National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for indoor environment group

  1. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  2. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  3. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  4. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  5. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  6. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  7. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  8. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  9. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  10. Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

  11. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  12. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore » mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  13. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  14. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  15. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  17. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group NERSC User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Environment --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 Overview * Login N odes, F ile S ystems, a nd D ot F iles - David T urner * So;ware M odules - Doug J acobsen * Compilers - Mike S ...

  18. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA NDCX NDCX Gretina Gamma particle device PET Scanner APEX APEX APEX LASER LASER Rifle, CO Rifle, CO The group: Authorizes work with...

  19. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building...

  20. GALAXIES IN X-RAY GROUPS. I. ROBUST MEMBERSHIP ASSIGNMENT AND THE IMPACT OF GROUP ENVIRONMENTS ON QUENCHING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Matthew R.; Bundy, Kevin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Finoguenov, Alexis; Tinker, Jeremy; Lin, Yen-Ting; Mei, Simona; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Ilbert, Olivier; Aussel, Herve; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Behroozi, Peter S.; Busha, Michael T.; Capak, Peter; Coccato, Lodovico; Covone, Giovanni; Faure, Cecile; Fiorenza, Stephanie L.; and others

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that lead dense environments to host galaxies with redder colors, more spheroidal morphologies, and lower star formation rates than field populations remains an important problem. As most candidate processes ultimately depend on host halo mass, accurate characterizations of the local environment, ideally tied to halo mass estimates and spanning a range in halo mass and redshift, are needed. In this work, we present and test a rigorous, probabilistic method for assigning galaxies to groups based on precise photometric redshifts and X-ray-selected groups drawn from the COSMOS field. The groups have masses in the range 10{sup 13} {approx}< M{sub 200c}/M{sub Sun} {approx}< 10{sup 14} and span redshifts 0 < z < 1. We characterize our selection algorithm via tests on spectroscopic subsamples, including new data obtained at the Very Large Telescope, and by applying our method to detailed mock catalogs. We find that our group member galaxy sample has a purity of 84% and completeness of 92% within 0.5 R{sub 200c}. We measure the impact of uncertainties in redshifts and group centering on the quality of the member selection with simulations based on current data as well as future imaging and spectroscopic surveys. As a first application of our new group member catalog which will be made publicly available, we show that member galaxies exhibit a higher quenched fraction compared to the field at fixed stellar mass out to z {approx} 1, indicating a significant relationship between star formation and environment at group scales. We also address the suggestion that dusty star-forming galaxies in such groups may impact the high-l power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and find that such a population cannot explain the low power seen in recent Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements.

  1. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  2. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  3. EXAMINING THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENT IN A COMPREHENSIVE SAMPLE OF COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Charlton, Jane C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Hibbard, John E.

    2012-03-15

    Compact groups, with their high number densities, small velocity dispersions, and an interstellar medium that has not been fully processed, provide a local analog to conditions of galaxy interactions in the earlier universe. The frequent and prolonged gravitational encounters that occur in compact groups affect the evolution of the constituent galaxies in a myriad of ways, for example, gas processing and star formation. Recently, a statistically significant 'gap' has been discovered in the mid-infrared (MIR: 3.6-8 {mu}m) IRAC color space of compact group galaxies. This gap is not seen in field samples and is a new example of how the compact group environment may affect the evolution of member galaxies. In order to investigate the origin and nature of this gap, we have compiled a larger sample of 37 compact groups in addition to the original 12 groups studied by Johnson et al. (yielding 174 individual galaxies with reliable MIR photometry). We find that a statistically significant deficit of galaxies in this gap region of IRAC color space is persistent in the full sample, lending support to the hypothesis that the compact group environment inhibits moderate specific star formation rates. Using this expanded sample, we have more fully characterized the distribution of galaxies in this color space and quantified the low-density region more fully with respect to MIR bluer and MIR redder colors. We note a curvature in the color-space distribution, which is fully consistent with increasing dust temperature as the activity in a galaxy increases. This full sample of 49 compact groups allows us to subdivide the data according to physical properties of the groups. An analysis of these subsamples indicates that neither projected physical diameter nor density shows a trend in color space within the values represented by this sample. We hypothesize that the apparent lack of a trend is due to the relatively small range of properties in this sample, whose groups have already been

  4. Pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session on S. 656 and S. 657, May 25, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This hearing on pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation includes testimony from individuals and representatives of the following groups: Business Council on Indoor Air; American Lung Association; Consumer Federation of America; Radiation Protection Programs, NJ; School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; AFL-CIO; EPA; National Parent Teacher Association. Additional material includes statements from: American Lung Assoc.; Alliance for Radon Reduction; Alliance to Save Energy; American Industrial Hygiene Assoc.; Bowser Morner, Inc.; Building Owners and Managers Assoc. International; Chemical Specialties Manufacturers Assoc.; Council for American Private Education; National Assoc. of Home Builders; National Assoc. of Realtors; National School Boards Assoc.; Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Assoc.

  5. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Srsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup 1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  6. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Assigning unique identification numbers to new user accounts and groups in a computing environment with multiple registries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRobertis, Christopher V.; Lu, Yantian T.

