 Abstract We present a new

  4. 5 Examination of Persistence Associated with Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    -1), in which the MLM is forced with heat and momentum fluxes from the fully coupled simulation. The examination94 5 Examination of Persistence Associated with Coupling The results of Chapter 4 suggest on mechanisms that act to increase the persistence of climate variability in the coupled system. The vertical

  5. The cross-coupled amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, George Clyde

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be the equivalent parallel resistance of the load and the plate load resistance. OUTPUT UNBALANCE WHEN USED AS A PHASE INVEHTEH When the cross-coupled amplifier circuit is used as a phase inverter, that is, when the input signal is single-ended, the unbalance.... The ampl1fier may be operated with input signals having any one of the follow- ing forms: ( I) A push-pull signal connected to terminals l, 2 and 3 (2) A single-ended signal connected to termi- nals I and 2 or 3 an& 2 ~ ( 3) Two separate s1ngle...

  6. Interfacial Co nanolayers for enhancing interlayer exchange coupling in antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Interfacial Co nanolayers for enhancing interlayer exchange coupling in antiferromagnetic of the interlayer coupling strength has been achieved by depositing Co nanolayers on both sides of the Ru layer in a conventional CoCrPt/Ru/CoCrPt antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling structure. The interlayer coupling

  7. Synchronizing Coupled Semiconductor Lasers under General Coupling Shuai Li, Yi Guo, and Yehuda Braiman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    coupling between the lasers [1]­[4]. General coupling topology has not been explored. The dynamics of each]. In the case of global coupling, the process of synchronization shows analogy to the process found tools in- spired by recent cooperative control advances. Examining the dynamic model of coupled

  8. Tuning the DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Flash radiography of large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives is a well-known diagnostic technique in use at many laboratories, and the Dual-Axis Radiography for Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos produces flash radiographs of large hydrodynamic experiments. Two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) make the bremsstrahlung radiographic source spots for orthogonal views of each test. The 2-kA, 20-MeV Axis-I LIA creates a single 60-ns radiography pulse. The 1.7-kA, 16.5-MeV Axis-II LIA creates up to four radiography pulses by kicking them out of a longer pulse that has a 1.6-{mu}s flattop. The Axis-II injector, LIA, kicker, and downstream transport (DST) to the bremsstrahlung converter are described. Adjusting the magnetic focusing and steering elements to optimize the electron-beam transport through an LIA is often called 'tuning.' As in all high-current LIAs, the focusing field is designed to be as close to that of the ideal continuous solenoid as physically possible. In ideal continuous solenoidal transport a smoothly varying beam size can easily be found for which radial forces balance, and the beam is said to be 'matched' to the focusing field. A 'mismatched' beam exhibits unwanted oscillations in size, which are a source of free energy that contributes to emittance growth. This is undesirable, because in the absence of beam-target effects, the radiographic spot size is proportional to the emittance. Tuning the Axis-II LIA is done in two steps. First, the solenoidal focusing elements are set to values designed to provide a matched beam with little or no envelope oscillations, and little or no beam-breakup (BBU) instability growth. Then, steering elements are adjusted to minimize the motion of the centroid of a well-centered beam at the LIA exit. This article only describes the design of the tune for the focusing solenoids. The DARHT Axis-II LIA was required to be re-tuned after installing an accelerator cell to replace a failed solenoid in March of 2012. We took advantage of this opportunity to improve the design of the focusing tune with better models of the remaining partially failed solenoids, better estimates of beam initial conditions, and better values for pulsed-power voltages. As with all previous tunes for Axis-II, this one incorporates measures to mitigate beam-breakup (BBU) instability, image displacement instability (IDI), corkscrew (sweep), and emittance growth. Section II covers the general approach to of design of focusing solenoid tunes for the DARHT Axis-2 LIA. Section III explains the specific requirements and simulations needed to design the tune for the injector, which includes the thermionic electron source, diode, and six induction cells. Section IV explains the requirements and simulations for tuning the main accelerator, which consists of 68 induction cells. Finally, Section V explores sensitivity of the tune to deviations of parameters from nominal, random variations, and uncertainties in values. Four appendices list solenoid settings for this new tune, discuss comparisons of different simulation codes, show halo formation in mismatched beams, and present a brief discussion of the beam envelope equation, which is the heart of the method used to design LIA solenoid tunes.

  9. Optomechanical-like coupling between superconducting resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Johansson; G. Johansson; Franco Nori

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and analyze a circuit that implements a nonlinear coupling between two superconducting microwave resonators. The resonators are coupled through a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) that terminates one of the resonators. This produces a nonlinear interaction on the standard optomechanical form, where the quadrature of one resonator couples to the photon number of the other resonator. The circuit therefore allows for all-electrical realizations of analogs to optomechanical systems, with coupling that can be both strong and tunable. We estimate the coupling strengths that should be attainable with the proposed device, and we find that the device is a promising candidate for realizing the single-photon strong-coupling regime. As a potential application, we discuss implementations of networks of nonlinearly-coupled microwave resonators, which could be used in microwave-photon based quantum simulation.

  10. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  11. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  12. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime. 10 figs.

  13. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  14. SMT-based Induction Methods for Timed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kindermann, Roland; Niemelä, Ilkka

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling time related aspects is important in many applications of verification methods. For precise results, it is necessary to interpret time as a dense domain, e.g. using timed automata as a formalism, even though the system's resulting infinite state space is challenging for verification methods. Furthermore, fully symbolic treatment of both timing related and non-timing related elements of the state space seems to offer an attractive approach to model checking timed systems with a large amount of non-determinism. This paper presents an SMT-based timed system extension to the IC3 algorithm, a SAT-based novel, highly efficient, complete verification method for untimed systems. Handling of the infinite state spaces of timed system in the extended IC3 algorithm is based on suitably adapting the well-known region abstraction for timed systems. Additionally, $k$-induction, another symbolic verification method for discrete time systems, is extended in a similar fashion to support timed systems. Both new methods...

  15. Mutational analysis of tissue-tissue interaction required for otic placode induction in zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendonsa, Emidio Savio

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the vertebrate inner ear begins with aphics. the induction of the otic placate. Several embryonic tissues have been implicated as potential sources of otic inducing signals, including cephalic mesoderm, notochord, and hindbrain...

  16. Experimental time-domain controlled source electromagnetic induction for highly conductive targets detection and discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benavides Iglesias, Alfonso

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of geological materials at the scale of meters and the response of buried targets of different shapes and sizes using controlled-source electromagnetic induction (CSEM) is investigated. This dissertation focuses on three topics; i) frac...

  17. Novice teachers' perceptions of their first year induction program in urban schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charleston-Cormier, Phyllis A

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    stress; assistance in instructional strategies; the allocation of resources; and overall support of the induction program in relation to mentors and reflection. Perceptions were consistent among the demographics; namely, the subject taught, grade level...

