National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for indoor racquet sports

  1. Vibration modeling and supression in tennis racquets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Buechler, M. A. (Miles A.); Espino, Luis; Thompson, G. A. (Gordon A.)

    2003-01-01

    The size of the 'sweet spot' is one measure of tennis racquet performance. In terms of vibration, the sweet spot is determined by the placement of nodal lines across the racquet head. In this studx the vibrational characteristics of a tennis racquet are explorod to discover the size and location of the sweet spot. A numerical model of the racquet is developed using finite element analysis and the model is verified using the results from an experimental modal analysis. The affects of string tension on the racquet's sweet spot and mode shapes are then quantified. An investigation is also carried out to determine how add-on vibrational datnpers affect the sweet spot.

  2. Brunel University Sport Kingston Lane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    . Quest defines industry standards and good practice and encourages our ongoing development and delivery with integrated scoreboard and timing systems. Our Sports Hall houses an Indoor Climbing Wall and Pump Room which

  3. E-sports broadcasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sell, Jesse (Jesse Colin)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, I situate e-sports broadcasting within the larger sports media industrial complex, discuss e-sportscasters, and investigate the economics behind the growing e-sports industry. E-sports, often referred to as ...

  4. Televisual sports videogames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Abraham D. (Abraham Daniel)

    2013-01-01

    Over the three decade long history of sports videogame development, design conventions have lead to the emergence of a new sports game genre: the televisual sports videogames. These games, which usually simulate major ...

  5. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

  6. Indoor Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Focus For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health-from cognitive ability to personal comfort...

  7. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Combustion -Generated Indoor Air Pollution Craigcontrol of air pollution from indoor combustion sources. Ifocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namely

  8. Low frequency indoor radiolocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Matthew S. (Matthew Stephen), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of electromagnetic wave propagation to the problem of indoor radiolocation. Determining the location of people and objects relative to their environment is crucial for asset tracking, ...

  9. The Center for Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    review of indoor air pollution in schools requested by the Environment Committee of the Connecticut and evaluating the students' and staff health symptoms, · assessing the building for causes of poor indoor air agencies. Programs have included guidance on the Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools

  10. Swimming Pool (Indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  11. International Sports Against Apartheid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01

    s ugges t ; and against contac ts i n t he fiel d of sport.ven they -c ondoned - su ch contac ts . Although oth er spo

  12. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  13. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residen-LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D.L,BL-5918 COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION C. D.

  14. Indoor air quality: Selected references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This document was compiled in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality, including sick-building syndrome. Included in the publication are the NIOSH Congressional testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications; two articles describing the results of NIOSH research and findings on indoor air-quality problems; NIOSH guidance on conducting indoor-air-quality investigations; and a description of the NIOSH health-hazard evaluation program, which can provide NIOSH assistance in evaluating indoor-air-quality problems.

  15. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometNovakov, T. : Formation of Pollution Particulate NitrogenGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.

  16. Allies in Sport Organizations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, Elizabeth

    2012-10-19

    Employee support is a key factor in creating more welcoming and accepting work environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals in sport. As such, organizations need to understand what factors ...

  17. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  18. SportServer Health & Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    N E W S Front Page Top Story Nation World Sports SportServer Business Technology Politics Opinions, the potential of tabletop nuclear "bubble fusion" raised earlier this year may have been exaggerated, new

  19. The Cricket indoor location system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priyantha, Nissanka Bodhi, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    Indoor environments present opportunities for a rich set of location-aware applications such as navigation tools for humans and robots, interactive virtual games, resource discovery, asset tracking, location-aware sensor ...

  20. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to having

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Carbon such as cleaners and pesticides How to Improve Indoor Air Quality · Open windows when you can to let in fresh air

  1. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.W. Traynor Introduction Air pollution research has focused

  2. Sports&Culture Buytendelft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    . Changes and omissions reserved. Menu Sports Cafe HOT BEVERAGES Coffee 1,60 Tea 1,60 Cappuccino 1,90 Latte macchiato 1,90 Espresso 1,60 Hot chocolate 1,90 Fresh mint tea 1,75 COLD BEVERAGES Milk 1 1,60 Sisi / Cassis / 7-up 1,60 Ice Tea 1,60 Water sparkling / flat 1,60 Bitter Lemon / Tonic 1

  3. Sport Management A major in sport management prepares students for careers in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Will

    Sport Management A major in sport management prepares students for careers in the sport and leisure industry in areas such as sport marketing and management, athletic administration, public relations and sports information. Housed in the School of Business Administration, sport management majors are provided

  4. Building Sport Brands with Music: The Impact of Sport Brand Music on the Shopping Behaviors of Sport Consumers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballouli, Khalid

    2012-10-19

    in an online retail store. Specifically, it was hypothesized that sport brand music would have a positive influence on sport consumers’ perceptions of musical fit with the sport brand, which would then lead to positive effects on various shopping behaviors...

  5. VARSITY SPORTS Football Fixture List Final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    VARSITY SPORTS Football Fixture List ­ Final 2015 VARSITY FOOTBALL #12;VARSITY SPORTS Football Fixture List ­ Final 3-Sept 15 28 18

  6. 2014 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation, 27th October 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Vinay

    , India Email: vinay@cse.iitd.ernet.in Saurabh Tewari CSR Technologies India Pvt. Ltd. Noida, India Email: Saurabh.Tewari@csr.com Abstract--Indoor maps are highly essential for indoor posi- tioning and location

  7. Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown...

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    for studies of indoor air quality and energy utilization inExt. 6782 Indoor Air Quality in Energy- Buildings Craig D.1, 1979) Indoor Air Quality in Energy~Efficient LBL-8892 EEB

  9. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Union of Air Pollution Prevention Associations,The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976, GeometAnnual Meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association,

  10. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

  11. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 – 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

  12. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402K-13001, February 2013 iaprev1.pdf More Documents...

  13. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

  14. Combination of Indoor and Outdoor PositioningOutdoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (indoor, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry of various building materials (L1 = 1500 MHz) Indoors: Positioning Requirements Overview of Systems GNSS

  15. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Quality and Energy Education In addition toAPPENDIX A1: Tenant Indoor Environmental Quality and Energyimproving indoor air quality (IAQ), energy efficiency and

  16. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    focused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on humanpollution sources exist inside buildings, notably sources associated with combustion (

  17. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  18. Bayesian Approach for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    Bayesian Approach for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation Ivan Spassov, EPFL ENAC TOPO Michel Bierlaire for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation Ivan Spassov EPFL ENAC TOPO Lausanne - Switzerland Michel Bierlaire EPFL via GPS or defined by the user. Consider a pedestrian navigation system which contains a GPS receiver

  19. A wireless LAN-based indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    A wireless LAN- based indoor positioning technology Z. Xiang S. Song J. Chen H. Wang J. Huang X services by exploiting user context information. In this paper, we present a wireless-local- area-network-based (WLAN-based) indoor positioning technology. The wireless device deploys a position- determination model

  20. Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of indoor air pollution determinant factors Jean-Baptiste Masson1,2 * , Gérard Govaert2 , Corinne Mandin1 representing different types of indoor air pollution. We restrain to the 20 variables corresponding to indoorClassification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification

  1. Young people, new media and sport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Donna Shy Yun

    2009-07-06

    This thesis investigates how sport is employed in the new media age as mediated sport goes through the liminal phase of new media. Set against the contextual background of recurrent ‘moral panics’ that accompanied each ...

  2. Sport Psychology Sport psychology is: a) the study of the psychological and mental factors that influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Sport Psychology Sport psychology is: a) the study of the psychological and mental factors, and b) the application of the knowledge gained through this study to everyday settings. Sport psychology) practice. Career opportunities in exercise and sport psychology may emphasize various aspects

  3. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBL-of combustion-generated indoor air pollution concluded thatTraynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; April,

  4. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    G.W. , "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBLfocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on human

  5. Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

    2000-01-01

    Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

  6. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

  7. TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, V.

    2008-01-01

    The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program...

  8. Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

  9. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  10. UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UPPER SACRAMENTO RIVER SPORT FISHERY Marine Biological Laborato«y L I B R. A. R "ST OCT 2 31950 significant changes in the environmental conditions which affect fisheries in Sacramento River have resulted number of sportsmen who are turning to the Upper Sacramento River is indicative of the magnitude

  11. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality can cause a stuffy nose, sore throat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products such as cleaners and bug sprays » Outdoor air pollution from factories, vehicles, wildfires allergies may have severe reactions. Common Indoor Air Pollutants Poor indoor air quality comes from many have asthma triggered by outdoor air pollution or pollen, opening windows might not be a good idea

  12. Improving Indoor Environmental Quality And Energy Performance Of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Spears, Michael; Lai, Chi-Ming; Shendell, Derek G.

    2005-01-01

    INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFINDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFEnergy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are

  13. Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building in relation to indoor air quality. Page 1 of 14 Needs Attention Not ApplicableOKComponent Comments Outside Air Screen Unobstructed? General condition? Size of mesh? (1 /2" minimum) Outside Air Dampers Operation

  14. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  15. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    and J. D. Wooley. Indoor chemistry: ozone volatile organicTibbetts. Ozone Reactive Chemistry on Interior Latex Paint.and the role of reactive chemistry. Indoor A ir. 16 (2006)7-

  16. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor chemical reactions may be more harmful to habitants. A few building flaws may be key factors...

  17. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    of Medicine (2011) Climate change, the indoor environment,on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality andto work and learn and climate change may make existing IEQ

  18. Aalborg Universitet Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Aalborg Universitet Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Yang, Zhenyu; Valente, Andrea., & Valente, A. (2010). Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate. I E E E Conference on Control Applications from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 07, 2015 #12;Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea

  19. Indoor air quality in French dwellings Sverine Kirchner1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on Indoor Air Quality (OQAI) aims at collecting data on population exposure to indoor pollutants in various INTRODUCTION Our lack of understanding of the health risks related to air pollutants exposure in buildingsIndoor air quality in French dwellings Séverine Kirchner1,* , Mickael Derbez1 , Cédric Duboudin2

  20. Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehrad, Mohsen

    Indoor positioning algorithm using light- emitting diode visible light communications Zhou Zhou of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light. This paper proposes a novel indoor positioning algorithm using visible light communications (VLC

  1. Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone Heather L. Papinchak1 , E for their species effectiveness in reducing ozone concentrations in a simulated indoor environment. Continuously supply system were used to simulate an indoor environment in which ozone concentrations could be measured

  2. The Safety of Sports Grounds (Designation) Order 1992 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Her Majesty's Stationary Office

    1992-03-13

    Article 2 of this Order designates the Sports grounds specified therein as sports grounds requiring safety certificate under the Safety of Sports Ground Act 1975. That Act was amended by Schedule 2 to the Fire Safety and ...

  3. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fagan, Jr., Thomas J. (Penn HIlls, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Humphrey, Joseph R. (Grand Rapids, MI)

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  4. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  5. Algorithms for GPS operation indoors and downtown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    Algorithms for GPS operation indoors and downtown Nainesh Agarwal Æ Julien Basch Æ Paul Beckmann Æ Piyush Bharti Æ Scott Bloebaum Stefano Casadei Æ Andrew Chou Æ Per Enge Æ Wungkum Fong Æ Neesha Hathi. Casadei Æ A. Chou Æ P. Enge Æ W. Fong N. Hathi Æ W. Mann Æ J. Stone Æ J. Tsitsiklis Æ B. Van Roy

  6. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  7. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    1989). Residential indoor air quality and energy efficiency.book Residential Indoor Air Quality and Energy Efficiency by2009). Indoor air quality in highly energy efficient homes—A

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

  9. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

  10. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tringe, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air ofthat the indoor air microbes are not random transients fromhealth policies. Airborne microbes are often attached to

  11. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building Prev Next Title: Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental...

  12. SP.235 Chemistry of Sports, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie, Patricia Dianne, 1967-

    In this new seminar, we will be focusing on three sports, swimming, cycling and running. There will be two components to the seminar, a classroom and a laboratory. The classroom component will introduce the students to the ...

  13. Sun-Herald Sport Advertising Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Sun-Herald Sport Advertising Contact Information NSW: Liam O'Meara 02 9282 4192 l years. Readership* Last 4 Weeks Net: 650,000* Last Week: 398,000** Overview Printed in The Sun

  14. “They Run, They Sweat, We Write”: ESPN’s Bill Simmons, Sports Journalism, and Intersectional Identities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eschrich, Joey

    2010-01-01

    ESPN’s Bill Simmons, Sports Journalism, and Intersectionalfigure in US sports journalism since joining ESPN, the “shift in sports journalism, which is increasingly leaving

  15. FALL 2013 SPRING 2014 Intramural Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (wage x 1.3 hours) 1st Year $7.25 $9.43 2nd Year $7.65 $9.95 3rd Year $8.05 $10.47 4th Year $8.45 $10 & Substitutions 4 4 ­ Intramural Sport Information 5 5 ­ Year-End Banquet 7 6 ­ Officials Information Outlets 8 that sport. Emails will be sent throughout the year by Intramural Staff to relay important information

  16. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Swainson, M. (2009). Indoor air quality in highly energyClayton, R. (2001). Indoor air quality: Residential cookingSacramento, CA: California Air Resources Board. Fugler, D. ,

  17. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    2002; 7. Goldmann DA. Transmission of viral respiratoryScheme of Infection Transmission Indoors 34. Krauter P,nosocomial tuberculosis transmission. Indoor Air, 1998; 8(

  18. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika

    2012-01-01

    caused by indoor air pollution, thermal load and noise.thermal load, low-frequency venti- lation noise and indoor air pollution.

  19. ETH ZurichEngineering Geodesy -Prof. Dr. H. Ingensand Overview of Current Indoor PositioningOverview of Current Indoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments: indoors: household, office & factory outdoors: urban & rural dynamic Positioning Requirements, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry, surveying

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA The indoor microbiome is a complex system that is thought to depend on dispersal from the outdoor biome and the occupants' microbiome

  1. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  2. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  3. The Center for Indoor Environments and Health's specific mission is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    pollutants and materials Outdoor air contaminants (including diesel particulates) and materials brought for Indoor Environments and Health #12;Why are building communities struggling with managing indoor air air problems? Design Structures built slab on grade, and/or with flat roofs with poor drainage

  4. Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold Editor: W. Elliott of indoor environments for mold growth increased dramatically in the past decade. Allergists can now for mold growth and robust enough to reliably detect mold growth. There is no standard method

  5. Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order...

  6. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation J.M.Logue1,P Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation LBNL-4945E Disclaimer This document.H. Sherman, B.C. Singer, Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  7. Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini B;Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini Submitted for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract The operation of unmanned aerial

  8. A System for Building Semantic Maps of Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amigoni, Francesco

    A System for Building Semantic Maps of Indoor Environments Exploiting the Concept of Building of indoor environments refers to the task of build- ing representations of these environments that associate knowledge. Usually, the classifiers that build semantic maps process data coming from laser range scanners

  9. Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Club Sports Coach/Volunteer Code of Conduct Agreement Form I that this position holds a high level of responsibility and I agree to the following Code for Club Sports, and other University officials as may be required. · I

  10. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    strategies for identifying high-radon homes· . . . . . . . .C. Behavior of radon indoors: generalgeographic radon modeling •••••••••••. •••••. •..•••. ••• D.

  11. Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer5250E #12;Logue et al, Health Hazards in Indoor air LBNL5250E Health Hazards in Indoor Air J, Singer BC, 2010 Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010 31st AIVC Conference, Low Energy

  12. Work quality in the avocation of sports officiating as determined by selected members of the Texas Association of Sports Officials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Michael Anthony

    2007-09-17

    The major purpose of this study was to examine work quality in the avocation of sports officiating, as determined by selected Texas High School Sports Officials. Specifically, the study investigated work quality indicators ...