    2010-02-23

    A method, system, and program storage device for creating a new user account or user group with a unique identification number in a computing environment having multiple user registries is provided. In response to receiving a command to create a new user account or user group, an operating system of a clustered computing environment automatically checks multiple registries configured for the operating system to determine whether a candidate identification number for the new user account or user group has been assigned already to one or more existing user accounts or groups, respectively. The operating system automatically assigns the candidate identification number to the new user account or user group created in a target user registry if the checking indicates that the candidate identification number has not been assigned already to any of the existing user accounts or user groups, respectively.

  8. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  9. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video News Room News Releases Environment newsroomassetsimagesenvi-icon.png Earth, Environment Climate impacts, including global temperatures, drought and forest fires ...

  10. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. I. WHICH ENVIRONMENT AFFECTS GALAXY EVOLUTION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carollo, C. Marcella; Cibinel, Anna; Lilly, Simon J.; Miniati, Francesco; Cameron, Ewan; Peng, Yingjie; Pipino, Antonio; Rudick, Craig S.; Norberg, Peder; Silverman, John D.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2013-10-20

    The Zurich Environmental Study (ZENS) is based on a sample of ∼1500 galaxy members of 141 groups in the mass range ∼10{sup 12.5-14.5} M{sub ☉} within the narrow redshift range 0.05 < z < 0.0585. ZENS adopts novel approaches, described here, to quantify four different galactic environments, namely: (1) the mass of the host group halo; (2) the projected halo-centric distance; (3) the rank of galaxies as central or satellites within their group halos; and (4) the filamentary large-scale structure density. No self-consistent identification of a central galaxy is found in ∼40% of <10{sup 13.5} M{sub ☉} groups, from which we estimate that ∼15% of groups at these masses are dynamically unrelaxed systems. Central galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups generally have similar properties, suggesting that centrals are regulated by their mass and not by their environment. Centrals in relaxed groups have, however, ∼30% larger sizes than in unrelaxed groups, possibly due to accretion of small satellites in virialized group halos. At M > 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, satellite galaxies in relaxed and unrelaxed groups have similar size, color, and (specific) star formation rate distributions; at lower galaxy masses, satellites are marginally redder in relaxed relative to unrelaxed groups, suggesting quenching of star formation in low-mass satellites by physical processes active in relaxed halos. Overall, relaxed and unrelaxed groups show similar stellar mass populations, likely indicating similar stellar mass conversion efficiencies. In the enclosed ZENS catalog, we publish all environmental diagnostics as well as the galaxy structural and photometric measurements described in companion ZENS papers II and III.

  11. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  12. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment Events Learn about our science, listen to lectures on environment and climate change at the Bradbury Science Museum or at Cafe Scientific events in your community. Oct 14 Wed 4:00 PM Laboratory's Electronic Public Reading room training J. Robert Oppenheimer Study Center, Room JRO 1&2 - West Jemez Road at Casa Grande The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), are holding training on the contents and use of the Los Alamos National

  13. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B

  14. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  15. THE EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENT ON MILKY-WAY-MASS GALAXIES IN A CONSTRAINED SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creasey, Peter; Scannapieco, Cecilia; Nuza, Sebastin E.; Gottlber, Stefan; Steinmetz, Matthias; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-02-10

    In this Letter, we present, for the first time, a study of star formation rate (SFR), gas fraction, and galaxy morphology of a constrained simulation of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies compared to other MW-mass galaxies. By combining with unconstrained simulations, we cover a sufficient volume to compare these galaxies environmental densities ranging from the field to that of the Local Group (LG). This is particularly relevant as it has been shown that, quite generally, galaxy properties depend intimately upon their environment, most prominently when galaxies in clusters are compared to those in the field. For galaxies in loose groups such as the LG, however, environmental effects have been less clear. We consider the galaxys environmental density in spheres of 1200 kpc (comoving) and find that while environment does not appear to directly affect morphology, there is a positive trend with SFRs. This enhancement in star formation occurs systematically for galaxies in higher density environments, regardless whether they are part of the LG or in filaments. Our simulations suggest that the richer environment at megaparsec scales may help replenish the star-forming gas, allowing higher specific SFRs in galaxies such as the MW.

  16. indoor | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building...

  17. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  18. Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2007-06-25

    A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

  19. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  20. Manual on indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

  1. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  2. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  3. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May ...

  4. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  5. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow ...

  6. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air...

  7. Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits of Apartments in California Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor ...

  8. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, ...

  9. Validation of a zero-equation turbulence model for complex indoor airflow simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srebric, J.; Chen, Q.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1999-07-01

    The design of an indoor environment requires a tool that can quickly predict the three-dimensional distributions of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentrations in the room on a desktop computer. This investigation has tested a zero-equation turbulence model for the prediction of the indoor environment in an office with displacement ventilation, with a heater and infiltration and with forced convection and a partition wall. The computed air velocity and temperature distributions agree well with the measured data. The computing time for each case is less than seven minutes on a PC Pentium II, 350 MHz.