  18. Isolation and characterization of five ozone-inductible cDNA clones from Atriplax canescens (saltbush) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    No, Eun-Gyu

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prolonged exposure of plants to ozone inhibits growth and development and produces visible signs of damage. Within a few hours of exposure, certain biochemical alterations have been observed with the induction of several stress-related proteins...

  19. Analysis of electromechanical interactions in a flywheel system with a doubly fed induction machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran, Li

    This paper analyzes the electromechanical inter-action in a flywheel system with a doubly fed induction machine, used for wind farm power smoothing or grid frequency response control. The grid-connected electrical machine ...

  20. The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

  1. Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction, and nucleotide dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Proton slip in the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus: induction, proton conduction. Uncoupled proton leakage (slip) has only been observed in chloroplast enzyme at unphysiologically low nucleotide concentration. We investigated the properties of proton slip in chromatophores (sub

  2. Design of a novel test bench for induction heating load characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez del Castillo, Lisa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic materials used in induction heating applications have nonlinear magnetic properties with respect to field strength and frequency, which can be effectively characterized using experimental techniques. To this end, ...

  3. Numerical analysis and thermographic investigation of induction heating Matej Kranjc, Anze Zupanic *, Damijan Miklavcic, Tomaz Jarm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    Thermography a b s t r a c t Induction heating process was investigated numerically and experimentally, a non-contact measurement method based on thermography can be used. Thermography is a form of infrared

  4. Main flux saturation modelling in double-cage and deep-bar induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, E. [Liverpool John Moores Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Electrical Engineering] [Liverpool John Moores Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Electrical Engineering

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The available models of saturated double-cage and deep-bar induction machines are the current state-space model and the flux state-space model, where state-space variables are selected either as stator current and currents of both rotor cages, or stator flux linkage and flux linkages of both rotor cages. This paper presents a number of models of saturated double-cage (deep-bar) induction machines where alternative sets of state-space variables are selected. The method of main flux saturation modelling relies on recently introduced concept of generalized flux space vector, which has originally been developed for modelling of saturated single-cage induction machines. The procedure and the novel models are verified by experimental study and simulation of self-excitation process in a double-cage induction generator.

  5. Stator-flux-based vector control of induction machines in magnetic saturation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, H.; Sanders, S.R.; Sullivan, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In many variable-torque applications of induction machines it is desirable to operate the machine in magnetic saturation, thus allowing the machine to produce higher torques. Stator-flux-based control schemes have been developed as a possible alternative method of control of induction machines. Stator-flux-based control schemes need not depend on the magnetic characteristics of the machine, and hence are potentially more robust and easier to implement in magnetic saturation than rotor-flux-based control. The authors analyze the induction machine in saturation using a nonlinear {pi}-model of the machine`s magnetics, and develop a control scheme in the stator flux reference frame that is independent of magnetics. Experiments carried out on a 3 hp, 1,800 rpm wound rotor induction machine show smooth operation of the control scheme at torque levels up to at least 4 times rated torque.

  6. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  7. A Coupled Quantum Otto Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the 1-d isotropic Heisenberg model of two spin-1/2 systems as a quantum heat engine. The engine undergoes a four-step Otto cycle where the two adiabatic branches involve changing the external magnetic field at a fixed value of the coupling constant. We find conditions for the engine efficiency to be higher than the uncoupled model; in particular, we find an upper bound which is tighter than the Carnot bound. A new domain of parameter values is pointed out which was not feasible in the interaction-free model. Locally, each spin seems to effect the flow of heat in a direction opposite to the global temperature gradient. This seeming contradiction to the second law can be resolved in terms of local effective temperature of the spins.

  8. Forward Modeling of the Induction Log Response of a Fractured Geologic Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, Steven Hunter

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Layered Earth Model The environment used for the induction log simulations is a layered Earth model. The model consists of six layers that are assigned different thicknesses and conductivities based on the desired induction log... Tx-Rx pair has a fixed separation and is moved along a vertical profile through the subsurface taking measurements at predetermined logging points. 20 The second change to the original Seatem code involves the surrounding environment. The code...

  9. Double active shielded magnetic field gradient design with minimum inductance method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xu

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Physics DOUBLE ACTIVE SHIELDED MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT DESIGN WITH MINIMUM INDUCTANCE METHOD A Thesis by XU WANG Approved as to style and content by: F. R. Huson (Chair of Committee) Steve Wry (Member) Edward...

  10. A study of state variable participation in limit-cycle of induction motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnendu Chakrabarty; Urmila Kar

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents bifurcation behavior of a single phase induction motor. This paper also attempts to discuss the bifurcation behavior of the system based on the evolution of different state variables. The bifurcation diagrams drawn looking at different state variables are different in terms of periodicity and route to chaos. The knowledge of the dynamics of the system obtained from bifurcation diagrams give useful guidelines to control the operation of the induction motor depending on the need of an application for better performance.

  11. Forward Modeling of the Induction Log Response of a Fractured Geologic Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, Steven Hunter

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Layered Earth Model The environment used for the induction log simulations is a layered Earth model. The model consists of six layers that are assigned different thicknesses and conductivities based on the desired induction log... Tx-Rx pair has a fixed separation and is moved along a vertical profile through the subsurface taking measurements at predetermined logging points. 20 The second change to the original Seatem code involves the surrounding environment. The code...

  12. The induction of breeding activity in lactating ewes during anestrus by the use of hormones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shams Uddin

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE INDUCTION OF BREEDING ACTIVITY IN LACTATING EWES DURING ANESTRUScBY THE USE OF HORMONES A Thesis By Shams Uddin Ahmed Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1963 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction 11 THE INDUCTION OF BREEDING ACTIVITY IN LACTATING EWES DURING ANESTRUS BY THE USE OF HORMONES A Thesis By Shams Uddin Ahmed Approved as to style...

  13. Joint used for coupling long heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menottie, James Louis

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for coupling ends of elongated heaters and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include two elongated heaters with an end portion of one heater abutted or near to an end portion of the other heater and a core coupling material. The core coupling material may extend between the two elongated heaters. The elongated heaters may include cores and at least one conductor substantially concentrically surrounds the cores. The cores may have a lower melting point than the conductors. At least one end portion of the conductor may have a beveled edge. The gap formed by the beveled edge may be filled with a coupling material for coupling the one or more conductors. One end portion of at least one core may have a recessed opening and the core coupling material may be partially inside the recessed opening.

  14. Inverse Vernier Effects in Coupled Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Li

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we study the Vernier effect in coupled laser systems consisting of two cavities. We show that depending on the nature of their coupling, not only can the "supermodes" formed at the overlapping resonances of the coupled cavities have the lowest thresholds and lase first as previously suggested, leading to a manifestation of the typical Vernier effect now in an active system; these supermodes can also have increased thresholds and are hence suppressed, which can be viewed as an inverse Vernier effect. We attribute this effect to detuning-dependent Q-spoiling, and it can lead to an increased free spectrum range and possibly single-mode lasing, which may explain the experimental findings of several previous work. We illustrate this effect using two coupled micro-ring cavities and a micro-ring cavity coupled to a slab cavity, and we discuss its relation to the existence of exceptional points in coupled lasers.

  15. Energy localization in two chaotically coupled systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Gronqvist; Thomas Guhr

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We set up and analyze a random matrix model to study energy localization and its time behavior in two chaotically coupled systems. This investigation is prompted by a recent experimental and theoretical study of Weaver and Lobkis on coupled elastomechanical systems. Our random matrix model properly describes the main features of the findings by Weaver and Lobkis. Due to its general character, our model is also applicable to similar systems in other areas of physics -- for example, to chaotically coupled quantum dots.

  16. Odderon with a running coupling constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Braun

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The running coupling is introduced into the equation for the odderon via the bootstrap relation. It is shown that the previously found odderon state with a maximal intercept, which is constructed from antisymmetric pomeron wave function, continues to exist in the running coupling case. Its intercept is found to remain equal to unity independent of the behaviour assumed for the running coupling at low momenta.

  17. CALDER - Neutrinoless double-beta decay identification in TeO$_2$ bolometers with kinetic inductance detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Battistelli; F. Bellini; C. Bucci; M. Calvo; L. Cardani; N. Casali; M. G. Castellano; I. Colantoni; A Coppolecchia; C. Cosmelli; A. Cruciani; P. de Bernardis; S. Di Domizio; A. D'Addabbo; M. Martinez; S. Masi; L. Pagnanini; C. Tomei; M. Vignati

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Next-generation experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay must be sensitive to a Majorana neutrino mass as low as 10 meV. CUORE, an array of 988 TeO$_2$ bolometers being commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, features an expected sensitivity of 50-130 meV at 90% C.L, that can be improved by removing the background from $\\alpha$ radioactivity. This is possible if, in coincidence with the heat release in a bolometer, the Cherenkov light emitted by the $\\beta$ signal is detected. The amount of light detected is so far limited to only 100 eV, requiring low-noise cryogenic light detectors. The CALDER project (Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution) aims at developing a small prototype experiment consisting of TeO$_2$ bolometers coupled to new light detectors based on kinetic inductance detectors. The R&D is focused on the light detectors that could be implemented in a next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

  18. CALDER - Neutrinoless double-beta decay identification in TeO$_2$ bolometers with kinetic inductance detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Battistelli; F. Bellini; M. Calvo; L. Cardani; N. Casali; M. G. Castellano; I. Colantoni; A Coppolecchia; C. Cosmelli; A. Cruciani; P. de Bernardis; S. Di Domizio; A. D'Addabbo; M. Martinez; S. Masi; L. Pagnanini; C. Tomei; M. Vignati

    2015-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Next-generation experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay must be sensitive to a Majorana neutrino mass as low as 10 meV. CUORE, an array of 988 TeO$_2$ bolometers being commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, features an expected sensitivity of 50-130 meV at 90% C.L, that can be improved by removing the background from $\\alpha$ radioactivity. This is possible if, in coincidence with the heat release in a bolometer, the Cherenkov light emitted by the $\\beta$ signal is detected. The amount of light detected is so far limited to only 100 eV, requiring low-noise cryogenic light detectors. The CALDER project (Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution) aims at developing a small prototype experiment consisting of TeO$_2$ bolometers coupled to new light detectors based on kinetic inductance detectors. The R&D is focused on the light detectors that could be implemented in a next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

  19. Vapor phase modifiers for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Volatilized metal compounds are described which are capable of retarding vapor phase alkane conversion reactions in oxidative coupling processes that convert lower alkanes to higher hydrocarbons.

  20. Double perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, K.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkali metal doped double perovskites containing manganese and at least one of cobalt, iron and nickel are useful in the oxidative coupling of alkane to higher hydrocarbons.

  1. The Los Alamos coupled climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.W.; Malone, R.C.; Lai, C.A.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain a full understanding of the Earth`s climate system, it is necessary to understand physical processes in the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice. In addition, interactions between components are very important and models which couple all of the components into a single coupled climate model are required. A climate model which couples ocean, sea ice, atmosphere and land components is described. The component models are run as autonomous processes coupled to a flux coupler through a flexible communications library. Performance considerations of the model are examined, particularly for running the model on distributed-shared-memory machine architectures.

  2. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zyserman

    layer, having a thickness of about 10 nm. Finite element approximation of coupled seismic and electromagnetic waves in gas hydrate-bearing sediments – p.

  3. Coupled atomistic-continuum methods for fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I will discuss the coupling scheme, its application to polymer fluids, and the major difficulties in implementations. In the second part of the talk, I will discuss the ...

  4. Electronic Relaxation Dynamics in Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherer, Norbert F.

    of hot electrons for photoelectrochemical processes, including solar energy conversion or organic wasteElectronic Relaxation Dynamics in Coupled Metal Nanoparticles Mark J. Feldstein, Christine D

  5. Scalar-tensor theories with pseudoscalar couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Flambaum; Simon Lambert; Maxim Pospelov

    2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the scalar-tensor theories of gravity extended by the pseudoscalar couplings to matter and gauge fields and derive constraints on the CP-odd combinations of scalar and pseudoscalar couplings from laboratory spin precession experiments and from the evolution of photon polarization over cosmological distances. We show the complimentary character of local and cosmological constraints, and derive novel bounds on the pseudoscalar couplings to photons from the laboratory experiments. It is also shown that the more accurate treatment of the spin content of nuclei used in the spin precession experiments allows to tighten bounds on Lorentz-violating backgrounds coupled to the proton spin.

  6. Vacuum coupling of rotating superconducting rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoykhet, Boris A.; Zhang, Burt Xudong; Driscoll, David Infante

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating coupling allows a vacuum chamber in the rotor of a superconducting electric motor to be continually pumped out. The coupling consists of at least two concentric portions, one of which is allowed to rotate and the other of which is stationary. The coupling is located on the non-drive end of the rotor and is connected to a coolant supply and a vacuum pump. The coupling is smaller in diameter than the shaft of the rotor so that the shaft can be increased in diameter without having to increase the size of the vacuum seal.

  7. Running coupling corrections to inclusive gluon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Horowitz; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate running coupling corrections for the lowest-order gluon production cross section in high energy hadronic and nuclear scattering using the BLM scale-setting prescription. At leading order there are three powers of fixed coupling; in our final answer, these three couplings are replaced by seven factors of running coupling: five in the numerator and two in the denominator, forming a `septumvirate' of running couplings, analogous to the `triumvirate' of running couplings found earlier for the small-x BFKL/BK/JIMWLK evolution equations. It is interesting to note that the two running couplings in the denominator of the `septumvirate' run with complex-valued momentum scales, which are complex conjugates of each other, such that the production cross section is indeed real. We use our lowest-order result to conjecture how running coupling corrections may enter the full fixed-coupling k_T-factorization formula for gluon production which includes non-linear small-x evolution.