  13. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  14. Single Particle Orientation and Rotational Tracking (SPORT) in biopysical studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Yan; Ha, Ji Won; Augspurger, Ashley E.; Chen, Kuangcai; Zhu, Shaobin; Fang, Ning

    2013-08-02

    The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) techniques have seen rapid development in the past 5 years. Recent technical advances have greatly expanded the applicability of SPORT in biophysical studies. In this feature article, we survey the current development of SPORT and discuss its potential applications in biophysics, including cellular membrane processes and intracellular transport.

  15. Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheta, S.

    2010-01-01

    , while the second ranking was indoor radon (Huelman, 2004, pp. 10-21). Indoor environmental quality problems in earth sheltered buildings can take many forms but the main way to look at problems is to remember the three ?P?s? of indoor....), carbon monoxide and other combustion products, radon, pesticides, and household chemicals (Barcik, 2005, pp. 30-1). There are three basic aspects of indoor environmental quality that will be covered in this article?the sources of indoor air...

  16. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Sports participation and body concern in an adult population: Does type of sport matter? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Rhona

    2011-11-23

    Body image is a human universal which affects the health and well-being of an individual and their ability to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Results in the field of body image research and its relationship with sports ...

  18. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  19. Advanced Technology for Economical Dehumidification to Improve Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckwith, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    High humidity can have a detrimental effect on many aspects of indoor environments. Building materials, books, and records deteriorate more rapidly in humidity levels above 60% due to biodegradation. High humidity increases electrical costs...

  20. Autonomous flight in unstructured and unknown indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, implementation, and validation of a system that enables a micro air vehicle to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. Such a vehicle would be of considerable ...

  1. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  2. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists.

  3. Clean-up of Contaminated Indoor Air Using Photocatalytic Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hingorani, S.; Greist, H.; Goswami, T.; Goswami, Y.

    2000-01-01

    to be completely effective. Dark control experiments were performed for each condition to confirm the validity of each experiment. The photocatalytic technology tested in these experiments was demonstrated to completely oxidize acetone at normal indoor air...

  4. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is...

  5. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  6. Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor...

  7. Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

  8. A fine-grained geospatial representation and framework for large-scale indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battat, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a system and method for extending the current paradigm of geographic information systems (GIS) to support indoor environments. It introduces features and properties of indoor multi-building environments ...

  9. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  10. Neighborhood Healthy Homes Project The University of Connecticut Center for Indoor Environments and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Neighborhood Healthy Homes Project The University of Connecticut Center for Indoor Environments and Health is a partner on the Connecticut Children's Medical Center's Neighborhood Healthy Healthy Housing Inspection Manual Center for Indoor Environments and Health, University of Connecticut

  11. Monitoring Viable Fungal and Bacterial Bioaerosol Concentrations to Identify Acceptable Levels for Common Indoor Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, L. D.

    1998-01-01

    Bioaerosol concentrations between 200 - 450 CFU/m3 have remained largely uncharacterized with respect to potential indoor air quality concerns. This research provides for further description of indoor bioaerosol concentrations and concludes that 3 0...

  12. Wearable Wireless Sensing for Sports and Ubiquitous Interactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    comfort control of building HVAC (heating/air conditioning) systems. I. INTRODUCTION Inertial sensors have into inertial applications ­ sports medicine and wearable management of air conditioning (HVAC) systems

  13. Double play : athletes' use of sport video games to enhance athletic performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silberman, Lauren (Lauren Beth)

    2010-01-01

    A design feature of contemporary sport video games allows elite athletes to play as themselves in life-like representations of actual sporting events. The relation between playing sport video games and actual physical ...

  14. Race Appropriate Sports: Is Golf Considered More Appropriate for Whites Compared to Racial Minorities? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosselli, Anthony C.

    2012-10-19

    For various reasons, certain races tend to play particular sports. Sports with low costs of participation (e.g., basketball and football) have higher percentages of minority participants relative to sports with high costs of participation (e...

  15. Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships Jean-Christophe Zufferey-Christophe.Zufferey@epfl.ch Abstract Because of their ability to naturally float in the air, indoor airships (often called blimps) con physics-based dynamic modelling of indoor airships including a pragmatic methodology for parameter

  16. A Marked Point Process Model for the Source Proximity E ect in the Indoor Environment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    indoor air quality monitors arise because of the source proximity e#11;ect, in which pollutant sources. McBride Abstract In indoor air quality studies, discrepancies between personal and station- ary Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship as well as the Center for Indoor Air Research. The author thanks

  17. Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings Jeff models for the indoor-air environment in control design for energy efficient buildings. In one method by a desire to incorporate models of the indoor-air environment in the design of energy efficient buildings

  18. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane [TIAX LLC., Lexington, MA (United States)

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  19. Sports Medicine for Emergency Medicine Physicians, Too Few to Maintain the Fellowship in Emergency Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delasobera, Bronson E; Davenport, Moira; Milzman, David

    2012-01-01

    Acad Emerg Med. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine1. Grindel SH. Sports medicine training in the UnitedM, Milzman D. Sports medicine fellowship Address for

  20. West Virginia University 1 College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    programs, sporting goods stores, or commercial sporting goods manufacturers, or pursue graduate training by petitioning the Committee on Academic Standards. Requirements for Degrees · All students must complete general

  1. West Virginia University 1 College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , or commercial sporting goods manufacturers, or pursue graduate training in sport and exercise psychology on Academic Standards. Requirements for Degrees · All students must complete general education curriculum

  2. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  3. Strategic Sports Management MGMT 4843 Sec 503 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Sports Management MGMT 4843 Sec 503 Spring 2015 Jan 19- March 13 Spears School. The two areas of concentration are: financing and revenue generation, and strategic management issues and issues involving strategic management and planning in the sports industry, as well as develop a broader

  4. Study Tips for Mathematics Mathematics as a sport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Study Tips for Mathematics Mathematics as a sport Imagine that you have an important soccer game. Imagine the perfect kick in great detail.) Doing well in Mathematics is very similar to doing well in any sport. If you know the mathematical rules, practise, and imagine succeeding you are on your way

  5. Roadmap: Sport Administration -Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-SPAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Sport Administration - Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-SPAD] College of Education, Health of Business Administration Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 15-May-12/JS This roadmap and Recreation 3 General Elective (lower or upper division) 3 #12;Roadmap: Sport Administration - Bachelor

  6. Roadmap: Electronic Media Electronic Media Sports Production Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Electronic Media ­ Electronic Media Sports Production ­ Bachelor of Science [CI­2013 Page 1 of 4 | Last Updated: 23-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan requirement #12;Roadmap: Electronic Media ­ Electronic Media Sports Production ­ Bachelor of Science [CI

  7. -Texas A&M University-Department of Recreational Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    for the second game. Teams shall not change sides of the court in the middle of the third game. 3. POSITIONS sports. Team captains are responsible for possessing a thorough understanding of these regulations High School Association) Rules Book with the following Texas A&M intramural sports modifications: 1

  8. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS RETURN TO: IMA PROGRAMS OFFICE OR cwigton@u.washington.edu PERSONAL TRAINING PROGRAM SURVEY FORM 1. How did you find out about the IMA OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS RETURN TO: IMA PROGRAMS OFFICE OR cwigton@u.washington

  9. Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    1 Texas A&M University Department of Recreational Sports Intramural Sports SAND VOLLEYBALL and their implications. Intramural Sand Volleyball will be played by 2011-2013 USA Volleyball Beach Rules for safety reasons. Under no circumstances will a player wearing a cast or splint be permitted to play. h. Co

  10. Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air quality dependent ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air online 19 May 2015 Keywords: Ventilation control system Indoor air quality Indoor air pollution control Outdoor air quality Passenger health promotion Ventilation energy a b s t r a c t Indoor air quality (IAQ

  11. Sports`n Science (SnS) strengthens the connection between sports and science at the University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    MISSION Sports`n Science (SnS) strengthens the connection between sports and science at the University of Utah and within the broader community. The program promotes science education and illustrates components: Public awareness campaign Program website Informal science education Formal science education

  12. Experimental Evaluation of an Angle Based Indoor Localization System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    Experimental Evaluation of an Angle Based Indoor Localization System Asis Nasipuri and Ribal El available off-the-shelf components. Wireless sensor nodes equipped with photo sensors determine is required at the sensor nodes. The system also does not involve any centralized server or off

  13. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Environment Department Energy Performance of Buildings Group Berkeley, CA 94720 January 2010 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the BuildingTechnologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy under ontract

  14. A Sensor Placement Approach for the Monitoring of Indoor Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    needed by research projects on energy management (ERGDOM [1]) and on the medical monitoringA Sensor Placement Approach for the Monitoring of Indoor Scenes Pierre David, Vincent Idasiak of a French project, which aims at developing a new human presence sensor, we intend to design a sensor system

  15. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  16. Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental measurements and collect energy consumption data. Based on analyses of the data collected fromEnergy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/environmental August 2011 The Issue

  17. Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts point to serve one floor and its staircase region achieves the best handover performance for IWN]. An alternative approach to transmitt/receive the RF signal is to use heating, ventilation, and airconditioning

  18. LuxTrace -Indoor Positioning Using Building Illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigations evaluate the potential for using solar modules alone as a low-cost alternative for estimating constraints of practical systems including, but not limited to, global cost, device volume and weight and used indoors. We investigate the use of wearable solar cells to track changing light conditions (a

  19. 2015 National 4-H Shooting Sports Workshop September 29 October 3, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    different National 4-H Shooting Sports disciplines: Archery, Hunting Skills, Muzzle loading, Pistol, Rifle

  20. Moving Toward Social Justice in Sport: A Comprehensive Study of Social Justice Activists in Sport and the Factors that Shape them 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Woojun

    2015-05-12

    There are many different types of injustices in society, and there is no exception for the sport field. Injustices have a negative impact on many aspects of sport. This has resulted in many researchers and former and current athletes realizing...

  1. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH Pleasance Sports Centre and Gym.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    . Page 12. F, A,S,I,C Sports MedicineCentre. Page 13. Receptions Page 13. Platform Lifts. Page 14. Lift line is at Waverley Station in the city Centre. The nearest bus stops are located on Holyrood Road

  2. The Impacts and Benefits Yielded from the Sport of Quidditch 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Adam

    2013-08-06

    This dissertation presents two individual studies aimed at providing insight into the impacts and benefits of participation and involvement in an alternative sport. Thus, the purpose was to monitor and evaluate the authentic ...

  3. The game story space of professional sports: Australian Rules Football

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiley, D P; Mitchell, L; Danforth, C M; Dodds, P S

    2015-01-01

    Sports are spontaneous generators of stories. Through skill and chance, the script of each game is dynamically written in real time by players acting out possible trajectories allowed by a sport's rules. By properly characterizing a given sport's ecology of `game stories', we are able to capture the sport's capacity for unfolding interesting narratives, in part by contrasting them with random walks. Here, we explore the game story space afforded by a data set of 1,310 Australian Football League (AFL) score lines. We find that AFL games exhibit a continuous spectrum of stories and show how coarse-graining reveals identifiable motifs ranging from last minute comeback wins to one-sided blowouts. Through an extensive comparison with a random walk null model, we show that AFL games are superdiffusive and deliver a much broader array of motifs, and we provide consequent insights into the narrative appeal of real games.

  4. B. TAMAN PANCARONA, PRECINCT 18 Sport Facilities Other facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    to the sliding sport arena and has pump track, dirt jump with north shore element and slope style jump. Others counter 2 changing room with bathroom 2 unit surau (Male/Female) Pool Maintenance Room, changing room

  5. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acutekerosene fuel combustion Indoor air pollution from biomasscombustion emits naphthalene [44, 46, 83, 84] and formaldehyde [42, 45, 85]. In the indoor air pollution

  6. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  7. Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01

    -147. [7]. Derek C. C, Li Baizhan. productivity and indoor environment [C]. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings. Espoo Finland: Vol.1, 1(2000): 629-634. ...

  8. Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    38961 Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon ConcentrationsRadon Potential Assessment of New Hampshire, Geologic Radoncollected in the New Hampshire Radon Survey. Fig. 2. The

  9. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and...

  10. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  11. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoor release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-01-01

    Indoor C in Deposition Resuspension Exhaust Figure 1deposition loss rate to areas where resuspension may occur (h -1 ) r: resuspension rate from “temporary” areas (h -1 ) D

  12. Movement of outdoor particles to the indoor environment: An analysis of the Arnhem Lead Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thatcher, T.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-03-01

    This paper analyzes the role of soil tracking as a source of indoor particles and quantifies key parameters influencing the transport of soil-derived particles (resuspension rates for particulate matter on floors, deposition velocities of suspended particles in indoor and outdoor air). The paper begins with a brief review of studies of particle transport processes and presents a simple model for studying the transport of particles in the indoor environment. The model is used to examine data on Pb distributions in the indoor and outdoor environments of community adjacent to a secondary lead smelter.

  13. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    surfaces, and resuspension activities lead to significantnear a secondary lead smelter, indicates that resuspensionresuspension. However, even moderate indoor activity, such as walking, can lead

  14. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  15. Estimating Environmental Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential-Dust Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Todd Patrick

    2011-01-01

    K. Polybrominated dioxins (PBDDs/DFs) and polybrominatedflame retardants and dioxin-like activities associated withU.S. indoor environments. Dioxin 2010: 30 th International

  16. SDAMS: SPOrt Data Archiving and Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Nicastro; G. Calderone; for the SPOrt collaboration

    2002-01-14

    SDAMS is the ensemble of database + software packages aimed to the archiving, quick-look analysis, off-line analysis, network accessibility and plotting of the SPOrt produced data. Many of the aspects related to data archiving, analysis and distribution are common to almost all the astronomical experiments. SDAMS ambition is to face and solve problems like accessibility and portability of the data on any hardware/software platform in a way as simpler as possible, though effective. The system is conceived in a way to be used either by the scientific community interested in background radiation studies or by a wider public with low or null knowledge of the subject. The user authentication system allows us to apply different levels of access, analysis and data retrieving. SDAMS will be accessible through any Web browser though the most efficient way to use it is by writing simple programs. Graphics and images useful for outreach purposes will be produced and put on the Web on a regular basis.

  17. Investigation and Analysis of the Indoor Air Environment of a Large-scale Art Exhibition Hall in Beijing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, X.; Cao, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adopting the method of locale measurement and subjective appraisal, this paper presents a synthesized investigation and analysis of both the indoor thermal and humid indices and the air quality of a specific exhibition hall in Beijing. Indoor air...

  18. Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthma and Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, indoor materials or finishes such as carpet, flexible flooring, paint,

  19. Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

    2010-01-01

    ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

  20. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Indoor Air 1993, Helsinki. IPMVP IEQ Committee. 1999. Indooruse can also improve IEQ (IPMVP 1998, Fisk and Rosenfeld

  1. High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes White + GreenSpec SHEET PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS #12;High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes NIST GCR 14 Division provides scientific leadership to help the U.S. achieve its vision of net zero energy (NZE

  2. Vol. 39, No. 11 ACTA AUTOMATICA SINICA November, 2013 A Comprehensive UAV Indoor Navigation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Vol. 39, No. 11 ACTA AUTOMATICA SINICA November, 2013 A Comprehensive UAV Indoor Navigation System for an indoor quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system. Three main sensors are used onboard the quadrotor. With this setup, the UAV is able to estimate its own velocity and position robustly, while flying along

  3. Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A) Austin, TX 78758, USA ABSTRACT Most ozone exposure occurs indoors even though some surfaces consume ozone and reduce its concentration relative to outdoors. Ozone consumption often results in emissions of secondary

  4. Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU, {muellerj, burgard}@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Abstract In recent years, autonomous miniature airships have navigation, sonar, IMU 1 Introduction Miniature airships as autonomous mobile systems for indoor navigation

  5. Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

  6. IMPACT OF THE URBAN POLLUTION ON THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT -EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A MECHANICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bâtiment (CSTB), Nantes, France ABSTRACT This study aims to assess the transfer of outdoor air pollution and the relationships between outdoor and indoor urban air pollutant concentrations are more and more a subject indoor pollutant sources. At the initial state, the dwelling was naturally ventilated. Air renewal

  7. Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air ozone (O3) during operation, either in- tentionally or as a byproduct of air ionization standards. Sev- eral types of air purifiers were tested for their ability to produce ozone in various indoor

  8. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Integration of WiFi and MEMS Sensors for Indoor Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Integration of WiFi and MEMS Sensors for Indoor Navigation by Yuan Zhuang of MEMS sensors and WiFi offer an efficient integration for indoor navigation applications. Two automatic-coupled) integration and TC (Tightly-coupled) integration are implemented for WiFi and MEMS sensors to further limit

  10. Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Valérie, University of Calgary 2500 University Drive NW Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 1N4 Abstract--Indoor pedestrian on a Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) navigation filter is investigated. Doppler errors are simulated using

  11. Targeted Autonomous Indoor Flight of a Rotary-Wing MAV Svetlana Potyagaylo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanza, Yaron

    Targeted Autonomous Indoor Flight of a Rotary-Wing MAV Svetlana Potyagaylo PhD Student Faculty of Aerospace Engineering svetap@tx.technion.ac.il Omri Rand Professor Faculty of Aerospace Engineering omri for Autonomous Rotary-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicles (RW MAVs) in indoor GPS-denied environments. In such missions

  12. MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    -Fi fingerprints; (2) an air exchange rate based IAQ sensing method, which measures general IAQ using only CO2MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yifei Jiang , Kun Li,omkar}@umich.edu, § dickrp@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT Most people spend more than 90% of their time in- doors; indoor air

  13. Changes in indoor pollutants since the 1950s Charles J. Weschler a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA b International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark Keywords: Air conditioning Body burden Building materials products used indoors. Composite-wood, synthetic carpets, polymeric flooring, foam cushioning, plastic

  14. Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target Discovery and Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target of unmanned vehicles in mixed indoor/outdoor reconnaissance scenarios. We outline the tools and techniques microautonomous vehicles become available. In the scenarios that serve as the focus of this paper, an unmanned

  15. Leadership Theory and Practice in Sport Management: What Constitutes Ethical Leadership According to Student-Interns? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clack, Justin Tyler

    2013-07-29

    and practitioners has recently shifted to include ethical behavior as a valuable asset. Thus, the purpose of this thesis is to understand what constitutes ethical leadership in contemporary sport organizations and academic curricula geared toward sport management...

  16. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  17. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  18. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  19. 2015 Sports Team Breakfast Buffet Buttermilk Pancakes with Maple Syrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Lunch One Sandwich ($2.00 per additional Sandwich) Pasta Salad or Green Salad with Dressing Granola Bar@ramadaprincegeorge.com #12;2015 Sports Team Game Time Buffet Pasta Buffet Pitchers of Chilled Fruit Juice & Ice Tea Freshly Fruit Salad Roast Beef Dinner Buffet Pitchers of Chilled Fruit Juice & Ice Tea Chef's Freshly Baked

  20. Health Undergraduate BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    %. The University is renowned as a research led academic institution with a strong focus on high quality education Science degrees was 100%. We are also very excited to offer a new concept of MSci (Hons) Sport of Bath is renowned as a research led academic institution with a strong focus on high quality education

  1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORTS MEDICINE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS HPRED 1405 Research Methods 3 HPREDBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORTS MEDICINE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101 English

  2. New Sports Hall and Health and Fitness Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    Park and Run Trails Loughborough University Stadium Holywell American Football Holywell 1 Football Pitch Holywell 2 Football Pitch Holywell 3 Football Pitch Holywell 4 Football Pitch Beach Park MultiVehicle Charging Point HOLYWELL PITCHES 5,6 & 7 OUTDOOR SPORT FACILITIES Beach Park HolywellAmerican Football

  3. SPORTS HANDBOOK Visit us at: www.recwell.umn.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 INTRAMURAL SPORTS HANDBOOK Visit us at: www.recwell.umn.edu Revised: 5/2014 ATTENTION TEAM are prepared to accept the commitment and duties inherent in the title you are assuming. This handbook has been read this guide carefully and keep it available at all times. After reading this handbook, if you feel

  4. Development of a modeling framework to predict indoor air concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loy, M.D.; Nazaroff, W.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental and Energy Technologies Div.

    1998-12-31

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are an important but largely unstudied class of indoor air pollutants. SVOCs have been well-studied as outdoor air pollutants, but much less effort has been focused on understanding the factors affecting their concentrations in indoor air. Because of these compounds` low (10-6 to 10 Pa at room temperature) vapor pressures, they readily partition into condensed phases from the gas phase. In outdoor air, this phenomenon is important as a source of secondary organic aerosol and as a mechanism for long range transport and persistence of SVOCs in the atmosphere as particle-phase species. Indoor environments include another potential condensed phase besides the airborne particle phase: surface materials such as carpet, wallboard, upholstery, ceiling tiles, linoleum, and many others. Adsorption to these materials has a markedly different effect on indoor contaminant concentrations because the condensed phase is stationary. Unlike the airborne particle phase, for which ventilation is a significant removal mechanism, the only significant pathway for removal of reversibly sorbed pollutants from the indoor environment is desorption into the gas phase followed by ventilation. Because buildings generally have a large surface area to gas-phase volume ratio, the net removal of SVOCs from the indoor environment via this mechanism is likely to be very slow. Compounds re-emitted from one surface are likely to quickly re-absorb to another. This paper presents an analysis of the factors affecting indoor concentrations of SVOCs including ventilation, gas-particle partitioning, gas phase sorption on indoor surfaces, particle deposition, and oxidative radical chemistry and estimates their relative importance to facilitate simplification of numerical simulations of indoor pollutant concentrations.

  5. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  6. The effects of indoor pollution on Arizona children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, R.

    1982-05-01

    The respiratory health of a large group of Arizona school children who have been exposed to indoor pollutants-tobacco smoke and home cooking fumes-is reported. A significant relationship was found between parental smoking and symptoms of cough, wheeze, and sputum production. Also, children in homes where gas cooking fuel was used had higher rates of cough than children in homes where electricity was used. No differences in pulmonary function or yearly lung growth rates occurred among subjects grouped by exposure to tobacco smoke or cooking fuel. Thus, parental smoking and home cooking fuel affected cross-sectional respiratory symptom rates in a large group of Arizona school children. Study of pulmonary function, however, revealed no lung function or lung growth effects during 4 yr of study.

  7. Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catalina, T.

    2011-01-01

    that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

  8. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    models for fine particle resuspension from indoor surfaces.Reed J, Hall D. On the resuspension of small parti- cles byFichman M, Gutfinger C. Resuspension of par- ticulates from

  9. Improve Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Building Performance: Leveraging Technology to Improve All Three 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, D.

    2011-01-01

    suburban-- locations, outdoor air is actually far more polluted than indoor air. Appropriate application of air cleaning technologies and monitoring can allow many buildings to achieve both improved IAQ and lower operating costs....

  10. Analysis of realistic ultrawideband indoor communication channels by using an efficient ray-tracing based method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Wasim Q.

    A fundamental step in ultrawideband (UWB) communication system design involves the characterization of the indoor propagation channel. In this paper, we show that the UWB propagation channel parameters can be accurately ...

  11. Ensuring Healthy American Indian Generations for Tomorrow through Safe and Healthy Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Joseph A.; Pacheco, Christina M.; Lewis, Charley Sabe; Williams, Chandler; Barnes, Charles; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.; Choi, Won S.; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-03-04

    when recruiting AI for a home-and employment-based environmental health assessments, highlight major successes, and propose recommendations for future indoor environmental health studies. The Center for American Indian Community Health (CAICH...

  12. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  13. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Indoor Air and Environmental Tobacco Smoke Measured with a New Integrated Organic Vapor-Particle Sampler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, C.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental tobaccoof polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Indoor Air 1991;1:497-NK. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives

  14. An Analysis of Sportswomen on the Covers and in the Feature Articles of Women's Sport and Fitness Magazine, 1975-1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leath, Virginia M.; Lumpkin, Angela

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes the treatment of athletes in Women's Sports and Fitness between 1975 and 1989. Author, article length, gender, sport, race, and sporting role were assessed for each article; the number of accompanying ...

  15. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  16. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  17. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

  18. Biomechanics and tennis Br J Sports Med 2006;40:392396. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2005.023150

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Robin L.

    REVIEW Biomechanics and tennis B Elliott science pertinent to the game. This paper outlines the role that biomechanics plays in player development from sport science and sport medicine perspectives. Biomechanics is a key area in player development

  19. 2011 Wesmen Summer Sport Camps July 4-8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    -22, 2011 16 Boys Volleyball VB, G8-11, AD, DW, D1 17 Coed Multi Sport MS, G5-9, AD, DW, D12 18 Boys Mini Advanced SOC, G5-9, M, TV, D9 26 Girls Advanced SOC, G5-9, M, TV, D9 27 Girls Volleyball VB, G8-10, A, DW, DW, D1 32 Girls Super Camp BB, G6-12, ADS, DW, D5 33 Boys Elite Player SOC, G8-12, AD, TV, D10 34

  20. Study of the relationship between indoor daylight environments and patient average length of stay (ALOS) in healthcare facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Joon Ho

    2007-04-25

    of indoor daylight variables in type A from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM. ...........................................................97 xiii TABLE Page 36 Summary of the average values of indoor... daylight variables in type B from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM.............................................................98 37 Significant ALOS comparisons and average illuminance between SE and NW...

  1. Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

  2. BID NO: SKA SSLE 009/2011 SUPPLY, DELIVERY AND INSTALLATION OF ROTARY UPS, MV INDOOR SWITCHGEAR AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    SWITCHGEAR AND POWER TRANSFORMERS AT THE MeerKAT SITE NEAR CARNARVON, NORTHERN CAPE TENDER NOTICE and Installation of Rotary UPS, MV Indoor Switchgear and Power Transformers at the MeerKAT Site near Carnarvon, alternator and kinetic module on shared base frame) diesel rotary UPSs, 22 kV and 33 kV indoor switchgear

  3. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10

  4. Sensing by Proxy: Occupancy Detection Based on Indoor CO2 Concentration Ming Jin, Nikolaos Bekiaris-Liberis, Kevin Weekly, Costas Spanos, Alexandre Bayen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing by Proxy: Occupancy Detection Based on Indoor CO2 Concentration Ming Jin, Nikolaos Bekiaris on indoor CO2 concentration. We propose a link model that relates the proxy measurements with unknown human, small particulates (PM2.5), CO2, illumi- nation, temperature, and humidity [6], [8], [9]. Indoor CO2

  5. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  6. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  7. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORT & RECREATION MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    : Arts & Letters 3 GE: PEDC 1 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Term 14 Credits Per Academic Year 29 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS HPRED 1401 Legal liability in Sport, RecreationBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORT & RECREATION MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM

  8. Study at the Norwegian School of Sports Sciences in Oslo (Norway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Xuhua

    Study at the Norwegian School of Sports Sciences in Oslo (Norway) Aimed at 3rd year students experience Once in a lifetime opportunity #12;About Norway · Norway is a constitutional monarchy cooler summers #12;Oslo, Norway #12;Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NSSS) www.nih.no · The central

  9. Adv. Strategic Sports Management (graduate) MGMT 5843 Sec 503 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adv. Strategic Sports Management (graduate) MGMT 5843 Sec 503 Spring 2015 Jan 19- March 13 Spears of Management; Director Sports Management Institute Contact Information: Office: BUS 301 Email: bryanLearn (Online Classroom): http://oc.okstate.edu Administrative contact: Spears School Distance Learning

  10. Adv. International Sports Management (graduate) MGMT 5943 Sec 503 Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adv. International Sports Management (graduate) MGMT 5943 Sec 503 Spring 2015 Jan 19- March 13 of Management, Director Sports Management Institute Contact Information: Office: Bus 301 Email: bryan.finch@okstate.edu Phone: 744-8652 Office Hours: by appointment Course Site: Desire2Learn (Online Classroom): http

  11. Texas A&M Sport Clubs Guidebook 2015-2016 Chapter 6: Finances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Sports Credit Card Rec Sports Credit Card Usage Policy SOFC Credit Card Usage Policy Invoiced Payment Organization Finance Center Accounts The Student Organization Finance Center (SOFC) is located on the second training seminar prior to utilizing the services provided SOFC. Funds received from club activities

  12. Performance of Multiple Pulse Multiple Delay Modulated UWB Signals in a Multiple Access Indoor Wireless Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F

    2003-06-12

    In this paper, the performance of a two user UWB multiple access (UWB-MA) system based on multiple-pulse multiple-delay (MPMD) modulation scheme in an indoor wireless channel is evaluated by computer simulations. The indoor multipath propagation channel model used in this study is based on the modified statistical Saleh-Valenzuela model proposed by Foerester and Li from Intel. The simulation results indicate that the multipath performance of MPMD modulated signals in a multiple access system outperforms the nonmultipath case as the number of autocorrelation function (ACF) sampling points increases for each user. This is an unusual but important result, since MPMD receiver exploits multipath phenomenon in indoor wireless channels to increase the BER performance, hence the transmission rate in a UWB-MA system.

  13. Modeling, Real-Time Estimation, and Identification of UWB Indoor Wireless Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Yanyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Fathy, Aly [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, stochastic differential equations (SDEs) are used to model ultrawideband (UWB) indoor wireless channels. We show that the impulse responses for time-varying indoor wireless channels can be approximated in a mean square sense as close as desired by impulse responses that can be realized by SDEs. The state variables represent the inphase and quadrature components of the UWB channel. The expected maximization and extended Kalman filter are employed to recursively identify and estimate the channel parameters and states, respectively, from online received signal strength measured data. Both resolvable and non-resolvable multipath received signals are considered and represented as small-scaled Nakagami fading. The proposed models together with the estimation algorithm are tested using UWB indoor measurement data demonstrating the method s viability and the results are presented.

  14. Arnold, R., Fletcher, D. and Daniels, K. (2014) Development and validation of the Organizational Stressor Indicator for Sport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCusker, Guy

    2014-01-01

    sport] without a valid and reliable measure- ment tool" (p. 192; see also Hanton, Fletcher, & Cough- lan

  15. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  16. Who are Climbing the Walls? An Exploration of the Social World of Indoor Rock Climbing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurten, Jason Henry

    2011-02-22

    .B.A., Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. Scott Shafer Dr. David Scot This study is an exploratory look at the social world of indoor rock climbers, specifically, those at Texas A&M University. A... ARE CLIMBING THE WALLS? AN EXPLORATION OF THE SOCIAL WORLD OF INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING A Thesis by JASON HENRY KURTEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  17. A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference Seng 802.11) and Zigbee (IEEE 802.15.4) all operate in the 2.4x GHz fre- quency bands. The stability and availability of RSSI infor- mation for WiFi- or Zigbee-based localization systems may vary depending

  18. Indoor airborne bacterial communities are influenced by ventilation, occupancy, and outdoor air source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    , is an energy-efficient way to simultaneously cool building mass and avoid overnight and weekend microbial an intensive temporal study of indoor airborne bacterial communities in a high-traffic university building associated with differing ventilation strategies relevant to modern building design. Our results indicate

  19. Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot Michael Wandel1@tech.oru.se Abstract Gas source localisation with robots is usually per- formed in environments with a strong in different environments, and the similarities as well as differences in the analyte gas distributions

  20. Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone Elliott T. Gall presents a Monte Carlo simulation to assess passive removal materials (PRMs) that remove ozone of homes in Houston, Texas, were taken from the literature and combined with back- ground ozone removal

  1. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  2. Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

  3. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  4. An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building of the effect on indoor climate, we verify that the controller achieves the energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems [1]. Energy-efficient control of HVAC systems

  5. Impact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    air pollution study (CITEPA), France * Corresponding email: Eva.Leoz@ineris.fr SUMMARY Data pollutants in ambient air. Consequently our study aims at describing both emission factors and inerisImpact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1 , Jacques Ribéron2

  6. A Coupled Airflow-and-Energy Simulation Program for Indoor Thermal Environment Studies (RP-927)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    for the design of radiative, convective, and hybrid heating and cooling systems. Keywords: Airflow, Air with convective, radiative, and hybrid heating and cooling systems. In the past few years, many investigations for thermal comfort (ASHRAE 1992). In an indoor space with radiative, convective, and hybrid heating

  7. Formaldehyde in residences: long-term indoor concentrations and influencing factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Formaldehyde in residences: long-term indoor concentrations and influencing factors Introduction Formaldehyde is a hazardous air pollutant that is widespread in residential buildings. It is a potent irritant. (2009) and Sax et al. (2006) concluded that formaldehyde was the highest contrib- utor to the cumulative

  8. LocSens -An Indoor Location Tracking System using Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerer, Theo

    proved itself for outdoor usage. But it is not suitable for indoor applications due to poor coverage: fbagci@uci.edu F. Kluge is with the Department of Computer Science, University of Augsburg, Germany, University of Augsburg, Germany, email: Theo.Ungerer@informatik.uni-augsburg.de N. Bagherzadeh

  9. Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    . Dif- ferent from image sensor and sound sensor, MEMS accelerometer sensor can measure some biomedical, Localization of footstep source, MEMS accelerometer, Personal health care, Sensor net- work, Smart home. 1Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured by MEMS

  10. Improving Indoor Air Quality Improves the Performance of Office Work and School Work 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wargocki, P.

    2008-01-01

    strong incentive for providing indoor air of a quality that is better than the minimum levels required by present standards. IAQ can be improved by reducing the pollution load on the air by selecting low-polluting building and furnishing materials...

  11. Modeling HSGPS Doppler Errors in Indoor Environments for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Modeling HSGPS Doppler Errors in Indoor Environments for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning Zhe He, Mark The use of high sensitivity GPS (HSGPS) receivers integrated with dead-reckoning sensors for pedestrian navigation has been broadly investigated and applied in the past decade. Pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR

  12. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  13. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01

    In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

  14. Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Lisa pollution in rural areas of developing countries. It is estimated that about half (53%) of all households in the poor countries of Latin American use biofuels (wood, dung and/or crop residues) to cook. Combustion by

  15. Ris-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION Jørn Roed Abstract. Beryllium-7 the pollution episode and airing shortly after is also investigated. Earlier relevant literature is reviewed descriptors; AEROSOLS; AIR FILTERS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR QUALITY; BUILDINGS; CONTAMINATION; DEPOSITION

  16. SP.235 / ES.SP235 Chemistry of Sports, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie, Patricia

    This seminar will focus on three sports: swimming, cycling and running. There will be two components to the seminar: classroom sessions and a "laboratory" in the form of a structured training program. The classroom component ...

  17. Urea SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SCR and DPF System for Diesel Sport Utility Vehicle Meeting Tier II Bin 5 DOE and Ford Motor Company Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development Program (DE-FC26-01NT41103)...

  18. A Comparison of Sport Consumption Motives Between American Students and Asian International Students 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Chanho

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to explore the differences between American students and Asian international students' frequency of sport spectating, motivation, team identification, future behavior and perceived barriers ...

  19. Developing professional judgment and decision making expertise in applied sport psychology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martindale, Amanda Beverley

    2011-07-04

    Establishing and enhancing standards of practice is important in any profession, and particularly so in a new and emerging domain such as sport psychology. Accordingly, this thesis draws on literature from teaching, ...

  20. Water Flow Through Geotextiles Used to Support the Root Zone of Turfgrass on Sports Fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose-Harvey, Keisha M.

    2010-01-14

    A sports field construction method that uses a geotextile to support the root zone atop a synthetic drainage structure is an alternative to the common design that uses gravel drainage material to support the root zone. A study was conducted...

  1. Factors influencing competiteve [i.e., competitive] state anxiety in sport and exercise: a research synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andres, Monica

    2013-02-22

    A meta-analysis was conducted across twenty-seven studies using the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2; Martens, Vealey, and Burton, 1990) administered to participants in both aerobic and anaerobic sports. The CSAI-2 assesses competitive...

  2. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  3. Indoor climate control accounts for over 40% of the energy used in US residential buildings1, much of which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    ) Annual Energy Outlook 2011. 2. Li, V.C. "ECC­ Material, Structural, and Durability Performance," ConcreteIndoor climate control accounts for over 40% of the energy used in US residential buildings1, much

  4. Very low temperature radiant heating/cooling indoor end system for efficient use of renewable energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianbo; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Congrong; Xiong, Weicheng; Zhu, Li

    2010-06-15

    Solar or solar-assisted space heating systems are becoming more and more popular. The solar energy utilization efficiency is high when the collector is coupled with indoor radiant heating suppliers, since in principle, lower supply temperature means lower demand temperature and then the system heat loss is less. A new type radiant end system is put forward for even lower supply temperature compared to the conventional radiant floor heating systems. A three dimensional model was established to investigate its energy supply capacities. Simulation results show that 50 W per meter length tube can be achieved with the medium temperature of 30 C for heating and 15 C for cooling. The predicted results agree well with the actual data from a demonstration building. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a supply temperature of 22 C in winter and of 17 C in summer already met the indoor requirements. The new end system has good prospects for effective use of local renewable resources. (author)

  5. PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Yu-Chen Chang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Pipelines Yu-Chen Chang1 , Tsung-Te Lai1 , Hao}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--We propose PipeProbe, a mobile sensor system for mapping water- sule into the source of the water pipelines. As the PipeProbe cap- sule traverses the pipelines

  6. Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Christopher P.; Ducati, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    and Photobiology A.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry Christopher P. Ireland* and Caterina Ducati Department of Materials... such as deodorizers or floor cleaners, removal of these is a key priority, particularly as many VOCs are known to be mutagenic or carcinogenic [11]. Whilst air purification techniques such as filtration via activated carbon [12] or thermal advanced oxidation processes...

  7. AC System Equipment Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirey, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control Don B. Shirey, III Program Manager Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, Florida ABSTRACT High-efficiency home designs have significantly reduced sensible...: Florida Solar Energy Center. James, P., J.E. Cummings, J. Sonne, R. Vieira, J. Klongerbo. 1997. The Effect of Residential Equipment Capacity on Energy Use, Demand, and Run-Time, FSEC-PF-328-97. Cocoa, FL: Florida Solar Energy Center. Lennox...

  8. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. )

    1991-07-15

    The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

  9. Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

  10. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  11. Q550 Sports Bursary Application 2014-15 Year: 1st / 2nd / 3rd / 4th / postgraduate (delete as applicable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Q550 Sports Bursary Application 2014-15 Name: Year: 1st / 2nd / 3rd / 4th / postgraduate (delete to personally incur participating in University level sport during the academic year 2014-15. Details of expense

  12. An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

    2000-08-01

    It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

  13. A meta-analytic study of the Profile of Mood States in sport and exercise research 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughan, Kristen Lea

    1989-01-01

    A META-ANALYTIC STUDY OF THE PROFILE OF MOOD STATES IN SPORT AND EXERCISE RESEARCH A Thesis by KRISTEN LEA VAUGHAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Psychology A META-ANALYTIC STUDY OF THE PROFILE OF MOOD STATES IN SPORT AND EXERCISE RESEARCH A Thesis by KRISTEN LEA VAUGHAN Approved as to style and content by: Arnold LeUneS (Chair of Committee...

  14. A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P. Dick, Michael Hannigan, Qin Lv, Li Shang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    .shang}@colorado.edu Abstract--Indoor air quality is important. It influences human productivity and health. Personal pollution pollutant exposure is important. Currently, stationary and accurate air quality monitoring sen- sors [30A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P

  15. Monitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase of a pilot survey.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . KEYWORDS Air pollution, air stuffiness, formaldehyde, benzene. 1 INTRODUCTION Indoor air quality to determine an air stuffiness index as an indirect mean to assess pollutants accumulation in a closed spaceMonitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase

  16. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulate- cyclic organic matter, including carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene (5­9). Exposure to indoor air

  17. Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372. A Dual Airflow Window for Indoor Air with exhausted indoor air. The energy needed to condition outdoor air is reduced because of the counterflow heat, the dual airflow window has a great potential for conserving energy and improving indoor air quality

  18. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  19. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2012-06-18

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore »measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.

  2. Search How do I find it? Home News Travel Money Sports Life Tech Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    such capabilities in flexible plastic-like materials and high-tech composites akin to the stuff now used to makeSearch How do I find it? Home News Travel Money Sports Life Tech Weather Tech Shopping Bu Illinois on a project to develop technology for the living room of the future. Inside Tech Page 1 of 3USATODAY

  3. Cause-Related Sport Marketing and Its Effects on Consumer Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Deock

    2010-10-12

    attribute for choosing a baseball cap, (b) a low-fit, but familiar, CRM program was preferred to a high-fit, but unfamiliar, program, and (c) fan identification moderated the impact of sport/cause fit on students' choice of team licensed products. Study 2...

  4. Quick Search SFGATE HOME BUSINESS SPORTS ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL JOBS REAL EST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    electrical PG & E bill Bay Solar Power Design, Inc. Bay Area 3-Areas for $99 + get hallway clean free CallQuick Search SFGATE HOME BUSINESS SPORTS ENTERTAINMENT TRAVEL JOBS REAL EST Meteorites provide of Mars. Printable Version Email This Article $250 Off Any Complete Solar System! Reduce or eliminate your

  5. Home National Sports Business World Features Columns Editorial Japan has key role in ITER project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    would house a mass of precision machines used to control the colossal amount of energy it would generateHome National Sports Business World Features Columns Editorial Top Japan has key role in ITER reactor has been settled after a contest lasting several years between Japan and the European Union

  6. Pro Sports Interest in Canada #2 Football Now More Popular Than Baseball in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Joy

    __________________________________________________________________________________ Football Now More Popular Than Baseball in Canada Second only to hockey Way back in February of 1942 ­ just was hockey, 17% said baseball, and just 8% said football. Basketball ­ despite being invented by a Canadian things do change. Today, baseball has been surpassed by pro football as the second most popular sport

  7. Home News Business Sports Travel Entertainment Homes Jobs Cars Shopping Top headlines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paller, Ken

    Home News Business Sports Travel Entertainment Homes Jobs Cars Shopping 31° Latest for Top Nursing Home Administrator read more & apply Search Chicago jobs All Chicago jobs Post resume Post a job applications," said Ralph Nuzzo, a chemistry professor who worked with Rogers to co-author a description

  8. Home News Sport Radio TV Weather Languages A-Z PROGRAMMES LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuñez, Rafael

    Home News Sport Radio TV Weather Languages A-Z PROGRAMMES LIST Listen to Science in Action Updated fossils of a bird-like animals that lived over 100 million years ago ­ during the time of the dinosaurs that they lived an aquatic existence rather like modern grebes and divers Oman cloud forest Cloud forests obtain

  9. Boiler Kids Camp Parent Manual Division of Recreational Sports Mission Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Boiler Kids Camp Parent Manual Division of Recreational Sports Mission Statement The Division which fosters an appreciation for a healthy lifestyle and promotes lifelong learning. Boiler Kids Camp Mission Statement Boiler Kids Camp is an interactive, summer day camp designed for children ranging

  10. Established within the Wayne State University (WSU) Bioengineering Center, the Sports Injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Established within the Wayne State University (WSU) Bioengineering Center, the Sports Injury the WSU Bioengineering Center. The Center is staffed by over 50 full-time and part-time personnel from both the College of Engineering and the School of Medicine. The Bioengineering Center has been

  11. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  12. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  13. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  14. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  15. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  16. Evaluation of control strategies for volatile organic compounds in indoor air (journal article)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, K.; Debler, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses research which evaluates the application of adsorption techniques to the control of indoor organic vapors. The adsorption on activated carbon of three compounds representing three classes of organic species was studied at 30 C in the concentration range zero to 200 ppb using a microbalance. The three were benzene (aromatic), acetaldehyde (oxygenated aliphatic), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (halogenated aliphatic). Three sorbents (a wood base carbon, a coal base carbon, and a coconut shell base carbon) were examined. Uptakes for all the compounds on all the carbons were low (on the order of 10 to the minus 7th power gmol/g carbon). Simulation of a packed bed of carbon indicated that carbon adsorption may not be practical for continuous removal, but may be applicable to sudden releases (e.g., spills). Potential alternatives to activated carbon adsorption are discussed. Potentially toxic organic vapors are emitted from a wide variety of building materials, consumer products, and human activities. Control of indoor organic vapors generally involves removing the source and/or increasing the ventilation rate. The ubiquitous nature of sources of organic vapors generally makes source removal impractical. Increased ventilation causes increased energy usage with its resultant economic penalties. Therefore, practical removal methods are needed.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  18. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  19. 2011 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation (IPIN), 21-23 September 2011, Guimares, Portugal Figure 1. The camera pose can be estimated in respect to the laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * * Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Email: tilchs@ethz.ch Abstract--This paper demand on positioning capabilities in applications such as healthcare, disaster management, metrology, logistics or housekeeping. A growing market in indoor positioning technologies appoints the research

  20. A crossover design study to evaluate the effectiveness of appliance inspection and servicing for lowering indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colome, S.D. ); Billick, I.H. ); Baker, P.E.; Beals, S.A.; Rubio, S.A.; Cunningham, S.J. ); Wilson, A.L. )

    1988-01-01

    Some researchers have suggested that natural gas appliances are significant contributors to indoor air pollution. Indoor unvented combustion appliances, such as gas-fired ranges, unvented space heaters, and portable kerosene space heaters, have been associated with a wide variety of pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), formaldehyde (HCHO), and respirable particles. Previous indoor air quality studies have demonstrated that indoor NO{sub 2} concentrations often exceed outdoor ambient levels when gas- burning appliances are used. Cooking with gas has been the focus of many of these studies, although other unvented appliances, such as space-heaters, have also been associated with elevated NO{sub 2} concentrations. Some epidemiologic studies of exposure to NO{sub 2} in homes with gas ranges have indicated a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and illness. However, other studies contradicted these findings and failed to show any significant effects associated with gas cooking.

  1. Demo Abstract: QiLoc--A Qi-Wireless Based Platform for Robust User-Initiated Indoor Location Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wireless charging protocol, a QiLoc Station is able to extract the unique IDs from phones placedLoc, we explore the use of the Qi wireless charg- ing protocol [2] for precise desk-level indoor location and identification. Qi is a widely adopted wireless charging stan- dard, which is based on electromagnetic induction

  2. Towards a Fully Autonomous Indoor Helicopter Slawomir Grzonka, Samir Bouabdallah, Giorgio Grisetti, Wolfram Burgard and Roland Siegwart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Towards a Fully Autonomous Indoor Helicopter Slawomir Grzonka, Samir Bouabdallah, Giorgio Grisetti the interest of the scientific community in the Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAV), fully autonomous micro-helicopters semi- autonomous coaxial helicopter which is able to fly for three minutes. Unfortunately, none

  3. ISTS'06 4th-6th September 2006, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Bayesian Inference for Autonomous Personal Localisation Indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    1 ISTS'06 4th-6th September 2006, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Bayesian Inference for Autonomous Personal Localisation Indoors Ivan Spassov EPFL ENAC TOPO Lausanne - Switzerland ivan.spassov@epfl.ch Prof. Michel Bierlaire EPFL SB IMA ROSO Lausanne - Switzerland michel.bierlaire@epfl.ch Prof. Bertrand Merminod

  4. 2013 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Navigation, 28-31 October 2013, Montbliard-Belfort, France Demo Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinalipour, Demetris

    the building. The onboard smartphone sensors (i.e., accelerometer, gyroscope and digital compass to the back-end database in order to efficiently store metadata regarding indoor POIs and provide navigation the blueprint of a building on top of Google Maps with multi-floor support. The user can later add, annotate

  5. ION GNSS12 Conference, Session F1, Nashville, TN (Sep 18-21, 2012) Investigating Indoor GPS Doppler and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    1/10 ION GNSS12 Conference, Session F1, Nashville, TN (Sep 18-21, 2012) Investigating Indoor GPS School of Engineering Position, Location and Navigation (PLAN) Group University of Calgary BIOGRAPHY of the Department of Geomatics Engineering at the University of Calgary. He received his BSc from the Isfahan

  6. Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006) Radiation Protection Division works to address hazards posed by technologically enhanced naturally occurring #12;1 URANIUM LOCATION DATABASE COMPILATION Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA

  7. Mechanistic modeling of the interrelationships between indoor/outdoor air quality and human exposure in a GIS framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Purushothaman, V.; Georgopoulos, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of human exposure to atmospheric contaminants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM) is often based on measured data from fixed ambient (outdoors) Air Monitoring Stations. This results in an artificial characterization of indoor exposures, as concentrations and physicochemical attributes of indoor pollutants vary significantly and are different from corresponding outdoor values. A mechanistically-based modeling approach is presented here that aims to improve estimates for the outdoor/indoor relationships of photochemical pollutants and of associated fine particles and, subsequently, of human exposure assessments. New approaches for refining the spatial, temporal, and indoor/outdoor patterns of gas phase photochemical contaminants and PM are currently being developed and tested. These approaches are combined with information from either ambient monitoring networks or from ambient air quality models that consider aerosol physics and chemistry coupled with gas phase photochemistry (e.g. UAM-AERO). This process utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Relational Database (RD) methods, to facilitate detailed exposure scenario construction (involving e.g. the geographic location of an individual considered in time) and to aid in the estimation of population exposure over selected geographic areas. The combination of monitor data or air quality modeling with microenvironmental modeling in a GIS framework can potentially provide a useful platform for more accurate assessments of human exposure to co-occurring gas and particulate phase air pollutants.

  8. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

    2008-06-01

    Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

  9. Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder Wolkoff , Gunnar D. Nielsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Review Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder 2010 Accepted 25 May 2010 Available online 16 June 2010 Keywords: Airways Asthma Children Formaldehyde Sensory irritation Susceptible subgroups There is considerable recent focus and concern about formaldehyde

  10. Indoor Pictures Monitoring System using a Mobile Robot Tsutomu TAKESHITA, Akihisa OHYA and Shin'ichi YUTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Indoor Pictures Monitoring System using a Mobile Robot Tsutomu TAKESHITA, Akihisa OHYA and Shin, section 3, will explain this method in detail. Furthermore, this paper will discuss the developed Picture picture which is necessary for the modification. #12;standard image test image (a) (b) (c) Fig.1

  11. Indoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    will be placed in the basement. Carbon dioxide CO2 tank and monitors: A CO2 tank will be placed in a first floor closet, and programmed to release CO2 gas four times a day for 15 minutes each time. Two CO2 monitorsIndoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded

  12. Horticulture -Landscape Design programs1 teach individuals how to design gardens and whole landscapes, both indoors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    landscapes, both indoors and outdoors, which will enhance the beauty and practicality of a building, they design small gardens or a land management plan and learn how to develop the sketches and specifications; Forde Nursery & Landscaping; Morrison Design and Land- scaping Inc.; Silver Wind Landscaping

  13. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  14. Participatory Pricing in Sport: An Examination of Name-Your-Own-Price and Pay-What-You-Want Pricing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reese, Jason 1985-

    2012-12-06

    The purpose of this study is to better understand the effects participatory pricing strategies have on consumer perceptions and behaviors in a sport event pricing scenario. Participatory pricing strategies are those that include the consumer...

  15. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  16. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  17. Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

    2011-03-30

    The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

  18. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  19. The genotoxic contribution of wood smoke to indoor respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, P.M. (John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory, New Haven, CT (USA)); Rossman, T.G. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York (USA)); Daisey, J.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wood burning stoves on the genotoxicity of indoor respirable organic matter was investigated for four homes during the winter and spring of 1986. Paired samples, one collected when the stove was not used and one when wood was burned, were extracted with dichloromethane and acetone. Aliquots of the dichloromethane extracts were analyzed with and without metabolic activation using the Microscreen bioassay. The Microscreen is a rapid, sensitive bioassay which measures a broad genotoxic endpoint, {lambda}-prophage induction. Per nanogram of organic material, wood smoke proved to be a major source of indirect (observed with metabolic activation) but not direct genotoxins in homes. The increase in indirect genotoxicity for extracts from aerosol containing wood smoke is probably due to higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the wood smoke aerosol as well as other unidentified classes. The direct genotoxicity observed for extracts of aerosol not containing wood smoke decreased with metabolic activation. This direct genotoxicity may be related to cooking activities in the homes. The trends in genotoxicity observed per nanogram of organic material are more pronounced when expressed per m{sup 3} of air due to the higher percentage of extractable material in aerosol containing wood smoke.

  20. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  1. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  2. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  3. Towards improved characterization of high-risk releases using heterogeneous indoor sensor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreedharan, Priya; Sohn, Michael D.; Nazaroff, William W.; J. Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-06-30

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardous to building occupants. For an acutely toxic contaminant, the speed of the emergency response strongly influences the consequences to occupants. The design of a real time sensor system is made challenging both by the urgency and complex nature of the event, and by the imperfect sensors and models available to describe it. In this research, we use Bayesian modeling to combine information from multiple types of sensors to improve the characterization of a release. We discuss conceptual and algorithmic considerations for selecting and fusing information from disparate sensors. To explore system performance, we use both real tracer gas data from experiments in a three story building, along with synthetic data, including information from door position sensors. The added information from door position sensors is found to be useful for many scenarios, but not always. We discuss the physical conditions and design factors that affect these results, such as the influence of the door positions on contaminant transport. We highlight potential benefits of multisensor data fusion, challenges in realizing those benefits, and opportunities for further improvement.

  4. Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China A Semi-autonomous UAV Platform for Indoor Remote Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Automation, Hong Kong, China A Semi-autonomous UAV Platform for Indoor Remote Operation with Visual present the development of a semi-autonomous quadrotor UAV platform for indoor teleoperation using RGB- D in order to stabilize the UAV velocity and track the desired velocity commanded by a remote operator though

  5. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in ''real-world'' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in ''real-world'' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the ''real world''. The use of solanesol was compromised--as it had been in the chamber experiments.

  6. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  7. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in the ZEBRAlliance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, D.; Jackson, M.; Shrestha, S.

    2013-09-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. In this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in research houses located in Oak Ridge, TN, that were less than 2 years old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built, unoccupied, and unfurnished. The team identified air pollutants of concern in the test homes that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern from initial air sampling surveys. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74°F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused minimal to modest increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  8. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, Diana E; Jackson, Mark C; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  9. History 280 topics for Spring 2015 Hist 280901 The History of Spectator Sports in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    History 280 topics for Spring 2015 Hist 280901 The History of Spectator Sports in the United, define an approach and conduct both primary and secondary sources on the topic. Hist 280902 History independence and wrote revolutionary constitutions. This course will explore the history of these independence

  10. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS The Husky Ski Team is for all students who want to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billey, Sara

    UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS PROGRAMS The Husky Ski Team is for all Office, located on the 3rd floor of the IMA. COLLEGE TEAMS The University of Washington, College of Idaho, University of Idaho, University of Oregon, Seattle University, Washington State University, Oregon State

  11. Indoor air pollution from portable kerosene-fired space heaters. [Effects of wick height and fuel consumption rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Dillworth, J.F.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-02-01

    Indoor use of unvented combustion appliances is known to cause an increase in indoor air pollutant levels. Laboratory tests were conducted on radiant and convective portable kerosene-fired space heaters to identify the pollutants they emit and to determine their emission rates. Laboratory-derived CO and NO/sub 2/ emission rates from unvented portable kerosense-fired space heaters are summarized and the effect of wick height and fuel consumption rate on CO and NO/sub 2/ emissions is given. Pollutant concentration profiles resulting from the use of kerosene heaters in a 27m/sup 3/ environmental chamber and a 240m/sup 3/ house are presented. When such heaters are operated for one hour in a 27m/sup 3/ chamber with 0.4 air changes per hour, the resultant CO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above the U.S. occupational standard, and NO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above California's short-term outdoor standard. Further data on parameters such as heater usage patterns and air exchange rates are needed to determine the actual pollutant exposure that kerosene heater users experience.

  12. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  13. Bayesian based design of real-time sensor systems for high-risk indoor contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreedharan, Priya; Sreedharan, Priya

    2007-12-01

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardousto building occupants. To respond effectively, the contaminant release must be quicklydetected and characterized to determine unobserved parameters, such as release locationand strength. Characterizing the release requires solving an inverse problem. Designinga robust real-time sensor system that solves the inverse problem is challenging becausethe fate and transport of contaminants is complex, sensor information is limited andimperfect, and real-time estimation is computationally constrained.This dissertation uses a system-level approach, based on a Bayes Monte Carloframework, to develop sensor-system design concepts and methods. I describe threeinvestigations that explore complex relationships among sensors, network architecture,interpretation algorithms, and system performance. The investigations use data obtainedfrom tracer gas experiments conducted in a real building. The influence of individual sensor characteristics on the sensor-system performance for binary-type contaminant sensors is analyzed. Performance tradeoffs among sensor accuracy, threshold level and response time are identified; these attributes could not be inferred without a system-level analysis. For example, more accurate but slower sensors are found to outperform less accurate but faster sensors. Secondly, I investigate how the sensor-system performance can be understood in terms of contaminant transport processes and the model representation that is used to solve the inverse problem. The determination of release location and mass are shown to be related to and constrained by transport and mixing time scales. These time scales explain performance differences among different sensor networks. For example, the effect of longer sensor response times is comparably less for releases with longer mixing time scales. The third investigation explores how information fusion from heterogeneous sensors may improve the sensor-system performance and offset the need for more contaminant sensors. Physics- and algorithm-based frameworks are presented for selecting and fusing information from noncontaminant sensors. The frameworks are demonstrated with door-position sensors, which are found to be more useful in natural airflow conditions, but which cannot compensate for poor placement of contaminant sensors. The concepts and empirical findings have the potential to help in the design of sensor systems for more complex building systems. The research has broader relevance to additional environmental monitoring problems, fault detection and diagnostics, and system design.

  14. Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless T.D.C. Little, P. Dib, K. Shah, N. Barraford, and B. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Thomas

    1 Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless Networking T.D.C. Little, P. Dib, K. Shah, N communications, free-space optical communications, visible light LED, modulation, OOK, FSO. #12;2 I. Introduction-based communication into these illumination devices. The LED-based visible-light optical channel becomes a very

  15. ION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor Magnetic Field Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    ION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor Lachapelle Position Location and Navigation (PLAN) Group Department of Geomatics Engineering, University Engineering. He received his B.E. degree in Computer Systems Engineering from NED University of Engineering

  16. United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190 "Environmental Radiation Protection Standards discussion about whether to revise the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power

  17. Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paciorek, Chris

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data Lisa Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA Abstract Previous studies have identified associations between traffic

  18. A Study to Determine the Incentives of Companies In Their Decisions to Either Sponsor or Not to Sponsor Professional Sports Teams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolling, David Mark

    2010-05-04

    or local franchises. Small and large companies also displayed no apparent differences in their decisions to sponsor. The implications for professional sports teams and for both current and potential sponsors are considerable if administrators and decision...

  19. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  20. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  1. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  2. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boudreaux, Philip R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof assemblies against moisture. The key variables investigated were the leakage area from the attic to the outside, leakage area from the attic to the interior, leakage area from the interior to the outside, supply duct leakage in the attic, and interior moisture generation. These investigations are described in this report.

  3. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore »mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  4. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  5. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  6. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  7. A scoping study on the costs of indoor air quality illnesses:an insurance loss reduction perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allan; Vine, Edward L.

    1998-08-31

    The incidence of commercial buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and the frequency of litigation over the effects of poor IAQ is increasing. If so, these increases have ramifications for insurance carriers, which pay for many of the costs of health care and general commercial liability. However, little is known about the actual costs to insurance companies from poor IAQ in buildings. This paper reports on the results of a literature search of buildings-related, business and legal databases, and interviews with insurance and risk management representatives aimed at finding information on the direct costs to the insurance industry of poor building IAQ, as well as the costs of litigation. The literature search and discussions with insurance and risk management professionals reported in this paper turned up little specific information about the costs of IAQ-related problems to insurance companies. However, those discussions and certain articles in the insurance industry press indicate that there is a strong awareness and growing concern over the "silent crisis" of IAQ and its potential to cause large industry losses, and that a few companies are taking steps to address this issue. The source of these losses include both direct costs to insurers from paying health insurance and professional liability claims, as weIl as the cost of litigation. In spite of the lack of data on how IAQ-related health problems affect their business, the insurance industry has taken the anecdotal evidence about their reality seriously enough to alter their policies in ways that have lessened their exposure. We conclude by briefly discussing four activities that need to be addressed in the near future: (1) quantifying IAQ-related insurance costs by sector, (2) educating the insurance industry about the importance of IAQ issues, (3) examining IAQ impacts on the insurance industry in the residential sector, and (4) evaluating the relationship between IAQ improvements and their impact on energy use.

  8. NIOSH testimony on indoor air quality: Selected references before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean and Water Protection, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by J. Donald Millar, May 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has compiled the document in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality (IAQ), including sick building syndrome. Included in the publication are: NIOSH Congressional testimony that describes the NIOSH IAQ investigations program and summarizes the results of NIOSH research and findings on IAQ problems, NIOSH guidance for conducting indoor air quality investigations, NIOSH journal article on evaluating building ventilation systems, and list of non-NIOSH publications on indoor air quality. As the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for occupational safety and health standards, NIOSH limits its IAQ activities to the occupational environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducts an IAQ program and can be contacted for information regarding both occupational and non-occupational settings.

  9. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In Unprecedented Detail Posted on of implantable device for measuring the heart's electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over allows for measuring electrical activity with greater resolution in time and space. The new device can

  10. A Compound Framework for Sports Prediction: The Case Study of Football Byungho Min , Jinhyuck Kim, Chongyoun Choe, Hyeonsang Eom, Robert Ian (Bob) McKay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Robert Ian

    A Compound Framework for Sports Prediction: The Case Study of Football Byungho Min , Jinhyuck Kim prediction certainly more realistic, and somewhat more accurate. We have implemented a football results predictor called FRES (Football Result Expert System) based on our framework, and show that it gives

  11. Home | Cities | India | World | Indians Abroad | Business | Cricket | Other Sports | Health/Sci | Infotech | Education | Earth | Opinion | Entertainment | Lifestyle | Classifieds Videos Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madisetti, Vijay K.

    Home | Cities | India | World | Indians Abroad | Business | Cricket | Other Sports | Health Friends? Advanced Search ePaper l mPaper l Archives India Go Andhra to get 2 Georgia Tech campuses 16 Feb Madisetti, executive director of Georgia Tech's India initiative and professor in its School of Electrical

  12. HOME NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS ENTERTAINMENT LIFE & STYLE SUBURBAN JOURNALS JOBS AUTOS HOMES SHOPPING #1 ST. LOUIS WEB SITE SITE SEARCH STORY FINDER ADJUST TEXT: + | -Go! Go!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    HOME NEWS BUSINESS SPORTS ENTERTAINMENT LIFE & STYLE SUBURBAN JOURNALS JOBS AUTOS HOMES SHOPPING #1 to be present. "What we have here is just like lightning," said U of I chemistry graduate student Nathan store brings taste to its displays [Last 7 Days] TOP JOBS INTERNET HOME OF: St. Louis Post

  13. Search All NYTimes.com WORLD U.S. N.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS ENVIRONMENT SPACE & COSMOS Enlarge This Image LUNAR CLUES World U.S. N.Y. / Region Business Technology Science Health Sports Opinion Arts Style Travel Jobs Real Estate Automobiles Back to Top Copyright 2009 The New York Times Company Privacy Policy Search

  14. HOME NEWS OPINION ENTERTAINMENT SPORTS BLOGS CLASSIFIEDS CALENDAR MULTIM Page 1 of 4The Shorthorn -Micro-scale technology used to create micro-Maverick pride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    HOME NEWS OPINION ENTERTAINMENT SPORTS BLOGS CLASSIFIEDS CALENDAR MULTIM Page 1 of 4The Shorthorn - Micro-scale technology used to create micro-Maverick pride 4/21/2010http-scale technology used to create micro-Maverick pride Microscale technology used to create microMaverick pride

  15. Day of wk Date Time Event Location Wednesday 10/29/2014 12:00pm1:00pm 3k Manley/Indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    :00am 55m, 400m, 800m, mile, 3k Syr. Chargers Meet @ Manley Saturday 12/20/2014 2:30pm5:30pm Relays: 4x/18/2015 7:00am10:00am 55m, 400m, 800m, mile, 3k Syr. Chargers Meet @ Manley Friday 1/23/2015 12:00pm1:00pm/Indoor Sunday 2/15/2015 7:00am10:00am 55m, 400m, 800m, mile, 3k Syr. Chargers Meet @ Manley Friday 2/20/2015 12

  16. Indoor-air-quality research. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications and the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, August 2, 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Spokesmen for the environmental health sciences, consumer product safety, medical profession, and conservation discussed current research on whether indoor air quality suffers as a result of weatherization to reduce air leakage at a two-day hearing. Critical areas for research were the identification, measurement, characterization, control and health effects of indoor pollutants. Of particular concern to the committee was the administration's phasing out of some research programs despite DOE authorization and Congressional appropriations to continue. The witnesses discussed contaminants from building materials, household products, and other sources as well as the effects of reduced ventilation. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

  17. Round Time Court 1 (Indoor) Court 2 (Indoor) Round Time Court 1 (Indoor) Court 2 (Indoor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    :00 Play-Offs (A) A1 (Super) Pos 5 vs A2 (Prem) Pos 2 Play-Offs (B) A1 (Super) Pos 6 vs A2 (Prem) Pos 1 4 13:00 Semi-Final (F) A1 (Super) Pos 2 vs A1 (Super) Pos 3 Play-Offs (H) A2 (Prem) Pos 4 vs A2 (Prem) Pos 5 5 14:30 Semi-Final (G) A1 (Super) Pos 1 vs A1 (Super) Pos 4 Play-Offs (I) A2 (Prem) Pos 3 vs A2

  18. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    1997-12-01

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS NOx = 0.50 g/mi PM = 0.05 g/mi CO = 2.8 g/mi NMHC = 0.07 g/mi California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi PM = 0.01 g/mi (2) FUEL ECONOMY The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  19. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John H. Stang

    2005-12-31

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS--NO{sub x} = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NO{sub x} = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY--The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT--Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  20. Development of Technologies for a High Efficiency, Very Low Emission, Diesel Engine for Light Trucks and Sport Utility Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stang, John H.

    2005-12-19

    Cummins Inc., in partnership with the Department of Energy, has developed technology for a new highly efficient, very low emission, diesel engine for light trucks and sport utility vehicles. This work began in April 1997, and started with very aggressive goals for vehicles in the 5751 to 8500 pound GCW weight class. The primary program goals were as follows: (1) EMISSIONS -- NOx = 0.50 g/mi; PM = 0.05 g/mi; CO = 2.8 g/mi; and NMHC = 0.07 g/mi. California decided to issue new and even tougher LEV II light truck regulations late in 1999. EPA also issued its lower Tier 2 regulations late in 2000. The net result was that the targets for this diesel engine project were lowered, and these goals were eventually modified by the publication of Federal Tier 2 emission standards early in 2000 to the following: NOx = 0.07 g/mi; and PM = 0.01 g/mi. (2) FUEL ECONOMY -- The fuel economy goal was 50 percent MPG improvement (combined city/highway) over the 1997 gasoline powered light truck or sport utility vehicle in the vehicle class for which this diesel engine is being designed to replace. The goal for fuel economy remained at 50 percent MPG improvement, even with the emissions goal revisions. (3) COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT -- Regular design reviews of the engine program will be conducted with a vehicle manufacturer to insure that the concepts and design specifics are commercially feasible. (DaimlerChrysler has provided Cummins with this design review input.) Cummins has essentially completed a demonstration of proof-of-principle for a diesel engine platform using advanced combustion and fuel system technologies. Cummins reported very early progress in this project, evidence that new diesel engine technology had been developed that demonstrated the feasibility of the above emissions goals. Emissions levels of NOx = 0.4 g/mi and PM = 0.06 g/mi were demonstrated for a 5250 lb. test weight vehicle with passive aftertreatment only. These results were achieved using the full chassis dynamometer FTP-75 test procedure that allowed compliance with the Tier 2 Interim Bin 10 Standards and would apply to vehicles in MY2004 through MY2007 timeframe. In further technology development with active aftertreatment management, Cummins has been able to report that the emissions goals for the Tier 2 Bin 5 standards were met on an engine running the full FTP-75 test procedure. The fuel economy on the chassis tests was measured at over 59 percent MPG improvement over the gasoline engines that are offered in typical SUVs and light trucks. The above demonstration used only in-cylinder fueling for management of the aftertreatment system.

  1. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These strategies, however, would make it more complex and more prescriptive, and would require substantial research. One practical intermediate strategy to save energy would be an alternate VRP, allowing VRs lower than currently prescribed, as long as indoor VOC concentrations were no higher than with VRs prescribed under the current VRP. This kind of hybrid, with source reduction and use of air cleaning optional but permitted, could eventually evolve, as data, materials, and air-cleaning technology allowed gradual lowering of allowable concentrations, into a fully developed IAQP. Ultimately, it seems that VR standards must evolve to resemble the IAQP, especially in California, where buildings must achieve zero net energy use within 20 years.

  2. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  3. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

    2003-09-01

    Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

  4. Sports Car Club 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active...

  5. Sports Field Maintenance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duble, Richard L.

    1995-07-31

    by the ryegrasses adds to the enjoyment of the players and fans. To prepare for overseeding, thin the bermudagrass turf with a flail mower or dethatching mower. Sweep or vacuum the field after mowing to remove grass clip- pings and thatch. Where common bermudagrass...

  6. System for reducing heat losses from indoor swimming pools by use of automatic covers. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This final report is an account of the principal activities of Lof Energy Systems, Inc. in a two-year project funded by the Energy Related Inventions Program (ERIP) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary objective has been the development of a fully practical and economical system for saving energy in indoor swimming pools by use of motorized covers. The goal is wide-spread use of a fully developed product, in institutional swimming pools. Four major tasks, depicted in the accompanying Performance Schedule, have been completed, and one other has been initiated and its completion committed. Principal accomplishments have been the selection and improvement of cover materials and designs, lengthening and strengthening of reels and improvements in motorized components and their control, design and installation of pool covers in full scale demonstration and evaluation of fully developed commercial system, preparation and dissemination of manuals and reports, finalization of arrangements for Underwriters Laboratory certification of products, and final report preparation and submission. Of greatest significance has been the successful demonstration of the fully developed system and the verification and reporting by an energy consultant of the large savings resulting from pool cover use. Probably the best evidence of success of the DOE-ERIP project in advancing this invention to a commercial stage is its acceptance for sale by the Lincoln Equipment Company, a national distributor of swimming pool supplies and equipment. A copy of the relevant page in the Lincoln catalog is included in this report as Annex A. Representatives of that company now offer Tof motorized pool cover systems to their pool owner customers. In addition to the plans for securing UL certification the company expects to continue making design improvements that can increase system reliability, durability, and cost-effectiveness.

  7. International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con Mag 08:30 08:45 WLAN Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con Mag 09:00 09:15 WLAN Foot HS UWB WSN Geo Con 09:30 WLAN Foot 09:45 Coffee, F-Floor Coffee, F-Floor 10:00 Opening Session, G7 10:15 WLAN Foot Aw UWB WSN Geo Con Inno Demo 10:30 RF IMU Req RFID US Con 10:45 WLAN Foot Aw UWB WSN Geo Con Inno

  8. indoor | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:WizardYatescloud Home Dc's pictureenergygridimproveindoor

  9. Mold: An Indoor Air Pollutant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2002-07-08

    the right conditions they begin to grow. The food source can be any organic material such as dust, books, papers, animal dander, soap scum, wood, particle board, paint, wallpaper, carpet and upholstery. When such materials stay damp (especially in dark... mold that grows on wet materials containing cellulose. Stachybotrys is one of several molds that produce potent mycotoxins (toxic sub- stances). How does mold affect health? Most people have few difficulties when exposed to mold spores...

  10. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    acrolein, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,4- dichlorobenzene,1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzene, and 1,3-butadiene are specificacetaldehyde *butadiene, 1,3- *dichlorobenzene, 1,4- benzyl

  11. Pedestrian localisation for indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodman, Oliver

    2010-11-16

    pedestrian tracking that uses on-body inertial sensors rather than relying on fixed infrastructure. It is demonstrated that general purpose inertial navigation algorithms are unsuitable for pedestrian tracking due to the rapid accumulation of errors...

  12. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    acrolein, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,4- dichlorobenzene,benzene, and 1,3-butadiene are specific products.acetaldehyde *butadiene, 1,3- *dichlorobenzene, 1,4- benzyl

  13. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

  14. Sports Medicine Building Student Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Center Starbucks (Cabell Library) Starbucks (MPC Addition) Subway (Student Commons) Taco Bell (Student

  15. Club Sports Trip Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    : ____________________________________________________________________________ Vehicle Use: Type - 7 Van, 8 Van, Car, Bus [DRS will reserve University vehicles]; Private [requires proof of insurance]; Rental Vehicle Type # of Passengers Primary Driver/Vehicle Owner Back-Up Driver [choose from list above

  16. More Sports Features/About

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    of the bus routes from the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District. Spaulding explains to the Clean Air Express, your home away from home, at least for a couple of hours each day. Time for reading for the Clean Air Express has been growing, with a waiting list for the subscription-only buses from Santa Maria

  17. University of Cambridge SPORTS CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    .........................................................................................................7 Floor usage summary...............................................................................................................................9 Heating and cooling ................................................................................................................10 Heating

  18. More Sports Features/About

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Region, county traffic managers have been able to add an extra nonstop Compressed Natural Gas Clean Air that the buses started out in 1991 as an air quality program, but the district's main function is monitoring air, was a natural to take over the program. The official changeover is April 1, as the current air district contract

  19. 04/10/2007 02:28 PMN.F.L. Suspends 2 Players for Personal Conduct -New York Times Page 1 of 2http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/10/sports/football/11cndnfl.html?_r=1&hp=&oref=slogin&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalas, Paul G.

    ://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/10/sports/football/11cndnfl.html?_r=1&hp=&oref=slogin&pagewanted=print April 10, 2007 N was suspended today for the entire 2007 football season and Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chris Henry was suspended for the first eight games as the National Football League began to crack down on players who

  20. Biofuels development in Maine: Using trees to oil the wheels of sustainability -Maine news, sports, obituaries, weather -Bangor Daily News http://bangordailynews.com/2013/03/12/opinion/biofuels-development-in-maine-using-trees-to-oil-the-wheels-of-sustain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    Biofuels development in Maine: Using trees to oil the wheels of sustainability - Maine news, sports, obituaries, weather - Bangor Daily News http://bangordailynews.com/2013/03/12/opinion/biofuels-development-in-maine-using-trees-to-oil-the-wheels-of-sustainability/print/[3/13/2013 1:54:43 PM] Biofuels development

  1. Arsenic-related skin lesions and glutathione S-transferase P1 A1578G (lle105Val) polymorphism in two ethnic clans exposed to indoor combustion of high arsenic coal in one village

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, G.F.; Du, H.; Chen, J.G.; Lu, H.C.; Guo, W.C.; Meng, H.; Zhang, T.B.; Zhang, X.J.; Lu, D.R.; Golka, K.; Shen, J.H. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2006-12-15

    A total of 2402 patients with arsenic-related skin lesions, such as hyperkeratosis, hyperpigmentation or hypopigmentation, or even skin cancer in a few villages in Southwest Guizhou Autonomous Prefecture, China represent a unique case of endemic arsenism related with indoor combustion of high arsenic coal. This study aimed to investigate the cluster of arsenism cases and the possible relevant factors including GSTP1 polymorphism in two clans of different ethnic origin living in one village for generations. Arsenism morbidity in Miao clan P was significantly lower than in the neighbouring Han clan G1 (5.9 vs. 32.7%, odds ratio (OR)=0.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.27, P < 0.0001). No sex differences were confirmed inside both clans. Analyses of the environmental samples indicated that Miao clan P members were exposed to higher amounts of arsenic via inhalation and food ingestion. Hair and urine samples also proved a higher arsenic body burden in ethnic Miao individuals. No corresponding differences by sex were found. Higher frequencies of combined mutant genotype G/G1578 and A/G1578 (OR=4.72, 95% CI: 2.34-9.54, P < 0.0001) and of mutant allele G1578 (OR=3.22, 95% CI: 2.00-5.18, P < 0.0001) were detected in diagnosed arsenism patients than in non-diseased individuals. The Miao individuals showed a lower percentage of combined mutant genotypes (30.6 vs. 52.7%, OR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.84, P=0.015) as well as of mutant allele G1578 (OR=0.46, 95% CI: 0.24-0.88, P=0.017) than their Han neighbours. Conclusions Genetic predisposition influences dermal arsenism toxicity. The GSTP1 A1578G (IIe105Val) status might be a susceptibility factor for arsenic-related skin lesions.

  2. Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    pressurize the crawl space. Sane of the llnderfloor fans were not opera* (failed) an3 this results in mist ~OQI: air flawing into the building through the apenFngs in the pip* chases anl aperative underfloor fan ducts. Turn off the underfloar fans, sedl...

  3. NorthFairwayRd. Indoor Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomulkiewicz, Richard

    orne Cir. Grimes Way Bill Chipman Trail LincolnDrive aWsillEy Ferdinand's Lane FairwayLn. College Ave. Landis Pl. Lower Dr. JuniperWy. Upper Dr. Williams Dr.Valley Rd. Illinois St. North Fairway Rd. Round Top Feeding Lab Annex Environmental Health Services Bear Facility Lab Animal Facility Wilmer Davis Community

  4. Indoor Landscaping with Living Foliage Plants. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWerth, A. F.

    1972-01-01

    periotls of tirnc if a daytime temperature of 70 to 75 degrees Faliren. i heit, and a night temperature of 60 to 65 t1egrcc.q Fahrenheit can be maintained. In general, plants in ' high light intensities will thrive in the upper limit( 1...

  5. NEXT GENERATION LUMINAIRES INDOOR JUDGING 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View this behind-the-scenes look at the 2014 NGL judging event where entries were evaluated by a panel of judges drawn from the architectural lighting community in an intensive three-step process...

  6. MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Indoor Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    that will blow you away. ZUMBA SENTAO ­ Using the same "Zumba music" and rhythmic steps. ZUMBA SENTAO heats up to improve muscular flexibility. Minute to WIN it - Using a hybrid of interval training and circuits your heart pumping, build strength and push you beyond your limits! Body Blast ­ An awesome workout

  7. MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Indoor Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    . ZUMBA SENTAO heats up exercise by adding additional toning and exciting new ideas. ZUMBA Toning a hybrid of interval training and circuits, participants will complete a series of timed exercises to get a total body workout! This class is sure to get your heart pumping, build strength and push you beyond

  8. MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Indoor Cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    you away. ZUMBA SENTAO ­ Using the same "Zumba music" and rhythmic steps. ZUMBA SENTAO heats up a hybrid of interval training and circuits, participants will complete a series of timed exercises to get a total body workout! This class is sure to get your heart pumping, build strength and push you beyond

  9. Indoor climate and productivity in office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    in improved of the potential heat stress and open-plan re-ope- Medicine, n. 4. heat stress on the Swedish Instituteed. on pairs of stresses: mild heat and low-frequency of

  10. Indoor Climate and Productivity in Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The effects of moderate heat stress and open–plan officeeffects of moderate heat stress on the mental performance byon pairs of stresses: mild heat and low–frequency noise”,

  11. Combination of Indoor and Outdoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry, surveying, navigation) June 24-26, 2008 ETH.00005 Attenuation of various building materials (L1 = 1500 MHz) Stone (1997) Signal Strength in Decibel Watt of GNSS

  12. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. )

    1990-08-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

  13. Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

  14. Procedure to Measure Indoor Lighting Energy Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Blair, N.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    This document provides standard definitions of performance metrics and methods to determine them for the energy performance of building interior lighting systems. It can be used for existing buildings and for proposed buildings. The primary users for whom these documents are intended are building energy analysts and technicians who design, install, and operate data acquisition systems, and who analyze and report building energy performance data. Typical results from the use of this procedure are the monthly and annual energy used for lighting, energy savings from occupancy or daylighting controls, and the percent of the total building energy use that is used by the lighting system. The document is not specifically intended for retrofit applications. However, it does complement Measurement and Verification protocols that do not provide detailed performance metrics or measurement procedures.

  15. GATEWAY Demonstration Indoor Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing Tool Fits theSunShotB, Title III, Title V and2010Coston

  16. OpenLS for indoor positioning : strategies for standardizing location based services for indoor use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodziej, Krzysztof W., 1978-

    2004-01-01

    The combination of location positioning technologies such as GPS and initiatives like the US Federal Communications Commission's E911 telecommunication initiatives has generated a lot of interest in applications and services ...

  17. SPORTDISCUS SportDiscus indexes a wide range of sports literature, which includes sport science/medicine,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    Discus. It is advisable to use this page to search for articles, rather than the basic search page. SEARCHING Enter your search terms in the search field(s). Click Search. You can use the drop-down menus to combine words that you are emailed details of future articles that relate to your search terms. To retrieve your results

  18. Sports&Culture Geadviseerd door het

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    / Cassis / 7-up 1,60 Ice Tea 1,60 Sourcy rood / blauw 1,60 Bitter Lemon / Tonic 1,60 Fles water 0,5 L 1,50 Lipton green 0,5 L 2,10 Energy drink 2,00 VERS GEPERST Keuze uit: sinaasappel, mango

  19. Sports Engineering ISSN 1369-7072

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -archived in electronic repositories. If you wish to self-archive your work, please use the accepted author's version jumps pose a sig- nificantly greater risk for certain classes of injury to resort patrons than other as well. The purpose of this work is to review the current state of the science of snow park jumps

  20. WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL Sport Date/Time Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    Football Mon. Sept 14 ­ 6pm-7:30pm Thurs. Sept 17 ­ 5:30pm-7pm Mon. Sept 21 ­ 5:30pm-7pm Valley Ice Hockey Outdoor Soccer Wed. Sept 9 ­ 5:30pm-7:30pm Mon. Sept 14 ­ 5:30pm-7:30pm Wed. Sept 16 ­ 5:30pm-7:30pm

  1. SPORT CLUBSFITNESS &WELLNESSAQUATICS INTRAMURALS RECREATION & WELLNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is prohibited. · Weapons (knife, gun, etc) are not permitted on the property at any time. FACILITY RULES of equipment beyond its designed purpose are prohibited. · Chalk is prohibited in the facility. · Spitting

  2. Virginia Tech Department of Recreational Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the ,,HOKIE GRAIL and the Crowning of the ALL-UNIVERSITY CHAMPION" DESCRIPTION: The purpose of the Intramural from each division will have their names engraved on the "HOKIE GRAIL" All-University Points

  3. Sports and Materials Science Course outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    and cast aluminium engines have all contributed to lighter cars, increased fuel efficiency and increased metallic alloys, materials selection and design. The final year project in the materials half

  4. Computational Biomechanics, Stochastic Motion and Team Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimpampi, E; Sacripanti, A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to present a computational model of the motion of a single athlete in a team and to compare the resulting trajectory with experimental data obtained in the field during competitions by match analysis software. To this purpose, some results related to a paths ensemble of a single player are discussed. Between each interaction it is assumed that he follows a straight line and his motion is characterized by viscous, pushing and pedestrian like force. A random force is supposed to influence only the trajectory direction after each interaction. Furthermore it is assumed that the time step between each interaction is a random variable belonging to a Gaussian distribution. The main criteria is a selection of a function correlated to the strategy of the player, around which, in a necessarily randomly way, a tactic function should be added. The strategy depends on the players role: for the numerical simulations in this paper, a forward player was selected, with the average target ...

  5. Sports over IP : dynamics and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blain, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances are allowing the use of the Internet Protocol and the Internet infrastructure mainly built by cable and telecom operators for broadcasting purposes in the U.S. This disruption raises a business issue ...

  6. Saturn's moon rhea sports a dusty halo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurity Administration winsSarah L.7: Prof.

  7. Department of recreational SportS S P O R T C L U B S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    , Taekwondo, Men's and Women's Volleyball, and Wrestling Clubs. 4 basketball courts 6 volleyball courts

  8. Energy Saving and Good Quality Lighting for Indoor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, H.

    2008-01-01

    but at the same time also in quality of lighting took place. This increase of efficiency can be realized in different ways. In e.g. offices, new fluorescent lamps TL5 with extremely high lamp efficacies, silver-coated aluminium lamellae optics for high... installations Recessed mounted office luminaire SmartForm with TL5 lamps and highly efficient silver-coated aluminium lamellae louvre with a light output ratio up to 94%. Very popular among architects are closed luminaires with optical acrylic micro lense...

  9. INDOOR POSITIONING AN AD-HOC POSITIONING SYSTEM Rainer Mautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to enable continuous tracking of the location of devices in all environments. Highly accurate, reliable 3D computers, printers, or simple tags with wireless radio connections that are `intelligent' enough to be able

  10. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Quality - Interviews Credits Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 5 Designer Occupant (7 interviews) Operations/Managementquality standpoint by not always from a thermal comfort standpoint. Operations interviews: All three buildings management

  11. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    in US multifamily buildings: Energy savings, costs, andeconomics." Energy 13(11): 797-811. Haas, R. , H. Auer andbenefits of apartment energy retrofits." Building and

  12. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  13. Application of receptor modeling to indoor air emissions from electroplating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadden, R.A.; Liao, S.L.; Scheff, P.A.; Franke, J.E.; Conroy, L.M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Public Health

    1998-12-01

    In work areas containing multiple sources of the same air pollutant, it is useful for control purposes to be able to separate out the contribution from each individual source. In this study, the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model was used to allocate the contributions from multiple sources to area concentration measurements in three electroplating shops. Shop 1 was a room with a single copper electroplating line; shop 2 was a large bay containing a chromium conversion coating line, a continuous chromium electroplating line, and several manual electroplating operations; shop 3 contained a piston chrome plating line, a decorative chrome plating line, and manual and barrel zinc coating lines. The receptor modeling approach uses the elemental composition of one or more source categories to determine what fraction of an area sample is contributed by each source. In most cases the CMB model predicted over 90% of the measured concentrations. The allocation procedure explained 100% of the copper measured at three locations in shop 1, with contributions of 95 to 98% from the plating line and the rest from air outside the room. For shop 2, a two-source model explained 100% of the chromium measured at five sampling locations. For shop 3, the percent contributions of chromium from the piston plating line and the decorative plating line were consistent with distance from each of the sources.

  14. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to...

  15. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    on ambient temperature, Ergonomics, 2007, Vol. 50, No. 4,on Environmental Ergonomics 2009, August. Humphreys, M.A. (

  16. Mechanism of Thermal Comfort and Its Application in Indoor Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lian, Z.; Liu, W.; Ye, X.; Ye, Y.

    2006-01-01

    -70% and air velocity was maintained at 0.2m/s during the experiment. The range of ambient temperature is from 16 to 34 . We measured the peak value of electric current of metabolite of dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC) in PO.... Differences were considered statistically significant as Pambient temperature resulted in the fluctuation of DOPAC. Since...

  17. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    group felt that the building automation or management systemhad issues with the building automation systems, a lack ofbe provided from the building automation systems and no air

  18. Maintaining Indoor Air Quality During Construction and Renovation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    / Hazards Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds that are readily Flooring Caulks Fuels, Cleaners Wall Coverings Sealants Adhesives Composite Wood Products Paints Carpeting be implemented. Hazardous Particulates which are subject to special regulation include lead paint dust which

  19. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01

    While it has brought green design and construction practicesand Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating Systemof sustainable design, we question how green buildings are

  20. LED Watch: Unlocking the Full Potential of Indoor Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems june2015ledwatch.pdf More Documents & Publications 2015 ARTICLES What's Next for Solid-State Lighting - February 2015 LED Watch: NGL Tells Us the State of Solid-State...

  1. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    caused by office's thermal Environment, J. Archit. Plann.Standard 55- 2010. Thermal environment conditions for humanindoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and

  2. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory Energy Efficient Buildings Mobile Laboratory.of 1,150 f t . LBL's Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) MobileLaboratory. Energy Efficient Buildings Program Energy and

  3. Indoor environmental quality surveys. A brief literature review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peretti, Clara; Schiavon, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Protocol for Energy-Efficient Buildings, 64 pages. Rouletof healthy and energy efficient buildings health offices and

  4. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    microbial burden The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobilein a number of energy efficient buildings, wherein pollutantenergy~efficient ventilation , institutional and commercial buildings.

  5. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radon-Resistant Homes. 2001. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA Radon Maps: EPA's Map of Radon Zones. 2008. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA Standard for New...

  6. Metrics-driven development of an autonomous indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Differential drive Ground-truth camera Sonars and IR Pan-tilt unit IMU Platform: depth-only perception #12 Obstacle avoidance Lag estimator Drive controller Differential drive Horizontal scan Path tracking in large environments #12;Key metric of autonomy: mean time to failure #12;10 Atrium Lounge Hallway

  7. Autonomous Indoors Navigation using a Small-Size Quadrotor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    is substantially more complex than that of ground-based vehicles which makes them harder to control. Finally, one localization algorithm. during testing. Whereas a failure in the stabilization of the pose of a ground robot- niques which have been successfully applied on ground robots to our flying platform. We validate our

  8. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside....

  9. Evaluation of spectrally efficient indoor optical wireless transmission techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Thilo Christian Martin

    2014-06-30

    existing RF systems. In OWC, data is transmitted by modulating the intensity of light sources, typically incoherent light emitting diodes (LEDs). Thus, OWC systems employ intensity modulation (IM) and direct detection (DD) of the optical carrier. Since off...

  10. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals...

  11. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-01-01

    OF IEQ ON WORK AND SCHOOL PERFORMANCE Temperature and officeand better work and school performance. Removal of pollutantoverall work and school performance. We now have estimates

  12. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Heating degree day Home energy saver web based program Homeenergy consumption, the Home Energy Saver Pro (HES) [http://savings, based on the Home Energy Saver tool and additional

  13. Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    for IEQ and energy efficiency in buildings through thefor IEQ and energy efficiency in buildings through thefor IEQ and energy efficiency in buildings, along with

  14. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    30 RTUs with advanced controls, resulting in over 100 kWh of energy savings; Walmart Stores Inc. completed over 10,000 high-efficiency RTU installations in new and...

  15. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Indoor LED Luminaires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  16. An indoor public space for a winter city

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crane, Justin Fuller

    2005-01-01

    Winter is a marginalized season in North American design. Even though most cities in the northern United States and Canada have winter conditions-snowfall, ice, freezing temperatures, and long nights-for substantial portions ...

  17. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2009-01-01

    Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryNational Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 October 2008 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchNational Laboratory.  The information from this project contributes to PIER’s  Energy?Related Environmental Research 

  18. Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzerling, David

    2012-01-01

    based input system for sensor metadata similar to the oneToolkit, deploying the sensors, recording metadata, takingcollecting the metadata that describes such sensor data

  19. Indoor Position Estimation System for Wide Area Augmented Reality Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    reality applications is to localize the user accurately so as to superimpose metadata in the user's field, scalable way; (b) construct multiple sensor e.g. WiFi and imagery signature databases for the same or carrying a mo- bile device equipped with a camera and WiFi sensor. The system consists of a man portable

  20. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    16 Energy dataretrofits. Analogous energy data were collected from similarthe retrofits. Analogous energy data were collected from a

  1. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) Country of...

  2. RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moschandreas, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    ENVIRONMENT DIVISION RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS INLBL-12590 EEB-Vent 81-12 RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS2.1 Monitoring History of Radon Table 2.1. Integrated (PERM)

  3. Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department today announced the winners...

  4. Indoor bicycle storage and shower station Covered bicycle storage outside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    materials in interior finishes Lots of natural day lighting Energy recovery units that reduce humidity, bring in outside air and reduce energy use Water conserving dual-flush toilets Low-flow faucets pavers in driveways to reduce storm-water runoff Digital television and website displays campus energy

  5. The Cricket Indoor Location System Nissanka Bodhi Priyantha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications. Cricket consists of location beacons that are attached to the ceiling of a building to compute their own locations. This active-beacon passive-listener architecture is scalable with respect

  6. Investigation of optical wireless systems for indoor broadband networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    in the light emitting diodes (LEDs) of a visible light communication (VLC) system are investigated. Keywords emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting in the visible spectral range has recently gained increasing attention been reported covering bit rates up to 50 Mb/s [5]. Optical wireless communications with (light

  7. Human Trajectory Forecasting In Indoor Environments Using Geometric Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addressing this problem, we have built a model to estimate the occupancy behavior of humans based enhancement in the accuracy of trajectory forecasting by incorporating the occupancy behavior model. Keywords Trajectory forecasting, human occupancy behavior, 3D ge- ometric context 1. INTRODUCTION Given a human

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Modem RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 18.95HEATING COMMERCIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 10.3data on various active and pas- sive methods of reducing energy consumption

  9. Building Efficiency and Indoor Air Quality - You Can Have Both 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettler, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    , and run around loops. These methods can be used on some packaged equipment but is normally provided on makeup air units and central air supply systems. These built up units offer opportunities to combine heat recovery, special filtration, humidity control...

  10. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Canada Method Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACH ACHReference Study Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACHKing Reference Leakage Measurement Units ACH ACH ACH ACH ACH

  11. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Quality Measurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Quality ~leasurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Gregory W. Traynor Energy Efficient Buildings Program Energy

  12. Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    noise and comfort in occupied spaces (psycho-acoustic phase) Laboratory observations of biocide efficiency against Legionella in model cooling tower

  13. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and they shall meet the emission requirements of the EPA Standards for New Residential Wood Heaters and WAC 173-433-100 (3). " Pellet stoves shall meet the requirements of ASTM...

  14. PHOTOGRAMMETRY BASED ERROR ANALYSIS OF INDOOR MOBILE ROBOT LOCALIZATION *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Font, Josep Maria

    .benedico, josep.m.font}@upc.edu ABSTRACT The presented work is a low cost "off-line" method that is able of the mobile object, localization will require higher or lower degrees of precision. This precision are the innovative tracking lasers used for metrology, like the LT800 model from Leica GeoSystems [1]. It allows

  15. Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    within the trailers make air quality concerns worse. Who Is Most At Risk Poor air quality causes problems with asthma · People who have allergies · People who have chronic lung disease such as bronchitis or of asthma may benefit from symptomatic treatment. Health Study CDC will work with parents to study children

  16. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    maintenance programs, water and energy use, environmentallySustainable Sites, Energy and Atmosphere, Water Efficiency,

  17. IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

    2010-01-01

    the operator and the work by recirculating some of the air through a HEPA filter to provide a down-flow over the working area. Class 3 safety cabinets are totally enclosed units designed to provide a high degree of user protection. As mentioned above... of filters is 6mm WG.Fine filters can filter down to 5-micron size with efficiency of 99.9%. Pressure drop is 15 mm of W.G. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters down to 0.3-micron size. Pressure drop is in these type of filters is 50 mm...

  18. INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) PROGGRAM GUIDELINE HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICE GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    congestion, itching, coughing, and runny nose. Throat symptoms include feelings of dryness and irritation

  19. Building America Indoor Temperature and Humidity Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engebrecht-Metzger, C.; Norton, P.

    2014-02-01

    When modeling homes using simulation tools, the heating and cooling set points can have a significant impact on home energy use. Every 4 years the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) asks homeowners about their heating and cooling set points. Unfortunately, no temperature data is measured, and most of the time, the homeowner may be guessing at this number. Even one degree Fahrenheit difference in heating set point can make a 5% difference in heating energy use! So, the survey-based RECS data cannot be used as the definitive reference for the set point for the 'average occupant' in simulations. The purpose of this document is to develop a protocol for collecting consistent data for heating/cooling set points and relative humidity so that an average set point can be determined for asset energy models in residential buildings. This document covers the decision making process for researchers to determine how many sensors should be placed in each home, where to put those sensors, and what kind of asset data should be taken while they are in the home. The authors attempted to design the protocols to maximize the value of this study and minimize the resources required to achieve that value.

  20. The Building America Indoor Temperature and Humidity Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, C.; Norton, Paul

    2014-02-01

    When modeling homes using simulation tools, the heating and cooling set points can have a significant impact on home energy use. Every four years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) asks homeowners about their heating and cooling set points. Unfortunately, no temperature data is measured, and most of the time, the homeowner may be guessing at this number. Even one degree Fahrenheit difference in heating set point can make a 5% difference in heating energy use! So, the survey-based RECS data cannot be used as the definitive reference for the set point for the "average occupant" in simulations. The purpose of this document is to develop a protocol for collecting consistent data for heating/cooling set points and relative humidity so that an average set point can be determined for asset energy models in residential buildings. This document covers the decision making process for researchers to determine how many sensors should be placed in each home, where to put those sensors, and what kind of asset data should be taken while they are in the home. The authors attempted to design the protocols to maximize the value of this study and minimize the resources required to achieve that value.

  1. RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moschandreas, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    present study controlled only the air infiltration rate, i tinfiltration rates and contaminant levels. The objectives of the study

  2. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    ROOF PORT HOLES AIR REGISTERS E8 XBL 7712-11473B Figure 3 - Schematic of Exterior and Interior of Energy Efficient

  3. TEXT-ALTERNATIVE VERSION: NEXT GENERATION LUMINAIRES INDOOR JUDGING 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dan Blitzer, NGL Steering Committee, The Practical Lighting Workshop: Products that have been evaluated by the Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition have been vetted to a degree that no...

  4. Toward Indoor Flying Robots Jean-D. Nicoud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    -beds like remote controlled helicopters [1], planes (e.g. the military drones [2-3] or the well-known micro

  5. Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzerling, David

    2012-01-01

    uc/item/2f6562gr 6 References ANSI/ASHRAE. (2010a). ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2010: Thermal environmentalConditioning Engineers, Atlanta. ANSI/ASHRAE. (2010b). ANSI/

  6. Indoor Air Quality Assessment of the San Francisco Federal Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael

    2010-01-01

    References ASHRAE. 1999. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 129-199,Atlanta GA. ASHRAE. 2004. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55, ThermalAtlanta GA. ASHRAE. 2007. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1,

  7. Indoor Air Quality Survey of Boston Nail Salons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    of salon activities, and a short questionnaire #12;Study Methods Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can be used's (ppb) 9,519 45 1,409 5,475 16,225 35,711 37,767 CO2 (ppm) 1,085 641 809 1,055 1,257 1,544 2,057 PM2.5 (g/m3) 21 6 14 16 20 49 62 #12;Average Measured CO2 (ppm) Concentrations · CO2 levels in 15 of 21

  8. Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

    2006-01-01

    Environmental Design (LEED). The rating system’s structurequality (IEQ) [3]. The LEED rating system has been adoptedhave been rated via the USGBC LEED rating system. Another 6

  9. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Potential recommendations for LEED, Buildings, Designers,of IEQ-related satisfaction in LEED buildings, however, theyThere was a time gap between LEED cert and occupant survey –

  10. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    review for each building based on their design approach to LEED,reviews of project and site documentation. The air-quality LEED

  11. Visual Control of an Autonomous Indoor Robotic Blimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    due to their properties. Unmanned aerial vehicles in general have advantages over unmanned ground and collect data of a larger area of terrain at a given instance. Unmanned aerial vehicles are also faster and have better maneuverability. Blimps also have advantages over winged unmanned aerial vehicles

  12. Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzerling, David

    2012-01-01

    quality (IEQ) acceptance in residential buildings.Energy and Buildings, 41(9), 930–936. doi:10.1016/j.more tolerant of “green” buildings? Building Research &

  13. NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Indoor Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The GeospatialSolarWorking with UsField

  14. Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2014 Indoor Winners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and Reduce Carbon PollutionZealand JoinsJune 1,ofInverter Next(BETO)|

  15. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1 - 67006++,

  16. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1 - 67006++,(Journal

  17. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energy ResourcesHasselbach Meats JumpHawai'i Meeting

  18. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBar (Thesis/Dissertation) |

  19. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBar (Thesis/Dissertation) |(Technical Report) |

  20. Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy of theSolar Power || Department of

  1. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy ofDepartment ofDepartment of EnergyCampaign for

  2. Energy Efficient Removal of Ozone from Indoor Air

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities Energy EfficiencyModularEfficiency:Industrial

  3. Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchersOctoberCharles Rousseaux - Senior

  4. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartment ofGraphics »DepartmentEERE

  5. Predictive analytics for inventory in a sporting goods organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolbert, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Inventory management for retail companies has become increasingly more important in recent years as competition grows and new supply chain models are implemented. Inventory levels have implications on not only the financial ...

  6. UNIVERSITY SPORT SOUTH AFRICA NATIONAL TOURNAMENT ROSTER 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    : 30/11 ­ 04/12 Taekwondo National Institutional City: Host: September Tennis National Institutional

  7. OSU DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL SPORTS MCALEXANDER FIELD HOUSE RENOVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    . for 1.5% of construction cost toward solar power 6 SSc2 Development Density and Community Connectivity 6)-based refrigerants 5 EAc1.1 Optimize Energy Performance - Lighting Power SEED Report indicates 48.7% energy use with >2:12 slope Partial Path 6: Light Pollution Reduction 1 0.5 Lights will be manually switched off from

  8. REVISED 10/11/2010 INTRAMURAL SPORTS INDIVIDUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    /EVENT________________________________ TEAM NAME ________________________________________ TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE ­ STUDENT ACTIVITIES WAIVER The undersigned students, employees, and invitees of Tulsa Community College, Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, OU-Tulsa, either directly or indirectly, from Tulsa Community College, Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, OU-Tulsa

  9. Overview of MEXT's Space Activities Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for would-be satellite engineers in order to learn satellite development process Overview of Space/broadcasting capability at a relatively low cost. (2) Disaster Risk Management Monitoring disasters, such as heavy rain in Integration, Test and Operation of Satellite (3) Acquisition of Satellite Application Capacity through

  10. A wearable, wireless sensor system for sports medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapinski, Michael Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a compact, wireless, wearable system that measures, for purposes of biomechanical analysis, signals indicative of forces, torques and other descriptive and evaluative features that the human body ...

  11. 4th Annual NH 4-H State Shooting Sports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    or just enjoy Archery, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun and a special Knowledge Quiz Bowl competition Cost: $5 for others. Pistol - .22 Cal. Pistol - open sights. 10 shots standing at 25 feet. 100 possible points

  12. New Moon Pavilion / NTU Visitor Center Sports Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yih-Min

    Subjects Classroom Building Xiao-Fu Square Liberal Education Classroom Building Gymnasium Swimming Pool Sciences Freshman Classroom Building Mathematics Research Center Building Department of Mathematics Shih and Research Center, College of Management The Odeum 2nd Student Activity Center Building 2, College

  13. Sunrayce 93: The hottest new sport on campus. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The solar powered electric vehicle race began in Arlington, Texas on June 20, 1993 and finished 7 days later in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Thirty four teams from Universities across the United States and Puerto Rico completed the race out of thirty six entries. The race demonstrated the viability of sunlight powered vehicles as the better average daily speeds were in excess of 50 miles an hour. Even in the rain, most average speeds were in excess of 15 miles an hour. Analyzed results, photographs, and project details are included. (GHH)

  14. SPORTS PRE-PARTICIPATION PHYSICAL EXAMINATION Name Date PSU ID #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    of the heart/irregular rhythm? ( ) ( ) Wheezing/coughing with exercise, or asthma? ( ) ( ) Weakness, fatigue

  15. Revised April 2013 TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY RECREATIONAL SPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    each team have a minimum of 3 players, CR ­ 2 males and 1 female or vice versa? · 1 st half = 12 participants must have a proper Photo I.D. to play. 1. Players may compete on only one men's / women's team with the team are subjected to the rules. D. The Game 1. Men, Women, Coed: Four (4) players will constitute

  16. SPORT F SHERY UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pollution from sawdust disposal, ammonia, oil wells, gas works, and flax and hemp retting waste water

  17. Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio1975)EnergyFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation,FloorAreaShops

  18. Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 - 19PortalStatusUserUserHomeUsingUsingbbcp

  19. Greening Up the Sports World | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping STD-1128-2013 April 2013DepartmentGreenPaulDepartmentBy

  20. Title IX: More than Just Sports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2HeldTidalTimothyOilBradITitle

  1. Live from the Lab - SPORT Video | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC L S C O N C2 Arnold

  2. RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepman, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    G. W. Combustion-generated indoor air pollution: ] . Fieldcontrol of air pollution from indoor combustion sources.

  3. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    chloride o-xylene Phenol Styrene Tetrachloroethylene LOQ cnonanal o-xylene phenol styrene Toluene a TXIB a 2,2,4-points, although styrene concentrations  increased by 

  4. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Air Using Adsorbent Cartridge Followed by High Performancewheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat todrawing air through silica gel cartridges coated with 2,4-

  5. 2010 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INDOOR POSITIONING AND INDOOR NAVIGATION (IPIN), 15-17 SEPTEMBER 2010, ZRICH, SWITZERLAND Self-Localization Application for iPhone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    noises, coughing of nearby passengers or other sounds which are ubiquitously available. Based on the TDOA

  6. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption in1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption inhigh indoor air quality in energy efficient way may be a

  7. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budnitz, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residentialG. W. Traynor, Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution,at LBL concerning combustion generated indoor air pollution

  8. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonderegger, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Traynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; April,W. Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," inof combustion-generated indoor air pollution concluded that

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    NOVAKOV INDOOR AIR POLLUTION STUDIES U COMBUSTION RESEARCHat LBL concerning combustion generated indoor air pollutionG. W. Traynor, Combustion-Generated Indoor Ajr Pollution,

  10. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    is heavily weighted towards hydroelectricity, accounting forof rain to drive hydroelectricity generation) and inadequatelack of rain for the hydroelectricity based system) and poor

  11. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    and radon from the outgassing of building materials. Theproblems with the outgassing of formaldehyde from One methodbecause of formaldehyde outgassing from building materials

  12. A Fast and Precise Indoor Localization Algorithm Based on an Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Han; Lu, Xiaoxuan; Jiang, Hao; Xie, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    C. -K. Extreme learning machine: Theory and applications.sequential extreme learning machine approach to WiFi basedloss and extreme learning machine. In Proceedings of the 1st

  13. News reports: update on buying indoor uv tanning with university debit cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    The University of Mississippi New Hampshire Universityof New HampshireSouthern New Hampshire University New Jersey Rutgers, The

  14. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    loss in venti- lation ducts. Atmospheric Environment, 2003;36. Zuraimi M. Is ventilation duct cleaning useful? A reviewin the ven- tilation duct after an artificial release: For

  15. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika

    2012-01-01

    2 by means of light; he placed it in the home of one family2 by means of light; he placed it in the home of one familyhome and office environment: behaviour in relation to window opening, adjusting heating and turning the lights

  16. Gender differences in office occupant perception of indoor environmental quality (IEQ)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard; Candido, Christhina; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2013-01-01

    and potential improvements. Ergonomics. 2005;48:25-37. [8]and sensations. Applied Ergonomics. 1981;12:29-33. [21]males and females at rest. Ergonomics. 1991;34:365-78. [28

  17. Impacts of Static Pressure Set Level on the HVAC Energy Consumption and Indoor Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Claridge, D. E.; White, E.

    1996-01-01

    Operation UTMB 6p static pressure drop (inH20Ift) Subscripts a ambient c cold deck, cold air f fan h hot deck, hot air m mixed air o designed, exit of fan INTRODUCTION The air static pressure will be defined here as the air static pressure at 213... OF to 100 OF as the ambient temperature changed from 70 OF to 30 OF. When the ambient temperature was higher than 70 OF, the design discharge air temperature was the same as the mixed air temperature. The hot air temperature could be reduced without...

  18. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Energy Group Consol Net Zero Energy Certified The ThousandEnergy Institute, 2012) Net-Zero Energy Certified (Zero Netare: Passive House Net-zero energy home Green certified home

  19. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bittencourt, L. S. (2010) Air movement acceptability limitsthermal acceptability and air movement assessments in a hot-e úmidos. (Applicability of air velocity limits for thermal

  20. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    in building energy research projects, and have beenof “energy efficient”. Later research projects in Rochester,Research and the Literature .. 117 Table 40 Project Summary Information . 140 Table 41 Energy and