  10. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  11. Numerical simulation of solar heat absorption within indoor space by means of composite grid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Murakami, Shuzo; Kato, Shinsuke

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the method for numerical simulation of solar radiation entering indoor spaces through fenestration. The proposed method can systematically deal with the interception of sunlight by buildings in the outdoor space and obstacles in the indoor space by tracing a large number of particles directed toward the sun. Configuration factors from the fenestration to the sky are also three-dimensionally treated by accounting for outdoor geometries. Distribution of the solar heat absorption in the indoor space is calculated by assuming radiation equilibrium. After the solar heat absorption analysis is carried out, heat transfer analysis in the space is conducted taking account of longwave radiation, convective heat transfer, thermal conduction, and cooling/heating by air conditioning. Then, the indoor thermal environment is evaluated using the resulting temperature distribution of air and indoor surfaces. To evaluate the applicability of these procedures, the thermal environment in a model hall with large glass windows and an overhang is predicted. The analyzed hall is assumed to be located near a tall building.

  12. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A.

    1980-01-01

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  13. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  14. Environment Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Videos Environment

  15. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The effects of indoor pollution on Arizona children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, R.

    1982-05-01

    The respiratory health of a large group of Arizona school children who have been exposed to indoor pollutants-tobacco smoke and home cooking fumes-is reported. A significant relationship was found between parental smoking and symptoms of cough, wheeze, and sputum production. Also, children in homes where gas cooking fuel was used had higher rates of cough than children in homes where electricity was used. No differences in pulmonary function or yearly lung growth rates occurred among subjects grouped by exposure to tobacco smoke or cooking fuel. Thus, parental smoking and home cooking fuel affected cross-sectional respiratory symptom rates in a large group of Arizona school children. Study of pulmonary function, however, revealed no lung function or lung growth effects during 4 yr of study.

  17. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  18. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013 iap_rev1.pdf (970.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

  19. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.; Fagan, Jr., Thomas J.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Humphrey, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  2. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air Partners: American Gas Association www.aga.org Center of Energy and Environment www.mncee.org Building Performance Institute www.bpi.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org/PARR Building Components: Gas Appliances Application: Retrofit Single Family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate

  3. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  4. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2008-10-01

    Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

  5. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing

  6. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Campaign for Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May 27, 2015 - 7:30am Addthis Today the Energy Department launched a new indoor lighting campaign to increase the use of high efficiency lighting technologies in commercial buildings. Through the Better Buildings Alliance, the Department is working with key

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building Prev Next Title: Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental...

  8. Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental quality and health and associated no-regrets mitigation measures Citation Details In-Document Search This content ...

  9. Indoor air quality & airborne disease control in healthcare facilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DISEASES; THERMAL COMFORT; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS Word ...

  10. The Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: The role of galaxy group environment in the star formation rate versus stellar mass relation and quiescent fraction out to z ? 0.8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Lihwai; Chen, Chin-Wei; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Jian, Hung-Yu; Foucaud, Sebastien; Norberg, Peder; Bower, R. G.; Cole, Shaun; Arnalte-Mur, Pablo; Draper, P.; Heinis, Sebastien; Phleps, Stefanie; Chen, Wen-Ping; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Burgett, William; Chambers, K. C.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Hodapp, K. W.; and others

    2014-02-10

    Using a large optically selected sample of field and group galaxies drawn from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS), we present a detailed analysis of the specific star formation rate (SSFR)stellar mass (M {sub *}) relation, as well as the quiescent fraction versus M {sub *} relation in different environments. While both the SSFR and the quiescent fraction depend strongly on stellar mass, the environment also plays an important role. Using this large galaxy sample, we confirm that the fraction of quiescent galaxies is strongly dependent on environment at a fixed stellar mass, but that the amplitude and the slope of the star-forming sequence is similar between the field and groups: in other words, the SSFR-density relation at a fixed stellar mass is primarily driven by the change in the star-forming and quiescent fractions between different environments rather than a global suppression in the star formation rate for the star-forming population. However, when we restrict our sample to the cluster-scale environments (M > 10{sup 14} M {sub ?}), we find a global reduction in the SSFR of the star-forming sequence of 17% at 4? confidence as opposed to its field counterpart. After removing the stellar mass dependence of the quiescent fraction seen in field galaxies, the excess in the quiescent fraction due to the environment quenching in groups and clusters is found to increase with stellar mass, although deeper and larger data from the full PS1/MDS will be required to draw firm conclusions. We argue that these results are in favor of galaxy mergers to be the primary environment quenching mechanism operating in galaxy groups whereas strangulation is able to reproduce the observed trend in the environment quenching efficiency and stellar mass relation seen in clusters. Our results also suggest that the relative importance between mass quenching and environment quenching depends on stellar massthe mass quenching plays a dominant role in producing quiescent galaxies

  11. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  12. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple

  13. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. II. GALAXY STRUCTURAL MEASUREMENTS AND THE CONCENTRATION OF MORPHOLOGICALLY CLASSIFIED SATELLITES IN DIVERSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cibinel, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Cameron, E.; Peng, Y.; Pipino, A.; Rudick, C. S.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.; Norberg, P. E-mail: marcella@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-10-20

    We present structural measurements for the galaxies in the 0.05 < z < 0.0585 groups of the Zurich Environmental Study, aimed at establishing how galaxy properties depend on four environmental parameters: group halo mass (M{sub GROUP}), group-centric distance (R/R{sub 200}), ranking into central or satellite, and large-scale structure density (?{sub LSS}). Global galaxy structure is quantified both parametrically and non-parametrically. We correct all these measurements for observational biases due to point-spread function blurring and surface brightness effects as a function of galaxy size, magnitude, steepness of light profile, and ellipticity. Structural parameters are derived also for bulges, disks, and bars. We use the galaxy bulge-to-total ratios (B/T) together with the calibrated non-parametric structural estimators to implement a quantitative morphological classification that maximizes purity in the resulting morphological samples. We investigate how the concentration C of satellite galaxies depends on galaxy mass for each Hubble type and on M{sub GROUP}, R/R{sub 200}, and ?{sub LSS}. At galaxy masses M ? 10{sup 10} M{sub ?}, the concentration of disk satellites increases with increasing stellar mass separately within each morphological bin of B/T. The known increase in concentration with stellar mass for disk satellites is thus due, at least in part, to an increase in galaxy central stellar density at constant B/T. The correlation between concentration and galaxy stellar mass becomes progressively steeper for later morphological types. The concentration of disk satellites shows a barely significant dependence on ?{sub LSS} or R/R{sub 200}. The strongest environmental effect is found with group mass for >10{sup 10} M{sub ?} disk-dominated satellites, which are ?10% more concentrated in high mass groups than in lower mass groups.

  14. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from the U.S. EPA BASE Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study You ...

  15. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  16. Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2014 Indoor Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Winners in the Indoor category of the sixth annual Next Generation LuminairesTM Design Competition were announced today at The LED Show in Los Angeles. Sponsored by DOE, the Illuminating...

  17. Indoor Temperature and Humidity Data Collection and Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Indoor Temperature and Humidity Data Collection and Analysis Chuck Booten, NREL Paul Norton, NERD Cheryn Metzger, NREL Why do we care about indoor Temp/RH? "Anecdotal evidence from the field and controlled studies have raised concerns about the accuracy of software-based energy analysis for existing homes. ....

  18. Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition | Department of Energy Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition September 17, 2014 - 5:45pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department

  19. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  20. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. V. PROPERTIES AND FREQUENCY OF MERGING SATELLITES AND CENTRALS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pipino, A.; Cibinel, A.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F.; Silverman, J. D.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Finoguenov, A.

    2014-12-20

    We use the Zurich Environmental Study database to investigate the environmental dependence of the merger fraction ? and merging galaxy properties in a sample of ?1300 group galaxies with M > 10{sup 9.2} M {sub ?} and 0.05 < z < 0.0585. In all galaxy mass bins investigated in our study, we find that ? decreases by a factor of ?2-3 in groups with halo masses M {sub HALO} > 10{sup 13.5} M {sub ?} relative to less massive systems, indicating a suppression of merger activity in large potential wells. In the fiducial case of relaxed groups only, we measure a variation of ??/?log (M {sub HALO}) ? 0.07 dex{sup 1}, which is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >10{sup 10.2} M {sub ?}, most mergers are dry accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of ? with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high-mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of nonmerging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses of <10{sup 10.2} M {sub ?} where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star-forming systems close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instead ?2 enhanced (specific) star formation rates and ?1.5 larger sizes than similar mass, nonmerging satellites. The increase in both size and star formation rate leads to similar surface star formation densities in the merging and control-sample satellite populations.

  1. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  2. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  3. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  4. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  5. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists. iap_verification_checklist_rev_1.pdf (261.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev.

  6. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  7. Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air

  8. Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Delp, Woody W.; Diamond, Richard C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Kumar, Satish; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

    2001-10-11

    It is commonly assumed that efforts to simultaneously develop energy efficient building technologies and to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are unfeasible. The primary reason for this is that IEQ improvements often require additional ventilation that is costly from an energy standpoint. It is currently thought that health and productivity in work and learning environments requires adequate, if not superior, IEQ. Despite common assumptions, opportunities do exist to design building systems that provide improvements in both energy efficiency and IEQ. This report outlines the selection of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to be used in demonstrating such an opportunity in a field study using relocatable school classrooms. Standard classrooms use a common wall mounted heat pump HVAC system. After reviewing alternative systems, a wall-mounting indirect/direct evaporative cooling system with an integral hydronic gas heating is selected. The anticipated advantages of this system include continuous ventilation of 100 percent outside air at or above minimum standards, projected cooling energy reductions of about 70 percent, inexpensive gas heating, improved airborne particle filtration, and reduced peak load electricity use. Potential disadvantages include restricted climate regions and possible increases in indoor relative humidity levels under some conditions.

  9. Focus Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Forums » Focus Group and Work Group Activities » Focus Group Focus Group The Focus Group was formed in March 2007 to initiate dialogue and interface with labor unions, DOE Program Secretarial Offices, and stakeholders in areas of mutual interest and concern related to health, safety, security, and the environment. Meeting Documents Available for Download November 13, 2012 Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements This Focus Group Work Group telecom was held with the Work

  10. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  11. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  12. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decision Making Performance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance You are ...

  13. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States ...