  8. Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Dynamic coupling drives conformational evolution of branched polymers in solutions March 06, 2015 Inter-particle collision time (filled circles) and...

  9. Reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splittings in microdisk resonators coupled to waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Sumei; Agarwal, G. S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the optomechanical design introduced by M. Li et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 223901 (2009)], which is very effective for investigation of the effects of reactive coupling. We show the normal mode splitting that is due solely to reactive coupling rather than due to dispersive coupling. We suggest feeding the waveguide with a pump field along with a probe field and scanning the output probe for evidence of reactive-coupling-induced normal mode splitting.

  10. Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hongkai

    Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation Kai Huang, Knut Solna and Hongkai Zhao #3; April simulation of wave propagation over long distances. The coupled parabolic equations are derived from a two algorithms are important in order to understand wave propagation in complex media. Resolving the wavelength

  11. Regulatory mechanisms and networks couple the different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilpel, Yitzhak

    , it is becoming increasingly clear that the different phases of the process are coupled. In our definition, two­3]. Coupling between transcription and downstream RNA-processing events (Figure 1, arrow 1) is predominantly RNA-processing molecules [4]. In this respect the polymerase serves as dynamic docking plat- form

  12. Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone) in a realistic configuration aiming at simulating the genesis and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica and Oceanic Coupled Models (AOCMs) which account for important air-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations

  13. Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica. Sensitiv- ity tests to the coupling method are carried out-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations of the Corresponding author. Phone: +33 (0)4 76 51 48 60 Fax: +33 (0)4 76

  14. An exact formulation of coupled-mode theory for coupled-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors derive coupled-mode rate equations for coupled-cavity lasers using a new approach. The method, based on the Mittag-Leffler theorem, is exact. The authors compare the coupling coefficients to those derived by several different approximations.

  15. Bayesian Model comparison of Higgs couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Bergstrom; Stella Riad

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) to the Higgs couplings, in the light of the LHC data. The work is performed within an interim framework where the magnitude of the Higgs production and decay rates are rescaled though Higgs coupling scale factors. We perform Bayesian parameter inference on these scale factors, concluding that there is good compatibility with the SM. Furthermore, we carry out Bayesian model comparison on all models where any combination of scale factors can differ from their SM values and find that typically models with fewer free couplings are strongly favoured. We consider the evidence that each coupling individually equals the SM value, making the minimal assumptions on the other couplings. Finally, we make a comparison of the SM against a single "not-SM" model, and find that there is moderate to strong evidence for the SM.

  16. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C. (Livermore, CA); Jensen, Steven A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  17. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasmaatomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  18. Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

  19. Quantitative analysis of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel by electrochemical etching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivas, A.L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Valle de Sartenejas-Edificio MEM Piso 2, Departamento Ciencia de los Materiales, Caracas-1080 (Venezuela)], E-mail: alrivas@usb.ve; Matlock, D.K. [Advanced Steel Processing and Product Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)], E-mail: dmatlock@mines.edu; Speer, J.G. [Advanced Steel Processing and Product Research Center, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)], E-mail: jspeer@mines.edu

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of Nb in solution in a microalloyed carburizing steel (Nb-modified SAE 8620) was evaluated in different heat treated conditions. The test procedure involved electrochemical extraction, filtration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopic (ICP-AES) analysis. Characterization by X-ray diffraction of the residues collected in the filters was also performed. Results showed that Nb in solution tends to hydrolyze during electrolysis in a 10 vol.% HCl electrolyte, giving misleading measurements of the amount of Nb that dissolved during high temperature heat treatment. Hydrolysis of Nb is prevented by the addition of tartaric acid to the electrolyte. In the full dissolution condition, coarse (Ti,Nb)CN was the only precipitate present. Finer (Nb,Ti)C precipitates were observed after heat treating at 1050 deg. C.

  20. ICP analysis of water slurries of ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, J.T.; Renfrow, M.B.; Riley, J.M. Jr.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct injection of solids-water slurries into the torch of an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer offers a rapid and easy method for the analysis of major and minor elements in various solids. In this project aqueous slurries of solids were prepared by milling with a stirred-ball slurry attritor mill and analyzed. Slurries of standard reference materials, prepared in the same manner, were used to calibrate the spectrometer. The best results were obtained with solids having a small particle size (2-5 {mu}m) and a close distribution of particle sizes. The average percent relative error for slurry-ICP analysis of most major and minor elements was generally less than 5% for the materials studied.

  1. Vitrification of Simulated LILW Using Induction Cold Crucible Melter Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.W.; Park, J.K.; Shin, S.W.; Hwang, T.W.; Ha, J.H.; Song, M.J. [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, 150 Dukjin, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitrification destroys hazardous organics, and immobilizes heavy metals and radioactive elements to form a chemically durable and highly leach-resistant vitrified form. The vitrification process provides exceptional volume reduction and is attractive for minimizing disposal volume. A pilot plant test using an induction Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) fitted with an off-gas treatment system (OGTS) has been conducted to vitrify a simulated low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) generated from Korean nuclear power plants. The CCM process is based on the use of a water-cooled metallic structure assembled in sectors which is transparent to the electromagnetic field supplied by a high-frequency generator. A solidified glass layer because of the water-cooled structure of the CCM protects the structure against corrosion. By creating the solidified glass auto-crucible on the inner surface of the wall, corrosion damage to the steel in contact with the molten glass is prevented. In order to start-up the CCM, the glass frits were loaded in the CCM. The glass melting was initiated by heating of a short-circuited titanium ring in an electromagnetic field followed by ring burnout and incorporation of the titania in the glass frits. The melter has one drain that exits through the bottom. It is a direct bottom drain from the floor of the melt tank. It is sealed by the solidified glass layer and can be activated by removing the water cooling system. This drain is used if it is desired to drain the melter. The melter employs oxygen bubbling to promote mixing and to increase the melting rate. The bubblers are desired to produce a curtain of bubbles rising from the melter floor. In addition to mixing, the bubbling of oxygen tends to keep the melt well oxidized. The top of the melter is equipped with a number of ports. These provide access for feed, viewing, off-gas discharge, etc. The normal method of feeding is dry feeding through a feed pipe mounted through the top of the melter. The HFG power and operating frequency were applied in the ranges of 100{approx}200 kW and 250{approx}270 kHz, respectively. The simulated mixed waste vitrification test using the pilot scale plant consisting of the CCM and the OGTS at NETEC has demonstrated its good workability, reliability, and high productivity. The mixed waste was easily vitrified at a maximum rate of 20 kg per hour. The product quality of the glass such as chemical durability, phase stability, etc. was satisfactory. All regulated gases in the stack were well below the environmental regulation limits. (authors)

  2. Enhanced electromechanical coupling of a nanomechanical resonator to coupled superconducting cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng-Bo Li; Shao-Yan Gao; Hong-Rong Li; Fu-Li Li

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling between a nanomechanical resonator and two parametrically coupled superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities that are driven by a two-mode squeezed microwave source. We show that, with the selective coupling of the resonator to the cavity Bogoliubov modes, the radiation-pressure type coupling can be greatly enhanced by several orders of magnitude, enabling the single photon strong coupling to be reached. This allows the investigation of a number of interesting phenomena such as photon blockade effects and the generation of nonclassical quantum states with electromechanical systems.

  3. High density growth of T7 expression strains with auto-induction option

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Studier, F. William (Stony Brook, NY)

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for promoting auto-induction of transcription of cloned DNA in cultures of bacterial cells grown batchwise, the transcription being under the control of a promoter whose activity can be induced by an exogenous inducer whose ability to induce said promoter is dependent on the metabolic state of said bacterial cells. Initially, a culture media is provided which includes: i) an inducer that causes induction of transcription from said promoter in said bacterial cells; and ii) a metabolite that prevents induction by said inducer, the concentration of said metabolite being adjusted so as to substantially preclude induction by said inducer in the early stages of growth of the bacterial culture, but such that said metabolite is depleted to a level that allows induction by said inducer at a later stage of growth. The culture medium is inoculated with a bacterial inoculum, the inoculum comprising bacterial cells containing cloned DNA, the transcription of which is induced by said inducer. The culture is then incubated under conditions appropriate for growth of the bacterial cells.

  4. Markovian evolution of strongly coupled harmonic oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaitanya Joshi; Patrik Ohberg; James D. Cresser; Erika Andersson

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate how to model Markovian evolution of coupled harmonic oscillators, each of them interacting with a local environment. When the coupling between the oscillators is weak, dissipation may be modeled using local Lindblad terms for each of the oscillators in the master equation, as is commonly done. When the coupling between oscillators is strong, this model may become invalid. We derive a master equation for two coupled harmonic oscillators which are subject to individual heat baths modeled by a collection of harmonic oscillators, and show that this master equation in general contains non-local Lindblad terms. We compare the resulting time evolution with that obtained for dissipation through local Lindblad terms for each individual oscillator, and show that the evolution is different in the two cases. In particular, the two descriptions give different predictions for the steady state and for the entanglement between strongly coupled oscillators. This shows that when describing strongly coupled harmonic oscillators, one must take great care in how dissipation is modeled, and that a description using local Lindblad terms may fail. This may be particularly relevant when attempting to generate entangled states of strongly coupled quantum systems.

  5. Quantum logic with weakly coupled qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Geller; Emily J. Pritchett; Andrei Galiautdinov; John M. Martinis

    2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are well-known protocols for performing CNOT quantum logic with qubits coupled by particular high-symmetry (Ising or Heisenberg) interactions. However, many architectures being considered for quantum computation involve qubits or qubits and resonators coupled by more complicated and less symmetric interactions. Here we consider a widely applicable model of weakly but otherwise arbitrarily coupled two-level systems, and use quantum gate design techniques to derive a simple and intuitive CNOT construction. Useful variations and extensions of the solution are given for common special cases.

  6. Quantum logic with weakly coupled qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geller, Michael R; Galiautdinov, Andrei; Martinis, John M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are well-known protocols for performing CNOT quantum logic with qubits coupled by particular high-symmetry (Ising or Heisenberg) interactions. However, many architectures being considered for quantum computation involve qubits or qubits and resonators coupled by more complicated and less symmetric interactions. Here we consider a widely applicable model of weakly but otherwise arbitrarily coupled two-level systems, and use quantum gate design techniques to derive a simple and intuitive CNOT construction. Useful variations and extensions of the solution are given for common special cases.

  7. A Maxwell field minimally coupled to torsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikodem J. Poplawski

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the Lagrangian density for a free Maxwell field, in which the electromagnetic field tensor minimally couples to the affine connection, in the Einstein-Cartan-Sciama-Kibble theory of gravity. We derive the formulae for the torsion and electromagnetic field tensors in terms of the electromagnetic potential. The divergence of the magnetic field does not vanish: the photon-torsion coupling acts like an effective magnetic monopole density. Such a coupling, which breaks U(1) gauge invariance, is significant only at extremely high energies existing in the very early Universe or inside black holes. It may, however, provide a mechanism for Dirac's quantization of electric charge.

  8. Information processing by a controlled coupling process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. W. Wei; Shan Zhao

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter proposes a controlled coupling process for information processing. The net effect of conventional coupling is isolated from the dynamical system and is analyzed in depth. The stability of the process is studied. We show that the proposed process can locally minimize the smoothness and the fidelity of dynamical data. A digital filter expression of the controlled coupling process is derived and the connection is made to the Hanning filter. The utility and robustness of proposed approach is demonstrated by both the restoration of the contaminated solution of the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation and the estimation of the trend of a time series.

  9. Current Reversals and Synchronization in Coupled Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. E. Vincent; A. Kenfack; D. V. Senthilkumar; D. Mayer; J. Kürths

    2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Current reversal is an intriguing phenomenon that has been central to recent experimental and theoretical investigations of transport based on ratchet mechanism. By considering a system of two interacting ratchets, we demonstrate how the coupling can be used to control the reversals. In particular, we find that current reversal that exists in a single driven ratchet system can ultimately be eliminated with the presence of a second ratchet. For specific coupling strengths a current-reversal free regime has been detected. Furthermore, in the fully synchronized state characterized by the coupling threshold $k_{th}$, a specific driving amplitude $a_{opt}$ is found for which the transport is optimum.

  10. Thermal emission in the ultrastrong coupling regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ridolfo; M. Leib; S. Savasta; M. J. Hartmann

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study thermal emission of a cavity quantum electrodynamic system in the ultrastrong-coupling regime where the atom-cavity coupling rate becomes comparable the cavity resonance frequency. In this regime, the standard descriptions of photodetection and dissipation fail. Following an approach that was recently put forward by Ridolfo et al.[arXiv:1206.0944], we are able to calculate the emission of systems with arbitrary strength of light matter interaction, by expressing the electric field operator in the cavity-emitter dressed basis. Here we present thermal photoluminescence spectra, calculated for given temperatures and for different couplings in particular for available circuit QED parameters.

  11. Shear Viscosity from Effective Couplings of Gravitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Gen Cai; Zhang-Yu Nie; Ya-Wen Sun

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the shear viscosity of field theories with gravity duals using Kubo-formula by calculating the Green function of dual transverse gravitons and confirm that the value of the shear viscosity is fully determined by the effective coupling of transverse gravitons on the horizon. We calculate the effective coupling of transverse gravitons for Einstein and Gauss-Bonnet gravities coupled with matter fields, respectively. Then we apply the resulting formula to the case of AdS Gauss-Bonnet gravity with $F^4$ term corrections of Maxwell field and discuss the effect of $F^4$ terms on the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density.

  12. The gradient flow running coupling scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Fodor; Kieran Holland; Julius Kuti; Daniel Nogradi; Chik Him Wong

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yang-Mills gradient flow in finite volume is used to define a running coupling scheme. As our main result the discrete beta-function, or step scaling function, is calculated for scale change s=3/2 at several lattice spacings for SU(3) gauge theory coupled to N_f = 4 fundamental massless fermions. The continuum extrapolation is performed and agreement is found with the continuum perturbative results for small renormalized coupling. The case of SU(2) gauge group is briefly commented on.

  13. Asynchronous response of coupled pacemaker neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramana Dodla; Charles J. Wilson

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a network model of two conductance-based pacemaker neurons of differing natural frequency, coupled with either mutual excitation or inhibition, and receiving shared random inhibitory synaptic input. The networks may phase-lock spike-to-spike for strong mutual coupling. But the shared input can desynchronize the locked spike-pairs by selectively eliminating the lagging spike or modulating its timing with respect to the leading spike depending on their separation time window. Such loss of synchrony is also found in a large network of sparsely coupled heterogeneous spiking neurons receiving shared input.

  14. Investigation of self-excited induction generators for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Sallan, J.; Sanz, M.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of squirrel-cage induction machines in wind generation is widely accepted as a generator of choice. The squirrel-cage induction machine is simple, reliable, cheap, lightweight, and requires very little maintenance. Generally, the induction generator is connected to the utility at constant frequency. With a constant frequency operation, the induction generator operates at practically constant speed (small range of slip). The wind turbine operates in optimum efficiency only within a small range of wind speed variation. The variable-speed operation allows an increase in energy captured and reduces both the torque peaks in the drive train and the power fluctuations sent to the utility. In variable-speed operation, an induction generator needs an interface to convert the variable frequency output of the generator to the fixed frequency at the utility. This interface can be simplified by using a self-excited generator because a simple diode bridge is required to perform the ac/dc conversion. The subsequent dc/ac conversion can be performed using different techniques. The use of a thyristor bridge is readily available for large power conversion and has a lower cost and higher reliability. The firing angle of the inverter bridge can be controlled to track the optimum power curve of the wind turbine. With only diodes and thyristors used in power conversion, the system can be scaled up to a very high voltage and high power applications. This paper analyzes the operation of such a system applied to a 1/3-hp self-excited induction generator. It includes the simulations and tests performed for the different excitation configurations.

  15. Heat-treatment with induction heating of pipes within the pipe welding mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zgura, A.A.; Krichevskii, E.M.; Rudenko, V.A.; Lysyak, A.V.; Kumanev, V.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameters of induction heat-treatment were determined for pipes from steels 10Kh18N10T and 12Kh18N10T. Mechanical properties of the base metal and the weld were determined by metallography. Induction heat treatment of corrosion-resistant steel pipes in the line of an argon-arc welding mill was found to produce a fine-grain structure of the base metal and weld, ensured that the mechanical properties satisfied all specifications, reduced time and consumption of the etching solution during chemical processing, required no additional personnel, reduced oxidation of the metal and saved energy.

  16. Acoustic sensor for real-time control for the inductive heating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, John Bruce; Lu, Wei-Yang; Zutavern, Fred J.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a system and method for providing closed-loop control of the heating of a workpiece by an induction heating machine, including generating an acoustic wave in the workpiece with a pulsed laser; optically measuring displacements of the surface of the workpiece in response to the acoustic wave; calculating a sub-surface material property by analyzing the measured surface displacements; creating an error signal by comparing an attribute of the calculated sub-surface material properties with a desired attribute; and reducing the error signal below an acceptable limit by adjusting, in real-time, as often as necessary, the operation of the inductive heating machine.

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring the rotating frequency of de-energized induction motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikesell, Harvey E. (McMurray, PA); Lucy, Eric (Murrysville, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotational speed of a coasting induction motor is measured by sensing e residual electrical voltages at the power terminals of the motor, thus eliminating the need for conventional tachometer equipment, additional mechanical components or modifications to the induction motor itself. The power terminal voltage signal is detected and transformed into a DC voltage proportional to the frequency of the signal. This DC voltage can be input to the control system of a variable frequency motor controller to regulate the output characteristics thereof relative to the speed of the coasting motor.

  18. Method and apparatus for monitoring the rotating frequency of de-energized induction motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikesell, H.E.; Lucy, E.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotational speed of a coasting induction motor is measured by sensing e residual electrical voltages at the power terminals of the motor, thus eliminating the need for conventional tachometer equipment, additional mechanical components or modifications to the induction motor itself. The power terminal voltage signal is detected and transformed into a DC voltage proportional to the frequency of the signal. This DC voltage can be input to the control system of a variable frequency motor controller to regulate the output characteristics thereof relative to the speed of the coasting motor. 6 figs.

  19. Unconventional plasmon-phonon coupling in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jablan, Marinko

    We predict the existence of coupled plasmon-phonon excitations in graphene by using the self-consistent linear response formalism. The unique electron-phonon interaction in graphene leads to unconventional mixing of plasmon ...

  20. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  1. Nuclear physics from strong coupling QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Fromm; Philippe de Forcrand

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong coupling limit (beta_gauge = 0) of QCD offers a number of remarkable research possibilities, of course at the price of large lattice artifacts. Here, we determine the complete phase diagram as a function of temperature T and baryon chemical potential mu_B, for one flavor of staggered fermions in the chiral limit, with emphasis on the determination of a tricritical point and on the T ~ 0 transition to nuclear matter. The latter is known to happen for mu_B substantially below the baryon mass, indicating strong nuclear interactions in QCD at infinite gauge coupling. This leads us to studying the properties of nuclear matter from first principles. We determine the nucleon-nucleon potential in the strong coupling limit, as well as masses m_A of nuclei as a function of their atomic number A. Finally, we clarify the origin of nuclear interactions at strong coupling, which turns out to be a steric effect.

  2. Measuring Higgs self-coupling at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment's ability to characterize Higgs self-coupling through the ... channel. The effective cross-section for detecting ... events is computed by finding the fraction ...

  3. A reductive coupling strategy towards ripostatin A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleicher, Kristin D.

    Synthetic studies on the antibiotic natural product ripostatin A have been carried out with the aim to construct the C9?C10 bond by a nickel(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction of an enyne and an epoxide, followed by rearrangement ...

  4. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL", theseTwelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers M. Xie and K. -

  5. Coupling between the Carbon Cycle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeeman, Mary Lou

    variation in carbon dioxide Coupling between the Carbon Cycle and Physical Processes on multiple scales in the past and present: "chap01" -- 2005/6/2 -- 10:43 -- page 4 -- #4 is difficult to measure global cloud properties

  6. Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurs, André

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

  7. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  8. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  9. A multicomponent smoking cessation program for couples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottingham, Carolyn Robin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NULTICONPONENT SNOKING CESSATION PROGRAN FOR COUPLES A Thesis by CAROLYN ROBIN NOTTINGHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAN University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1987 Najor Subject: Psychology A NULTICONPONENT SNOKING CESSATION PROGRAN FOR COUPLES A Thesis CARO(. YN ROBIN NOTTINGHAN Approved as to style and content by: fe Kern ( ir of Cinittee) Wendy Wo (Memb Ar ()r R e Steve Wore l (Head...

  10. Coupling spin ensembles via superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyin Qiu; Wei Xiong; Lin Tian; J. Q. You

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a hybrid quantum system consisting of spin ensembles and superconducting flux qubits, where each spin ensemble is realized using the nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond crystal and the nearest-neighbor spin ensembles are effectively coupled via a flux qubit.We show that the coupling strengths between flux qubits and spin ensembles can reach the strong and even ultrastrong coupling regimes by either engineering the hybrid structure in advance or tuning the excitation frequencies of spin ensembles via external magnetic fields. When extending the hybrid structure to an array with equal coupling strengths, we find that in the strong-coupling regime, the hybrid array is reduced to a tight-binding model of a one-dimensional bosonic lattice. In the ultrastrong-coupling regime, it exhibits quasiparticle excitations separated from the ground state by an energy gap. Moreover, these quasiparticle excitations and the ground state are stable under a certain condition that is tunable via the external magnetic field. This may provide an experimentally accessible method to probe the instability of the system.

  11. Universality of the Nf=2 Running Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Murano; S. Aoki; S. Takeda; Y. Taniguchi

    2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate universality of the Nf=2 running coupling in the Sch\\"odinger functional scheme, by calculating the step scaling function in lattice QCD with the renorm alization group (RG) improved gauge action at both weak(u=0.9796) and strong(u=3.3340) couplings, where u=\\bar{g}^2_SF with \\bar{g}_SF being the running coupling in this scheme. In our main calculations, we use the tree-level value for O(a) improvement coefficients of boundary gauge fields. In addition we employ the 1-loop value for them in order to see how scaling behaviours are affected by them. In the continuum limit, the step scaling function obtained from the RG improved gauge actions agrees with the previous result obtained from the plaquette action within errors at both couplings, though errors of our result are larger. Combined fits using all data with the RG improved action as well as the plaquette action reduce errors in the continuum limit by 2% at the weak coupling and 22% at the strong coupling.

  12. Experimental characterization and modeling of non-linear coupling of the LHCD power on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preynas, M. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Litaudon, X.; Ekedahl, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve steady state operation on future tokamaks, in particular on ITER, the unique capability of a LHCD system to efficiently drive off-axis non-inductive current is needed. In this context, it is of prime importance to study and master the coupling of LH wave to the core plasma at high power density (tens of MW/m{sup 2}). In some specific conditions, deleterious effects on the LHCD coupling are sometimes observed on Tore Supra. At high power the waves may modify the edge parameters that change the wave coupling properties in a non-linear manner. In this way, dedicated LHCD experiments have been performed using the LHCD system of Tore Supra, composed of two different conceptual designs of launcher: the Fully Active Multijunction (FAM) and the new Passive Active Multijunction (PAM) antennas. A nonlinear interaction between the electron density and the electric field has been characterized in a thin plasma layer in front of the two LHCD antennas. The resulting dependence of the power reflection coefficient with the LHCD power, leading occasionally to trips in the output power, is not predicted by the standard linear theory of the LH wave coupling. Therefore, it is important to investigate and understand the possible origin of such non-linear effects in order to avoid their possible deleterious consequences. The PICCOLO-2D code, which self-consistently treats the wave propagation in the antenna vicinity and its interaction with the local edge plasma density, is used to simulate Tore Supra discharges. The simulation reproduces very well the occurrence of a non-linear behavior in the coupling observed in the LHCD experiments. The important differences and trends between the FAM and the PAM antennas, especially a larger increase in RC for the FAM, are also reproduced by the PICCOLO-2D simulation. The working hypothesis of the contribution of the ponderomotive effect in the non-linear observations of LHCD coupling is therefore validated through this comprehensive modeling for the first time on the FAM and PAM antennas on Tore Supra.

  13. Mechanical Behavior Analysis of a Test Coil for MICE Coupling Solenoid during Quench

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Heng; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinglong; Wu, Hong; Green, M.A.

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling magnet for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment has a self-inductance of 592 H and the magnet stored energy of 13 MJ at a full current of 210 A for the worst operation case of the MICE channel. The high level of stored energy in the magnet can cause high peak temperature during a quench and induce considerable impact of stresses. One test coil was built in order to validate the design method and to practice the stress and strain situation to occur in the coupling coil. In this study, the analysis on stress redistribution during a quench with sub-divided winding was performed. The stress variation may bring about failure of impregnating material such as epoxy resin, which is the curse of a new normal zone arising. Spring models for impregnating epoxy and fiber-glass cloth in the coil were used to evaluate the mechanical disturbance by impregnated materials failure. This paper presents the detailed dynamic stress and stability analysis to assess the stress distribution during the quench process and to check whether the transient loads are acceptable for the magnet.

  14. A Fuzzy-Based Strategy to Improve Control Reconfiguration Performance of a Sensor Fault-Tolerant Induction Motor Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    utilization of the limited battery capacity (extension of the running distance per battery charge-Tolerant Induction Motor Propulsion Bekheira Tabbache1,2 , Mohamed Benbouzid1 , Abdelaziz Kheloui2 and Jean decision approach. Copyright © 2011 Praise Worthy Prize S.r.l. - All rights reserved. Keywords: Induction

  15. 2nd Coq workshop, Edinburgh, Scotland c S. Wilson, J. Fleuriot & A. Smaill Inductive Proof Automation for Coq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Automation for Coq Sean Wilson Jacques Fleuriot Alan Smaill School of Informatics, The University of Edinburgh {sean.wilson,jacques.fleuriot,a.smaill}@ed.ac.uk We introduce inductive proof automation for Coq support for proofs involving case splits and multiple inductive hypotheses. The automation makes use

  16. Appears in Abduction and Induction P. Flach and A. Kakas (Eds.), pp.181-191, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, Raymond J.

    Appears in Abduction and Induction P. Flach and A. Kakas (Eds.), pp.181-191, Kluwer Academic: ...... Abstract. This article discusses the integration of traditional abductive and inductive rea- soning methods of traditional abductive methods to propose revisions during theory re nement, where an existing knowledge base

  17. Sensorless Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator-Based Wind urbines using a High-Order Sliding Mode Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    ­ This paper deals with the sensorless control of a doubly-fed induction generator based wind turbine reaching time, robustness and unmodeled dynamics (generator and turbine). Simulations using the wind of the proposed sensorless control strategy. Keywords: Wind turbine, doubly-fed induction generator, sensorless

  18. Control of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field Weakening Regiori -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    inductance of stator and rotor winding (Ls = L, = L,,, +Lo is assumed here). Rotor speed. Number of pole pairs. Resistances of stator and rotor winding. Rotor time constant. Electromagnetic torque. Load torqueControl of Induction Motor with Cbrientation on Rotor Flux or on Stator Flux in a very wide Field

  19. Diagnosis of Stator Winding Inter-Turn Shorts in Induction Motors Fed by PWM-Inverter Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    Diagnosis of Stator Winding Inter-Turn Shorts in Induction Motors Fed by PWM-Inverter Drive Systems Abstract---An effective technique for diagnosis of stator winding inter-turn shorts in induction motors fed diagnostics, on-line condition monitoring, stator winding inter-turn shorts, time series, space vector

  20. Study of the Stability of a Direct Stator Current Controller for a Doubly-Fed Induction Machine using the Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    Study of the Stability of a Direct Stator Current Controller for a Doubly-Fed Induction Machine #12;Study of the Stability of a Direct Stator Current Controller for a Doubly-Fed Induction Machine to renewable energy (wind farms in particular). The proposed control algorithm offers the advantages of proven

  1. Machine Induction of Geospatial P A Whigham1, R I McKay2 & J R Davis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Machine Induction of Geospatial Knowledge P A Whigham1, R I McKay2 & J R Davis1 1CSIRO Division the implications of inductive techniques applied to geospatial data in a logical framework. It is argued trivial of cases. A heavily constrained geospatial domain, topographic representation, is described as one

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 4, APRIL 2008 1813 Models for Bearing Damage Detection in Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    be supervised by measur- ing quantities such as noise, vibration, and temperature. The implementation Damage Detection in Induction Motors Using Stator Current Monitoring Martin Blödt, Member, IEEE, Pierre analytical model for the influence of rolling-element bearing faults on induction motor stator current

  3. 512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 20, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2005 Fault Detection and Diagnosis in an Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Diagnosis in an Induction Machine Drive: A Pattern Recognition Approach Based on Concordia Stator Mean with the stator Concordia mean current vector. One is dedicated to the healthy domain and the last six are to each detection and diag- nosis, induction motor, inverter, pattern recognition. I. INTRODUCTION IN many processes

  4. Amplitude-phase coupling drives chimera states in globally coupled laser networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabian Böhm; Anna Zakharova; Eckehard Schöll; Kathy Lüdge

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For a globally coupled network of semiconductor lasers with delayed optical feedback, we demonstrate the existence of chimera states. The domains of coherence and incoherence that are typical for chimera states are found to exist for the amplitude, phase, and inversion of the coupled lasers. These chimera states defy several of the previously established existence criteria. While chimera states in phase oscillators generally demand nonlocal coupling, large system sizes, and specially prepared initial conditions, we find chimera states that are stable for global coupling in a network of only four coupled lasers for random initial conditions. The existence is linked to a regime of multistability between the synchronous steady state and asynchronous periodic solutions. We show that amplitude-phase coupling, a concept common in different fields, is necessary for the formation of the chimera states.

  5. Amplitude-phase coupling drives chimera states in globally coupled laser networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Böhm, Fabian; Schöll, Eckehard; Lüdge, Kathy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a globally coupled network of semiconductor lasers with delayed optical feedback, we demonstrate the existence of chimera states. The domains of coherence and incoherence that are typical for chimera states are found to exist for the amplitude, phase, and inversion of the coupled lasers. These chimera states defy several of the previously established existence criteria. While chimera states in phase oscillators generally demand nonlocal coupling, large system sizes, and specially prepared initial conditions, we find chimera states that are stable for global coupling in a network of only four coupled lasers for random initial conditions. The existence is linked to a regime of multistability between the synchronous steady state and asynchronous periodic solutions. We show that amplitude-phase coupling, a concept common in different fields, is necessary for the formation of the chimera states.

  6. Sandia Energy - Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the Capacitance of Metamaterial Nanocavities Home Highlights - Energy Research Control of Strong Light-Matter Coupling Using the...

  7. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR...

  8. Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on graphene Citation Details Title: Gate-tunable exchange coupling between cobalt clusters on...

  9. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape034hsu2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling...

  10. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with...

  11. Strategies for coupling energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Zhiqiang; Chen, Qingyan; Klems, Joseph H.; Haves, Philip

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. “EnergyPlus: Energy Simulation Program” . ASHRAEA Coupled Airflow-and-Energy Simulation Program for IndoorSTRATEGIES FOR COUPLING ENERGY SIMULATION AND COMPUTATIONAL

  12. Optimization of the Coupled Cluster Implementation in NWChem...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Coupled Cluster Implementation in NWChem on Petascale Parallel Architectures. Optimization of the Coupled Cluster Implementation in NWChem on Petascale Parallel Architectures....

  13. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechan...

  14. Thermoelectric Couple Demonstration of (In, Ce)-based Skutterudite...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Couple Demonstration of (In, Ce)-based Skutterudite Materials for Automotive Energy Recovery Thermoelectric Couple Demonstration of (In, Ce)-based Skutterudite Materials for...

  15. A longitudinal trend study of a university-based teacher induction program: observable behaviors of urban teachers and their perceptions of program components five years after participation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon Merchant, Vickie V

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This longitudinal trend study (Gall, Borg & Gall, 1996) examined the effectiveness of a one-semester university-based teacher induction program as compared to a two-semester university-based teacher induction program based ...

  16. A longitudinal trend study of a university-based teacher induction program: observable behaviors of urban teachers and their perceptions of program components five years after participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon Merchant, Vickie V

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    participants of a one-semester or a two-semester teacher induction program responding to the Teacher Induction Program Participant Survey (TIPPS) recognized formative observation as the most effective component. Peer support and professional development were...

  17. Method of Evaluating the Zero-Sequence Inductance Ratio for Electrical Luis De Sousa, IEEE member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    shaft cannot move during the battery charge. In traction mode, the grid is not connected to the EMMethod of Evaluating the Zero-Sequence Inductance Ratio for Electrical Machines Luis De Sousa, IEEE.grenoble-inp.fr Acknowledgement The SOFRACI project, high efficiency inverter with integrated charge function, is certified

  18. A Loss-Minimization DTC Scheme for EV Induction Motors A. Haddoun1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    totally overcome. Indeed, EVs have a low energy density and long charging time for the present batteries distance per battery charge. Therefore, DTC should be associated to a loss- minimization strategy soA Loss-Minimization DTC Scheme for EV Induction Motors A. Haddoun1 , M.E.H. Benbouzid2 , D. Diallo3

  19. On ascertaining inductively the dimension of the joint kernel of certain commuting linear operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    On ascertaining inductively the dimension of the joint kernel of certain commuting linear operators), and a collection f`xgx2X of commuting linear maps on some linear space, the family of linear operators whose joint DMS-9000053, DMS-9102857. i #12;proposed running head: dimension of joint kernels Proofs should

  20. INDUCTION TIME EFFECTS IN PULSE COMBUSTORS \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUCTION TIME EFFECTS IN PULSE COMBUSTORS \\Lambda Daniel L. Marcus y Richard B. Pember John B of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator -- a burn­ ing cycle drives a resonant pressure wave a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant