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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings are responsible for about 40 percent of the total U.S. energy demand and carbon dioxide environmental measurements and collect energy consumption data. Based on analyses of the data collected fromEnergy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY

2

ENERGY IMPACTS OF ENERGY AND INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RETROFITS OF APARTMENTS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with simultaneous energy savings and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) improvements as the goal. The control apartments to energy use changes of control apartments, total measured savings of gas energy plus site1 ENERGY IMPACTS OF ENERGY AND INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RETROFITS OF APARTMENTS IN CALIFORNIA

3

Energy and indoor environmental quality in relocatable classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly utilized by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. Four energy-efficient RCs were designed and constructed for this study to demonstrate technologies that simultaneously attempt to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each RC had two HVAC systems, alternated weekly, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The hypothesized advantages of the IDEC include continuous outside air ventilation at {ge}7.5 L s{sup -1} per person, {approx}70% less cooling energy and efficient particle filtration. Measurements include: carbon dioxide, particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. Preliminary IEQ monitoring results are reported.

Apte, Michael; Hodgson, Alfred; Shendell, Derek; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Hochi, Toshifumi; Kumar, Satish; Lee, Seung-Min; Liff, Shawna; Rainer, Leo; Schmidt, Richard; Sullivan, Douglas; Diamond, Richard; Fisk, William

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,office buildings, comparing green with non-green buildings.On average, occupants in green buildings were more satisfied

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

145: Learning from our buildings: a state-of-the- practiceProceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon, Vol. III,Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation

Kammen, Daniel M.

7

Indoor environmental quality and ventilation in U.S. office buildings: A view of current issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of the current focus on indoor environmental quality and ventilation in US office buildings is a response to sick building syndrome and occupant complaints about building-related health symptoms, poor indoor air quality, and thermal discomfort. The authors know that serious ``sick-building`` problems occur in a significant number of US office buildings and that a significant proportion of the occupants in many normal (non-sick) buildings report building-related health symptoms. Concerns about the health effects of environmental tobacco smoke have also focused attention on the indoor environment. The major responses of industry and governments, underway at the present time, are to restrict smoking in offices, to attempt to reduce the emissions of indoor pollutants, and to improve the operation of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Better air filtration, improved HVAC commissioning and maintenance, and increased provisions for individual control of HVAC are some of the improvements in HVAC that are currently being, evaluated. In the future, the potential for improved productivity and reduced airborne transmission of infectious disease may become the major driving force for improved indoor environments.

Fisk, W.J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Regulation of indoor air quality: The last frontier of environmental regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution (IAP) is ranked by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) among the top five environmental risks to human health. The World Health Organization estimates that nearly one in every six commercial buildings in the United States suffers from sick-building syndrome and that occupants of another one in twelve suffer from building-related illnesses. Indoor air quality (IAQ) problems cost American business $10 billion per year through lowered productivity, absenteeism, and medical costs. Yet despite the importance and high cost of IAQ problems, indoor air is not yet specifically addressed in any federal regulatory program. The reason probably is because indoor air is a quanitatively different environment in which traditional modes of regulation, based on pollutant-by pollutant risk assessments, are of limited utility. This paper covers the following topics: four factors influencing IAQ regulation; EPA regulation of indoor air; the role of the consumer product safety commission; OSHA and IAQ issues; state regulation and economic concerns; the pressure for legislation.

Dickson, R.B. [Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Indoor environmental quality surveys. A brief literature review.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and (IAQ), occupant health, individuals productivity (selfproductivity, and quality, and structure layout organizational effectiveness quality 100 buildings in Long term Occupant perceptions of IAQproductivity) al. , 2003) Long term SBS research, benchmarking Thermal comfort, IAQ,

Peretti, Clara; Schiavon, Stefano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of lighting complaints in the two main comparison groups.the lighting control profiles in the two comparison groups.lighting and acoustic quality in green buildings do not show a significant improvement in comparison

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality (IEQ) acceptance in residential buildings.Energy and Buildings, 41(9), 930–936. doi:10.1016/j.more tolerant of “green” buildings? Building Research &

Heinzerling, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U to retrofit existing homes for energy savings. The largest retrofit program is the Federal Weatherization Energy Research Program, Energy Related Environmental Research Program, through contract 50009022

13

School Indoor Environmental Quality Assessments and Interventions: Benefits of Effective Partnerships in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public, private, government, and university stakeholders have focused increasing attention on children's environmental health. Priority areas have been healthy school environments including indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ); susceptibilities of children to environmental factors and associated illness; and, understanding exposure to biological, chemical, and physical agents. As multidisciplinary teams, studies and intervention demonstrations in California public schools were conducted. A common theme among them was a ''partnership,'' the collaboration between stakeholders from the aforementioned sectors. Federal funding and local bond measures for planning, maintenance, and modernization of school facilities have recently been authorized. Therefore, beneficial ''partnerships'' should be established to conduct needed IEQ, environmental health, and productivity research, development and demonstration. This commentary describes benefits for stakeholders and five strategies for future effective collaborations.

Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.; Kim, Janice; Smorodinsky, Svetlana

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

15

Safeguarding indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has created and implemented the first state program devoted exclusively to the investigation of nonindustrial indoor air quality. The program is responsible for promoting and conducting research on the determining factors of healthful indoor environments and is structured to obtain information about emission sources, ventilation effects, indoor concentrations, human activity patterns, exposures, health risks, control measures and public policy options. Data are gathered by a variety of methods, including research conducted by staff members, review of the available scientific literature, participation in technical meetings, contractual agreements with outside agencies, cooperative research projects with other groups and consultation with experts. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Sexton, K.; Wesolowski, J.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that efforts to simultaneously develop energy efficient building technologies and to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are unfeasible. The primary reason for this is that IEQ improvements often require additional ventilation that is costly from an energy standpoint. It is currently thought that health and productivity in work and learning environments requires adequate, if not superior, IEQ. Despite common assumptions, opportunities do exist to design building systems that provide improvements in both energy efficiency and IEQ. This report outlines the selection of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to be used in demonstrating such an opportunity in a field study using relocatable school classrooms. Standard classrooms use a common wall mounted heat pump HVAC system. After reviewing alternative systems, a wall-mounting indirect/direct evaporative cooling system with an integral hydronic gas heating is selected. The anticipated advantages of this system include continuous ventilation of 100 percent outside air at or above minimum standards, projected cooling energy reductions of about 70 percent, inexpensive gas heating, improved airborne particle filtration, and reduced peak load electricity use. Potential disadvantages include restricted climate regions and possible increases in indoor relative humidity levels under some conditions.

Apte, Michael G.; Delp, Woody W.; Diamond, Richard C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Kumar, Satish; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Air quality and thermal comfort in office buildings: Results of a large indoor environmental quality survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ambient Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon,Vol.and operation of healthy buildings Introduction Indoor airdatabase Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon,Vol.

Huizenga, C; Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Arens, Edward A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Indoor Air Quality Plan Page 1 of 5 Environmental Health and Safety Original: December 15, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality (IAQ) Standard (N.J.A.C. 12:100-13)(2007), which was proposed on December 18, 2006's health and productivity. The College has established the following plan to promote good indoor air quality for employees in our buildings. This plan follows the requirements established by the PEOSH IAQ

Rainforth, Emma C.

19

Energy Efficiency & Environmental News: Duct Cleaning and Indoor Air Quality 1 Florida Energy Extension Service and Gary Cook 2 DUCT CLEANING AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With concern about secondary smoke, dust mites, formaldehyde emissions and bioaerosols, the public has become more aware of indoor air quality problems. Heating, air conditioning and ventilation units as well as associated ductwork can be the sources of mold, fungi and other microbial pollutants as well as particulates of dust, secondary smoke and pieces of dead dust mites. Along with the public’s concern has been the development of businesses directly associated with indoor air quality. Some of these businesses are reputable and supply effective indoor air quality services; others, on the other hand, offer little more than technical jargon and will take advantage of the unwary consumer. Duct cleaning has been an area that has been attracted by both reputable and unscrupulous businesses.

unknown authors

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits of Apartments in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly gas and electricity use data from a set of 13 study apartments and 20 control apartments from three apartment buildings (B1 B3) in California were analyzed. The study apartments were retrofit with simultaneous energy savings and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) improvements as the goal. The control apartments were not retrofit. Pre-retrofit modeling indicated annual energy savings of 21percent, 17percent, and 27percent for the study apartments in B1-B3, respectively. Based on a comparison of changes in energy use of study apartments to energy use changes of control apartments, total measured savings of gas energy plus site electrical energy were 28percent in B1, 5percent in B2, and 3percent in B3. Given the small number of study apartments and the substantial changes in energy use within control apartments, the project yielded no conclusive evidence of energy savings. Apartment energy use increased with number of occupants and with floor area; however, the association with occupancy was most evident. Climate differences did not appear to be the major driver for the variability in energy use among apartments. Changes in occupant behaviors affecting energy use may have overwhelmed and obscured the energy savings in this small number of buildings. Much larger prior studies employing similar retrofits indicate that the retrofits usually do save energy.

Fisk, William J.; Norris, Federico; Singer, Brett C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature against indoor relative humidity for the same comfort sensation. These two concepts will save 17% to 22% of the project total energy demand, In addition to introducing new design criteria for acceptable indoor conditions in the new rural developed...

Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Workshop on indoor air quality research needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monoxide and nitrogen dioxide from gas appliances;health, indoor air quality, nitrogen dioxide, radon The workin residen- (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NOz), formaldehyde (

Hollowell, C.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to having  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Carbon monoxide that comes from burning propane, other gases and fuels, and charcoal · Household products

25

Indoor air quality: The legal landscape II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s office environment is as different from its predecessor as an automobile is from a horse and buggy. A 1950s office typically contained tile floors, painted walls, plaster ceilings, carbon paper, and plentiful fresh air circulating through windows that were usually open when weather permitted. In the 1990s, the decor has shifted to carpeted floors, synthetic wall coverings, ceiling tile and multiple copiers. Sophisticated building materials and motorized office products can emit unwelcome constituents into the indoor air, yet ventilation is limited by windows that do not open. One result of these changes has been an unprecedented and ever-increasing concern about indoor air quality (IAQ). Some studies rank indoor air pollution as today`s number one environmental health risk. Increased media attention to the topic has increased public awareness, which has increased litigation and regulatory activity in the area. This paper explores the legal landscape of IAQ in the US, ranging from legislative to regulatory activity on both the federal and state levels, and from civil litigation to actions brought before administrative boards. Along the way, the paper defines and discusses such IAQ problems as building-related illness (BRI) and sick building syndrome (SBS), examining the magnitude of the problems and their possible causes. Finally, the paper provides suggestions to those potentially liable for alleged injuries from indoor air pollution, including architects, builders, contractors, building product manufacturers, building owners and managers, building sellers, employers, and engineering and environmental consultants. This paper is an update of a paper presented at the Air and Waste Management Association`s Annual Meeting in 1992.

Neet, J.O. Jr.; Smith, T.A. [Shook, Hardy and Bacon, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

27

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 – 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reaching agreements on indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phrases sick building syndrome and indoor air quality (IAQ) are in common use today because of a heightened public awareness of various environmental issues. IAQ complaints must be diplomatically resolved because employers and building owners and managers now face a potential impact on their bottom-lines. The office's IAQ was first questioned when 12 of the 47 employees reported complaints particular to the time they spent in the office building. Three employees were so severely affected, they developed respective cases of rhinitis, conjunctivitis and sinus infection. When the tenant presented this information to the building owner, he was told that there was not an IAQ problem within the building. This article summarizes an unfortunate, yet typical, aspect of IAQ problems. It also offers a more efficient method for evaluating and resolving all IAQ problems.

Stewart, S.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to suffering from lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and charcoal · Household products such as cleaners and pesticides How to Improve Indoor Air Quality · OpenIndoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Fumes

30

Indoor air quality in French dwellings Sverine Kirchner1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Indoor Air Quality (OQAI) aims at collecting data on population exposure to indoor pollutants in various INTRODUCTION Our lack of understanding of the health risks related to air pollutants exposure in buildingsIndoor air quality in French dwellings SĂ©verine Kirchner1,* , Mickael Derbez1 , CĂ©dric Duboudin2

Boyer, Edmond

31

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Statistical Analysis and Interpretation of Building Characterization, Indoor Environmental Quality Monitoring and Energy Usage Data from Office Buildings and Classrooms in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three independent tasks had been performed (Stetzenbach 2008, Stetzenbach 2008b, Stetzenbach 2009) to measure a variety of parameters in normative buildings across the United States. For each of these tasks 10 buildings were selected as normative indoor environments. Task 1 focused on office buildings, Task 13 focused on public schools, and Task 0606 focused on high performance buildings. To perform this task it was necessary to restructure the database for the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) data and the Sound measurement as several issues were identified and resolved prior to and during the transfer of these data sets into SPSS. During overview discussions with the statistician utilized in this task it was determined that because the selection of indoor zones (1-6) was independently selected within each task; zones were not related by location across tasks. Therefore, no comparison would be valid across zones for the 30 buildings so the by location (zone) data were limited to three analysis sets of the buildings within each task. In addition, differences in collection procedures for lighting were used in Task 0606 as compared to Tasks 01 & 13 to improve sample collection. Therefore, these data sets could not be merged and compared so effects by-day data were run separately for Task 0606 and only Task 01 & 13 data were merged. Results of the statistical analysis of the IEQ parameters show statistically significant differences were found among days and zones for all tasks, although no differences were found by-day for Draft Rate data from Task 0606 (p>0.05). Thursday measurements of IEQ parameters were significantly different from Tuesday, and most Wednesday measures for all variables of Tasks 1 & 13. Data for all three days appeared to vary for Operative Temperature, whereas only Tuesday and Thursday differed for Draft Rate 1m. Although no Draft Rate measures within Task 0606 were found to significantly differ by-day, Temperature measurements for Tuesday and Thursday showed variation. Moreover, Wednesday measurements of Relative Humidity within Task 0606 varied significantly from either Tuesday or Thursday. The majority of differences in IEQ measurements by-zone were highly significant (p<0.001), with the exception of Relative Humidity in some buildings. When all task data were combined (30 buildings) neither the airborne culturable fungi nor the airborne non-culturable spore data differed in the concentrations found at any indoor location in terms of day of collection. However, the concentrations of surface-associated fungi varied among the day of collection. Specifically, there was a lower concentration of mold on Tuesday than on Wednesday, for all tasks combined. As expected, variation was found in the concentrations of both airborne culturable fungi and airborne non-culturable fungal spores between indoor zones (1-6) and the outdoor zone (zone 0). No variation was found among the indoor zones of office buildings for Task 1 in the concentrations of airborne culturable fungi. However, airborne non-culturable spores did vary among zones in one building in Task 1 and variation was noted between zones in surface-associated fungi. Due to the lack of multiple lighting measurements for Tasks 13 and 0606, by-day comparisons were only performed for Task 1. No statistical differences were observed in lighting with respect to the day of collection. There was a wide range of variability by-zone among seven of the office buildings. Although few differences were found for the brightest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcBrtst) and the darkest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcDrkst) in Task 1, there was considerable variation for these variables in Task 13 and Task 0606 (p < 0.001). Other variables that differed by-zone in Task 13 include CombCCT and AmbCCT1 for S03, S07, and S08. Additionally, AmbChromX1, CombChromY, and CombChromX varied by-zone for school buildings S02, S04, and S05, respectively. Although all tasks demonstrated significant differences in sound measurements by zone, some of the buil

Linda Stetzenbach; Lauren Nemnich; Davor Novosel

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Handbook on Review and Detection of Indoor Environment [M]. Beijing: Mechanical Industry Press, 2003: 1-5.(In Chinese) [2] Pan Xiaochuan. Review on Indoor Air Pollution and Its Harmfulness to Health [J]. Chin. Prev. Med., 2002,3(3):167-169 (in... of Urban Construction, Nanhua University, Hengyang, P.R.China hunanluoqinghai@163.com Abstract: Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor...

Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airflows. ” ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 90, Part 1B, pp.601-ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division MS 90-

Sherman, Max H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

36

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the plans design wly airflow was 8,850 ch. 'Ihe kitchen air handler has 1,075 &I -ly air flow. ?he plans shmd a design airflow of 2,700 cfm. Ihe following are abservatians and pmblelr6 which wxe related to the mildew pmblan. . 'Ihe twb chilled water... in Texas schaols will be the indoor envFranment. 5-1s enaxraged to be m aggressive in preventive maintermme and plan for irdaar air quality and energy efficiency in school air- conditianimg retrofits. A cpalitative investigation of problems reported...

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Commissioning to avoid indoor air quality problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on indoor air quality (IAQ) which has become a pervasive problem plaguing the building industry worldwide. Poor IAQ in commercial and office buildings is primarily related to new building technology, new materials and equipment and energy management operating systems. Occupants of buildings with air quality problems suffer from a common series of symptoms. As early as 1982, ASHRAE, realizing the significance of the problem, produced an IAQ position statement that identified strategies for solving IAQ problems. Many of those strategies have now been implemented, including Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Air Quality; Standard 90.1, Energy Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings; the 100 series of energy standards; and Guideline 1, Guideline for Commissioning of HVAC Systems.

Sterling, E.M.; Collett, C.W. (Theodore D. Sterling and Associates, Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)); Turner, S. (Healthy Buildings International Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)); Downing, C.C. (Environmental Science and Technology Lab., Georgia Technology Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swainson, M. (2009). Indoor air quality in highly energyClayton, R. (2001). Indoor air quality: Residential cookingSacramento, CA: California Air Resources Board. Fugler, D. ,

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Maintaining Indoor Air Quality During Construction and Renovation Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pollutants that can impact the indoor air quality (IAQ) of a building. These contaminants may be transported communication efforts can successfully control pollutant levels, allay concerns, and maintain occupant comfort to nuisance dusts and odors from a construction site unacceptable. Indoor air pollutants are typically complex

Huang, Jianyu

42

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Homes Max H. Sherman, Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. P.E. Member ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division MS 90-3074 1

43

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Sherman, Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. P.E. Member ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division MS 90-3074 1 Cyclotron Rd

44

inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the development of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, heart disease, and lung cancer. Complicating with our loved ones [6]. Yet, some of our activities degrade the environmental quality of these spaces into the air, and laser printers give off toxic chemicals [8]. To make indoor spaces clean and amenable, we

Paulos, Eric

45

Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing For Healthcare Providers Background formaldehyde and air quality in FEMA trailers. This fact sheet provides basic information on formaldehyde expo sure, other air quality concerns, risk factors and tips to give to trailer residents so they can

47

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

48

Environmental sensor technologies and procedures for detecting and identifying indoor air pollution. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public concern about environmental quality now encompasses the indoor environment-the buildings where people work and live. In recent years researchers have been discovering new links between indoor air quality (IAQ) and the occupants' comfort, health, and productivity. As the operator of many thousands of buildings, and the employer of the millions of people who use those buildings, the U.S. Army has a strong interest in maintaining and promoting good IAQ. This report presents a concise summary of the key IAQ parameters of interest to building managers, the most common indoor air contaminants, the variety of sensor technology currently available for detect and identifying those contaminants, and basic procedures for using that technology.

O'Connor, E.T.; Kermath, D.; Kemme, M.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATIVE TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR INDOOR AIR QUALITY STUDIES Steven R. Kennedy, C.E.P., REM, project Manager I C. Brandon ~uinn, P.E., C.P.G., Project Manager James E. Henderson, Ph. D., Director of ~nalytical services ' Robert G. ~ickery...

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DRAFT 11/09/2010 PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)......................................................................................................... 2 gARAgE AIR POLLUTANTSDRAFT 11/09/2010 PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) HeAlTHy InDooR env

52

ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing -...

53

EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

54

Council on Environmental Quality - Guidance for Environmental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Environmental Assessments of Forest Health Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Guidance...

55

Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

Daisey, J.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Indoor Air Quality Assessment of the San Francisco Federal Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the indoor air quality (IAQ) of the San Francisco Federal Building (SFFB) was conducted on May 12 and 14, 2009 at the request of the General Services Administration (GSA). The purpose of the assessment was for a general screening of IAQ parameters typically indicative of well functioning building systems. One naturally ventilated space and one mechanically ventilated space were studied. In both zones, the levels of indoor air contaminants, including CO2, CO, particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, and aldehydes, were low, relative to reference exposure levels and air quality standards for comparable office buildings. We found slightly elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including two compounds often found in"green" cleaning products. In addition, we found two industrial solvents at levels higher than typically seen in office buildings, but the levels were not sufficient to be of a health concern. The ventilation rates in the two study spaces were high by any standard. Ventilation rates in the building should be further investigated and adjusted to be in line with the building design. Based on our measurements, we conclude that the IAQ is satisfactory in the zone we tested, but IAQ may need to be re-checked after the ventilation rates have been lowered.

Apte, Michael; Bennett, Deborah H.; Faulkner, David; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P; Trout, Amber L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air qualityincorporating energy efficient designs. In the future, theenergy efficient ventilation standards and ventilation designs

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thresholds for indoor thermal comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survey, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009, September.building, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2003 Conference.of the California Healthy Building Study: A Summary, Indoor

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward A; Pasut, Wilmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Practical approaches for healthcare: Indoor air quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of indoor air quality (IAQ) is of interest to building occupants, managers, owners, and regulators alike. Whether by poor design, improper attention, inadequate maintenance or the intent to save energy, many buildings today have significantly degraded IAQ levels. Considering the increase of facilities and occupants in the non-industrial sector of the nation`s workforce, the consequences of inadequate IAQ, as related to productivity, human wellness and healthcare costs in the commercial (healthcare) environment, have become increasingly urgent issues to design professionals, building owners and managers, safety and health professionals, interior product manufacturers, and HVAC control vendors. The first step of proper IAQ management is to fully understand the issue of IAQ and to a certain elemental degree, the extent of the problem(s), causes and possible solution applications. The second step is to conduct a performance review of the HVAC systems based on equipment design specifications and guidelines for acceptable IAQ. And the third step is to identify potential chemical, physical and biological sources that are known to contribute to adverse air quality.

Turk, A.R.; Poulakos, E.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

Mankoff, Jennifer

63

Heat Pipe Impact on Dehumidification, Indoor Air Quality and Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT PIPE IMPACT ON DEHUMIDIFICATION, INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY SAVINGS by J. Thomas Cooper Heat Pipe Technology, Inc Alachua, Florida, USA TENTH SYMPOSIUM ON IMPROVING BUILDING SYSTEMS IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES MAY 13-14, 1996 FT....WORTH, TEXAS ABSTRACT Heat pipe impact on our ability to dehumidify, protect, and improve our indoor air quality and save energy in our building systems is tremendous. Projects all over the world in hot and humid climates are using heat pipes in both...

Cooper, J. T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Congress established the Council on Environmental Quality within the Executive Office of the President as part of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In enacting NEPA, Congress...

65

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effect of air pollution on human health, 2) the designgenerated indoor air pollution on human health; and if borneAir Pollution Control Association, Portland, Oregon (June 27-July 1, 1976). vJorld Health

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

Yang, Xudong, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

69

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials to the timescale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model

70

Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

Boyer, Edmond

71

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service). The IAQP determines minimum VRs based on objectively and subjectively evaluated indoor air quality (IAQ

74

Impact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution study (CITEPA), France * Corresponding email: Eva.Leoz@ineris.fr SUMMARY Data pollutants in ambient air. Consequently our study aims at describing both emission factors and inerisImpact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1 , Jacques Ribéron2

Boyer, Edmond

75

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Measurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Quality ~leasurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Gregory W. Traynor Energy Efficient Buildings Program Energy

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor pollutant source control measures and air cleaningof indoor pollutant source control measures or gas phase aircontrol indoor pollutants, by allowing lower energy costs from reduced outdoor air

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Energy Saving and Good Quality Lighting for Indoor Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with extremely high lamp efficacies, silver-coated aluminum lamellae optics for high luminares efficiency, as well as highly efficient electronic gear take care that the energy consumption is decreasing up to 40%, while the light quality is improving. Latest...

Lange, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S, 2004). Nordstrom and his team from Sweden investigated IAQ in hospitals in relation to building dampness and type of construction. They analyzed four hospital buildings of different age and design and concluded that building dampness in the floor...? Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University hospital, Sweden.1998 Proc CIB World Building Congress ,Gaevle,Sweden. ? O'Neal C. Infection control; Keeping diseases at bay a full-time effort for healthcare professionals...

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Indoor-air-quality management for operations and maintenance personnel. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a growing body of information related to facility indoor air quality (IAQ) and its affect on the health and productivity of building occupants. Indoor air pollution can increase employee absenteeism and reduce productivity. Poor IAQ may be a result of poor building or ventilation design, improper maintenance, or inappropriate energy conservation strategies. To help ensure the health, welfare, and productivity of Army personnel and the performance of Army facilities, installation operations and maintenance (O and M) personnel need access to relevant and useful information about IAQ issues. This report includes background information for O and M managers and staff, an installation-level IAQ management plan, and practical O and M procedures for correcting the problems that most commonly lead to IAQ-related complaints.

Sliwinski, B.J.; Kermath, D.; Kemme, M.R.; Imel, M.R.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Improvement and Energy Conservation in Buildings J.R. Gosselin Q. Chen* Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT indoor air quality (Sherman and Matson, 1997). Indoor air quality (IAQ) is important since up to 90

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

82

Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control should be the first priority instead of dilution of pollutants by ventilation or by cleaning the air.air quality, could better provide healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutantsair quality, could better document healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutants

Mendell, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Arizona Department of Environmental Quality's Application Forms and Guidance Website Abstract This site contains forms...

84

Council on Environmental Quality - Regulations for Implementing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Council on Environmental Quality - Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the NEPALegal...

85

NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

Wallingford, K.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

RULES AND REGULATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on best management practices to protect and restore that important resource, and to meet PennsylvaniaRULES AND REGULATIONS ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD [25 PA. CODE CHS. 91 AND 92] Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations and Other Agricultural Operations [35 Pa.B. 5796] The Environmental Quality Board

Guiltinan, Mark

87

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

88

Monitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase of a pilot survey.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. KEYWORDS Air pollution, air stuffiness, formaldehyde, benzene. 1 INTRODUCTION Indoor air quality to determine an air stuffiness index as an indirect mean to assess pollutants accumulation in a closed spaceMonitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase

Boyer, Edmond

89

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

non-green) LEED-rated / green buildings Office Layout Officebuildings, and LEED-rated/green buildings Figure 2 shows aMedian of LEED- rated/green buildings Percentile Rank

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildenv.2010.07.024 Buildings Energy Data Book. (n.d. ).CO 2 (18%) (“Buildings Energy Data Book,” n.d. ; EPA, 2009).

Heinzerling, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to operate fans cost 0.10 € per kWh, the daily energy costdata, and energy costs of 0.04 € per kWh for heat and 0.1 €0.05 and 0.15 € per kWh, the benefit-cost ratios are 80 and

Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assess how IAQ affects human health or productivity. Tableof IAQ with occupant health or productivity. Because thisproductivity impacts (including lost-time due to illness) associated with IAQ;

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary team of IEQ and energy researchers has defined a program of priority energy-related IEQ research. This paper describes the methods employed to develop the agenda, and 35 high priority research and development (R&D) project areas related to four broad goals: (1) identifying IEQ problems and opportunities; (2) developing and evaluating energy-efficient technologies for improving IEQ; (3) developing and evaluating energy-efficient practices for improving IEQ; and (4) encouraging or assisting the implementation of technologies or practices for improving IEQ. The identified R&D priorities reflect a strong need to benchmark IEQ conditions in small commercial buildings, schools, and residences. The R&D priorities also reflect the need to better understand how people are affected by IEQ conditions and by the related building characteristics and operation and maintenance practices. The associated research findings will provide a clearer definition of acceptable IEQ that is required to guide the development of technologies, practices, standards, and guidelines. Quantifying the effects of building characteristics and practices on IEQ conditions, in order to provide the basis for development of energy efficient and effective IEQ control measures, was also considered a priority. The development or advancement in a broad range of IEQ tools, technologies, and practices are also a major component of the priority research agenda. Consistent with the focus on ''energy-related'' research priorities, building ventilation and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and processes are very prominent in the agenda. Research related to moisture and microbiological problems, particularly within hot and humid climates, is also prominent within the agenda. The agenda tends to emphasize research on residences, small commercial buildings, and schools because these types of buildings have been underrepresented in prior research. Most of the research areas apply to both new construction and existing buildings. Nearly all of the recommended priority R&D project areas include tasks intended to facilitate the communication and implementation of the research results. In addition, the priority agenda includes several projects specifically designed to facilitate or stimulate the use of existing energy-efficient technologies and practices for improving IEQ. To assure that the research program continues to meet the needs of stakeholders and to facilitate the coordination of research among sponsors, the core team recommends an annual meeting attended by sponsors, a balanced group of stakeholders, and a selection of researchers implementing the agenda.

Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Burge, H.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.S.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality in Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds (VOCs). Each RC had two HVAC systems, alternated weekly, consisting of a standard heat-pump system

95

Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economic benefits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and temperature, in Healthy Buildings 2006. 2006: Lisbon,of schools, in Healthy Buildings/IAQ 1997. 1997. p. 81-86.performance, in Healthy Buildings 2006. 2006: Lisbon,

Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon, Vol.and operation of healthy buildings Introduction For moreIn Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon, Vol. III,

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BP Post 90 Peer Review - Working Draft 10 Jan 2012. ASHRAE/ASHRAE, 2012). The guide has not been published, though a 90%

Heinzerling, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

some natural-draft water heaters posed risks of combustion-with pilot lights, and water heaters; and installation ofappliance (furnace, water heater) with potential back

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for sustainable building. While it has brought green designof sustainable design, we question how green buildings are

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the National Weatherization Assistance Program, Oak RidgeNational Weatherization Assistance Program, which targetsthe National Weatherization Assistance Program indicates a

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants, using green materials, giving occupants personal control over operable windows, task air-

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lorsch, H. G. , & Abdou, O. A. (1994). The impact of theBordass, 2007; Lorsch & Abdou, 1994; Singh, Syal, Grady, &

Heinzerling, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P. Dick, Michael Hannigan, Qin Lv, Li Shang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor pollutants, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), can have significant impacts on the productivity quality sensor networks [17], [34]. Mobile sensor networks are composed of many low-cost, power- efficient than outdoors. Many indoor pollutants, such as volatile or- ganic compound (VOC), carbon monoxide

Dick, Robert

105

Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

Washington State Energy Code Program

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lurmann.2010. "Air pollution, health and economic benefits-health impact factors from the literature are used to quantify total harm attributable to indoor air pollution.

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Indoor air quality implications of using ion generators in residences Michael S. Waring*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(IAQ). Positively, ion generators remove the charged particle contaminants to collector plates, Denmark - Paper ID: 598 #12;mortality and exposures to indoor ozone and its oxidation products. Ozone and Shields, 1999). Terpenes are common indoors and are emitted from consumer products such as air fresheners

Siegel, Jeffrey

108

Hvac systems as a tool in controlling indoor air quality: A literature review. Final report, May-August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of a review of literature on the use of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems to control indoor air quality (IAQ). One conclusion of the review is that HVAC systems very often contribute to the indoor air pollution because of (1) poor system maintenance, (2) overcrowding or the introduction of new pollution-generating sources with buildings, and (3) the location of outdoor air near ambient pollution sources. Another conclusion is that failure to trade off between energy conservation and employee productivity may result in increased IAQ problems. The report contents are based on literature survey covering the years 1988 through 1993, involving 60 references, 32 of which are cited in the report.

Samfield, M.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

Gao, Yang, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

Hun, Diana E [ORNL; Jackson, Mark C [University of Texas at Austin; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

112

Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable indoor air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Summary: pollutants, human exposure to indoor air pollution, and control of indoor pollutants. Much of the research... building energy, indoor air quality, or...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration indoor air Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Summary: pollutants, human exposure to indoor air pollution, and control of indoor pollutants. Much of the research... building energy, indoor air quality, or...

116

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High-Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California. Although the mechanically vented homes were six times as airtight as non-mechanically ventilated homes (medians of 1.1 and 6.1 ACH50, n=11 and n=8, respectively), their use of mechanical ventilation systems and possibly window operation meant their median air exchange rates were almost the same (0.30 versus 0.32 hr-1, n=8 and n=8, respectively). Pollutant levels were also similar in vented and unvented homes. These similarities were achieved despite numerous observed faults in complex mechanical ventilation systems. More rigorous commissioning is still recommended. Cooking exhaust systems were used inconsistently and several suffered from design flaws. Failure to follow best practices led to IAQ problems in some cases. Ambient nitrogen dioxide standards were exceeded or nearly so in four homes that either used gas ranges with standing pilots, or in Passive House-style homes that used gas cooking burners without venting range hoods. Homes without active particle filtration had particle count concentrations approximately double those in homes with enhanced filtration. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials; consistent with this, formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional, new CA homes built before 2008. Emissions of ultrafine particles (with diameters <100 nm) were dramatically lower on induction electric cooktops, compared with either gas or resistance electric models. These results indicate that high performance homes can achieve acceptable and even exceptional IAQ by providing adequate general mechanical ventilation, using low-emitting materials, providing mechanical particle filtration, incorporating well-designed exhaust ventilation for kitchens and bathrooms, and educating occupants to use the kitchen and bath ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are thousands of indoor ice rink arenas in the United States, Canada, and Europe. The combustion byproducts from. A field survey of ten ice rink arenas in Greater Boston and Halifax, Nova Scotia indicates that the fuel environment, ventilation INTRODUCTION There are several thousands ice rink arenas in the United States

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

119

Resolving the ambiguities: An industrial hygiene Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resolving the Ambiguities: An Industrial Hygiene (IAQ) Symposium was a one-day event designed to inform practicing industrial hygienists about highlight presentations made at Indoor Air `93. A broad range of topics was presented by invited speakers. Topics included were attempts to deal with guidelines and standards, questionnaires, odors and sensory irritation, respiratory allergies, neuroses, sick building syndrome (SBS), and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

Gammage, R.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Memorandum for Heads of Federal Departments and Agencies Abstract This...

122

Council on Environmental Quality - Forty Most Asked Questions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Council on Environmental Quality - Forty Most Asked Questions Concerning CEQ's NEPA Regulations Abstract...

123

Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Regulations: 40 CFR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to library Legal Document- Secondary Legal SourceSecondary Legal Source: Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA Regulations: 40 CFR 1500 - 1518Legal Author CEQ Published NA...

124

Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulateEnvironmental Health Perspectives · VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts

Kammen, Daniel M.

125

A survey and critical review of the literature on indoor air quality, ventilation and health symptoms in schools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey and critical review were undertaken of existing published literature and reports on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, including California schools. Over 450 relevant publications were obtained and reviewed, including papers published in the archival peer-reviewed scientific literature, proceedings of scientific meetings, government reports, 77 NIOSH Health Hazard Evaluation Reports (HHER) and 70 reports on investigations of problem schools in California. Most of the reviewed literature was for complaint or problem schools. The types of health symptoms reported in schools were very similar to those defined as sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, although this may be due, at least in part, to the type of health symptom questionnaires used. Some of the symptoms, e.g., wheezing, are indicative of asthma. In the studies in which complaint and noncomplaint buildings or areas were compared, complaint buildings generally had higher rates of health symptoms.

Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Angell, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings to climate change, concerns over the detrimental air quality impacts of high performance green

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Air Quality 4 4-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality 4 4-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Brookhaven National Laboratory monitors both with the requirements of the Clean Air Act. In addition, the Laboratory conducts ambient air monitoring to verify local air quality and assess possible environmental impacts from BNL operations. During 2003, BNL facilities

Homes, Christopher C.

128

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Standards and Ambient Environmental Quality Standards in Stochastic Receiving Media quality standards, for in- stance SO2 emissions are capped under Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments while ambient SO2 concentrations are limited under National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS

Silver, Whendee

129

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a significant increase in total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicated a subsequent worseningENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2005-2006 by Michael A: The City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and the US EPA 319 Program (through NC Division of Water quality

Mallin, Michael

130

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

Mallin, Michael

131

Quality Assurance 9 2009 Site environmental report9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout the entire organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems and associated processes, in order to: PlanQuality Assurance 9 2009 Site environmental report9- DRAFT Quality assurance is an integral part

132

Quality Assurance 9 2008 Site environmental report9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout the entire organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems and associated processes, in order to: PlanQuality Assurance 9 2008 Site environmental report9- DRAFT Quality assurance is an integral part

133

A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the California Healthy Building Study, Phase 1.ASHRAE IAQ 91 Healthy Buildings, Atlanta, GA, ASHRAE, 228-1 of the California Healthy Building Study. Indoor Air, 3:

Daisey, Joan M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide fron gas appliances;quality, infiltration, nitrogen dioxide, radon, ventilation.carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (N02)• formaldehyde (

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARB. (2011). Nitrogen dioxide - overview. Retrieved 6/8,concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde inair quality standard for nitrogen dioxide (Technical Support

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.contaminants-. ;--- ---- nitrogen dioxide from gas stoves,buildings: nitrogen dioxide (N02), formaldehyde (HCHO), and

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.22 Gaseous Emissions: Nitrogen Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide,3- 4 GASEOUS EMISSIONS: NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE,

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Improve Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Building Performance: Leveraging Technology to Improve All Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building owners and occupants expect more from their buildings today- both better IEQ and less energy consumption. Many facilities strive to design and commission a =smart building' - one that is healthy, environmentally conscious and operating...

Wiser, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Council on Environmental Quality - Steps to Modernize and Reinvigorate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Council on Environmental Quality - Steps to Modernize and Reinvigorate NEPA Abstract This page links to the...

140

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Outside air ventilation is the principal mechanism by which indoorgenerated air pollutants are removed control strategy impacts on indoor air quality, and impacts of ventilation and indoor contaminants, encompassing indoor pollutant source characterization, baseline ventilation and indoor air quality

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality (IEQ) acceptance in residential buildings, Energyand Building, 41, 930- Lai, J.H.K. and Yik, F.W.H. (2007)of workers in office buildings: the European HOPE project,

Frontczak, Monika

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ms. Nancy Sutley Chair, Council on Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For each rule, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was prepared by the Navy and adopted by NOAAMs. Nancy Sutley Chair, Council on Environmental Quality 730 Jackson Place, NW Washington, DC 20503 has a history ofbeing controversial, and you requested that NOAA conduct a comprehensive review of all

143

MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality (IAQ) influences human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. This paper describes MAQS, a personalized mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. In contrast with existing stationary or out- door air personalized IAQ information. To improve accuracy and energy efficiency, MAQS incorporates three novel

Dick, Robert

144

Quality Services: Environmental Justice (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this part is to establish a regulatory framework for undertaking an analysis of environmental justice issues associated with the siting of major electric generating facilities in New...

145

THE EFFECTS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AT AN OHIO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor concentration of nitrogen dioxide was approximatelyof carbon monoxide~ nitrogen dioxide» as well as on theL5 pg/m· Lead (Pb) Nitrogen dioxide (N0 ) 11g/m year (50

Berk, J.V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Environmental Health Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health professional Volume 74, No. 2 September 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implementation in Connecti cut of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agen cy's indoor air quality program, Tools......................................................................................................16 International Perspectives: Solid Waste Management Problems in Secondary Schools in Ibadan Investment

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality conformity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: OKComponent Comments 200 Indoor Air Quality Forms Control sequence conforms to designspecifications? (describe changes... Indoor Air Quality...

148

A scoping study on the costs of indoor air quality illnesses:an insurance loss reduction perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incidence of commercial buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and the frequency of litigation over the effects of poor IAQ is increasing. If so, these increases have ramifications for insurance carriers, which pay for many of the costs of health care and general commercial liability. However, little is known about the actual costs to insurance companies from poor IAQ in buildings. This paper reports on the results of a literature search of buildings-related, business and legal databases, and interviews with insurance and risk management representatives aimed at finding information on the direct costs to the insurance industry of poor building IAQ, as well as the costs of litigation. The literature search and discussions with insurance and risk management professionals reported in this paper turned up little specific information about the costs of IAQ-related problems to insurance companies. However, those discussions and certain articles in the insurance industry press indicate that there is a strong awareness and growing concern over the "silent crisis" of IAQ and its potential to cause large industry losses, and that a few companies are taking steps to address this issue. The source of these losses include both direct costs to insurers from paying health insurance and professional liability claims, as weIl as the cost of litigation. In spite of the lack of data on how IAQ-related health problems affect their business, the insurance industry has taken the anecdotal evidence about their reality seriously enough to alter their policies in ways that have lessened their exposure. We conclude by briefly discussing four activities that need to be addressed in the near future: (1) quantifying IAQ-related insurance costs by sector, (2) educating the insurance industry about the importance of IAQ issues, (3) examining IAQ impacts on the insurance industry in the residential sector, and (4) evaluating the relationship between IAQ improvements and their impact on energy use.

Chen, Allan; Vine, Edward L.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing indoor air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

includes field and chamber studies and modeling to investigate indoor air quality... control strategy impacts on indoor air ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection:...

151

Air quality VI details environmental progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

NONE

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to assess the impact of outdoor ozone on indoor air quality (IAQ) during photochemical pollution episodes). Based on the Paris area outdoor air pollution monitoring network (AIRPARIF) daily forecast, specificProceedings: Indoor Air 2005 1739 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY M Nicolas, O

Boyer, Edmond

153

Quality Assurance 9 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to imple- ment QM methodology throughout the vari- ous BNL management systems and associated processes to: Plan and perform BNL operations is de-For environmental monitoring, QA ployed as an integrated system of management activities

Homes, Christopher C.

154

Quality Assurance 9 2010 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems is de- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning- ect manager for each environmental program determines the type, amount, and quality of data needed

155

Quality Assurance 9 2011 Site environmental report9-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems is de- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning- ect manager for each environmental program determines the type, amount, and quality of data needed

156

Quality Assurance 9 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems is de- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning- ect manager for each environmental program determines the type, amount, and quality of data needed

157

INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, formaldehyde, radon, andcarbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (N0 ), formaldehyde (

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Quality of environmental impact statements in Portugal and Spain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key steps of the Environmental Impact Assessment Process, defined by Directive 337/85 'on the assessment of the effects of certain public and private projects' is the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of a Project. The quality of the EIS is of great importance to properly inform the public and the decision makers about the significant environmental effects of the project. Using the 'Guidance on EIA-EIS Review' 2001 report, produced with the support of the European Commission, this paper analyses the overall quality of 46 recently elaborated EIS from Portugal and Spain (1998-2003). It also analyses the quality of the various chapters of the EIS and the Non-Technical Summary. A comparison is made between the quality of the EIS from Portugal and from Spain. The results for Portugal are also compared with those of other European countries (Ireland and United Kingdom) in similar periods. Finally it presents overall conclusions and suggestions for improvement.

Canelas, Leonel; Almansa, P.; Merchan, M.; Cifuentes, Pedro

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Guidelines for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) sets forth national policy for the protection of the environment. The NEPA process is intended to help officials of the federal government make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences, and take actions that protect, restore, and enhance the environment. The California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 (CEQA) is similar to NEPA. The California legislature established CEQA to inform both state and local governmental decision-makers and the public about potential significant environmental effects of proposed activities, to identify ways to avoid or reduce environmental impacts, and to disclose to the public the reasons why a project is approved if significant environmental effects are involved. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), complies with the provisions of both NEPA and CEQA. This document defines the responsibilities and authorities for NEPA/CEQA compliance at LBL.

Kielusiak, C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESNET national standard for home energy audits.  standards/National_Energy_Audit_Standard.pdf, in, 

Noris, Federico

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Indoor environmental quality assessment models: a literature review and a proposed weighting and classification scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IAQ) is related to sick-building-syndrome (SBS) [1–3], and high IEQ is associated with company and employee productivity

Heinzerling, David; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A priority agenda for energy-related indoor environmental quality research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multidisciplinary team of IEQ and energy researchers is working together to define a program of priority energy-related IEQ research. This paper describes the methods employed, ten high priority broad research and development (R&D) goals, and 34 high priority R&D project areas linked to these goals.

Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Brook, M.; Burge, H.; Cole, J.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Logee, T.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and satisfaction aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and thermal comfort in office buildings: Results of a largeIn: Proceedings of Healthy Buildings, Vol III, pp. 393-397.M. (2007) 'Green' buildings: What Australian building users

Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Wargocki, Pawel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs.  In addition, the a?light bulbs with  fluorescent light bulbs that use less light  bulbs  with  compact  fluorescent lights   Replace 

Noris, Federico

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL- 49026 Report on HVAC Option Selections for aTable 3. High performance HVAC system filter selectionDrop ("H 2 O) Appendix A – RC HVAC working drawings. Figure

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Some Quantitative Relations between Indoor Environmental Quality and Work Performance or Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

premises. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000 conference,Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000, Vol. 1 151-155.Conference of Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore. 3: 237-243.

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sustainability of present earth sheltered building design and development. To attain its goals, the study develops a conceptual micro-framework of healthy buildings' parameters and economic aspects for evaluating links between sustainable construction...

Sheta, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Quantitative relationships between occupant satisfaction and satisfaction aspects of indoor environmental quality and building design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In: Proceedings of Healthy Buildings, Vol III, pp. 393-397.Proceedings of Healthy Buildings, paper nr 747. Danielsson,

Frontczak, Monika; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A; Zhang, Hui Ph.D; Wargocki, Pawel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Gender differences in office occupant perception of indoor environmental quality (IEQ)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and potential improvements. Ergonomics. 2005;48:25-37. [8]and sensations. Applied Ergonomics. 1981;12:29-33. [21]males and females at rest. Ergonomics. 1991;34:365-78. [28

Kim, Jungsoo; de Dear, Richard; Candido, Christhina; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Indoor environmental quality, adaptive action and thermal comfort in naturally ventilated and mixed-mode buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comfort. ASHRAE standard 55 defines the 80 and 90%on the ASHRAE adaptive chart (Figure 89 and Figure 90). For90% satisfaction and ± 0.85 for 80% satisfaction. However, the 2010 addendum of the ASHRAE

Honnekeri, Anoop N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from furnaces and water heaters.  Some protocols caution with pilot lights,  and water heaters; and installation of natural draft gas water heaters in an internal closet on 

Noris, Federico

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Indoor environmental quality assessment models: a literature review and a proposed weighting and classification scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more tolerant of “green” buildings? Information 2007;35:662–Korkmaz S. Effects of green buildings on employee health andcosts and financial benefits of green buildings: a report to

Heinzerling, David; Schiavon, Stefano; Webster, Tom; Arens, Edward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A prototype toolkit for evaluating indoor environmental quality in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

more tolerant of “green” buildings? Building Research &Korkmaz S. Effects of green buildings on employee health andcosts and financial benefits of green buildings: a report to

Heinzerling, David; Webster, Tom; Schiavon, Stefano; Anwar, George; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices for weatherization assistance program, in, Energy Weatherization program targeting low?income populations that receive public assistance 

Noris, Federico

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement Overview Tasked with improving cost and quality throughout the Volvo diesel engine

Demirel, Melik C.

176

Healthy Home Assessment Program: The Wampanoag Environmental Life Learning (W.E.L.L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(chemistry) and an M.S. from Harvard University (organic chemistry). Connie May was an English teacher health hazards and conducting indoor environmental assessments to public and non-profit organizations known speaker, he is author or co-author of four books on indoor air quality - published by Johns

177

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials: Preliminary Results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials air quality. #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removing ozone from indoor

Siegel, Jeffrey

178

Environmental quality indexing of large industrial development alternatives using AHP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two industrial development alternatives have been proposed for the East Coast of Iceland in order to strengthen its socio-economic basis. The favoured option is to build a large aluminium smelter, which requires massive hydropower development in the nearby highlands. Another viable option is the construction of a 6-million-ton oil refinery, following the planned exploitation of the Timan Pechora oil reserves in the Russian Arctic. A third 'fictitious' alternative could be general development of existing regional industry and new knowledge-based industries, development of ecotourism, establishment of national parks, accompanied by infrastructure improvement (roads, tunnels, communications, schools, etc.). The three alternatives will have different environmental consequences. The controversial hydropower plant for the smelter requires a large water reservoir as well as considerable land disturbance in this unique mountain territory, considered to be the largest uninhabited wilderness in Western Europe. The aluminium smelter and the oil refinery will give rise to substantial increase of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the country (about 20%). Then there is potential environmental risk associated with the refinery regarding oil spills at sea, which could have disastrous impact on the fisheries industry. However, the oil refinery does not require any hydropower development, which is a positive factor. Finally, the third alternative could be defined as a ''green'' solution whereby the detrimental environmental consequences of the two industrial solutions are mostly avoided. In order to compare the three alternatives in an orderly manner, the analytic hierarchy process methodology of Saaty was applied to calculate the environmental quality index of each alternative, which is defined as a weighted sum of selected environmental and socio-economic factors. These factors are evaluated on a comparison basis, applying the AHP methodology, and the weights in the quality index summation are estimated in the same manner. Six persons with different backgrounds were asked to fill in the comparison matrices in order to reduce bias in the evaluation. The final results show that the two industrial alternatives come out poorly, i.e. with low quality indices, whereas the third pseudo-alternative, i.e. general development, with a considerably higher quality index, is certainly worth a further study.

Solnes, Julius

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10 of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal

Kammen, Daniel M.

180

Utah Department of Environmental Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTagusparkCalculatorEnviroenergy2005NickNigroSparqlEnvironmental Quality

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOEElectricalonJustice Environmental Justice SelectedIndependentQuality

182

9-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 9: QUALITY ASSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various9-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 9: QUALITY ASSURANCE Quality Assurance 9Quality assurance is an integral part of every activity at Brookhaven National Laboratory. BNLs Quality Assurance

Homes, Christopher C.

183

EnvironMEntAl EnginEEring AnD EnvironMEntAl QuAlity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution, waste treatment, water and air pollution, solid waste disposal, hazardous and toxic wasteEnvironMEntAl EnginEEring AnD EnvironMEntAl QuAlity SciEncE College of Engineering and Mines management, pollution prevention, environmental impact evaluation, administration of environmental programs

Hartman, Chris

184

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory building related symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the US EPA 100 office-building BASE Study dataset, they conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the relationship between indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (LResp) building related symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. In addition, they tested the hypothesis that certain environmentally-mediated health conditions (e.g., allergies and asthma) confer increased susceptibility to building related symptoms within office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependent associations (p < 0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100 ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average, reduce the prevalence of several building related symptoms by up to 70%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. Building occupants with certain environmentally-mediated health conditions are more likely to experience building related symptoms than those without these conditions (statistically significant ORs ranged from 2 to 11).

Erdmann, Christine A.; Apte, Michael G.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An Invitation to the National Conference on Livestock and Poultry Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Invitation to the National Conference on Livestock and Poultry Environmental Quality A national Denver, Colorado · Grand Hyatt Hotel · April 1-5, 2013 Livestock & Poultry Environmental Learning Center

Mukhtar, Saqib

186

9-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 9: QUALITY ASSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Laboratory Approval Program (potable and nonpotable water), BNL received a satisfactory rating and expectations. For environmental monitoring, QA is defined as an integrated system of management activities9-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 9: QUALITY ASSURANCE 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

Homes, Christopher C.

187

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris* , Kerry A and Environmental Engineering * Corresponding email: Fedenoris@mail.utexas.edu SUMMARY HVAC filters are long heavy metal (Pb, Cd and As) concentrations. HVAC filter microbial concentrations appear to be consistent

Siegel, Jeffrey

188

Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City Yao DeLi Gongsheng districts of Qingdao city. A total of 319 surface soil samples (at 0~10cm depth) were taken with a density of human activities on the soils environmental quality in mathematics? #12;

189

Department of Energy EPA\\OAR\\Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U. S. Environmental Protection Agency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Ariel Rios Building, 6601 J 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. Washington, DC 20460 Subject: Hanford Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff asked some additional questions concerning the Hanford Tank and K (DOE) staff, EPA staff and Hanford site personnel on April 13, 2005. Three questions remain

190

An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An environmental sensor network to determine drinking water quality and security Anastassia. Small Civil & Environmental Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy Carnegie Mellon University ms35@andrew.cmu.edu Jeanne VanBriesen Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Carnegie

Ailamaki, Anastassia

191

Sandia National Laboratories, California Quality Assurance Project Plan for Environmental Monitoring Program.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) applies to the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Sandia National Laboratories/California. This QAPP follows DOE Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE G 414.1-2A June 17, 2005). The Environmental Monitoring Program is located within the Environmental Operations Department. The Environmental Operations Department is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA operations have minimal impact on the environment. The Department provides guidance to line organizations to help them comply with applicable environmental regulations and DOE orders. To fulfill its mission, the department has groups responsible for waste management; pollution prevention, air quality; environmental planning; hazardous materials management; and environmental monitoring. The Environmental Monitoring Program is responsible for ensuring that SNL/CA complies with all Federal, State, and local regulations and with DOE orders regarding the quality of wastewater and stormwater discharges. The Program monitors these discharges both visually and through effluent sampling. The Program ensures that activities at the SNL/CA site do not negatively impact the quality of surface waters in the vicinity, or those of the San Francisco Bay. The Program verifies that wastewater and stormwater discharges are in compliance with established standards and requirements. The Program is also responsible for compliance with groundwater monitoring, and underground and above ground storage tanks regulatory compliance. The Program prepares numerous reports, plans, permit applications, and other documents that demonstrate compliance.

Holland, Robert C.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited research is available on potential adverse effects of school environments on academic performance, despite strong public concern. We examine the scientific evidence relevant to this relationship by reviewing available research relating schools and other indoor environments to human performance or attendance. As a primary focus, we critically review evidence for direct relationships between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in buildings and performance or attendance. As a secondary focus, we summarize, without critique, evidence on potential connections indirectly linking IEQ to performance or attendance: relationships between IEQ and health, between health and performance or attendance, and between attendance and performance. The most persuasive direct evidence showed increases in indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and outdoor concentrations of several specific pollutants to be related to reduced school attendance. The most persuasive indirect evidence showed indoor dampness and microbiologic pollutants to be related to asthma and respiratory infections, which have in turn been related to reduced performance and attendance. Furthermore, a substantial scientific literature links poor IEQ (e.g., low ventilation rate, excess moisture or formaldehyde) with respiratory and other health effects in children and adults. Overall, evidence suggests that poor IEQ in schools can influence the performance and attendance of students, primarily through health effects from indoor pollutants. Also, inadequate IEQ in schools seems sufficiently common to merit strong public concern. Evidence is available to justify (1) immediate actions to protect IEQ in schools and (2) focused research on exposures, prevention, and causation, to better guide policies and actions on IEQ in schools.

Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes.  A critical aspect of...

194

Concentrations of indoor pollutants database: User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes the computer-based database on indoor air pollutants. This comprehensive database alloys helps utility personnel perform rapid searches on literature related to indoor air pollutants. Besides general information, it provides guidance for finding specific information on concentrations of indoor air pollutants. The manual includes information on installing and using the database as well as a tutorial to assist the user in becoming familiar with the procedures involved in doing bibliographic and summary section searches. The manual demonstrates how to search for information by going through a series of questions that provide search parameters such as pollutants type, year, building type, keywords (from a specific list), country, geographic region, author's last name, and title. As more and more parameters are specified, the list of references found in the data search becomes smaller and more specific to the user's needs. Appendixes list types of information that can be input into the database when making a request. The CIP database allows individual utilities to obtain information on indoor air quality based on building types and other factors in their own service territory. This information is useful for utilities with concerns about indoor air quality and the control of indoor air pollutants. The CIP database itself is distributed by the Electric Power Software Center and runs on IBM PC-compatible computers.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

air quality environmental: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dynamics in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It has also been modified to model pollution in South Korea, Mexico Manohar, Rajit 103 Predicting Air Quality: Current Status...

196

Quality Assurance 9 2005 Site environmental report9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout the entire organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to imple- ment QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems and associated processes- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning

197

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

198

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 4 days after the reporting deadline via the Internet at www.eml.doe.gov. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 47th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVII) that were received on or before December 1, 1997.

Greenlaw, P.D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. This report presents the results from the analysis of the 48th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLVIII) that were received on or before June 1, 1998.

Greenlaw, P.D.; Minick, S.K.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marketing success. The HVAC market and the School Facilitiesof advanced classroom HVAC in the market through interactionof the improved HVAC technology to the market. The design of

Apte, Michael; Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developedwith standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment.generated by the wall mount heat pump air conditioner (HPAC)

Apte, Michael; Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines) (Cole Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL).tubing, Cole- Parmer Instrument Corporation, Vernon Hills,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 10 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and improve implementation of the Division- wide QA program. 10.1 Environmental Surveillance Program The QA- prehensive QA program and are subject to audits by ES&HS Division personnel to ensure its implementation Management (QM) Office, headed by the QM Manager, coordinates and evaluates QA implementation

205

State Registration Number Michigan Department Of Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quality Division RENEWABLE OPERATING PERMIT STAFF REPORT Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility SRN: M4148 located at 5700 Russell Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48211-2545 RO Pennit Number 199600325 Permit Number: Staff Report Date: RO Penmit Issuance Date: RO Permit Expiration Date: 199600325 October 14, 2003

206

Quality Assurance 9 2007 Site environmental report9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governing work, and extends throughout the entire organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems is de- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning

207

Quality Assurance 9 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to implement QM methodol- ogy throughout the various BNL management systems and associated processes, in order to: Plan and perform BNL operations in a reliable monitoring, QA is de- ployed as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve

208

Quality Assurance 9 2006 Site environmental report9-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

throughout the entire organization. The purpose of the BNL Quality Management (QM) System is to imple- ment QM methodology throughout the various Laboratory management systems and associated processes as an integrated system of management activities. These activities involve planning, implementation, control

209

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P. [Kings College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. for Public Health Science

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart GridThird Quarterinto PARS |Council on Environmental

212

Establishing the Office of Environmental Management Quality Assurance Corporate Board  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResources DOEElectricalonJustice EnvironmentalDISTRIBUTIO FROM: DAE Y. CHUNG DEPUTY

213

P\\procedure\\FP#36 TITLE: GREEN BUILDING POLICY PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P\\procedure\\FP#36 TITLE: GREEN BUILDING POLICY PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND RESOURCE the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED Silver standard or equivalent. This policy will be limited% of building replacement value". RESPONSIBILITY: ACTION FACILITIES PLANNING DIRECTOR Ensure that the green

Fernandez, Eduardo

214

On the Challenge of Creating and Communicating Air Quality Information: A Case for Environmental Engineers*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, development of air pollutant concentration assessment and interpretation techniques, which must be tailored, with a possible refer- ence to general background information on the nature of the individual air pollutantOn the Challenge of Creating and Communicating Air Quality Information: A Case for Environmental

Möbius, Bernd

215

Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Individual-based modeling of environmental quality effects on early life stages of fish: A case study using striped bass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate an individual-based approach to population modeling to evaluate environmental quality effects on early life stages of fishes. We believe that, regardless of the modeling approach, environmental quality effects ultimately must be evaluated at the population level. Determining population-level consequences of changes in environmental quality is critical because the population is the relevant endpoint of interest with respect to success of the species and its availability for harvest. It offers a common metric upon which to compare among different environmental factors, effects, and life stages.

Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Cowan, J.H. Jr. (University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences); Houde, E.D. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Coutant, C.C. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Individual-based modeling of environmental quality effects on early life stages of fish: A case study using striped bass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate an individual-based approach to population modeling to evaluate environmental quality effects on early life stages of fishes. We believe that, regardless of the modeling approach, environmental quality effects ultimately must be evaluated at the population level. Determining population-level consequences of changes in environmental quality is critical because the population is the relevant endpoint of interest with respect to success of the species and its availability for harvest. It offers a common metric upon which to compare among different environmental factors, effects, and life stages.

Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cowan, J.H. Jr. [University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL (United States). Dept. of Marine Sciences; Houde, E.D. [Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.; Coutant, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental Restoration Program quality system requirements for the Hanford Site. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the quality system requirements for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Program at the Hanford Site. The Quality System Requirements (OSR) for the Hanford Site integrates quality assurance requirements from the US Department of Energy Orders, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement), and applicable industry standards into a single source document for the development of quality systems applicable to the Environmental Restoration Program activities. This document, based on fifteen criteria and divided intro three parts, provides user organizations with the flexibility to incorporate only those criteria and parts applicable to their specific scopes of work. The requirements of this document shall be applied to activities that affect quality based on a graded approach that takes into consideration the risk inherent in, as well as the importance of, specific items, services, and activities in terms of meeting ER Program objectives and customer expectations. The individual quality systems developed in accordance with this document are intended to provide an integrated management control system that assures the conduct of ER Program activities in a manner that protects human health and the environment.

Cote, R.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Local environmental decision-making with the California environmental quality act: a Santa Barbara case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The ERC and staff review projects, hold public hearings, and certify environmental documents. Staff support is provided through the Planning Division of the Community Development Department. Decisions on the need for an EIR may be appealed to the City..., it appears that hotel projects generated the most controversy and comments, followed by residential projects. This holds true for both agencies. Commercial projects in the City were also controversial. Since the City projects were often in 30 areas...

Karstadt, Kent Leonard

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Standard Review Plan for Environmental Restoration Program Quality Management Plans. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Manual Environmental Restoration Program Quality System Requirements (QSR) for the Hanford Site, defines all quality requirements governing Hanford Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities. The QSR requires that ER Program participants develop Quality Management Plans (QMPs) that describe how the QSR requirements will be implemented for their assigned scopes of work. This standard review plan (SRP) describes the ER program participant responsibilities for submittal of QMPs to the RL Environmental Restoration Division for review and the RL methodology for performing the reviews of participant QMPS. The SRP serves the following functions: acts as a guide in the development or revision of QMPs to assure that the content is complete and adequate; acts as a checklist to be used by the RL staff in their review of participant QMPs; acts as an index or matrix between the requirements of the QSR and implementing methodologies described in the QMPs; decreases the time and subjectivity of document reviews; and provides a formal, documented method for describing exceptions, modifications, or waivers to established ER Program quality requirements.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Coupled Airflow and Source/Sink Model for Simulating Indoor VOC and Q. Chen2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection Agency (EPA) have identified indoor air pollution as one of the top environmental risks 1 Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Building Technology Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

222

Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Quality of environmental impact statements and variability of scrutiny by reviewers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adequate provision of information is essential for decision making. This paper provides the results of the quality assessment of Environmental Impact Statements (EIS), documents prescribed by EIA Directive (337/85/EEC). The assessment was completed by several categories of reviewers in Estonia, which has been an EU member state since 2004. The quality assessment of EIS was based on the EC Guidance on EIS Review (2001). Firstly, the quality assessment of 50 randomly selected EIS was carried out by a single reviewer. Secondly, the individual grading among 24 independent reviewers of a single EIS was tested. Thirdly, a comparison of the results of 15 individual and 5 group assessments of the same EIS was conducted. The results from the quality assessment of the selected EIS demonstrate a satisfactory level of information provided for decision making; 68% of the sample EIS were positively graded. However, more than half of the 50 EIS were graded as 'just satisfactory'. Comparison between the individual and group assessment of the same EIS demonstrates that the group assessment is more critical than the individual assessment. This possibly results from a wider technical expertise and balancing of subjective values and perspectives among group members. Arguably, the current practice of EIA competent authorities assessing the quality of EIS with individuals could be revised. We discuss the effect of the group assessment on expanding the narrow technical expertise and the subjectivity of a single expert.

Peterson, Kaja, E-mail: kaja.peterson@seit.e [Stockholm Environment Institute Tallinn Centre, Lai Street 34, Tallinn 10133 (Estonia)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A Keywords: Activated carbon fiberVolatile organic compoundIndoor pollutantEnergy efficient ventilation a b s t r a c t This study explores the potential environmental and energy benefits of using activated

225

Indoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted in the frame of BUMA (Prioritization of Building Materials Emissions as indoor pollution sourcesIndoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b , N. Michael b , E.I. Tolis a , J.G. Bartzis a a University of West Macedonia, Environmental Technology

Short, Daniel

226

Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

227

Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421431 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing environmental impacts on stream water quality: deforestation in mid-Wales 421 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 421­431 (2002) © EGS Assessing environmental impacts on stream water the environmental sciences, there are major management issues over the impact of man on the water quality

Boyer, Edmond

228

Indoor Environmental Risk Factors for Occupant Symptoms in 100U.S. Office Buildings: Summary of Three Analyses from the EPA BASEStudy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes three analyses of data on building-related environmental factors and occupant symptoms collected from 100 representative large U.S. office buildings. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found increased occupant symptoms associated with a number of building-related factors, including lower ventilation rates even at the current guideline levels, lack of scheduled cleaning for air-conditioning drain pans and cooling coils, poor condition of cooling coils, poorly maintained humidification systems, and lower outdoor air intake height. Some expected relationships were not found, and several findings were opposite of expected. Although requiring replication, these findings suggest preventive actions to reduce occupant symptoms in office buildings.

Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Cozen, M.; Brightman, H.S.; Apte,M.; Erdmann, C.A.; Brunner, G.; Girman, J.R.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Building Air Quality Alliance Program fro Building Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air quality (IAQ) has emerged as a major concern for building owners, managers, engineers and tenants. As the public recognizes the importance of healthy, comfortable. and productive indoor environments, their awareness and demand for good...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Health Hazards in Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residences: acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, 1,3-butadiene,with the addition of acrolein, which was not included inlarge contributors to acrolein and NO 2 respectively indoors

Logue, Jennifer M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometNovakov, T. : Formation of Pollution Particulate NitrogenGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Environmental Information Sources: Websites and Books  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$80.00. Jeffs, Eric J. Green Energy: Sustainable Electricityand indoor air quality. * Green Energy Portal: Department ofacts as a gateway to green energy findings from thousands of

Shrode, Flora

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Signaling environmental quality to green consumers and the incentive to invest in cleaner technology: Eect of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to environmentally conscious consumers that are not informed about the environmental damage caused by ...rms to pay more for goods pro- duced with lower environmental damage1, and the market incentives it generates speci...c kinds of environmental damage and remains signi...cantly limited relative to the environmental

Edwards, Paul N.

234

ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rainfall Timing and Poultry Litter Application Rate Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rainfall Timing and Poultry Litter Application Rate Effects on Phosphorus Loss in Surface Runoff P. D with poultry runoff from hayfields and pastures (Sharpley et al., 1992).litter may be a significant contributor surface-applied poultry litter and to develop equations ticulate P in runoff (McLeod and Hegg, 1984

Radcliffe, David

235

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

236

9-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 CHAPTER 9: QUALITY ASSURANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring data are consistent with the requirements of 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, "Quality Assurance Requirements" and DOE Order 414.1 (1998), Quality Assurance. Responsibility for quality at BNL starts

Homes, Christopher C.

237

Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

th floor were complaining of IAQ related symptoms which included eye irritation. sinus infections, sneezing and coughing fits. The occupants also complained of a dirty, musty smell which was particularly strong early in the morning. The majority...

Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment: PM 2.5 , acrolein, and formaldehyde. There isAcetaldehyde  Acrolein  Benzene  Formaldehyde  Naphthalene that total are PM 2.5 , acrolein, formaldehyde, and ozone.

Sherman, Max

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in place since April of 2002. Recognizing the need to expand the program in depth and breadth, we designed TEAMS. We were able to do this by assistance from Mike Miller and the EPA, who gave the District six “Tools for Schools” test kits (TfS Kit...

Melton, V.

240

Improving water quality with a "territorial" agri-environmental policy? Insights from the new generation AES in South-West France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improving water quality with a "territorial" agri-environmental policy? Insights from the new with the Local Agri-Environmental Schemes (LAES), the French contractual policy instrument within the European underlie the French agri-environmental policy, from a retrospective of the successive national schemes set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measuring perceived air quality and intensity by a Sensor System, the European Project SysPAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as it is perceived by humans to be used as a control device for indoor air quality. KEYWORDS Perceived air quality;because of the unmatched sensitivity to many odorous indoor air pollutants. One of the reasons indoor air pollutants that trigger human sensory response. The SysPAQ project builds upon current

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

Aviation environmental policy effects on national- and regional-scale air quality, noise, and climate impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continued growth of the aviation industry poses a challenge to policy-makers and industry stakeholders as each decision represents a trade-off on efficiency, equity, and environmental impact. The Aviation environmental ...

Wolfe, Philip J. (Philip James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTECTION AGENCY The preparation of this report was financed through grants from the U.S. Environmental yield and high-energy content. Corn silage can yield 20-25 tons of forage per acre based on 35% dry or sand. Biological activity, ventilation and heat generated during the composting process remove much

Mukhtar, Saqib

245

CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT FINDINGS IN CONNECTION WITH THE AMENDMENT TO THE 2003 LRDP AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 LONG RANGE DEVELOPMENT PLAN FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT The findings set forth below") of Addendum #1 to the Final Environmental Impact Report ("Final EIR") for the University of California, Davis. The Final EIR consists of the May 2003 Draft Environmental Impact Report ("Draft EIR") and the November 2003

California at Davis, University of

246

Indoor Pollutants Emitted by Electronic Office Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The last few decades have seen major changes in how people collect and process information at work and in their homes. More people are spending significant amounts of time in close proximity to computers, video display units, printers, fax machines and photocopiers. At the same time, efforts to improve energy efficiency in buildings by reducing leaks in building envelopes are resulting in tighter (i.e., less ventilated) indoor environments. Therefore, it is critical to understand pollutant emission rates for office equipment because even low emissions in areas that are under-ventilated or where individuals are in close proximity to the pollutant source can result in important indoor exposures. We reviewed existing literature reports on pollutant emission by office equipment, and measured emission factors of equipment with significant market share in California. We determined emission factors for a range of chemical classes including volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), ozone and particulates. The measured SVOCs include phthalate esters, brominated and organophosphate flame retardants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Measurements were carried out in large and small exposure chambers for several different categories of office equipment. Screening experiments using specific duty cycles in a large test chamber ({approx}20 m{sup 3}) allowed for the assessment of emissions for a range of pollutants. Results from the screening experiments identified pollutants and conditions that were relevant for each category of office equipment. In the second phase of the study, we used a smaller test chamber ({approx}1 m{sup 3}) to measure pollutant specific emission factors for individual devices and explored the influence of a range of environmental and operational factors on emission rates. The measured emission factors provide a data set for estimating indoor pollutant concentrations and for exploring the importance of user proximity when estimating exposure concentrations.

Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo; Russell, Marion L.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Influence of Romanian steam coal quality on power plants environmental impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal provides about 25% of primary energy resources for electricity generation in Romania. Coal is burned in pulverized coal (PC) boilers without flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The coal demands are 90% covered by country`s reserves out of which 80% is lignite. The lignite from Oltenia basin represents about 90% of the domestic lignite quantity used in Romanian power plants. The characteristics defining the typical Romanian lignite are: moisture 40--43%; ash dry basis 37--48%; low heat value 6.0--7.5 MJ/kg; sulfur 0.8--1.2%; volatile matter 17--23%. There are some sorts of lignite which have a higher content of sulfur, but these are used in smaller quantities. RENEL`s strategy includes the preferential utilization of domestic fuels (lignite, hard coal) with imported fuels priority in order natural gas, low sulfur content heavy oil and steam hard coal. Low grade quality of Romanian lignites creates many problems, and due to its high ash and water contents, large quantities of raw coal are required in order to generate energy. The high content of sulfur in coal produces high SO{sub 2} emissions. On the other hand, the very low power values of Romanian lignite generate a low flame temperature, so that, even using fuel oil or gas support for lignite combustion, the NOx emissions are low. Environmental laws have been in force in Romania since December 30, 1995. The Waters Forests and Environment Protection Ministry regulated the pollutant concentration for both new and existing coal fired boilers, beginning in January 1998. Comparing the measured values of SO{sub 2}, NOx and CO contents measured in flue gas from some boilers running on different coal types with the pollutants` emissions limits it is obvious that clean coal technologies (CCT) implementation is necessary, especially for SO{sub 2} reduction.

Matei, M. [Romanian Electricity Authority, Bucharest (Romania). Study, Research and Engineering Group

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

249

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

253

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Shah, K.B.

1990-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Health and environmental chemistry: Analytical techniques, data management, and quality assurance. Volume 1, Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical procedures are described for the determination of organic compounds, metals and radioisotopes in environmental materials, human tissues, urine, feces, and waste water.

Gautier, M.A. [ed.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environ- mental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government.

Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Health and environmental chemistry: analytical techniques, data management, and quality assurance. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical procedures are described for the determination of organic compounds, metals, and radioisotopes in environmental materials, human tissue, urine, feces, and waste water.

Gautier, M A

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Wind and Other Renewables, Summary Report: A Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for the Period September 2007 - August 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wind renewables. This legislation also requires the Public Utilities Commission of Texas (PUCT) to establish a target of 10,000 megawatts of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and requires the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop...

Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Subbarao, K.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.

260

Hacettepe University Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Turkey. Research Interests - Indoor and outdoor air pollution, statistical data analysis, environmental management.Sc., and Ph.D.) Industrial Engineering (B.Sc) Environmental Engineering (M.Sc. and Ph.D.) Mining Engineering. Research Interests - Water pollution control, physical-chemical processes for water and wastewater

Köprülü, Kahraman Güçlü

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Three Essays on the Relationship between Economic Development and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Angelsen and Kaimowitz’s theories for deforestation, the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) hypothesis and the forest transition theory. Macro-level data are used to examine the implications of these frameworks. The implications of the first essay suggest...

Pancharatnam, Padmaja

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 4 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each

California at Davis, University of

263

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 3 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. 130.1 (a) Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. 130.1 (b) Multi-level Controls: "Dimmability." Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light

California at Davis, University of

264

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES INDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.1) #12;SECTION 5 MANDATORY LIGHTING CONTROLS 1. Area Controls: Manual controls that control lighting in each area separately 2. Multi-level Controls: Allow occupants to choose the appropriate light level for each area 3. Shut

California at Davis, University of

265

The Center for Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

review of indoor air pollution in schools requested by the Environment Committee of the Connecticut risk 99 Industrial hygiene visit and walk- through assessment 99 Review of industrial hygiene interventions 99 Provide guidance on protecting occupants from exposures during construction 99 Coordinate

Kim, Duck O.

266

Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, enery con- servation, indoor air quality, and thermal comfort. Construction engineering and management quality, and wastewater engineer- ing. Geotechnical and geonenvironmental research em- phasizes soil mechanics, rock mechanics, engineering geology, earthquake engineering, soil structure, and soil

Heller, Barbara

267

Cotton production and water quality: Economic and environmental effects of pollution prevention. Agricultural economic report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cotton production, compared with other crops, is less likely to cause erosion-induced water-quality problems because cotton acreage is not the major source of erosion in most regions. For cotton production, the most widespread potential damages to water quality are nitrates from fertilizer polluting ground water and pesticides contaminating surface water. This damage could be reduced by restricting chemical and fertilizer use on all cotton production, but doing so could reduce cotton yields and raise cotton prices. The same level of water-quality improvement could be achieved at less cost by targeting the chemical use or erosion restrictions only to cotton farms with the most vulnerable soils. Data come from a 1989 USDA survey of cotton producers.

Crutchfield, S.R.; Ribaudo, M.O.; Hansen, L.T.; Quiroga, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Environmental Studies An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Water Conservation Environmental Education Environmental Communications Water Quality Management Air water supplies, and reclaim contaminated land and water to comply with federal environmental regulationsEnvironmental Studies An Overview Environmental scientists conduct research to identify and abate

Colorado at Boulder, University of

269

SUMMER TO SUMMER VARIATIONS IN INDOOR RADON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor radon concentrations show a strong dependence on weather. winter tends to be associated with higher than average indoor radon, and summer with lower than average. However, in northern Virginia, the summer of 1988 was wetter than the summer of 1987. Consequently, the regional indoor radon during the summer of 1988 was about 30 % higher than during the summer of 1987, and indoor radon during the summer of 1988 actually exceeded the indoor radon level of the 1987-88 winter. Evidently care must be taken when attempting to estimate regional indoor radon concentrations, and homesite risk estimates should rely on long-term measurement intervals. Key word index: summer precipitation, soil capping, alpha-track radon monitors, home heating system, radon and radon progeny,

Paul Dibenenetto; Douglas G. Mose; George W. Mushrush

270

Compilation of Quality Assurance Documentation for Analyses Performed for the Resumption of Transient Testing Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a companion document to the analyses performed in support of the environmental assessment for the Resumption of Transient Fuels and Materials Testing. It is provided to allow transparency of the supporting calculations. It provides computer code input and output. The basis for the calculations is documented separately in INL (2013) and is referenced, as appropriate. Spreadsheets used to manipulate the code output are not provided.

Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Efficiency Effects of Quality of Service and Environmental Factors: Experience from Norwegian Electricity Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Initially, the focus of the early electricity sector reforms was mainly on implementing competition in the wholesale generation and retail supply activities. Meanwhile incentive regulation of the natural monopoly transmission and distribution networks may... ). However, it soon became evident that there is a potential conflict in the use of incentive regulation and provision of quality of service. Both theoretical arguments presented (e.g. Spence, 1975) and empirical findings (e.g. Ter- Martirosyan, 2003) have...

Growitsch, Christian; Jamasb, Tooraj; Wetzel, Heike

272

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Japanese Union of Air Pollution Prevention Associations,The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976, GeometAnnual Meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association,

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document briefly describes the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) program. It profiles the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of OIT`s principal customers--the materials and process industries--that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by industry in the US. OIT-supported research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) activities relating to these industries are described as well as OIT`s crosscutting technology programs that target the needs of multiple US industries. Quantitative estimates of the potential benefits (or metrics) to US industry of many current OIT-supported technologies are also discussed.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

276

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality iaq Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

indoor air quality is a challenge for IAQ sensors used in HVAC systems. Data mining... to inferior performance, poor ... Source: Kusiak, Andrew - Department of Mechanical...

277

Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Waste Area Grouping at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the drilling and installation of 18 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11. WAG 11 (White Wing Scrap Yard) is located on the west end of East Fork Ridge between White Wing Road and the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The scrap yard is approximately 25 acres in size. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled and developed between January 1990 and October 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at WAG 11 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of four basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at WAG 11. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents.

Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Quality assurance and data management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains graphs and tables relating to quality assurance and data management for environmental quality at Hanford Reservation.

Lockrem, L.L.

1998-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

United States Environmental Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Health and Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (40 CFR Part 197)--Final Rule Response to Comments Document #12;Yucca Mountain Standards Response to Comments Standards for Yucca Mountain, Nevada 40 CFR Part 197 June, 2001 Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Valuation of environmental quality and eco-cultural attributes in Northwestern Idaho: Native Americans are more concerned than Caucasians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valuation of features of habitats and ecosystems usually encompasses the goods and services that ecosystems provide, but rarely also examine how people value ecological resources in terms of eco-cultural and sacred activities. The social, sacred, and cultural aspects of ecosystems are particularly important to Native Americans, but western science has rarely examined the importance of eco-cultural attributes quantitatively. In this paper I explore differences in ecosystem evaluations, and compare the perceptions and evaluations of places people go for consumptive and non-consumptive resource use with evaluations of the same qualities for religious and sacred places. Qualities of ecosystems included goods (abundant fish and crabs, butterflies and flowers, clean water), services (complexity of nature, lack of radionuclides that present a health risk), and eco-cultural attributes (appears unspoiled, scenic horizons, noise-free). Native Americans and Caucasians were interviewed at a Pow Wow at Post Falls, Idaho, which is in the region with the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, known for its storage of radioactive wastes and contamination. A higher percentage of Native American subjects engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians. Native Americans engaged in higher rates of many activities than did Caucasians, including commune with nature, pray or meditate, fish or hunt, collect herbs, and conduct vision quests or other ceremonies. For nearly all attributes, there was no difference in the relative ratings given by Native Americans for characteristics of sites used for consumption/non-consumptive activities compared to religious/sacred places. However, Caucasians rated nearly all attributes lower for religious/sacred places than they did for places where they engaged in consumptive or non-consumptive activities. Native Americans were less concerned with distance from home for consumptive/non-consumptive activities, compared to religious activities. - Research Highlights: {yields} A higher percentage of Native Americans engaged in consumptive and religious activities than did Caucasians interviewed. {yields} Caucasians rated environmental attributes as more important for consumptive and non-consumptive activities than they did for places where they engaged in religious/cultural ones. {yields} Native Americans rated environmental attributes as equally important regardless of the activities performed. {yields} Eco-cultural attributes (such as 'appears unspoiled') were rated as high as ecosystem services (e.g. unpolluted water).

Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States) [Division of Life Sciences, Nelson Biological Laboratory, Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Drainage System for Drainage Water Quality Management,quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius. Commercial turn-key monitoring systems

Quinn, N.W.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Environmental Knowledge, Environmental Attitudes, and Vehicle Ownership and Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guide to Effective Environmental Choices: Practical Advicefor Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity.A Structural Model of Environmental Attitudes and Behaviour.

Flamm, Bradley John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High quality Y-type hexaferrite thick films for microwave applications by an economical and environmentally benign crystal growth technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thick barium hexaferrite Ba{sub 2}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (i.e., Zn{sub 2}Y) films having thicknesses of ?100??m were epitaxially grown on MgO (111) substrates using an environmentally benign ferrite-salt mixture by vaporizing the salt. X-ray diffraction pole figure analyses showed (00l) crystallographic alignment with little in plane dispersion confirming epitaxial growth. Saturation magnetization, 4?M{sub s}, was measured for as-grown films to be 2.51?±?0.1?kG with an out of plane magnetic anisotropy field H{sub A} of 8.9?±?0.1?kOe. Ferromagnetic resonance linewidth, as the peak-to-peak power absorption derivative at 9.6?GHz, was measured to be 62?Oe. These properties demonstrate a rapid, convenient, cost-effective, and nontoxic method of growing high quality thick crystalline ferrite films which could be used widely for microwave device applications.

Hu, Bolin; Chen, Yajie, E-mail: y.chen@neu.edu; Gillette, Scott; Su, Zhijuan; Harris, Vincent G. [Center for Microwave Magnetic Materials and Integrated Circuits and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Wolf, Jason; McHenry, Michael E. [Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Environmental Conflict Resolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Conflict Resolution Environmental Conflict Resolution ENVIRONMENTAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION In September 2012, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Office...

286

Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are ...

Bachrach, Abraham Galton

288

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Indoor robot gardening: design and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed autonomous gardening system with applications in urban/indoor precision agriculture. The garden is a mesh network of robots and plants. The gardening ...

Correll, Nikolaus

290

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering covers a wide range of critical services, from designing water and wastewater treatment facilitiesENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING www.cee.pdx.edu What do environmental engineers do? Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic field that is critical to our quality

291

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

292

Exploring Quality in MultiSensor Pervasive Systems -A Localization Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in GPS and other technologies have enabled high quality outdoor localization, the realization of accurate indoor location technologies is significantly more complex. We present a generalized indoor localization framework that composes inputs from multiple localization technologies in a quality-aware manner so

Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

293

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Environmental and Public Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Indoor air pollution has been coal was burned in stoves not designed for that fuel, and indoor air quality was frequently found for the mining of coal on the reservation. Utah International Inc. and Arizona Public Service Compa- nies

294

Agriculture and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices, land application of biosolids and organic wastes, bioenergy, pesticides, and wetlands. Course Water Act, wetlands, bioenergy, food waste and pesticides. Students will examine the nitrogen

Ma, Lena

295

ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professonal Education Showcase New! Professional Concentration in Environmental Management for Industry HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAMS #12;NEW Professional Concentration in Environmental Management for Industry management, air quality, water quality and hazardous materials transportation. Acquire the knowledge to help

California at Davis, University of

296

environmental, health and safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professonal Education Showcase New! Professional Concentration in Environmental Management for Industry for hazardous materials, waste stream management, air quality, water quality and hazardous materials The Professional Concentration in Environmental Management for Industry and Facilities is designed specifically

California at Davis, University of

297

DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

298

Harmonisation of indoor material emissions labelling systems in the EU JRC Ispra, Italy, May 19-20, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

available in France on the environmental properties and on the emissions to indoor air of building products products in France F. Maupetit 1 , O. Ramalho, E. Robine and C. Cochet Centre Scientifique et Technique du-based characteristics of building products. This evaluation scheme has been introduced in France in 2003, on a voluntary

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

299

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

300

Environmental Technology and Emergency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Clean Air Act, Water Quality, and Method 9 Visible Emissions in environmental applications and emergency management. Past projects include assistance in environmental rule, border environmental and security studies, emergency communications, and energy assurance reviews

McGraw, Kevin J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CONDITION CONTROLLING AND MONITORING OF INDOOR SWIMMING POOLS Nissinen, Kari, VTT Building and Transport, PO Box 18021, FO-90571 Oulu Finland, Kauppinen, Timo, VTT Building and Transport, Hekkanen, Martti, VTT Building and Transport..., technical risk map, operation and maintenance manual, software INTRODUCTION There are about 250 indoor swimming pools and 50 indoor spas in public use in Finland. Typically, the indoor swimming pools are owned by the local community. The public...

Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity, and IAQ, Vol. I-2-5 The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter Jiaolin Wang Lu Chen Postgrauate Master... surface temperature decline to reduce the body?s heat loss. Meanwhile shudder will promote the body?s heat production. So the temperature of organism doesn?t drop with decline of the environmental temperature. But if organism stays at cool environment...

Wang, J.; Chen, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evaluation of Quality-Assurance/Quality-Control Data Collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from Wells and Springs between the Southern Boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1989 through 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological (USGS) and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected and analyzed water samples to monitor the water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho. Concurrently, replicate samples and blank samples were collected and analyzed as part of the quality-assurance/quality-control program. Samples were analyzed from inorganic constituents, gross radioactivity and radionuclides, organic constituents, and stable isotopes. To evaluate the precision of field and laboratory methods, analytical results of the water-quality and replicate samples were compared statistically for equivalence on the basis of the precision associated with each result. Statistical comparisons of the data indicated that 95 percent of the results of the replicate pairs were equivalent. Blank-sample analytical results indicated th at the inorganic blank water and volatile organic compound blank water from the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory and the distilled water from the Idaho Department of Water Resources were suitable for blanks; blank water from other sources was not. Equipment-blank analytical results were evaluated to determine if a bias had been introduced and possible sources of bias. Most equipment blanks were analyzed for trace elements and volatile organic compounds; chloroform was found in one equipment blank. Two of the equipment blanks were prepared after collection and analyses of the water-quality samples to determine whether contamination had been introduced during the sampling process. Results of one blank indicated that a hose used to divert water away from pumps and electrical equipment had contaminated the samples with some volatile organic compounds. Results of the other equipment blank, from the apparatus used to filter dissolved organic carbon samples, indicated that the filtering apparatus did not affect water-quality samples.

Williams, L.M.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Campbell, L.J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I--Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2008-December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary...

Baltazar, Juan-Carlos; Claridge, David; Yazdani, Bahman; Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Liu, Zi; Muns, Shirley; Gilman, Don; Degelman, Larry; Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles

306

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I - Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2006 - June 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary...

Verdict, M.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.; Ahmed, M.; Degelman, L.; Muns, S.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Gilman, D.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; McKelvey, K.; Montgomery, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

307

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) Volume I-Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, January 2009-December 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report, 'Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy (EE/RE) Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan' to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This report is organized in three volumes: Volume I - Summary Report - provides an executive summary...

Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Lewis, C.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Gilman, D.; Degelman, L.; McKelvey, K.; Claridge, D.

308

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume II – Technical Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality September 2002 – August 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) is pleased to provide our second annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Council on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) in fulfillment of its...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP), Volume I – Summary Report, Annual Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality September 2002 – August 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Energy Systems Laboratory (Laboratory) is pleased to provide our second annual report, Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Impact in the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan to the Texas Council on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) in fulfillment of its...

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bryant, J.; Turner, W. D.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

2013 R&D 100 Award: DNATrax could revolutionize air quality detection and tracking  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A team of LLNL scientists and engineers has developed a safe and versatile material, known as DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol Experiments (DNATrax), that can be used to reliably and rapidly diagnose airflow patterns and problems in both indoor and outdoor venues. Until DNATrax particles were developed, no rapid or safe way existed to validate air transport models with realistic particles in the range of 1-10 microns. Successful DNATrax testing was conducted at the Pentagon in November 2012 in conjunction with the Pentagon Force Protection Agency. This study enhanced the team's understanding of indoor ventilation environments created by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. DNATrax are particles comprised of sugar and synthetic DNA that serve as a bar code for the particle. The potential for creating unique bar-coded particles is virtually unlimited, thus allowing for simultaneous and repeated releases, which dramatically reduces the costs associated with conducting tests for contaminants. Among the applications for the new material are indoor air quality detection, for homes, offices, ships and airplanes; urban particulate tracking, for subway stations, train stations, and convention centers; environmental release tracking; and oil and gas uses, including fracking, to better track fluid flow.

Farquar, George

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

2013 R&D 100 Award: DNATrax could revolutionize air quality detection and tracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team of LLNL scientists and engineers has developed a safe and versatile material, known as DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol Experiments (DNATrax), that can be used to reliably and rapidly diagnose airflow patterns and problems in both indoor and outdoor venues. Until DNATrax particles were developed, no rapid or safe way existed to validate air transport models with realistic particles in the range of 1-10 microns. Successful DNATrax testing was conducted at the Pentagon in November 2012 in conjunction with the Pentagon Force Protection Agency. This study enhanced the team's understanding of indoor ventilation environments created by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. DNATrax are particles comprised of sugar and synthetic DNA that serve as a bar code for the particle. The potential for creating unique bar-coded particles is virtually unlimited, thus allowing for simultaneous and repeated releases, which dramatically reduces the costs associated with conducting tests for contaminants. Among the applications for the new material are indoor air quality detection, for homes, offices, ships and airplanes; urban particulate tracking, for subway stations, train stations, and convention centers; environmental release tracking; and oil and gas uses, including fracking, to better track fluid flow.

Farquar, George

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Environmental Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cloned genes be used to safety test chemicals? The Drive to Prevent: · Cancer · Heart Disease · AlzheimerThe New Environmental Health The New Environmental Health How You'll Live Longer, Smarter Can's · Parkinson's · and other chronic diseases #12;As the environment gets healthier, so do we... The New

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

313

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

Draper, Robert (Churchill, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fagan, Jr., Thomas J. (Penn HIlls, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Humphrey, Joseph R. (Grand Rapids, MI)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Inter-Faculty Environmental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategies to address human impact. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Our Bachelor of Environmental Studies Information System (GIS), cartography, cost-benefit analyses, environmental impact assessment, questionnaire for Environmental Research. Career Tracks · Environmental audits · Impact assessment and quality assessment

316

NOx Emissions Reduction from CPS Energy's "Save For Tomorrow Energy Plan" Within the Alamo Area Council of Governments Report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-10-10-01 NOx EMISSIONS REDUCTION FROM CPS ENERGY?S ?SAVE FOR TOMORROW ENERGY PLAN? WITHIN THE ALAMO AREA COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS REPORT TO THE TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (TCEQ) Sung Lok Do Juan.../yr and annual NOx emissions reductions of non-residential sector were 32.01 Ton/yr. The NOx emissions reductions estimated through 2020 energy savings potential were 3,344 ton/year. Annual NOx emissions reductions of residential sector were 1,873 ton...

Do, S. L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.

317

Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and human origins. Civil and Environmental Engineers create, con- struct, and manage the infrastructure water and air pollution as well as industrial and hazardous waste management. They monitor the quality, construc- tion, transportation, environmental engineering, and water resources. The Structural Engineering

Wang, Hai

318

Arnold Schwarzenegger INDOOR-OUTDOOR AIR LEAKAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage in Apartments and Commercial Buildings Appendix A Air Infiltration Model for Large Buildings Appendix B Analysis of Commercial Building Data Appendix C Commercial Building Data contains data and discussion of the leakage parameter in commercial buildings. The leakage parameter

319

Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain surface water quality standards, stream classifications, discussion of lakes and impounded basins, and water...

320

Water Quality Standards Implementation (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality regulates Oklahoma's Water Quality Standards. The law states the requirements and standards for point source discharges. It also establishes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

322

Water Quality Trading Program (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Water quality trading is a tool for achieving water quality improvements. Under the right circumstances, trading has the potential to yield both environmental and economic benefits, while...

323

Link Quality Metrics in Large Scale Indoor Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ut ´energ´etique de cette estimation et de ses cons´equences sur la stabilit´e des routes construites sur (WSN) 1 Introduction Much research has considered the problem of characterizing wireless links

Boyer, Edmond

324

INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates are reduced. nitrogen dioxide (N0 ) con~ centrationsfor some parameters (nitrogen dioxide and ozone) when the

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

new buildings incorporating energy- efficient designs, Theenergy-efficient residential, studied as possible models design.

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced Technology for Economical Dehumidification to Improve Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is then positioned so that one end is in a heat source and the other end is in a heat sink. The refrigerant on the warm side absorbs heat, boils, and flows to the cold side. Here it condenses, releases heat and returns to the warm side by gravity to complete..., the liquid refrigerant is subcooled directly by passing it through a coil in the supply air. After subcooling, the liquid refrigerant flows into the evaporator. The subcoolinglreheating step can be continuous or controlled. In addition, a Heat Pipe...

Beckwith, W. R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secretary for Conservation and Solar Energy of the U.S.Secretary for Conservation and Solar Energy of the U.S.

Berk, J.V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Health and productivity benefits of improved indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two studies completed for a national contractor`s association on the health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The original study documented the general health costs and productivity benefits of improved IAQ. The second study expanded the scope to include medical cost reductions for specific illnesses from improved IAQ. General information on the objectives, assumptions, definitions, and results of the studies are presented, followed by detailed information on research methodology, building inventory and wellness categories, health and medical effects of poor IAQ, health cost benefits, productivity benefits, recommended improvements, and conclusions and future improvements.

Dorgan, C.B. [Dorgan Associates, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Dorgan, C.E.; Kanarek, M.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Willman, A.J. [Quantum Technology, Inc., Springfield, VA (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Building Efficiency and Indoor Air Quality - You Can Have Both  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dioxide sensors controlling inlet dampers or fan control systems. As the people load varies causing changes in carbon dioxide level, the controls can vary the amount of ventilation air entering the building. A second method is removing the contaminants...

Kettler, G. J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2003 Conference.of the California Healthy Building Study: A Summary, Indoorsurvey, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009, September.

Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) PROGGRAM GUIDELINE HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICE GROUP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

congestion, itching, coughing, and runny nose. Throat symptoms include feelings of dryness and irritation

Su, Xiao

332

Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operational? Cooling Coil Inspection access? Clean? Supply water temp. O F Water carryover? Any indication? Odors from outdoors? (describe) Carryover of exhaust heat? Cooling tower within 25 feet? Exhaust outletOKComponent Comments Mist Eliminators Clean, straight, no carryover? Supply Fan Chambers Clean? No trash or storage

333

STATE OF CALIFORNIA INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND MECHANICAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for selection of the whole-building ventilation fan and for the duct design for the whole-building ventilation

334

Indoor Air Quality Survey of Boston Nail Salons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) suggest that spontaneous abortion in workers exposed to toluene may occur nearly 3 times more than a control group. Roelofs et al. (2008) showed an elevation of respiratory symptoms, skin problems.5 (PM2.5) are linked with respiratory problems #12;Table 1: Information on Layout, Ventilation

Fraden, Seth

335

Summary of residential environmental issues and program consistency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Act authorizes the Bonneville Power Administration to acquire all necessary energy resources to serve Northwest utilities choosing to acquire power from the agency and to give conservation the highest priority in responding to the demand for electricity. To meet this mandate, the agency has established residential conservation programs for weatherizing existing homes, building new energy-efficient homes, and promoting energy-efficient appliances. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared this report to compare and contrast the environmental requirements and issues involving Bonneville's residential conservation programs. The key environmental concern confronting each of the programs with measures aimed at reducing air leakage rates in houses (both new and existing) is indoor air quality (IAQ). This report reviews the similarity and consistency of the programs' approach to IAQ, their impacts, program features, mitigation techniques, and new information about IAQ and other potential environmental issues confronting the programs. The information is intended for use in comparing and contrasting how environmental features mesh with other program features, checking consistency across programs and determining whether it makes sense for programs to be consistent, determining consistency between programs, and providing information to aid program planning in light of potential environmental issues and new information. 31 refs.

Baechler, M C

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Indoor Environmental Science and Engineering: An Integrated Academic Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Healthy Buildings, and Human Exposure Analysis. These courses are designed to share several common

Siegel, Jeffrey

337

Livestock waste treatment systems of the future: A challenge to environmental quality, food safety, and sustainability. OECD Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- operation and Development), Co-operative Research Programme: Biological Resource Management for Sustainable and to improve soil properties through accretion of soil organic matter. On the other hand, improperly managed quality, food safety, and sustainability. OECD Workshop This Special Issue of Bioresource Technology

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

338

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon and Its Decay Products in Indoor Air, Wiley, New York.radon daughter products in indoor air, Radiat. Prot. Dosim..and their decay products in indoor air, Health Phys. , 34,

Nero, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

GATEWAY Demonstration Indoor Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for Fast-TrackApplicationsIndoor Projects

340

Modeling and adaptive control of indoor unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in constrained indoor environments presents many unique challenges in control and planning. This thesis investigates modeling, adaptive control and trajectory optimization ...

Michini, Bernard (Bernard J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Graduate students in Vanderbilt's environmental engineering program have opportunities to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management, risk analysis, the environmental investigation and remediation of nuclear and hazardous chemical · Water Quality & Resources · Energy Choices & Environmental Consequences · Environmental Risk Assessments, Waste Management & Remediation · Environmental Science · Environmental Management & Policy LEARN MORE

Simaan, Nabil

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution indoor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

indoor Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution indoor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Building Energy & Environments (BEE) Dept....

343

Extending the Horizons: Environmental Environmental Excellence as Key to Improving Operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investment in quality management systems had the oppositeISO 9000 series of quality management systems standards.environmental management systems drawn from earlier quality

Corbett, C. J.; Klassen, R. D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management Water conservation LBNL’s approach to sustainable environmentalWater Discharges) of Introduction Environmental Managementenvironmental compliance programs, such as air and water quality, as well as less traditional programs, such as wildland fire management,

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. (Univ. of Wageningen (Netherlands))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Quality Policy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

348

Groundwater quality monitoring well installation for Lower Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the drilling and installation of 11 groundwater quality monitoring (GQM) wells on the perimeter of Lower Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2. Lower WAG 2 consists of White Oak Lake and the embayment below White Oak Dam above the Clinch River. The wells in Lower WAG 2 were drilled and developed between December 1989 and September 1990. These wells were installed to characterize and assess the WAG in accordance with applicable Department of Energy, state, and Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The wells at Lower WAG 2 were drilled with auger or air rotary rigs. Depending on the hydrogeologic conditions present at each proposed well location, one of three basic installation methods was utilized. Detailed procedures for well construction were specified by the Engineering Division to ensure that the wells would provide water samples representative of the aquifer. To ensure conformance with the specifications, Energy Systems Construction Engineering and ERCE provided continuous oversight of field activities. The purpose of the well installation program was to install GQM wells for groundwater characterization at Lower WAG 2. Data packages produced during installation activities by the ERCE hydrogeologists are an important product of the program. These packages document the well drilling, installation, and development activities and provide valuable data for well sampling and WAG characterization. The forms contained in the packages include predrilling and postdrilling checklists, drilling and construction logs, development and hydraulic conductivity records, and quality control-related documents.

Mortimore, J.A.; Lee, T.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Office of Industrial Technologies - enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry through technology partnerships  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical component of the Federal Government`s effort to stimulate improved industrial energy efficiency is the DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT). OIT funds research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) efforts and transfers the resulting technology and knowledge to industry. This document describes OIT`s program, including the new Industries of the Future (IOF) initiative and the strategic activities that are part of the IOF process. It also describes the energy, economic, and environmental characteristics of the materials and process industries that consume nearly 80% of all energy used by manufacturing in the United States. OIT-supported RD&D activities relating to these industries are described, and quantitative estimates of the potential benefits of many OIT-supported technologies for industry are also provided.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Sciences 2007 Research Evaluation, including SENSE Research School December 2007 #12; QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Quality,byphotocopy- ingorbyanyothermeanswiththepermissionofQANUifthesourceismentioned. #12;3QANU/ResearchEvaluationEnvironmentalSciences007 Table of contents

Utrecht, Universiteit

351

Environmental Studies and Planning Page 137Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND PLANNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concentration Water Quality Technology Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies Energy Management and Design and Restoration, Water Quality Technology Programs Offered Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies Education Water Quality Technology Minor in Environmental Studies and Planning Elementary Teacher Credential

Ravikumar, B.

352

3D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localisation C´eline Teuli`ere, Eric Marchand, Laurent Eck set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localisation problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights. Index Terms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Evolving an Indoor Robotic Localization System Based on Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of indoor robotic localization. We investigate the design and building of an autonomous localization system provides the position of one robot in a space, as in a Cartesian plane, corroborating with the EvoEvolving an Indoor Robotic Localization System Based on Wireless Networks Gustavo Pessin1

Braun, Torsten

354

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

355

The 3D jigsaw puzzle: mapping large indoor spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3D jigsaw puzzle: mapping large indoor spaces Ricardo Martin-Brualla1 , Yanling He1 , Bryan C of famous tourist sites. While current 3D reconstruction algorithms often produce a set of disconnected components (3D pieces) for indoor scenes due to scene coverage or matching failures, we make use

Anderson, Richard

356

Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Predicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attributable to air pollution, 1.5 million of these from indoor air pollution. Worldwide there are more deathsPredicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea , Jim Kusznirb , Brian Lambb and Diane J that is often overlooked in maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the air quality of the environment. In this paper

Cook, Diane J.

358

Vanderbilt Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineering 4 water quality and resources 6 waste containment and management 8 multimodal transportation 17 environmental risks, sustainability and remediation 1 programs of study 18 construction management management, nuclear environmental engineering, environmental remediation and environmental management

Bordenstein, Seth

359

Extending the Horizons: Environmental Environmental Excellence as Key to Improving Operations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

line. Environmental Quality Management, 10(4) 1-12. th1998. The effects of total quality management on corporateEnvironmental Quality Management. Winter. 1-10. Evans,

Corbett, C. J.; Klassen, R. D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US)); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (US)); Cropp, J.W. (Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau, Chattanooga, TN (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Environmental Policy February 2013 The University of Leeds is responsible to reflect best environmental practice, implement an environmental management system to pursue sustainability and continuous improvement and seek innovative ways of meeting environmental objectives. These include: To meet

Haase, Markus

362

Quality Assurance Corporate Board | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assurance Corporate Board Quality Assurance Corporate Board The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Quality Assurance Corporate Board is an executive board that includes both...

363

Bees in urban landscapes: An investigation of habitat utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, Indoor Environmental Quality, Locations and Linkages, Awareness and Education,

Wojcik, Victoria A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW for CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Being Applied: Memorandum from EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY May 12 1 h. 2010. SUBJECT: Emergencies and the National Environmental...

365

Environmental Protection Act (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The broad-ranging Environmental Protection Act has sections on waste management, air quality, environmental assessment, and hazardous or polluting substances. The act establishes the framework for...

366

Environmental Protection Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. This report focuses on the following: notification of environmental occurrences; general planning and reporting; special programs and plans; environmental monitoring program; and quality assurance and data verification.

Brekke, D.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Center for Indoor Environments and Health's specific mission is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the building pose challenges for maintaining a "healthy" indoor environment. System operations Building pollutants and materials Outdoor air contaminants (including diesel particulates) and materials brought in by occupants (such as pet dander and hair o

Oliver, Douglas L.

368

Autonomous Flight in Unstructured and Unknown Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are ...

Bachrach, Abraham Galton

369

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Conditions Environmental Conditions Appendix II The unique geology, hydrology and instream habitat. This chapter examines how environmental conditions in the Deschutes watershed affect, the discussion characterizes the environmental conditions within three watershed areas: the Lower Deschutes

371

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

also be treated are explosives contaminated by or encased in materials such as foams, plastics and metals. Continuation Sheet 38 of 40 Provision x.B. Unit Operations Delete...

373

29 August 2014 ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for Coordination on Cleanup & Decommissioning of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action

US Army Corps of Engineers

374

Improving Home Indoor Air Quality There are three general ways of improving air quality in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of back-drafting from combustion appliances such as gas water heaters that might be located in the garage they can do damage. Do not use unvented fossil-fuel-based space heaters, e.g., kerosene heaters, under any faulty gas wall heaters and other combustion appliances. Consider hiring a qualified professional to test

Lightsey, Glenn

375

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Inter-Faculty Environmental Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategies to address human impact. A Rigorous, Enriching Program Our Bachelor of Environmental Studies, environmental impact assessment, questionnaire design, and field measurement. #12;Environmental Studies We look · Environmental audits · Impact assessment and quality assessment · Planning and resource management

377

Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F I N A L Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report UCSF Mount Zion Garage State Clearinghouse No ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT Under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the University of California procedures for implementing CEQA, following completion of a Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR

Mullins, Dyche

378

A fine-grained geospatial representation and framework for large-scale indoor environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a system and method for extending the current paradigm of geographic information systems (GIS) to support indoor environments. It introduces features and properties of indoor multi-building environments ...

Battat, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Modeling the comfort effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors. Building andEFFECTS OF SHORT-WAVE SOLAR RADIATION INDOORS Edward ARENSK. The effects of solar radiation on thermal comfort.

Arens, Edward; Huang, Li; Hoyt, Tyler; Zhou, Xin; Schiavon, Stefano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Concentrations of indoor pollutants (CIP) database user's manual (Version 4. 0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the latest release of the database and the user manual. The user manual is a tutorial and reference for utilizing the CIP Database system. An installation guide is included to cover various hardware configurations. Numerous examples and explanations of the dialogue between the user and the database program are provided. It is hoped that this resource will, along with on-line help and the menu-driven software, make for a quick and easy learning curve. For the purposes of this manual, it is assumed that the user is acquainted with the goals of the CIP Database, which are: (1) to collect existing measurements of concentrations of indoor air pollutants in a user-oriented database and (2) to provide a repository of references citing measured field results openly accessible to a wide audience of researchers, policy makers, and others interested in the issues of indoor air quality. The database software, as distinct from the data, is contained in two files, CIP. EXE and PFIL.COM. CIP.EXE is made up of a number of programs written in dBase III command code and compiled using Clipper into a single, executable file. PFIL.COM is a program written in Turbo Pascal that handles the output of summary text files and is called from CIP.EXE. Version 4.0 of the CIP Database is current through March 1990.

Apte, M.G.; Brown, S.R.; Corradi, C.A.; Felix, S.P.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Smith, B.V.; Traynor, G.W.; Woods, A.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building Environmental Health Capacity in Allegheny County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Environmental Health Capacity in Allegheny County: Environmental Indicators Outcomes standard Air Quality Computer Systems Days exceeding ozone standard Air Quality Computer Systems Attainment of the annual PM-2.5 standard (Fine particulates) Air Quality Computer Systems Annual PM-2.5 level Air Quality

382

Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(proportion of each class, hal-00447841,version1-16Jan2010 Author manuscript, published in "ISIAQ's Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference, Syracuse : United States (2009)" #12;descriptors of the conditional distributions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

383

Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings Jeff models for the indoor-air environment in control design for energy efficient buildings. In one method by a desire to incorporate models of the indoor-air environment in the design of energy efficient buildings

Gugercin, Serkan

384

Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea Valente  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea Valente Abstract-- An optimal indoor climate control is very critical to manned offshore platforms in terms of onboard staffs' comfort limitations, offshore indoor climate control is much more challenging than any on-ground situations

Yang, Zhenyu

385

Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software and validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Development of a new model to predict indoor daylighting : integration in CODYRUN software in the scientific literature for determining indoor daylighting values. They are classified in three categories. The originality of our paper relies on the coupling of several simplified models of indoor daylighting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

386

Policy Name: Closing due to Indoor Temperature Extremes Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management and Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Name: Closing due to Indoor Temperature Extremes Originating/Responsible Department to be followed in the event that indoor temperature extremes prompt the closing of any building or work area. The closing of any building or work area due to indoor temperatures extremes shall be subject to operational

Dawson, Jeff W.

387

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard I[ o Fig. 2. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in aCritical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards,with gas appliances. Nitrogen dioxide levels in kitchens of

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental Approvals (Manitoba, Canada)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Approvals Branch ensures that developments are regulated in a manner that protects the environment and public health, and sustains a high quality of life for present and future...

389

Graduate Studies Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The principal focus areas include: environmental biotechnology; water quality and treatment; wastewater collabora- tions in Atlanta with units at Emory Uni- versity and the US Centers for Disease Control

Storici, Francesca

390

Wireless Indoor Location Estimation Based on Neural Network RSS Signature Recognition (LENSR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Location Based Services (LBS), context aware applications, and people and object tracking depend on the ability to locate mobile devices, also known as localization, in the wireless landscape. Localization enables a diverse set of applications that include, but are not limited to, vehicle guidance in an industrial environment, security monitoring, self-guided tours, personalized communications services, resource tracking, mobile commerce services, guiding emergency workers during fire emergencies, habitat monitoring, environmental surveillance, and receiving alerts. This paper presents a new neural network approach (LENSR) based on a competitive topological Counter Propagation Network (CPN) with k-nearest neighborhood vector mapping, for indoor location estimation based on received signal strength. The advantage of this approach is both speed and accuracy. The tested accuracy of the algorithm was 90.6% within 1 meter and 96.4% within 1.5 meters. Several approaches for location estimation using WLAN technology were reviewed for comparison of results.

Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Environmental geographic information system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Environmental Engineering GRADUATE STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation and Control · Air Pollution Meteorology · Air Pollution Physics and Chemistry · Atmospheric quality monitoring, pollution control and model- ing; environmental sciences; and industrial ecology assessment. COURSES · Advanced Environmental Chemistry · Advanced Topics in Air Pollution · Air Pollution

Wang, Yuhang

394

Environmental Technology Verification Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Technology Verification Program Quality Management Plan (QMP) for the ETV Materials Management and Remediation Center Version 1.0 #12;QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLAN (QMP) for the ETV MATERIALS MANAGEMENT AND REMEDIATION CENTER Version 1.0 (SIGNATURE ON FILE) Teri Richardson 3-13-09 EPA MMR CENTER

395

Minnesota DOT Environmental Stewardship & Streamlining Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for environmental impact statements (EIS) for major Federal actions Created Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ a significant effect on the human environment Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ­ detailed written statement) ­ significance of environmental impact is not clearly established; to determine the appropriate environmental

Minnesota, University of

396

Direct from CDC Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental health services (i.e., services involving water quality, air quality, waste management, or vector management plans of water supply systems. The team also works on sustainability evalu ation and sanitationDirect from CDC Environmental Health Services Branch Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up

397

A Review on Indoor Optical Wireless Systems Chaturi Singh, AMIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kanpur, U.P.-208016 Joseph John, FIETE, Y.N.Singh MIETE, MIEEE Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT assistants for indoor use are rapidly growing in offices, manufacturing floors, shopping areas and warehouses cable free communication at very high bit rates (a few Gbps as compared to tens of Mbps supported

Singh Yatindra Nath

398

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y Inhaled progeny of 222Rn (radon progeny) are the most important source of irradiation of the human-, urban-, and marine-influenced aerosols. The ASDs of attached radon progeny for all three studied ambient

Yu, K.N.

399

Image Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Mobile robot exploration is a vital cog in the automa- tion of the mapping process. In recentImage Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features (Extended Abstract) Aravindhan K Krishnan Madhava Krishna Supreeth Achar ABSTRACT This paper presents an approach to explore

Treuille, Adrien

400

An Information Theoretic Analysis on Indoor PLC Channel Characterizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Information Theoretic Analysis on Indoor PLC Channel Characterizations Hao LIN , Aawatif MENOUNI. But the development of Power Line Communications (PLC) highly depends on the knowledge of the channel characterizations. For this reason, a large number of attentions have been payed on the PLC channel analysis using

Gesbert, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

Charles Weschler

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

FEMP Offers Updated Training on the Guiding Principles for High...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

maintenance practices in the areas of energy efficiency, water conservation, indoor environmental quality, materials and waste management, and environmentally preferable building...

403

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality simulation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Commission on Environmental Quality, Saffett Tanrikulu Bay Area Air Quality Control District, Jon Pleim- EPA... for SIPs and air quality forecasting Problem to be...

404

OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution This Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) joint memorandum expands...

405

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Cornell University Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering School of Civil and Environmental Engineering enve.cornell.edu 2013-2014 #12;Environmental Engineering 2013-2014 1 UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING MISSION STATEMENT

Walter, M.Todd

406

Environmental overview of geothermal development: northern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional environmental problems and issues associated with geothermal development in northern Nevada are studied to facilitate environmental assessment of potential geothermal resources. The various issues discussed are: environmental geology, seismicity of northern Nevada, hydrology and water quality, air quality, Nevada ecosystems, noise effects, socio-economic impacts, and cultural resources and archeological values. (MHR)

Slemmons, D.B.; Stroh, J.M.; Whitney, R.A. (eds.) [eds.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

162 Environmental Programs Environmental Programs Committee Walter Whitfield Isle, Chair (English) Katherine Bennett Ensor (Statistics) Mark R. Wiesner (Civil and Environmental Engineering) Donald Ostdiek (Architecture) The Environmental Programs Committee coordinates courses and curricula on environmental topics

Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

408

Water Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

409

Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

Gammage, R.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR linearly decreased with HCHO exposure, with estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Georgia Water Quality Control Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) is a set of environmental regulations and permitting requirements that comply with the federal Clean Water Act. The Georgia Water Quality Control Act...

414

Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them...

415

Quality Assurance Specialist (Safety Software Qualtiy Assurance)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position performs safety software quality assurance oversight of all activities that support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) compliance with environmental,...

416

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total...

417

Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complexes between nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, nitrous1992) Indoor ozone and nitrogen dioxide: A potential pathwaybed of SiO 2 pellets. Nitrogen dioxide is introduced from a

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

419

Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-147. [7]. Derek C. C, Li Baizhan. productivity and indoor environment [C]. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings. Espoo Finland: Vol.1, 1(2000): 629-634. ...

Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Shading and Cooling: Impacts of Solar Control and Windows on Indoor Airflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summer wind driven natural ventilation potential for indoor estimates the cooling potential of wind?driven ventilation and monsoon ? have  potential for wind?driven occupant 

Hildebrand, Penapa Wankaeo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

COLLABORATIVE INVESTIGATIONS OF WATER QUALITY POLLUTION PATTERNS: WORKING WITH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Management Title of Research Project: Collaborative Investigations of Water Quality Pollution: Chair: Jennifer Silver Phd Candidate in Resource and Environmental Management (REM) ___________________________________________ Dr. Evelyn Pinkerton Senior Supervisor Professor of Resource and Environmental Management, SFU

422

Environmental Participation and Environmental Motivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Willingness to pay for environmental protection in Germany:varying the causes of environmental problems on stated WTPstudy. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management,

Torgler, Benno; García-Valińas, María A.; Macintyre, Alison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chronic respiratory effects of indoor formaldehyde exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6-15 years of age) and 613 adults. HCHO measurements were made with passive samplers during two 1-week periods. Data on chronic cough and phlegm, wheeze, attacks of breathlessness, and doctor diagnoses of chronic bronchitis and asthma were collected with self-completed questionnaires. Peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) were obtained during the evenings and mornings for up to 14 consecutive days for each individual. Significantly greater prevalence rates of asthma and chronic bronchitis were found in children from houses with HCHO levels 60-120 ppb than in those less exposed, especially in children also exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. In children, levels of PEFR decreased linearly with HCHO exposure, with the estimated decrease due to 60 ppb of HCHO equivalent to 22% of PEFR level in nonexposed children. The effects in asthmatic children exposed to HCHO below 50 ppb were greater than in healthy ones. The effects in adults were less evident: decrements in PEFR due to HCHO over 40 ppb were seen only in the morning, and mainly in smokers.

Krzyzanowski, M.; Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D. (Univ. of Arizona Health Sciences Center, Tucson (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Environmental Stewardship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Stewardship Environmental Stewardship #12;Organizational Opportunities or Threats Environmental StewardshipEnvironmental Stewardship #12;ADOT Organizational StructureADOT Organizational of safety and efficiency, while retaining and promoting its irreplaceable natural landscape and protecting

Minnesota, University of

425

SNES 2000: Environmental Sciences Colloquium Water Resource Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SNES 2000: Environmental Sciences Colloquium Fall 2011 Water Resource Management Friday afternoons for first speaker September 9 The world water savings bank Mike Walter, Biological and Environmental, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University October 7 OPEN October 14 Water Quality

Keinan, Alon

426

Course Number: 7120 Course Title: Introduction to Environmental Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It also addresses environmental health applications and domains such as water quality, air pollution and fate of pollutants, exposure and risk assessment, epidemiology, toxicology, and environmental policy to environmental health stressors including heavy metals, pesticides, radiation, organic pollutants, among others

Dasgupta, Dipankar

427

Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Ass  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an...

428

Environmental Assessment for the Construction, Operation, and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation...

429

EnvironmentalHealth Dedicated to the advancement of the environmental health professional Volume 70, No. 8 April 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ing indoors under certain conditions, was not effective in reducing indoor air pollution, while .......................................................................................................72 Advertisers Index

430

Use of environmental sensors and sensor networks to develop water and salinity budgets for seasonal wetland real-time water quality management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful management of river salt loads in complex and highly regulated river basins such as the San Joaquin of California presents significant challenges to Information Technology. Models are used as means of simulating major hydrologic processes in the basin which affect water quality and can be useful as tools for organizing basin information in a structured and readily accessible manner. Models can also be used to extrapolate the results of system monitoring since it is impossible to collect data for every point and non-point source of a pollutant in the Basin. Fundamental to every model is the concept of mass balance. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art sensor technologies deployed in concert to obtain the first water and salinity budgets for a 60,000 hectare tract of seasonally managed wetlands in the San Joaquin Basin of California.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.J.A,; Royer, C.W.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Final project report on arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir: Volume 2, Quality assurance/quality control summary report for arsenic biogeochemistry in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arsenic contamination was studied in the Clinch River/Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system downstream from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Arsenic is of particular interest and concern because (1) it occurs commonly in coal-bearing rock and waste products such as fly ash associated with the burning of coal, (2) it is classified as a Class A carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency, and (3) disposal of fly ash, both on and off the ORR, may have contaminated surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir. The present study dffers from previous reports on arsenic concentrations in the CR/WBR system in the use of much more sensitive and precise processing and analytical techniques to measure arsenic species (arsenate, arsenite, and organic arsenic) at levels well below the ecological and human health risk screening criteria. The absolute detection limits using these techniques are approximately 20 to 40 pmol/L or 0.0015 to 0.003 {mu}g/L.

Newman, K.A.; Ford, C.J.; Byrd, J.T.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quality Assurance 8-1 8. Quality Assurance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overall goal of a well-designed and well-implemented sampling and analysis program is to measure of a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for environmental monitoring activities at the ORR sampling QA program and for incorporation of new procedures to reflect chang- ing technologies

Pennycook, Steve

434

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2118 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON PRIMARY of reactions of ozone on building products and on their emissions in indoor air. For this purpose, 12 building products were exposed to ozone in a dedicated experimental setup. The measured ozone removal rate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Tips for Reducing Asthma Triggers in Indoor Environments The goal of parents who have children with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products and pesticides can add pollutants to the indoor air. Keep your home well ventilated when using these #12;products. Consider using less toxic products. Keep foods "in the kitchen" for easier cleaning allergens in the indoor air. Buildings need to have a sufficient amount of outdoor air to dilute and remove

436

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network Yves Josse communications in indoor environments. In this paper, the power consumption and energy efficiency of a DAS using for different transmission configurations, yielding a distance- dependent energy efficiency model. In a second

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

437

Indoor Lighting Overview Page 5-1 2008 Nonresidential Compliance Manual August 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compliance Manual August 2009 5.1 Overview The primary mechanism for regulating indoor lighting energy under building's energy consumption, including lighting power, meets the energy budget. The performance approach lighting applications. Indoor lighting is one of the single largest consumers of energy (kilowatt

438

A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard Abstract--Recently there has been an increased interest in the development of autonomous flying vehicles. Whereas most system to autonomously operate in indoor environments. To achieve this, we systematically extend

Teschner, Matthias

439

Automobile Proximity and Indoor Residential Concentrations of BTEX and Diana E. Hun1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automobile Proximity and Indoor Residential Concentrations of BTEX and MTBE Diana E. Hun1 from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car of other BTEX components and MTBE have been reported (CalEPA 2009; U.S. EPA 2005). Up until 2000, MTBE

Siegel, Jeffrey

440

Author's personal copy Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to have been dominated by car exhaust concentrations of other BTEX components and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) have been reported [5,6]. Up until

Siegel, Jeffrey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

IMPACT OF THE URBAN POLLUTION ON THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT -EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A MECHANICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bâtiment (CSTB), Nantes, France ABSTRACT This study aims to assess the transfer of outdoor air pollution and the relationships between outdoor and indoor urban air pollutant concentrations are more and more a subject indoor pollutant sources. At the initial state, the dwelling was naturally ventilated. Air renewal

Boyer, Edmond

442

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV...

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Multi-Link Level Simulation Model of Indoor Peer-to-Peer Radio Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multi-Link Level Simulation Model of Indoor Peer-to-Peer Radio Channels Paolo Castiglione, Claude presents a link-simulation model for cooperative indoor communication systems at 2.4 GHz, based of this paper is to propose a multi-link simulation model for peer-to-peer cooperative (a.k.a. distributed

Gesbert, David

445

Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California, Irvine, CA ABSTRACT Indoor air purifiers are advertised as safe household prod- ucts for health. This is a serious concern, because O3 is a criteria air pollutant reg- ulated by health-related federal and state of growing air pollution problems in urban areas, indoor air purification has gained widespread popularity

Nizkorodov, Sergey

446

Go to Energy Plenary Lecture * Go to Bridge Scouring Paper Energy Problems and Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy, hydroelectric energy, waste management, water pollution, air pollution, indoor climate etcGo to Energy Plenary Lecture * Go to Bridge Scouring Paper #12;Energy Problems and Environmental Engineering Proceedings of the 3rd WSEAS International Conference on ENERGY PLANNING, ENERGY SAVING

Kostic, Milivoje M.

447

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Indoor air pollution in rural China: Cooking fuels, stoves, and health status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid fuels are a major source of indoor air pollution, but in less developed countries the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution are poorly understood. The authors conducted a large cross-sectional study of rural Chinese households to determine associations between individual health status and domestic cooking as a source of indoor air pollution. The study included measures of health status as well as measures of indoor air-pollution sources, such as solid cooking fuels and cooking stoves. Compared with other fuel types, coal was associated with a lower health status, including negative impacts on exhaled carbon monoxide level, forced vital capacity, lifetime prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, and health care utilization. Decreasing household coal use, increasing use of improved stove technology, and increasing kitchen ventilation may decrease the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution.

Peabody, J.W.; Riddell, T.J.; Smith, K.R.; Liu, Y.P.; Zhao, Y.Y.; Gong, J.H.; Milet, M.; Sinton, J.E. [Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Indoor Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and AchievementsResearch StaffSustainabilityComponentsIndoor

450

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Air Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Why Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data...

452

Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Environmental Report 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2008 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2008: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status wildlife and plants (Chapter 6). Complete monitoring data, which are summarized in the body of the report, are provided in Appendix A. The remaining three chapters discuss the radiological impact on the public from LLNL operations (Chapter 7), LLNL's groundwater remediation program (Chapter 8), and quality assurance for the environmental monitoring programs (Chapter 9). The report uses Systeme International units, consistent with the federal Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and Executive Order 12770, Metric Usage in Federal Government Programs (1991). For ease of comparison to environmental reports issued prior to 1991, dose values and many radiological measurements are given in both metric and U.S. customary units. A conversion table is provided in the glossary. The report is the responsibility of LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Monitoring data were obtained through the combined efforts of the Environmental Protection Department; Environmental Restoration Department; Physical and Life Sciences Environmental Monitoring Radiation Laboratory; and the Hazards Control Department.

Gallegos, G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Dibley, V; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; MacQueen, D H; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

Not Available

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Environmental Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Compliance Inspector Certification 2009 Candidate Handbook This booklet contains... ° Subject matter for the Environmental Compliance Inspector tests ° Education and experience requirements Contents Environmental Compliance Inspector 2009 Candidate Handbook This handbook contains information

459

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, meanwhile, could focus lim- Initiative and Application Model Impact Environmental Information Networ27 ICT AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY T he environment is a large complex sys- tem. Managing. Environmental Monitoring and Associated Resource Management and Risk Mitigation ICTimprovestheabilitytoobtain

460

Environmental Outreach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outreach Environmental Outreach Our vision is to operate a proactive and interactive environmental communication and public involvement program that is inclusive and responsive to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogen, methanol and gasoline as fuels for fuel cellon Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Gasoline Vapor Recovery (Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality implementation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission on Environmental Quality, Saffett Tanrikulu Bay Area Air Quality Control District, Jon Pleim- EPA... for SIPs and air ... Source: Jacob, Daniel J. - School of...

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality strategy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission on Environmental Quality, Saffett Tanrikulu Bay Area Air Quality Control District, Jon Pleim- EPA... for SIPs and air ... Source: Jacob, Daniel J. - School of...

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality research Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commission on Environmental Quality, Saffett Tanrikulu Bay Area Air Quality Control District, Jon Pleim- EPA... for SIPs ... Source: Jacob, Daniel J. - School of...

466

Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nexus EnergyHome...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

indoor environmental quality, achieving the highest rating possible under the National Green Building Standard Nexus EnergyHomes - Frederick, Maryland More Documents &...

467

Newest Los Alamos facility receives LEED® Gold certification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

indoor environmental quality and innovation in design. RLUOB's features include: Building envelope design (orientation, materials and insulation) yielded a 20 percent improvement...

468

Structured financial solutions for green affordable housing projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmentally responsible buildings are increasing gaining recognition in the building industry because they address objectives such as conserving natural resources, improving energy efficiency and indoor air quality and ...

Subramanian, Shwetha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings”. Indoor Air; 14 (Strategies for Mixed-Mode Buildings, Summary Report, CenterCBE). 2006. Website: Mixed-Mode Building Case Studies.

Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

What School Buildings Can Teach Us: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with indoor environmental quality in green buildings.In Proceedings of Healthy Buildings (Vol. 3, pp. 365–370).Bernstein, Tobie, 2003. Building Healthy, High Performance

Baker, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Using text analysis to listen to building users.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Built Environment, Building Research & Information 36(with Indoor Environmental Quality in Green Buildings.Proceedings of the Healthy Buildings Conference, Lisbon.

Moezzi, Mithra; Goins, John

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Occupant satisfaction in mixed-mode buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings”. Indoor Air; 14 (Financial Benefits of Green Buildings. Report to California’to incorporate other green building features (75% were LEED-

Brager, Gail; Baker, Lindsay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - air laws cigarette Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring Environmental AirQuality ProvidingChildren withGoodIndoor Air... with air pollution caused by the state's mountainous topogra- phy ... Source: National Center for...

474

Environmental Decision Analysis: Meeting the Challenges of Making Good Decisions at CALFED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Water Account, Drinking Water Quality, Watershed Management,environmental collaborations, formed with the express goal of improving ecological health and water management

Tomkins, Claire D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Limei Ran Research Associate, Center for Environmental Modeling for Policy Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) with the Environmental Policy Integrated Limei Ran Research Associate, Center for Environmental Modeling for Policy Development

McLaughlin, Richard M.

476

Indoor Air Quality Factors in Designing a Healthy Building John D. Spengler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Healthy Building Abstract Current guidelines for green buildings are cursory and inadequate for specifying assessment models. Introduction At the beginning of the 21st century, "green building design" can be seen through terms such as "sustainable development," "ecotourism," "ecotaxation," "socially responsible

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

477

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington, D.C. : U.S. Green Building Council. U.S. DOE. (NAHB/ICC. (2009). National green building standard. NAHBcommercial-customers/green-building-and- the- environment/

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

many hospitals for energy audits and for energy-conserving1980, will include an energy audit, modifications to theannotated bibliography of energy audit source materials will

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

standard, ASHRAE 90-75R, Energy Conservation in New Building Design, 3 has stipulated that the minimum

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Classification .. 62 MS Thesis, Dept. of Architecture,Sustainability Classifications of Project Homes MS Thesis, Dept. of Architecture,Architecture, UC Berkeley 2012 http://escholarship.org/uc/item/25x5j8w6 Figure 24 Formaldehyde Concentrations by Energy/Sustainability

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environmental quality" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Group Consol Net Zero Energy Certified The ThousandEnergy Institute, 2012) Net-Zero Energy Certified (Zero Netare: Passive House Net-zero energy home Green certified home

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone andppm) 10 mg/m 3 (9 ppm) Nitrogen dioxide EPA 100 M91m 3 (50and except for nitrogen dioxide in one of the classrooms.

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in new "energy-efficient design" hospitals. Developmentenergy-efficient ventilation standards and ventilation designs

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advantage Institute. Emmerich, S. J. , Gorfain, J. E. ,in attached garages. Emmerich et al. (2003) provide anthe building envelope (Emmerich et al. , 2003). Measurements

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Evaluating Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.D. Hind Al-Momani Department of Architecture Jordan University of Science and Technology Irbid-Jordan Hikmat_ali@yahoo.com Hikmat@just.edu.jo Phone... http://www.consumer voice usa.com, sick building and toxic mold.27/3/2003 http://www.consumer voice usa.com, do you have a ?sick building ?? 27/3/2003 http://www.epa.gov/iaq/schools/tfs/guide5.html. IAQ tools for schools kit ?IAQ coordinator...

Ali, H. H.; Al-Momani, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the analysis, most importantly acrolein, NO 2 , and PM 2.5 .concentrations found that acrolein concentrations were onof PM 2.5 , NO 2 , and acrolein requires a substantially

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PM 2.5 , acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, 1,3- butadiene,PM 2.5 , formaldehyde and acrolein accounted for the vastof these pollutants, except acrolein, radon and ozone are

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Secretary for Conservation and Solar Energy of the u.s.Secretary for Conservation and Solar Energy of the U. s.

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporated energy efficient design. The EEB measuredshowed that energy efficient design features, intended toenergy efficient ventilation standards and ventilation designs

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Measuring Indoor Mobile Wireless Link Quality Andreas Wapf and Michael R. Souryal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

make it obsolete in time-varying conditions. Furthermore, since packet success rate, in general reliability of an RF link in terms of its packet success probability in the pres- ence of a time-varying channel. We compare various approaches to estimating the current packet success rate (PSR), including

492

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas furnace Air-to-air heat pump Gas fireplace (primarywith their air-to-air heat pumps, such as nighttimeSystem Type None Air-to-air heat pump Night ventilative

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connected to the home’s central heating and cooling system.homes. For homes with electric heating, given the higher

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into nine of the home heating systems, being paired withElectric cooking and heating homes were also recruited toheating. Very few homes had traditional heating equipment;

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation to which the general population is exposed. Radon- 222 is an inert, radioactive, naturally-occurring

Berk, James V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy audit provisions of the 1978 U, S, National Energy Act, Finally, also in 1979, the University

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X Gas furnace X X Geothermal Combisystem Solar X X Air-to-Solar Combisystem Heating Equipment Type Gas boiler Gas furnace

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Impact of residential wood burning on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,version1-4Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "9. International Conference & exhibition Healthy Buildings, Syracuse : United States (2009)" #12;In two rooms (e.g. the living-room, where the appliance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Setting of French indoor air quality guidelines for chronic exposure to Marion Keirsbulck1,*  

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in "9. International Conference & exhibition Healthy Buildings, Syracuse : United States (2009)" #12;As

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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inAir: A Longitudinal study of Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations  

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pollutants are colorless and odorless, while many activities are inconspicuous and routine. We implemented inAir. Among those, air pollution and its effects on health have been researched extensively over past several decades [13]. In particular, the health effects of air pollution cover a wide variety of respiratory

Mankoff, Jennifer