  14. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  15. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of ?{sub matter}?0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  16. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  17. Creating Los Alamos Women's Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raeanna Sharp-Geiger-Creating a cleaner, greener environment March 28, 2014 Creating Los Alamos Women's Group Inspired by their informal dinner discussions, Raeanna Sharp-Geiger and a few of her female colleagues decided to create a new resource a few years ago, the Los Alamos Women's Group. They wanted to create a comfortable environment where women from all across the diverse Lab could network, collaborate, share ideas and gain a broader perspective of the Lab's mission. The Women's Group has

  18. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2010-04-27

    The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The

  19. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  20. STAR Test Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables

  1. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  2. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-03-29

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  3. DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on Indoor LED Luminaires | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Indoor LED Luminaires DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on Indoor LED Luminaires June 5, 2014 - 10:56am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a Snapshot Report on indoor LED luminaires, which utilizes the LED Lighting Facts® program's extensive product database to help industry stakeholders understand the current state and trajectory of the market for that class of products. Based on data through the first quarter of 2014, the report focuses on

  4. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  5. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-06-01

    Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

  6. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a 50% reduction in building energy consumption. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings (890.97 KB) More Documents & ...

  7. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  8. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014. Watch the presentation.

  9. User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You

  10. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  11. Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Groups Research Group Homepages: Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Sherry Yennello's Research Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Group...

  12. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  13. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  14. Energy and indoor environmental quality in relocatable classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael; Hodgson, Alfred; Shendell, Derek; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Hochi, Toshifumi; Kumar, Satish; Lee, Seung-Min; Liff, Shawna; Rainer, Leo; Schmidt, Richard; Sullivan, Douglas; Diamond, Richard; Fisk, William

    2002-02-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly utilized by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. Four energy-efficient RCs were designed and constructed for this study to demonstrate technologies that simultaneously attempt to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each RC had two HVAC systems, alternated weekly, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The hypothesized advantages of the IDEC include continuous outside air ventilation at {ge}7.5 L s{sup -1} per person, {approx}70% less cooling energy and efficient particle filtration. Measurements include: carbon dioxide, particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. Preliminary IEQ monitoring results are reported.

  15. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  16. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  17. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on

  18. I/O values for determination of the origin of some indoor organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otson, R.; Zhu, J.

    1997-12-31

    To reduce human health risks resulting from exposure to toxic chemicals, it is important to determine the origin of such substances. The ratio (I/O) of indoor to outdoor concentrations of selected airborne vapor phase organic compounds (VPOC) was used to estimate the contribution of indoor sources to levels of the compounds in the air of 44 homes selected randomly in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Average I/O values for all of the homes were greater 1.5 for 10 of the 20 detected target compounds, and it could be concluded that indoor VPOC sources had a greater impact on indoor air quality than outdoor air in these instances. A significant finding, which aptly demonstrates the importance of indoor sources and pollution, was the overall I/O value of 5.2 for the 44 representative GTA homes. Possible indoor sources for most of the 10 compounds could be identified, based on information collected by means of a questionnaire, as well as from the scientific literature. However, possible sources for some compounds could not be determined as readily, probably because of the presence of multiple sources, and sources which had not been previously noted, such as foods and beverages. The sensitivity of I/O values to various factors (e.g., source strength, air exchange rates, precision of measurements, unanticipated sources), and the reliability of determining the origin of pollutants by use of I/O values alone were examined, with some examples. If used judiciously, the I/O value can be a useful tool for IAQ investigations.

  19. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes

  1. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  2. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  3. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  4. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Jackson, Roderick K.

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof

  5. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Shuh (CS) Amy Kronenberg (LSD) Jim O'Neil (LSD) Jeff Kortright (MSD) Henrik Scheller (PBD) John Christensen (ESD), SAC Liaison Marty White (NSD, PH), DSC Liaison Link to...

  6. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be appointed by the Laboratory Director for three year renewable terms on the basis of knowledge of the principles and practices of the control of radiation hazards and on...

  7. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  8. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  9. Very low temperature radiant heating/cooling indoor end system for efficient use of renewable energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianbo; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Congrong; Xiong, Weicheng; Zhu, Li

    2010-06-15

    Solar or solar-assisted space heating systems are becoming more and more popular. The solar energy utilization efficiency is high when the collector is coupled with indoor radiant heating suppliers, since in principle, lower supply temperature means lower demand temperature and then the system heat loss is less. A new type radiant end system is put forward for even lower supply temperature compared to the conventional radiant floor heating systems. A three dimensional model was established to investigate its energy supply capacities. Simulation results show that 50 W per meter length tube can be achieved with the medium temperature of 30 C for heating and 15 C for cooling. The predicted results agree well with the actual data from a demonstration building. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a supply temperature of 22 C in winter and of 17 C in summer already met the indoor requirements. The new end system has good prospects for effective use of local renewable resources. (author)

  10. United States Office of Radiation and EP A Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 1997

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EP A Environmental Protection Indoor Air August 1997 Agency Washington, DC 20460 EPA-402-R-97-015 GEPA Offsite Environmental RECEIVED Monitoring Report , , , , , , 0 . S T I Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1996 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Governrnent. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied,

  11. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Mullen, Nasim; Singer, Brett; Walker, Iain

    2015-07-01

    Today’s high performance green homes are reaching previously unheard of levels of airtightness and are using new materials, technologies and strategies, whose impacts on Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) cannot be fully anticipated from prior studies. This research study used pollutant measurements, home inspections, diagnostic testing and occupant surveys to assess IAQ in 24 new or deeply retrofitted homes designed to be high performance green buildings in California.

  12. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  13. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. )

    1991-07-15

    The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

  14. System and method for secure group transactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2006-04-25

    A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

  15. Interagency Committees and Working Groups | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Environment » Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment » Interagency Committees and Working Groups Interagency Committees and Working Groups DOE is actively involved with other Federal agencies that have responsibilities for the radiation protection of the public and the environment. This site provides the different committees and working groups that DOE is involved with. Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS): The ISCORS is comprised of 8

  16. CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

  17. JLF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jlf user group JLF User Group 2015 NIF and JLF User Group Meeting Links: Send request to join the JLF User Group Join the NIF User Group Dr. Carolyn Kuranz - JLF User Group Dr. Carolyn Kuranz received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics from the University of Michigan in 2009. She is currently an Assistant Research Scientist at the Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysical Research and the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics at the University of Michigan. Her research involves hydrodynamic

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This group is responsible for the update of DOE Manual 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual.  This manual was issued on September 23, 2002, and establishes a set of...

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a...

  20. JLab Users Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Users Group Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? JLab Users Group User Liaison Home Users Group Program Advisory Committee User/Researcher Information print version UG Resources Background & Purpose Users Group Wiki By Laws Board of Directors Board of Directors Minutes Directory of Members Events At-A-Glance Member Institutions News Users Group Mailing

  1. Energy-related indoor environmental quality research: A priority agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J.; Brager, G.; Burge, H.; Cummings, J.; Levin, H.; Loftness, V.; Mendell, M.J.; Persily, A.; Taylor, S.; Zhang, J.S.

    2002-08-01

    apply to both new construction and existing buildings. Nearly all of the recommended priority R&D project areas include tasks intended to facilitate the communication and implementation of the research results. In addition, the priority agenda includes several projects specifically designed to facilitate or stimulate the use of existing energy-efficient technologies and practices for improving IEQ. To assure that the research program continues to meet the needs of stakeholders and to facilitate the coordination of research among sponsors, the core team recommends an annual meeting attended by sponsors, a balanced group of stakeholders, and a selection of researchers implementing the agenda.

  2. Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Moltech Power Systems Group (MPS Group) Place: China Product: China-based subsidiary of Shanghai Huayi Group...

  3. Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group aka Huarui Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd (formerly Farsighted Group, aka...

  4. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pion Group

  5. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  6. Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  7. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fis, William J.

    2012-06-18

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  8. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:43

  9. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  10. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

  11. UFD Working Group 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group 2015 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare UFD Working Group 2015 HomeStationary ...

  12. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:04

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on July 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Cindy Taylor, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the June 12, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on June 18, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the May 21, 2013 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  15. NIF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    group NIF User Group The National Ignition Facility User Group provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who use NIF for "Science Use of NIF" experiments and NIF management. Responsibility for NIF and the research programs carried out at NIF resides with the NIF Director. The NIF User Group advises the NIF Director on matters of concern to users, as well as providing a channel for communication for NIF users with funding agencies and

  16. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procurement - Routing criteriaemergency preparedness Tribal Issues Topic Group * TEPP Navajo Nation (Tom Clawson) - 1404 - Needs Assessment * Identified strengths and...

  17. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  18. Tritium Focus Group- INEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014.

  19. Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab

  20. SSRL ETS Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint ASD: Schedule Priorites Accelerator tech support - Call List Documentation: Engineering Notes, Drawings, and Accelerator Safety Documents Mechanical Systems: Accelerator Drawings Accelerator Pictures Accelerator Vacuum Systems (SSRL) LCW Vacuum Projects: Last Updated: February 8, 2007 Ben Scott

  1. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  2. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  3. Results of a forty-home indoor-air-pollutant monitoring study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.; Gupta, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted in 40 homes in the areas of Oak Ridge and west Knoxville, Tennessee. Concentrations of CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, particulates, formaldehyde, and radon, as well as selected volatile organic compounds, were quantified. In addition, information was collected on air exchange rates, meteorological conditions, and structural and consumer products. This paper summarizes some of the results and provides specific examples of increased indoor concentrations of pollutants due to the operation of a kerosene space heater, a gas range, and a wood/coal stove. Results showed formaldehyde levels frequently exceeded 0.1 ppM; were highest in newer homes; and fluctuate diurnally and seasonally. Radon levels frequently exceeded 3 pCi/L and correlated strongly with house location. Organic pollutant levels were at least an order of magnitude higher indoors than outdoors. Combustion sources (especially unvented) significantly increased levels of CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, and particulates. Air exchange rates were increased nearly two-fold by operation of the HVAC central air circulation fan.

  4. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  5. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  6. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  7. Large Group Visits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Group Visits Large Group Visits All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Contact Us thumbnail of 1350 Central Avenue (505) 667-4444 Email Let us know if you plan to bring a group of 10 or more. All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Parking for buses and RVs is available on Iris Street behind the Museum off of 15th St. See attached map (pdf). Contact

  8. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  9. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  10. Centre for Energy, Environment and Engineering Zambia | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ss":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: CAN International 1 Centre for Energy, Environment and Engineering Zambia is a research...

  11. NERSC User Services Group!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for great scalability * SoYware environment similar to Hopper * Performs 2 .2x s ... f or e xtreme energy e fficiency Vital Statistics --- 5 --- Hopper Edison Cabinets 68 28 ...

  12. STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE ... OF NEW MEXICO BEFORE THE SECRETARY OF ENVIRONMENT NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT, ...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan (206.83 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  14. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  15. A crossover design study to evaluate the effectiveness of appliance inspection and servicing for lowering indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colome, S.D. ); Billick, I.H. ); Baker, P.E.; Beals, S.A.; Rubio, S.A.; Cunningham, S.J. ); Wilson, A.L. )

    1988-01-01

    Some researchers have suggested that natural gas appliances are significant contributors to indoor air pollution. Indoor unvented combustion appliances, such as gas-fired ranges, unvented space heaters, and portable kerosene space heaters, have been associated with a wide variety of pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), formaldehyde (HCHO), and respirable particles. Previous indoor air quality studies have demonstrated that indoor NO{sub 2} concentrations often exceed outdoor ambient levels when gas- burning appliances are used. Cooking with gas has been the focus of many of these studies, although other unvented appliances, such as space-heaters, have also been associated with elevated NO{sub 2} concentrations. Some epidemiologic studies of exposure to NO{sub 2} in homes with gas ranges have indicated a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and illness. However, other studies contradicted these findings and failed to show any significant effects associated with gas cooking.

  16. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Combustion Safety Using Appliances for Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this case study, the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team provides guidance on how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings.

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 15, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on January 15, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the December 18, 2012 meeting. One issue

  18. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on December 17, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the

  19. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:05 PM on October 22, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Joan Kessner (Washington Closure Hanford (WCH)), Karl Pool (Pacific

  20. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2016 The meeting was called to order by Jonathan Sanwald, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on January 26, 2016 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)), Jeff Cheadle (DOE-ORP), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 The meeting was called to order by Jonathan Sanwald, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 19, 2016 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (Mission Support Alliance (MSA)), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Marcus Aranda (Wastren Advantage Inc. Wastren Hanford Laboratory (WHL)), Joe Archuleta (CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company

  2. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Issues Topic Group Judith Holm, Chair April 21, 2004 Albuquerque, NM Tribal Issues Topic Group * February Tribal Summit with Secretary of Energy (Kristen Ellis, CI) - Held in conjunction with NCAI mid-year conference - First Summit held in response to DOE Indian Policy - Addressed barriers to communication and developing framework for interaction Tribal Issues Topic Group * Summit (continued) - Federal Register Notice published in March soliciting input on how to improve summit process

  3. Tritium Focus Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting Information Tritium Focus Group Charter (pdf) Hotel Information Classified Session Information Los Alamos Restaurants (pdf) LANL Information Visiting Los Alamos Area Map ...

  4. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all...

  5. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on October 16, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. New personnel have joined the Focus Group since the last

  6. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on November 27, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Steve Trent, and Rich Weiss. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the October 16, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on August 20, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Steve Smith, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the July 23, 2013 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they had

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 15, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the March 18, 2014 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  10. The Chaninik Wind Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Chaninik Wind Group Villages Kongiganak pop.359 Kwigillingok pop. 388 Kipnuk pop.644 Tuntutuliak pop. 370 On average, 24% of families are below the poverty line. ...

  11. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Working Group Translator Update Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Outline 1. Data development in support of CMWG * Climate modeling best estimate data * ...

  12. Buildings Sector Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Group Forrestal 2E-069 July 22, 2013 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Lighting model - Equipment, shell subsidies - ENERGY STAR benchmarking - Housing stock formation ...

  13. Unix File Groups at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A user's default group is the same as their username. NERSC users usually belong to ... Useful Unix Group Commands Command Description groups username List group membership id ...

  14. Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment Environment Environment The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) complies with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and establishes its own environmental requirements to ensure workers, the public, and the environment is protected from hazards associated with all Department operations. DOE provides assistance to the field to implement these policies, works in resolving environmental protection issues, and provides feedback to enhance environmental performance throughout the

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary (101.72 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January - February 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  16. Computing environment logbook

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  17. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  18. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group PDF icon May 17, 2007 PDF icon January 16, 2007 PDF icon...

  20. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on June 12, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thomson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the

  2. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on August 21, 2012 in an alternate Conference Room in 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton. Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, and Rich Weiss. I. Because the meeting was scheduled to take place in Room 308 and a glitch in

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 The beginning of the meeting was delayed due to an unannounced loss of the conference room scheduled for the meeting. After securing another meeting location, the meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:18 PM on April 16, 2013 in Conference Room 156 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool,

  4. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on November 19, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Mike Barnes, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if

  5. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 28, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 28, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on

  6. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on February 25, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 18, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the February 25, 2014

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on May 20, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on June 12, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Sara Champoux, Glen Clark, Jim Douglas, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the presence of new and/or infrequent

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on June 17, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Robert Elkins, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton and Rich Weiss. I. Because of the short time since the last meeting, Huei Meznarich stated that the minutes from the June 12, 2014 meeting have not yet

  11. Group key management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  12. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  13. Tritium Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matters related to tritium. Contacts Mike Rogers (505) 665-2513 Email Chandra Savage Marsden (505) 664-0183 Email The Tritium Focus Group consists of participants from member...

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been distributed to the Focus Group prior to the meeting. The comments that required editorial changes to the document were made in the working electronic version. b. At the June...

  15. Strategic Initiatives Work Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Work Group, comprised of members representing DOE, contractor and worker representatives, provides a forum for information sharing; data collection and analysis; as well as, identifying best practices and initiatives to enhance safety performance and safety culture across the Complex.

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Huei Meznarich, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Andrew Stevens, Genesis Thomas, ... the radar of the DOE- HQ QA group. Noe'l Smith-Jackson commented that Ecology was always ...

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elkins, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rick ... Noe'l Smith-Jackson stated that the HASQARD document is the work of the Focus Group not ...

  18. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Dave St. John, Steve Smith, Steve Trent and Eric Wyse. ... On January 31, the Secretary received a call from the QA Sub-Group Chair, Steve Smith. ...

  19. Date Times Group Speakers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Research Meeting Toms Arias Mon, 3-10 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Richard Robinson Fri, 3-14 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Michael Zachman (Kourkoutis) & Deniz...

  20. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, and Keri Troutman. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and publicity, and

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:03 PM on November 16, 2010 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Paula Ciszak, Glen Clark, Doug Duvon, Kathi Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Thompson, Eric Wyse. New members to the Focus Group were

  2. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with

  3. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, and Keri Troutman. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and publicity, and

  4. DOE STGWG Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia,

  5. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Washington, DC TEC Meeting - 180(c) Group Summary - March 15, 2006 (29.33 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - July 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries

  6. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter ...

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon Atlanta TEC...

  9. Good Energy Group Plc previously Monkton Group Plc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plc previously Monkton Group Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Good Energy Group Plc (previously Monkton Group Plc) Place: Chippenham, Wiltshire, United Kingdom Zip: SN15 1EE...

  10. Environment, Safety, & Health | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Diversity and Inclusion Environment, Safety & Health Environmental Management System Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Environment, Safety, & Health About PPPL ES&H The Environment,

  11. Rejuvenated by environmental groups' support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, E.

    1993-05-12

    A letter of conditional support last week from seven environmental groups reinvigorated the North American Free Trade Agreement. The likelihood of NAFTA ratification in Congress seemed to hit its nadir when Office of Management and Budget chief Leon Panetta declared that the Canada-US-Mexico pact was dead. Observers say that ratification, said to be stalled because of a lack of public support, could be jump-started by the proposal. The seven groups offered to back NAFTA on more conciliatory terms than they had previously demanded. They proposed that the North American Commission on the Environment (NACE), which is to be defined by the side agreements, be given power and finances to investigate environmental offenses. The signatories would also negotiate criteria for process standards. Public participation must be built into the side agreements, they said. Non-binding NACE recommendations must then be considered by the governments. The Sierra Club broke ranks, demanding more power for NACE, with a specific emphasis on industry accountability. [open quotes]NAFTA must insure that industries bear the responsibility for their actions,[close quotes] said Sierra trade and environmental program director John Audley. Sierra Club called for funding for cleanup under a [open quotes]polluter pays[close quotes] principle, legal avenues for NACE information gathering, industry-specific sanctions, and consideration of production processes in addition to product qualities.

  12. Modules Software Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment » Modules Environment Modules Software Environment NERSC uses the module utility to manage nearly all software. There are two huge advantages of the module approach: NERSC can provide many different versions and/or installations of a single software package on a given machine, including a default version as well as several older and newer versions; and Users can easily switch to different versions or installations without having to explicitly specify different paths. With modules,

  13. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  14. XML Engineering Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-07-27

    The XML Engineering Environment is a reconfigurable software system that allows users to translate, enhance and route data from sources to sinks.

  15. SUB ZERO GROUP, INC.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUB ZERO GROUP, INC. 4717 Hammersley Road. Madison, WI 53711 P: 800.532.7820 P: 608.271.2233 F: 608.270.3362 Memorandum To: David Foster, Senior Advisor, Office of the Secretary of Energy CQ Michael Lafave, Director of Production Workers, SMART Union Workers Marc Norberg, Assistant to the General President, SMART Union Workers From: Christopher Jessup, Corporate Compliance Manager, Sub-Zero Group, Inc. Date: June 21, 2016 Re: June 15, 2016 Meeting at Department of Energy Forrestal Building in

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 20, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the February 21, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  17. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  18. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  19. ENN Group aka XinAo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENN Group aka XinAo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ENN Group (aka XinAo Group) Place: Langfang, Hebei Province, China Zip: 65001 Product: Chinese private industrial...

  20. Greenko Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenko Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenko Group Place: Hyderabad, India Zip: 500 033 Product: Focused on clean energy projects in Asia. References: Greenko Group1...

  1. Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinocome Group Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector...

  2. Valesul Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valesul Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Valesul Group Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian ethanol producer. References: Valesul Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  3. Angeleno Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angeleno Group Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Angeleno Group Name: Angeleno Group Address: 2029 Century Park East, Suite 2980 Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90067 Region:...

  4. MTorres Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: MTorres Group Place: Murcia, Spain Zip: 30320 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturer References: MTorres Group1 This...

  5. Ferrari Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ferrari Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ferrari Group Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Sao Paulo-based ethanol producer. References: Ferrari Group1 This article is a...

  6. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications Topic Group Summary - July 1998 (58.3 KB) Inaugural Group Meeting - April 1998 (83.34 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup April 6, 2006 (14.05 KB) February 23, 2006 Draft (20.29 KB) January 24, 2006 (27.44 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 (114.02 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup

  9. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  10. MEA BREAKOUT GROUP

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS