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1

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

2

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk 5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk William Fisk January 2014 Quantifying the Economic Implications of Indoor Air on Energy Efficiency, Performance, and Health William Fisk is a senior scientist, mechanical engineer, and leader of the Indoor Environment Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). During his 33 years at the lab, he has researched the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the

3

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

Daisey, J.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group Staff. Staff Listing. Dr. Andrew K. Persily, Leader, Supervisory Mechanical Engineer, 301-975-6418. ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income apartments: retrofit selection protocol Title Indoor environment quality and energy retrofits in low-income...

7

Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: Theory and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: Theory and Examples from Real-Time Interpretation of Indoor Plumes of Airborne Chemical Title Rapid Data Assimilation in the...

9

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: theory and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rapid Data Assimilation in the Indoor Environment: theory and examples from real-time interpretation of indoor plumes of airborne chemicals Title Rapid Data Assimilation in the...

10

Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

Daisey, J.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A novel positioning system for accurate tracking in indoor environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise positioning is crucial to many applications involving autonomous robots in indoor environments. Current solutions to the indoor localization problem are either both highly unreliable and inaccurate (like GPS based ...

Linga, Srujan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Surface-associated Chemical and Biological Processes Speaker(s): Ellison M. Carter Date: February 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diane Douglas Indoor air pollution in the workplace, public buildings, and residential dwellings has the potential to adversely impact human health. Within these diverse indoor environments, chemical and biological processes that occur at surfaces and interfaces strongly influence the fate, transport, and generation of indoor pollutants. A molecular-level understanding of the physical and chemical properties and processes characteristic of indoor surfaces is key to developing resilient building materials that strengthen building integrity and safeguard human health by reducing human exposure to

14

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: September 18, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In China, the...

15

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this...

16

Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments Recently completed analyses suggest that improving buildings and indoor environments could reduce health-care costs and sick leave and increase worker performance, resulting in an estimated productivity gain of $30 to $150 billion annually. The research literature provides strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and their indoor environments influence the prevalence of several adverse health effects. These include communicable respiratory disease (e.g., common colds and influenza), allergy and asthma symptoms, and acute sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms such as headaches, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. For example, in six studies, the number of respiratory illnesses in building occupants varied by a factor of 1.2 to

17

RAPOSI: rapidly installable positioning system for indoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RAPOSI is a radio-signal-strength based positioning system for indoor environments. Independent self-localization as well as centralized tracking of light-weight mobile devices is enabled. By omitting typically required a-priori scene analysis, set-up ...

Florian Schreiner; Holger Ziemek

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect

The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is based on mathematical models developed mostly from theoretical science and helps for studying and prediction of the behavior of engineered systems. The advantages of computer simulation are the ease of varying the desired parameters to investigate various possible design scenarios, explore new theories, and design new experiments to test these theories. It also provides detailed information and serves as a powerful alternative to experimental science and observation when phenomena are not observable or when measurements are impractical or too expensive. This seminar presents the different types of mechanistic modeling approaches

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

22

A Coupled Airflow-and-Energy Simulation Program for Indoor Thermal Environment Studies (RP-927)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Jelena Srebric* Qingyan Chen; Ph.D. Leon R. Glicksman; Ph.D. ASHRAE Student Member ASHRAE Member ASHRAE for thermal comfort (ASHRAE 1992). In an indoor space with radiative, convective, and hybrid heating-and-energy simulation program for indoor thermal environment studies," ASHRAE Transactions, 106(1), 465-476. #12

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

23

Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature  

SciTech Connect

Limited research is available on potential adverse effects of school environments on academic performance, despite strong public concern. We examine the scientific evidence relevant to this relationship by reviewing available research relating schools and other indoor environments to human performance or attendance. As a primary focus, we critically review evidence for direct relationships between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in buildings and performance or attendance. As a secondary focus, we summarize, without critique, evidence on potential connections indirectly linking IEQ to performance or attendance: relationships between IEQ and health, between health and performance or attendance, and between attendance and performance. The most persuasive direct evidence showed increases in indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and outdoor concentrations of several specific pollutants to be related to reduced school attendance. The most persuasive indirect evidence showed indoor dampness and microbiologic pollutants to be related to asthma and respiratory infections, which have in turn been related to reduced performance and attendance. Furthermore, a substantial scientific literature links poor IEQ (e.g., low ventilation rate, excess moisture or formaldehyde) with respiratory and other health effects in children and adults. Overall, evidence suggests that poor IEQ in schools can influence the performance and attendance of students, primarily through health effects from indoor pollutants. Also, inadequate IEQ in schools seems sufficiently common to merit strong public concern. Evidence is available to justify (1) immediate actions to protect IEQ in schools and (2) focused research on exposures, prevention, and causation, to better guide policies and actions on IEQ in schools.

Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

2004-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

An experimental setup for performance evaluation of spectrum sensing via energy detector: indoor environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectrum sensing is an essential task for cognitive radios (CRs) and next generation wireless networks (NGWNs). In this study, an experimental setup which can emulate a spectrum sensing scheme through the use of energy detector is proposed. Both line--of--sight ... Keywords: energy detector, experimental setup, fading, indoor environment, spectrum sensing, wireless propagation

Serhan Yarkan; Wael Halbawi; Khalid A. Qaraqe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Evaluating Indoor Location Tracking Systems in a Nuclear Facility: Experimentation with Different Techniques in an Industrial Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details how different kinds of indoor geolocalization systems perform when used in nuclear power plants and similar complex industrial environments.BackgroundIndoor location tracking systems can help to ensure worker safety. Over the past several years, indoor geolocalization capabilities have improved, and several technology options now exist. However, these new technologies have to be carefully evaluated in an industrial setting in order for ...

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Efficient Hybrid Parabolic Equation --- Integral Equation Method for the Analysis of Wave Propagation in Highly Complex Indoor Communication Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient, full-wave computational technique to investigate the electromagnetic wave propagation within a complex building environment, resulting from contemporary indoor communication systems, is proposed. Unlike a standard ray-tracing technique, ... Keywords: indoor communications, integral equations, parabolic equation, ray-tracing, wave propagation

G. K. Theofilogiannakos; T. V. Yioultsis; T. D. Xenos

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mapping multiple gas/odor sources in an uncontrolled indoor environment using a Bayesian occupancy grid mapping based method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of autonomously localizing multiple gas/odor sources in an indoor environment without a strong airflow. To do this, a robot iteratively creates an occupancy grid map. The produced map shows the probability each discrete ... Keywords: Gas source localization, Gas source mapping, Indoor monitoring, Occupancy grid mapping

Gabriele Ferri; Michael V. Jakuba; Alessio Mondini; Virgilio Mattoli; Barbara Mazzolai; Dana R. Yoerger; Paolo Dario

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Efficiency Standards Group Indoor Environment Group International Energy Studies Group Sustainable Energy Systems Group Energy...

29

Impact of the humidity pump on indoor environments. Final report, August 1989-November 1990  

SciTech Connect

The impact of the humidity pump, (a newly developed, gas-fired, liquid desiccant, make-up air conditioning unit) on the indoor air environment of two office buildings was investigated during a two month field program. The study generated a data base and gained insights on indoor air quality (IAQ), comfort, and ventilation parameters of each building operating under routine conditions. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of the humidity pump on (1) indoor pollution concentration levels; (2) comfort parameters as perceived by occupants of and visitors to each building; and (3) building ventilation (energy) parameters. Each objective was attained by testing the null hypothesis (Operation of the humidity pump has no impact.) The null hypothesis was tested on occupant exposure levels. Consequently, it was rejected only if the humidity pump affects potential factors that may alter significantly pollutant concentrations, comfort levels, and ventilation rates. Operation of the humidity pump affects levels of volatile organic compounds and microbiological conditions. The humidity pump did not affect comfort and ventilation parameters.

Moschandreas, D.J.; Relwani, S.M.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Visual Localisation of Mobile Devices in an Indoor Environment under Network Delay Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current progresses in home automation and service robotic environment have highlighted the need to develop interoperability mechanisms that allow a standard communication between the two systems. During the development of the DHCompliant protocol, the problem of locating mobile devices in an indoor environment has been investigated. The communication of the device with the location service has been carried out to study the time delay that web services offer in front of the sockets. The importance of obtaining data from real-time location systems portends that a basic tool for interoperability, such as web services, can be ineffective in this scenario because of the delays added in the invocation of services. This paper is focused on introducing a web service to resolve a coordinates request without any significant delay in comparison with the sockets.

Fernández, Alberto Alonso; Alonso, Ignacio González; Hu, Huosheng; 10.5121/ijdps.2011.2201

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

SMSD Microanalysis Research Group Environment Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environment. Summary: Behavior and effects of environmental nanoparticles are analyzed using model systems and focused ion beam scanning ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Brookhaven National Laboratory Industrial Hygiene Group Environment, Safety, Health Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety & Health Services Division Industrial Hygiene Laboratory R. Wilson (0.8) __________________ 06Brookhaven National Laboratory Industrial Hygiene Group Environment, Safety, Health Directorate

Homes, Christopher C.

34

Brookhaven National Laboratory Industrial Hygiene Group Environment, Safety, Health Directorate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety & Health Services Division Industrial Hygiene Laboratory/ HEPA Filter Surveillance TestingBrookhaven National Laboratory Industrial Hygiene Group Environment, Safety, Health Directorate

Homes, Christopher C.

35

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Comparative Study Between Measurement and Predictions Using Geometrical Optics and Uniform Theory of Diffraction for Case of Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) in Indoor Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the investigation and comparison of the accuracy of a deterministic model for a WLAN system in the indoor environment. The measurement system consisted of a spectrum analyzer and a log-periodic antenna. Non-line-of-sight (NLOS) propagation ... Keywords: Diffraction, Geometrical optics, Uniform theory of diffraction

E. M. Cheng; Zulkifly Abbas; M. Fareq; K. Y. Lee; K. Y. You; S. F. Khor

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Enabling technologies on hybrid camera networks for behavioral analysis of unattended indoor environments and their surroundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a layered network architecture and the enabling technologies for accomplishing vision-based behavioral analysis of unattended environments. Specifically the vision network covers both the attended environment and its surroundings ... Keywords: behaviour analysis, hybrid camera network, surveillance of unattended environments

Giovanni Gualdi; Andrea Prati; Rita Cucchiara; Edoardo Ardizzone; Marco La Cascia; Liliana Lo Presti; Marco Morana

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Workshop on indoor air quality research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Low frequency indoor radiolocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis concerns the application of electromagnetic wave propagation to the problem of indoor radiolocation. Determining the location of people and objects relative to their environment is crucial for asset tracking, ...

Reynolds, Matthew S. (Matthew Stephen), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S): Industrial Hygiene Group...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EH&S A-Z Site Map Organization Chart EHS Internal Search EH&S Find a Lab Employee Environment, Health, & Safety Division Groups JHA Training Whom to Call Databases Ergonomics...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

3D Modeling of Indoor Environments for a Robotic Security Guard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous mobile robots will play a major role in future security and surveillance tasks for large scale environments such as shopping malls, airports, hospitals and museums. Robotic security guards will autonomously survey such environments, unless a remote human operator takes over control. In this context a 3D model can convey much more useful information than the typical 2D maps used in many robotic applications today, both for visualization of information and as human machine interface for remote control.

Peter Biber; Sven Fleck; Tom Duckett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Environmental Services Group (ESG)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Services Group Environmental Services Group Whom To Call Operating Permits For LBNL Activities Publications Advisories Internal Documents Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration Program Weather Data Image of Chicken Creek The Environmental Services Group, within the Environment, Health and Safety Division, provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective environmental management services to Berkeley Lab by working with research and support staff. Services include: Your visit may be enhanced by upgrading or installing the latest Flash Player. ESG sampling activity Air and Water Quality Management Hazardous Materials Management Environmental Monitoring Radiological Dose and Environmental Risk Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Restoration News & Updates

43

Indoor Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image Indoor Environmental Quality EETD conducts a broad program of research, technology development, and dissemination activities directed toward improving the health, comfort, and energy efficiency of the indoor environment. EETD researchers conduct a broad program of research and development with the goals of: reducing the energy used for thermally conditioning and distributing ventilation air in buildings improving indoor air quality (IAQ), thermal comfort and the health and productivity of building occupants understanding human exposures to environmental pollutants found in indoor and outdoor air improving the scientific understanding of factors and processes affecting air quality developing sound science to inform public policy on the most

44

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

48

An aware-environment enhanced group home: awarerium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have constructed "AwareRium", an enhanced group home with ubiquitous technology to establish person-centered care. The group home is a facility that provides care for Alzheimer's and dementia patients. The group home is effective in curbing the progress ...

Hideaki Kanai; Toyohisa Nakada; Goushi Tsuruma; Susumu Kunifuji

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Dynamic Model of the Indoor Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new approach to modeling the radio channel experienced by transceivers moving in an indoor environment. For modeling the time-varying impulse response (IR) a randomly time-varying power-delay profile (PDP) is used, which ... Keywords: channel measurements, indoor channel modeling, ray clustering, time-varying PDP, wide band model

Jesper Ødum Nielsen; Valentine Afanassiev; Jørgen Bach Andersen

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Group Radiation Protection Group Under the direction of Radiological Control Manager (RCM) David Kestell, the Radiation Protection Group (RPG) provides radiation safety-related technical assistance to the lab community to ensure that all work is performed safely, efficiently and in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines. BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA NDCX NDCX Gretina Gamma particle device PET Scanner APEX APEX APEX LASER LASER Rifle, CO Rifle, CO The group: Authorizes work with radioactive material and radiation-producing machines Manages the site inventory of radioactive and nuclear material Provides coverage for: Radiological operations Radiological engineering and shielding design Internal / external dosimetry services Radiation Safety and Transportation training

51

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

52

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Industrial Hygiene Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Respiratory Protection Respiratory Protection The Berkeley Lab maintains a Respiratory Protection Program to assist with selection and proper use of respirators. Details may be found in the Lab Respirator Program. When employees may be exposed to airborne contaminants during the course of their work, engineering or administrative controls are often used to control the hazard. However, when the use of those types of controls is not feasible or sufficient, a respirator may be issued to protect the employee from those contaminants. Working with supervisors and line managers, the Industrial Hygiene Group will evaluate the workplace exposure and compare it with OSHA Personal Exposure Limits (PELs) or ACGIH Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Worker Exposure is Measured with Air Monitoring Equipment

53

Ubiquitous Indoor Localization and Worldwide Automatic Construction of Floor Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although GPS has been considered a ubiquitous outdoor localization technology, we are still far from a similar technology for indoor environments. While a number of technologies have been proposed for indoor localization, they are isolated efforts that are way from a true ubiquitous localization system. A ubiquitous indoor positioning system is envisioned to be deployed on a large scale worldwide, with minimum overhead, to work with heterogeneous devices, and to allow users to roam seamlessly from indoor to outdoor environments. Such a system will enable a wide set of applications including worldwide seamless direction finding between indoor locations, enhancing first responders' safety by providing anywhere localization and floor plans, and providing a richer environment for location-aware social networking applications. We describe an architecture for the ubiquitous indoor positioning system (IPS) and the challenges that have to be addressed to materialize it. We then focus on the feasibility of automating ...

Youssef, Moustafa; Elkhouly, Reem; Lotfy, Amal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Pedestrian localisation for indoor environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reckoning . . . . . 159 8.1.3 Research question 3: Determining absolute location and heading . . . 160 8.1.4 Research question 4: Use of environmental constraints . . . . . . . . 160 8.2 Future work... drift in position incurred by the PDR filter during an ex- ample walk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 4.11 Eight more example paths generated by the PDR filter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 4.12 The error...

Woodman, Oliver

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of indoor air qmlity or indoor environment problems were accomplished in seven different Texas schools. The schools were located in hot and humid climates. Comfort and mildew were the most frequent complaints. In all cases, the air-conditioning system maintenance and operation was a primary factor in the problem cause and solution. The significance of problems investigated cculd have been minimized had the symptoms been addressed when they were reported the first time. Preventive maintenance and better housekeeping of air-conditioning systems in Texas schools will improve the indoor environment. Schools are encouraged to be more aggressive in preventive maintenance and plan for indoor air quality and energy efficiency in school air-conditioning retrofits.

McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EVALUATION OF THE INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROCEDURE FOR USE IN RETAIL BUILDINGS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings Spencer M. Dutton, Wanyu R. Chan, Mark J. Mendell, Marcella Barrios, Srinandini Parthasarathy, Meera Sidheswaran, Douglas P. Sullivan, Katerina Eliseeva, William J. Fisk Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 February 1, 2013 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy-Related Environmental Research Program, award number 500-09-049.The study was additionally supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

57

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

EECG RESEARCH PAPERS from the Energy, Environment, and Climate Group (EECG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy future: construction of demand and renewable energy supply scenarios. Int. J. Energy Res. (20071 EECG RESEARCH PAPERS from the Energy, Environment, and Climate Group (EECG) Roskilde University, Denmark Final Report Energy Research Programme of the Danish Energy Authority, project EFP05 033001

59

InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes inAir, a tool for sharing measurements and visualizations of indoor air quality within one's social network. Poor indoor air quality is difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and can contribute to the development ... Keywords: air quality, domestic technology, environment, health, iphone, persuasive technology, sensors, sustainability

Sunyoung Kim; Eric Paulos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and Non-Industrial Environments Speaker(s): Don Milton Date: October 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is...

62

HI in NGC 5433 and its Environment: High-Latitude Emission in a Small Galaxy Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present HI synthesis maps of the edge-on starburst NGC 5433 and its environment, obtained with the VLA in its C and D configurations. The observations and spectral model residuals of the main disc emission in NGC 5433 reveal 3 extraplanar features. We associate 2 of these features with coherent extraplanar extensions across multiple spectral channels in our data, including a complete loop in position-velocity space. Interpreting the latter as an expanding shell we derive a corresponding input energy of 2 x 10^54 ergs, comparable to that for the largest supershells found in the Galaxy and those in other edge-on systems. NGC 5433 is in a richer environment than previously thought. We confirm that KUG 1359+326 is a physical companion to NGC 5433 and find two new faint companions, both with Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner identifications, that we label SIS-1 and SIS-2. Including the more distant IC 4357, NGC 5433 is the dominant member of a group of at least 5 galaxies, spanning over 750 kpc in a filamentary structure. A variety of evidence suggests that interactions are occurring in this group. While a number of underlying mechanisms are consistent with the morphology of the high-latitude features in NGC 5433, we argue that environmental effects may play a role in their generation.

K. Spekkens; J. A. Irwin; D. J. Saikia

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Pawel Wargocki 1* , Max Sherman 2 , Willem de Gids 3 , Peter Wouters 4 , Francis Allard 5 , Remi Carrie 6 , Paolo Carrer 7 , and Stylianos Kephalopolous 8 1 International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, DTU Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark 2 Residential Building Systems Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, Belgium 5 University of La Rochelle, France 6 International Network for Information on Ventilation, Belgium 7 The University of Milan, Italy 8 Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy ABSTRACT Research topics that need to be addressed so that the future highly energy efficient buildings do not compromise

65

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

groups/all/feed en Buildings groups/all/feed en Buildings http://en.openei.org/community/group/buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings.group/buildings" target="_blank">read more architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc

66

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee...

67

Indoor Sampler Siting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

68

Impact of clustering in indoor MIMO propagation using a hybrid channel model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The clustering of propagating signals in indoor environments can influence the performance of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems that employ multiple-element antennas at the transmitter and receiver. In order to clarify the effect of clustering ... Keywords: MIMO, Ricean K factor, angle sensitivity, channel efficiency, indoor propagation, ray tracing, signal clusters

Zhongwei Tang; Ananda Sanagavarapu Mohan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Poster: INPRESS: indoor climate prediction and evaluation system for energy efficiency using sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern buildings include an indoor climate control system, installed and operated to maintain a comfortable environment for the building occupants. However, these climate control systems consume a significant amount of energy due to an inefficient control ... Keywords: energy efficiency, indoor climate, sensor network

Jae Yoon Chong; Jinwook Baek; Sukun Kim

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...O. Jonas, Corrosion of Steam Turbines, Corrosion: Environments and Industries, Vol 13C, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2006, p 469â??476...

71

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor environment: How to validate comfort and energy reduction Speaker(s): Wouter Borsboom Date: December 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 TNO is a research institute which is active in the energy saving and indoor environment. We like to present our research, our goals and discuss the challenges and the opportunities for cooperation. Therefore we like to give a presentation about the following topic and we are also interested in a presentation of LBL and UC Berkeley. An important topic in the building industry is near zero energy buildings. Most countries in Europe implemented programs to advance this goal in one way or another. In near-zero energy buildings, the interaction between building and systems

72

FM-based indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major challenge for accurate fingerprint-based indoor localization is the design of robust and discriminative wireless signatures. Even though WiFi RSSI signatures are widely available indoors, they vary significantly over time and are susceptible ... Keywords: fingerprinting, fm, localization, mobile systems, wireless

Yin Chen; Dimitrios Lymberopoulos; Jie Liu; Bodhi Priyantha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 LANL has a strategy to clean up the past, control current operations, and move toward a sustainable future in which waste is minimized and other effects on the environment are reduced or eliminated. We work safely, securely, ethically, and in a manner that protects the environment We understand that the health and viability of the Laboratory depend in part on a record of environmental performance, building confidence of the public and our regulators. To gain the right to do what we do, we must work

74

NNSA ASC Exascale Environment Planning, Applications Working Group, Report February 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scope of the Apps WG covers three areas of interest: Physics and Engineering Models (PEM), multi-physics Integrated Codes (IC), and Verification and Validation (V&V). Each places different demands on the exascale environment. The exascale challenge will be to provide environments that optimize all three. PEM serve as a test bed for both model development and 'best practices' for IC code development, as well as their use as standalone codes to improve scientific understanding. Rapidly achieving reasonable performance for a small team is the key to maintaining PEM innovation. Thus, the environment must provide the ability to develop portable code at a higher level of abstraction, which can then be tuned, as needed. PEM concentrate their computational footprint in one or a few kernels that must perform efficiently. Their comparative simplicity permits extreme optimization, so the environment must provide the ability to exercise significant control over the lower software and hardware levels. IC serve as the underlying software tools employed for most ASC problems of interest. Often coupling dozens of physics models into very large, very complex applications, ICs are usually the product of hundreds of staff-years of development, with lifetimes measured in decades. Thus, emphasis is placed on portability, maintainability and overall performance, with optimization done on the whole rather than on individual parts. The exascale environment must provide a high-level standardized programming model with effective tools and mechanisms for fault detection and remediation. Finally, V&V addresses the infrastructure and methods to facilitate the assessment of code and model suitability for applications, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods for assessment and quantification of margins of uncertainty (QMU). V&V employs both PEM and IC, with somewhat differing goals, i.e., parameter studies and error assessments to determine both the quality of the calculation and to estimate expected deviations of simulations from experiments. The exascale environment must provide a performance envelope suitable both for capacity calculations (high through-put) and full system capability runs (high performance). Analysis of the results place shared demand on both the I/O as well as the visualization subsystems.

Still, C H; Arsenlis, A; Bond, R B; Steinkamp, M J; Swaminarayan, S; Womble, D E; Koniges, A E; Harrison, J R; Chen, J H

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

75

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quality air is fundamental to people's health and well-being. Indoor air quality is an important issue from both a social and economic point of view. Continual advances in medicine and technology necessitate constant reevaluation of the air-conditioning needs of hospital and medical facilities. The application of air conditioning to health facilities presents many problems not encountered in the usual comfort air conditioning design. Hospital air conditioning assumes a more important role than just the promotion of comfort. Studies show that patients in controlled environment generally have more rapid physical improvement than do those in uncontrolled environment. Air quality at hospitals needs special precautions during design and maintenance stage to prevent infections from spreading. 50% of all illnesses are either caused by, or aggravated by, polluted indoor air. The main objective of this paper is to critically review and summarize the available information about IAQ particularly in health care industries. Symptoms of poor IAQ in a building, contaminants causing poor IAQ, features of HVAC systems for a hospital for better IAQ are briefly discussed in this paper. Strategies to improve indoor air quality in hospitals and the current international research to improve indoor air quality are reported in this paper. Based on the extensive interactions with different stake holders of a hospital it is concluded that maintenance of proper indoor quality in a hospital needs meticulous team work among the various members of the hospital at various stages .

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

Gao, Yang, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Accurate simulation of 802.11 indoor links: a “bursty” channel model based on real measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel channel model to be used for simulating indoor wireless propagation environments. An extensive measurement campaign was carried out to assess the performance of different transport protocols over 802.11 links. This enabled us to better ...

Ramón Agüero; Marta García-Arranz; Luis Muñoz

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DRAFT 12-5-10 To be submitted to Indoor Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters Meera A. Sidheswaran 1 , Hugo Destaillats 1,2, , Douglas P. Sullivan 1 , Sebastian Cohn 1 , and William J. Fisk 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Arizona State University School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment Phoenix, AZ April 2011 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5176E 2 Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with

79

Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment Photo Gallery A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area

80

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning Environments Through Energy Efficiency Upgrades Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

82

Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses Figure 1: Measurements of total volatile organic compounds in five new houses in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Florida and median concentration in U.S. EPA study. In 1993, the Indoor Environment Program began investigating indoor air quality in new energy-efficient houses. Five new houses have been included in the study, all in the eastern U.S. Two had nearly identical floor plans and were part of a demonstration project near Pittsburgh, PA; one was built conventionally, while the other incorporated a number of energy-efficient features. The conventional house was studied for one year following construction, and the energy-efficient house was sampled on three occasions over a two-year period. The other three demonstration houses were in

83

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

84

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

85

indoor | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

indoor indoor Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

86

Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

73 Federal Register 73 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 48 / Monday, March 12, 2012 / Rules and Regulations adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. This rule does not use technical standards. Therefore, we did not consider the use of voluntary consensus standards. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321-4370f), and have concluded this action is one of a category of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This rule is categorically excluded, under figure 2-1, paragraph (34)(g), of the Instruction. This rule

87

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Indoor air quality measurements in energy efficient buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Efficient Buildings Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has designed and fabricated a mobile laboratory for research and development studies of ventilation requirements and energy utilization in residential and commercial buildings. The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobile Laboratory is used in studies of indoor air quality in buildings before and after energy conservation retrofits and in new buildings incorporating energy efficient designs. Indoor air quality measurements have been conducted in residential buildings and work in progress includes indoor air quality monitoring in schools, hospitals, and energy efficient residential buildings. The monitoring program includes measurement of CO, CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, NO, NO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, infiltration rate (tracer gas technique), and aerosol size distribution on a continuous basis. Total and respirable-fraction particulate samples are collected on membrane filter media for analysis by x-ray fluorescence (XRFA), photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA), proton activation analysis (PAA), combustion, and wet-chemistry techniques for the determination of particulate elemental composition (S, N, C, etc.) and ionic species such as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, and NH/sub 4//sup +/. Results of the initial phases of this program indicate that the concentrations of some gaseous and respirable particulate air pollutants in specific indoor environments exceed those levels commonly found in the outdoor urban air environment.

Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Traynor, G.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Title Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Michael Spears, Chi-Ming Lai, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of Sustainable Buildings 2005 Conference Pagination 1432-1437 Conference Location Tokyo, Japan, September 27-29, 2005 Abstract The factory-built relocatable classroom (RC) is a dominant force in the school facility construction industry in the United States (U.S.) and elsewhere. It is estimated that there are approximately 650,000 RCs currently occupied in the U.S., housing about 16 million students. RCs receive public attention due to complaints about poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Both measured data and anecdotal evidence in California have suggested excessive acoustical noise from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment as a central factor leading to degraded IEQ. In the U.S., RCs are typically equipped with unitary exterior wall-mount HVAC systems, and interior acoustical noise due to structural and airborne transmission can reach levels of about 58dB(A) with compressor cycling, under unoccupied conditions. Due to these noise levels teachers often simply choose to turn off the HVAC, leading to inadequate ventilation, as well as poor thermal conditioning, and thus to poor indoor air quality. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde are common. We discuss the acoustic component of our efforts to develop and test energy efficient HVAC systems that address the ventilation, controls, and acoustic requirements necessary to ensure high quality indoor environments in RCs

91

Indoor Scene Recognition Through Object Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scene recognition is a highly valuable perceptual ability for an indoor mobile robot, however, current approaches for scene recognition present a significant drop in performance for the case of indoor scenes. We believe ...

Espinace, P.

92

Indoor air radon  

SciTech Connect

This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

Cothern, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Manual on indoor air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Indoor Thermal Comfort, an Evolutionary Biology Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As is becoming increasingly clear, the human species evolvedin the East African savannah. Details of the precise evolutionary chainremain unresolved however it appears that the process lasted severalmillion years, culminating with the emergence of modern Homo sapiensroughly 200,000 years ago. Following that final evolutionary developmentmodern Homo sapiens relatively quickly populated the entire world.Clearly modern Homo sapiens is a successful, resourceful and adaptablespecies. In the developed societies, modern humans live an existence farremoved from our evolutionary ancestors. As we have learned over the lastcentury, this "new" lifestyle can often result in unintendedconsequences. Clearly, our modern access to food, shelter, transportationand healthcare has resulted in greatly expanded expected lifespan butthis new lifestyle can also result in the emergence of different kinds ofdiseases and health problems. The environment in modern buildings haslittle resemblance to the environment of the savannah. We strive tocreate environments with little temperature, air movement and lightvariation. Building occupants often express great dissatisfaction withthese modern created environments and a significant fraction even developsomething akin to allergies to specific buildings (sick buildingsyndrome). Are the indoor environments we are creating fundamentallyunhealthy -- when examined from an evolutionary perspective?

Stoops, John L.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Texas Rice Industry Coalition for the Environment (R.I.C.E.): Main Points from Six Focus Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................... iv Background ..................................................................1 Texas R.I.C.E. ..........................................................2 Methods .....................................................................4 Rice Producers Focus Groups Materials ......................................5 Environmental Interests and General Public Focus Groups Materials ...............5 Children Focus Group Interview Materials ....................................6 West Side Rice Producers Focus Group ............................................6 EastSideRiceProducersFocusGroup ............................................11 OfficersofEnvironmentalOrganizationsFocusGroup ...............................16 MembersofEnvironmentalOrganizationsFocusGroup ..............................20 Unaffiliated Public Citizens of Houston Focus Group ................................24 ChildrenFocusGroup .............................

Texas A; Ed Rister; Amy Purvis Thurow; Amy Purvis Thurow; Shannon Sneary; Shannon Sneary; Sarah Stasny; Sarah Stasny

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

97

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

98

Residential Indoor Air Background Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor intrusion, the migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated soil or groundwater into overlying buildings, has become one of the primary exposure pathways of concern for state and federal environmental agencies regulating contaminated sites in the USA. Regulators are requesting comprehensive evaluation of the subsurface vapor-to-indoor air pathway for currently occupied buildings, areas which may be developed in the future, and closed sites for which this pathway was not previously evaluat...

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

100

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Indoor to Outdoor Channel Measurements & Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... delay dispersion statistics for outdoor-indoor average PDPs (all values in ns). Band RMS Delay Spread Delay Window 90% Energy Delay Interval ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Indoor Air Quality and Volatile Organic Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The unit was sized to comply with the outdoor air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62.2 Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Cornell University Indoor Air Quality Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

construction, and testing. The HVL is a large, interior space, previously used for plasma research. By building the house and storing materials indoors, we greatly reduced the...

104

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Title Joint Urban 2003: Indoor Measurements Final Data Report Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors...

105

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools Listed Alphabetically Tools by Platform Tools by Country Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

106

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland United Kingdom United States Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

107

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Platform PC Mac UNIX Internet Tools by Country Related Links Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in...

108

Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Title Active and passive methods for indoor formaldehyde elimination Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication...

109

Influence of indoor transport and mixing times scales on the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Influence of indoor transport and mixing times scales on the performance of sensor systems for characterizing contaminant releases Title Influence of indoor transport and mixing...

110

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning using activated carbon fiber media with nightly regeneration Title Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound...

111

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Title Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters...

112

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Webinar December 9, 2013 1:00PM...

113

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Title Modeling indoor exposures to VOCs and SVOCs as ventilation rates vary Publication Type Conference Paper...

114

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Title Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin...

115

Exploring indoor white spaces in metropolises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a promising vision to utilize white spaces, i.e., vacant VHF and UHF TV channels, to satisfy skyrocketing wireless data demand in both outdoor and indoor scenarios. While most prior works have focused on exploring outdoor white spaces, the indoor ... Keywords: TV white spaces, clustering algorithms, sensor placement

Xuhang Ying, Jincheng Zhang, Lichao Yan, Guanglin Zhang, Minghua Chen, Ranveer Chandra

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

UWB channel measurements for accurate indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, indoor localization has attracted considerable attention. More importantly, indoor channel measurements and models are very essential to accurate characterization of the ranging error for military applications. This paper provides the results ... Keywords: channel measurement, geolocation, path loss, ranging, ultra-wideband

Bardia Alavi; Nayef Alsindi; Kaveh Pahlavan

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Indoor environmental quality and ventilation in U.S. office buildings: A view of current issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the current focus on indoor environmental quality and ventilation in US office buildings is a response to sick building syndrome and occupant complaints about building-related health symptoms, poor indoor air quality, and thermal discomfort. The authors know that serious ``sick-building`` problems occur in a significant number of US office buildings and that a significant proportion of the occupants in many normal (non-sick) buildings report building-related health symptoms. Concerns about the health effects of environmental tobacco smoke have also focused attention on the indoor environment. The major responses of industry and governments, underway at the present time, are to restrict smoking in offices, to attempt to reduce the emissions of indoor pollutants, and to improve the operation of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Better air filtration, improved HVAC commissioning and maintenance, and increased provisions for individual control of HVAC are some of the improvements in HVAC that are currently being, evaluated. In the future, the potential for improved productivity and reduced airborne transmission of infectious disease may become the major driving force for improved indoor environments.

Fisk, W.J.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A comparison of line extraction algorithms using 2D range data for indoor mobile robotics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental evaluation of different line extraction algorithms applied to 2D laser scans for indoor environments. Six popular algorithms in mobile robotics and computer vision are selected and tested. Real scan data collected ... Keywords: 2D range data, Line extraction algorithm, Mobile robotics

Viet Nguyen; Stefan Gächter; Agostino Martinelli; Nicola Tomatis; Roland Siegwart

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Indoor tracking of laboratory mice via an rfid-tracking framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a solution for tracking of laboratory mice in an indoor semi natural environment based on RIFD-Technology is presented. A tracking framework is built where combined sensors identify and track the mice continuously 24 hours a day and 7 days ... Keywords: RFID, localization, tracking

Mareike Kritzler; Stephanie Jabs; Philipp Kegel; Antonio Krüger

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Polaris: getting accurate indoor orientations for mobile devices using ubiquitous visual patterns on ceilings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ubiquitous computing applications commonly use digital compass sensors to obtain orientation of a device relative to the magnetic north of the earth. However, these compass readings are always prone to significant errors in indoor environments due to ... Keywords: ceiling pictures, digital compass, orientation

Zheng Sun; Aveek Purohit; Shijia Pan; Frank Mokaya; Raja Bose; Pei Zhang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Venetian Blind Control System Based on Fuzzy Neural Network for Indoor Daylighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the indoor daylighting need, venetian blinds are a key element in the passive control of building’s vision environment. They help to control glare, daylighting, and overheating, all of which affect both the comfort of occupants and a building’s ... Keywords: fuzzy neural network, visual comfort, position of venetian blind, double control loops

Yifei Chen; Huai Li; Xueliang Chen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Removal of Indoor Ozone by Green Building Materials Clement Cros1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The rooms covered a wide range of indoor environments in both residential and institutional buildings rates were calculated. Light carbonyls (C1 through C5 n- aldehydes and acetone) were sampled on DNPH-tolualdehyde, benzaldehyde) were sampled on Tenax tubes and analyzed using thermal desorption and gas chromatography

Siegel, Jeffrey

125

Generating semantic-based trajectories for indoor moving objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel method to generate semantic-based trajectories for indoor moving objects. Indoor moving objects management has been a research focus in recent years. In order to get the trajectory data of indoor moving objects, we have to ... Keywords: indoor space, moving objects, simulation, trajectory data

Huaishuai Wang; Peiquan Jin; Lei Zhao; Lanlan Zhang; Lihua Yue

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Review: A survey of active and passive indoor localisation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years the need for indoor localisation has increased. Earlier systems have been deployed in order to demonstrate that indoor localisation can be done. Many researchers are referring to location estimation as a crucial component in numerous ... Keywords: Indoor active localisation, Indoor passive localisation, Location estimation techniques

Gabriel Deak; Kevin Curran; Joan Condell

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

Thorhaug, A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: radon  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a long-standing interest in investigating the impact of energy conservation measures on indoor air quality. The Office of Environmental Analysis has prepared this handbook in an effort to bring together available information on the impact of radon and its decay products on residential indoor air quality and on human health. The handbook is designed to enhance the understanding of the current state-of-knowledge regarding indoor radon for both homeowners and technical persons with an interest in indoor air quality issues. It provides the technical reader with a comprehensive review and reference source on the sources of radon and its transport mechanisms; reported indoor concentrations; building, and meteorological effects on radon concentration; models for predicting indoor concentrations; health effects and standards; and control technologies. The major questions and concerns of homeowners regarding the issue of indoor radon are addressed in a separate section entitled Radon in the Home: A Primer for Homeowners. This section also provides a starting point for readers desiring a general overview of the subject.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in diagnosing and solving problems of indoor air humidity and dryness. Indoor Humidity Tools is comprised of two sections: - Calculations provide humidity calculations. - Reference provides background information on humidity in convenient lookup formats, such as recommended indoor humidity levels for different types of spaces, against which calculations may be compared. Keywords indoor air humidity, dryness, condensation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required No special expertise required. Users first released in July 1997. Audience engineers, industrial hygienists and safety professionals, architects, building scientists, contractors, government air quality specialists, and

130

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Title Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Apte, Michael G., Lara A. Gundel, S. Katharine Hammond, Raymond L. Dod, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael D. Sohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, Gee-Minn Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and 'real-world' buildings to 1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, 2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and 3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles - using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in 'real-world' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in 'real-world' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the 'real world'. The use of solanesol was compromised - as it had been in the chamber experiments.

131

Indoor robot gardening: design and implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed autonomous gardening system with applications in urban/indoor precision agriculture. The garden is a mesh network of robots and plants. The gardening ...

Correll, Nikolaus

132

COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

Hollowell, C.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy Efficiency and Improved Indoor Environmental Quality:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Improved Indoor Environmental Quality: No-Regrets Climate Change Insurance for the Insurance Industry Speaker(s): Evan Mills Date: December 19, 1996 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148...

134

Expectations of Indoor Climate Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

humid climate, ASHRAE Trans.. 100(2) (1994). [7] A . Lovins,isothermal environments, ASHRAE Trans. , 100 (2) (1994) 14.

Fountain, M.; Brager, G.; de Dear, Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hostile work environment.com: increasing participation of underrepresented groups, lessons learned from the dot-com era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data is presented from three cases studies of three small IT-focused businesses that were created and failed within the context of the Dot-Com era (1996-2001). This era can be characterized as a time in which the IT industry was facing an acute shortage ... Keywords: IT workforce, dot-com, employment, gender, gold rush, organization, power, recruitment, retention, underrepresented groups

Andrea Hoplight Tapia

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

Fisk, W.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris* , Kerry A and Environmental Engineering * Corresponding email: Fedenoris@mail.utexas.edu SUMMARY HVAC filters are long heavy metal (Pb, Cd and As) concentrations. HVAC filter microbial concentrations appear to be consistent

Siegel, Jeffrey

139

Expectations of Indoor Climate Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a hot-humid climate, ASHRAE Trans.. 100(2) (1994). [7] A .isothermal environments, ASHRAE Trans. , 100 (2) (1994) 14.

Fountain, M.; Brager, G.; de Dear, Richard

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluating Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most fundamental goal in the design of educational facilities is to provide an environment that encourages learning achievement for students and teachers. Poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can negatively affect student health, comfort and performance that will eventually produce unacceptable learning environment. Poor IAQ can decrease a person's ability to perform specific mental tasks requiring concentration, calculation and memory. Therefore, schools should be designed, built and maintained in away to minimize and control the source of pollution. Around 29% of Jordanians occupy school buildings each day. A specific prototype building design was applied in the different locations of the country. This prototype could be appropriate for one location but it is not for the entire country that has diversity in climatic and environmental conditions The purpose of this research paper was to evaluate the indoor air quality in public school buildings in urban and rural area, through investigations of the causes and its effects on student health, comfort, and performance. Achieving healthy indoor air quality is a multifaceted a problem which can be arrived at by a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to the design, construction and operation of the school building. Results indicate that the prototype system used was not appropriate as healthy school design, and it did not take into consideration the indoor environmental factors as crucial issue in designing school buildings.

Ali, H. H.; Al-Momani, H.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

142

Public policy model for the indoor radon problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed that predicts the shift in distributions of indoor radon concentrations and potential risk reduction resulting from a program of homeowner sampling and remediation in a region. Indoor radon concentrations for a region are represented ...

M. J. Small; C. A. Peters

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Project: Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Energy Buildings Project. Summary: NIST is developing tools and metrics to both ...

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Changes per Hour * Heat exchanger on timing cycle: 0.8 Aphases: Phase A when the heat exchanger was generally notand Phase B when a heat exchanger was operating. As

Moschandreas, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Creating Friendly Indoor Environments for the Asthma Child: Submicron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the Asthma Child: Submicron Capture and Energy Efficiency Speaker(s): Drew Wood Date: January 24, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Hugo...

147

Dust in the Indoor Environment: Physical and Chemical Changes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hottinger said: "Settled dust on hot surfaces above 70 degrees Celsius results in distillation products having irritating effect on mucous membranes, fairly equal to the effect...

148

Preventing Indoor Environment-Related Symptom Complaints in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation, maintenance, or management)? • Why do youScheduled maintenance of outdoor air system Management ofmaintenance, repair, replacement, housekeeping) Behavioral/organizational (management

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

WORLD TRADE CENTER INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to monitor the current environmental conditions for residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and to individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-3 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

LOWER MANHATTAN INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to respond to concerns of residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-2003 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

152

Indoor air pollution: a new concern  

SciTech Connect

Radon, asbestos, and formaldehyde are emerging as major health hazards because home-winterization efforts are trapping toxic agents indoors. Other pollution sources, such as tobacco smoke and unvented heating units, also lower indoor air quality. Radon decay products present in the structural materials of well-insulated homes are linked to lung-cancer deaths. Exposure to asbestos fibers has been identified as a problem in many school buildings, while physical discomfort caused by urea-formaldehyde foam insulation has affected the health of many homeowners. The Environmental Protection Agency is collecting and disseminating information to help local officials and homeowners understand the risks and is urging building auditors to inform clients about indoor air pollution. (DCK)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Coupled urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation modelling on a high-resolution grid: A case study for the Amsterdam ArenA stadium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind flow in urban environments is an important factor governing the dispersion of heat and pollutants from streets, squares and buildings. This paper presents a coupled CFD modelling approach for urban wind flow and indoor natural ventilation. A specific ... Keywords: Air exchange rate, Air quality, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Cross-ventilation, Full-scale measurements, Grid generation technique, Integrated model, Model validation and solution verification, Numerical simulation, Outdoor and indoor air flow, Sports stadium

T. van Hooff; B. Blocken

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications  

SciTech Connect

This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sustainable Energy Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Systems Group The Sustainable Energy Systems Group studies the impacts of energy generation and use, manufacturing, and other activities on the environment, the...

156

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

03E 03E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *Now with the California Energy Commission PIER Program, Sacramento CA. This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041.

157

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Title Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-63480 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Brett C. Singer, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3177-3181 ISBN Number 1352-2310 Keywords acid-base, cellulose, gypsum, nicotine, pyridine, sorption, surface materials Abstract Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm-1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm-1). During desorption under a stream of N2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm-1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

158

Gas ranges: latest indoor pollution target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although a National Research Council study claims that unvented gas cooking and heating appliance are probably responsible for a large portions of the nitrogen dioxide exposures in the population, the data base for gas-stove emissions is actually too limited to be conclusive. The problem of indoor pollution more likely rests with the increased airtightness of houses rather than with gas combustion. In the last 5 years, the normal air flow in new houses has been reduced 80% through new insulation and building techniques designed to lower heating and cooling costs. Other elements contributing to indoor pollution are much more hazardous than gas combustion products: radon gas from the soil, formaldehyde for insulation and construction materials, and toxic chemicals from household aerosols and solvents.

O'Sullivan, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimating Environmental Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential-Dust Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indoor combustion sources, including cigarette smoke, wood-combustion and there are a variety of indoor PAH sources including cigarette smoke, wood-combustion. Humans are exposed to PAHs from a variety of indoor sources including cigarette smoke, wood-

Whitehead, Todd Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR checklists now satisfies the following Indoor airPLUS requirements: * Finish all masonry and concrete walls (e.g., poured concrete, concrete masonry, insulated concrete...

163

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Title Improving Ventilation and Saving...

164

Quality in Relation to Indoor Climate & Energy Efficiency: An...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quality in Relation to Indoor Climate & Energy Efficiency: An Analysis of Trends, Achievements & Remaining Challenges Speaker(s): Peter Wouters Date: July 6, 2001 - 12:00pm...

165

Measurements of Indoor Pollutant Emissions From EPA Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of wood consumed starting with the load before the ... for the rate of wood consumption during each ... Indoor Air for Health and Energy Conservation. ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring,...

167

Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How to Cite. Tshudy, J. A. (1995), Indoor air quality and the emissions of VOCs from interior products. J Vinyl Addit Technol, 1: 155–158. doi: ...

168

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

169

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

170

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

171

Advanced support vector machines for 802.11 indoor location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the proliferation of ubiquitous computing services, locating a device in indoor scenarios has received special attention during recent years. A variety of algorithms are based on Wi-Fi measurements of the received signal strength and estimate ... Keywords: Autocorrelation kernel, Complex support vector machines, Fingerprinting, IEEE 802.11, Indoor location, Support vector machines

Carlos Figuera; José Luis Rojo-Álvarez; Mark Wilby; Inmaculada Mora-Jiménez; Antonio J. Caamaño

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

GROUP 4: Is biomass burning carbon-neutral? Global environment aspect. It is argued that since trees take CO2 out of the air and give off oxygen as they grow,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROUP 4: Is biomass burning carbon-neutral? Global environment aspect. It is argued that since trees take CO2 out of the air and give off oxygen as they grow, that by burning them we are just putting in terms of CO2 in the atmosphere. Investigate the national scene, which seems very pro- biomass burning

173

Vision-based guidance and control of a hovering vehicle in unknown environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology, architecture, hardware implementation, and results of a system capable of controlling and guiding a hovering vehicle in unknown environments, emphasizing cluttered indoor spaces. Six-axis ...

Ahrens, Spencer Greg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

175

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Title California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2001 Authors Apte, Michael G., William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Marion L. Russell, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Exposure Analysis, Charleston, SC Date Published November 4-8, 20 Publisher International Society for Exposure Analysis, Boston, MA

176

Knowledge-Based Multi-Criteria Optimization to Support Indoor Positioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Potsdam, Germany Abstract Indoor position estimation constitutes a central task in home-based

Schaub, Torsten

177

Advanced Indoor Module Light-Soaking Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of the accelerated, indoor light-soaking test station is presented in this paper, along with data obtained for six modules that underwent exposure. The station comprises a climate-controlled chamber equipped with a solar simulator that allows 1-sun light intensity exposure. Concurrently, we monitor the electrical characteristics of multiple PV modules and exercise active control over their electrical bias using programmable electronic loads, interfaced to a data acquisition system that acquires power-tracking and current-voltage data. This capability allows us to the test different bias conditions and to cyclically alternate between them. Additionally, we can vary the light intensity and module temperatures to garner realistic temperature coefficients of module performance. Data obtained on cadmium telluride (CdTe) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) modules are presented.

del Cueto, J. A.; Osterwald, C.; Pruett, J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors configurations will contribute to an improved design, safety, and operation of nuclear reactors. In relation

Lindken, Ralph

179

NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Indoor Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Testing Indoor Testing Photo of a distant summer view of SERF, FTLB, and OTF/array field. Our indoor testing and R&D equipment can be found in several laboratories across the permanent NREL site, including the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF), the Field Test Laboratory Building (FTLB), and the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). We use an assortment of indoor equipment to test modules and systems under simulated and accelerated conditions, as well as to perform module packaging R&D. Our equipment is housed in several laboratories in buildings across NREL: High-Bay Accelerated Testing Laboratory (OTF) Failure Analysis (OTF) Data Acquisition and Calibration (OTF) Optical Mechanical Characterization Laboratory (FTLB/153-01) Thin-Film Deposition and Sample Preparation Laboratory (FTLB/158-02)

180

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed to Model Materials Speaker(s): Hugo Destaillats Date: May 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 During this seminar,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Indoor Air Quality Primer for HVAC System Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are major energy users in commercial and institutional buildings. Increased ventilation for acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ), besides increasing energy use, may result in unacceptably high indoor humidity, particularly in humid climates and/or applications requiring high ventilation rates. This report analyzes how increased ventilation affects the dehumidification capabilities of air conditioning systems in three applications -- offices, retail...

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VTT has executed a lot of research work concerning the usage, functionality and refurbishment of indoor swimming pools and spas lately. This work includes for instance detailed condition surveys, energy audits, cost analysis and maintenance planning tools. The prevailing conditions make special demands for planning, constructing, repairing and maintaining the indoor swimming pools. Main topics are usually connected with shortening of the service lives of the building parts and technical installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order to repair facilities successfully. Due to optimizing the operation and maintenance VTT has developed operation and maintenance manual software that is specially targeted for indoor swimming facilities. This paper presents the technical risk map, the condition survey procedure, the energy saving methods and the maintenance record book for indoor swimming facilities to secure the success of a refurbishment project.

Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors: Better prediction of the flow and heat transfer in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors will contribute

Lindken, Ralph

185

Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Standards Working Groups - Safety and Operating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Safety and Operating Environment Working Group. Scope: These two areas have been combined ...

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program was required to embrace the two needs with the overall objective to educate all—teachers, administrators, various departments, and students. The educational outreach program chosen is TEAMS, which is the IAQ program designed to attain these goals. The CFBISD prides itself in acting quickly to resolve IAQ issues. Our belief is problems defined and recognized, create trust, and enable the District to maximize potential for performance improvements via reduced concerns by staff. We’ve had our IAQ program in place since April of 2002. Recognizing the need to expand the program in depth and breadth, we designed TEAMS. We were able to do this by assistance from Mike Miller and the EPA, who gave the District six “Tools for Schools” test kits (TfS Kit). The information from these kits gave us a guideline to build TEAMS to meet our objectives of reaching a larger audience with additional material, and adding to the goals of TEAMS increased efficiency, reduced cost, and educated consumers.

Melton, V.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Title Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6147E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, William W. Delp, Kimberly Vermeer, Gary Adamkiewicz, Brett C. Singer, and William J. Fisk Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 61 Pagination 378-386 Date Published 06/2013 Keywords apartments, buildings, costs, energy, indoor environmental quality, Protocol, retrofits, Selection Abstract The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

189

Socioeconomic and Outdoor Meteorological Determinants of Indoor Temperature and Humidity in New York City Dwellings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous mechanisms link outdoor weather and climate conditions to human health. It is likely that many health conditions are more directly affected by indoor rather than outdoor conditions. Yet, the relationship between indoor temperature and ...

J. D. Tamerius; M. S. Perzanowski; L. M. Acosta; J. S. Jacobson; I. F. Goldstein; J. W. Quinn; A. G. Rundle; J. Shaman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making...

191

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of...

192

ARIEL: automatic wi-fi based room fingerprinting for indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

People spend the majority of their time indoors, and human indoor activities are strongly correlated with the rooms they are in. Room localization, which identifies the room a person or mobile phone is in, provides a powerful tool for characterizing ...

Yifei Jiang; Xin Pan; Kun Li; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies  

SciTech Connect

After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air conditioning, consider window treatments and fans to cool down your home. If your internal thermostat is melting like the rest of the U.S. right now, you probably could use some fanning, ice, or air conditioning. With that in mind, we are providing a rundown of the cheapest ways to keep your home

195

inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, air quality, domestic computing, health ACM Classification Keywords H.m. Information interfacesinAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos Human}@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT Good indoor air quality is a vital part of human health. Poor indoor air quality can contribute

Paulos, Eric

196

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

197

UCom: Ultra-wideband Communications in Harsh Propagation Environments  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has developed an ultra-wideband (UWB) system that provides unique, through-the-wall wireless communications in heavy metallic and heavy concrete indoor channels. LLNL's UWB system is the only available wireless communications system that performs successfully and reliably in facilities where conventional narrowband communications usually fail due to destructive reflections from multiple surfaces. These environments include: cargo ships and reinforced, heavy concrete buildings. LLNL's revolutionary system has applications for the military, as well as commercial indoor communications in multistory buildings, and cluttered industrial structures.

Nekoogar, F

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor airPLUS CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS VERSION 1 (REV. 01) www.epa.gov/indoorairplus Contents About the Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications ................................................................................................................. i What's New in Version 1 (Rev. 01)? ........................................................................................................................................... i Eligibility and Verification Requirements ................................................................................................................................... i Terms Used in This Document ..................................................................................................................................................

199

Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the environmental attributes to underground building shape and configuration, materials, structures, use, maintenance, lighting, occupancy, and management. These criteria are hypothesized to be of more influences on the building environment in the cases of underground spaces than in the aboveground. The aim is to approach and link together the many recent architectural and engineering factors that affect indoor environmental quality (IEQ) as a contribution to the affordability and sustainability of present earth sheltered building design and development. To attain its goals, the study develops a conceptual micro-framework of healthy buildings' parameters and economic aspects for evaluating links between sustainable construction and outcomes of health, productivity, and affordability. The conclusion indicates the importance of integrating appropriate technologies into earth sheltered space design, while the recommendations conform with environmental organizations and policies' directives in both their short and long-term development plans to provide affordable and healthy earth sheltered interiors.

Sheta, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Diagnostic Process All plants grown indoors in containers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing light. Bulbs of different light Caring for Plants in the Home Lynn Ellen Doxon, former Extension temperatures more closely resemble the tropics than local outdoor temperatures. Light Needs Even among plants that naturally grow in the shade, light needs vary. There are four basic light categories for indoor plants grown

Castillo, Steven P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

HVAC System Design Strategies to Address Indoor Air Quality Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes strategies that can be employed in the design and operation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems to address the ASHRAE Standard 62 "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality" requirements. The report examines a wide variety of approaches to meeting the standard and their impact on energy consumption, occupant comfort, and other factors.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Honkamaa, T.; Rosenberg, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The solution of smart home indoor positioning based on wifi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LAN gradually to the wireless technology in the direction of multi-play development in the multi-play in the process of rapid development, driven by a wide range of applications for a variety of wireless technologies, WIFI is one of them. WiFi the most ... Keywords: WiFi, indoor positioning, smart home

Songjuan Zhang; Lilei Qi

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Directional Handoff using Geomagnetic Sensor in Indoor WLANs Sangyup Han  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directional Handoff using Geomagnetic Sensor in Indoor WLANs Sangyup Han , Myungchul Kim , Ben Lee a geomagnetic sensor (or a digital compass) embedded in mobile devices. The proposed scheme predicts; Directional handoff; Geomagnetic sensor; Digital compass; AP Table I. INTRODUCTION With the popularity

Lee, Ben

206

An adaptive location estimator using tracking algorithms for indoor WLANs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents adaptive algorithms for estimating the location of a mobile terminal (MT) based on radio propagation modeling (RPM), Kalman filtering (KF), and radio-frequency identification (RFID) assisting for indoor wireless local area networks ... Keywords: Calibration, Kalman filtering, Location estimation, Neural network, Radio-frequency identification, Tracking, Wireless local area network

Yih-Shyh Chiou; Chin-Liang Wang; Sheng-Cheng Yeh

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Materials for Biological Environments Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... membranes for more efficient water treatment and alternative energy technologies. ... with integrated sensing to enable real-time optimization of the ...

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

Controls Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Schedule Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups...

209

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown. Therefore, an investigative approach must usually be taken to identify the source(s) of the air quality problem, and if present, air contaminant concentrations. As the general public becomes more aware of the problems associated with poor indoor air quality conditions, an associated increase in air quality evaluation requests can be expected. This paper discusses some of the various investigative tools and techniques that can be utilized to identify air quality contaminants when performing an indoor air quality evaluation. These investigative tools and techniques can be used to develop a site specific list of possible contaminants and their sources, and can then be used to determine which contaminants are, in fact, present in adverse concentrations. Some of the investigative tools and techniques to be discussed in this paper include the following: visual inspections and site observations, information searches, review of building construction, review of ventilation systems, interviews, low and high volume sampling pumps, flow and oxygen meters, portable photoionization and flame ionization detectors (PID & FID), various types of vapor detector tubes, and gas chromatograph/mass spectrophotometer (GC/MS) analysis. This paper will be an introductory overview of the above listed investigative tools and techniques. The paper's attempt is to acquaint the reader with these investigative tools and techniques, and how they can assist the reader in an air quality evaluation.

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

211

Community, Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment community-environmentassetsimagesicon-community.jpg Community, Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico...

212

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

213

Quantum groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of Quantum groups, although rather young, since the expression Quantum ... introduction of a suitable form of the quantum group, the algebra A ...

214

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor air temperature is in summer or the higher the indoor temperature is in winter, the more energy the air conditioning system will consume. For the sake of energy conservation, the indoor air should be set as high as possible in summer and as low as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV equation and extensive field investigation.

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Energy Saving System to Remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Indoor Air  

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have developed a catalyst and deployment devices to improve indoor air quality and reduce ventilation energy needs.

217

STAR Test Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables defined when you do this (and it will probably be much quicker than usual, too). Do a manual STAR login If you want to modify what test environment you use copy the test login scripts to your own working area: cp -r /common/star/startest /path/to/myworkdir/. If you don't want to modify these files you can source them directly from

218

Lessons for Climate Stabilizing Innovation from Experience with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Envelope Materials Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts China Energy Group Electricity Markets and Policy Group Energy Efficiency Standards Group Indoor Environment...

219

Context: Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Decision Tree for Global Environmental Impact Screening.. ... United Nations Environment Programme's Role in Eliminating Halon Dependency in ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matchstick: A Room-to-Room Thermal Model for Predicting Indoor Temperature from Wireless Sensor present a room-to-room thermal model used to accurately predict temperatures in residential buildings. We that our model can predict future indoor temperature trends with a 90th percentile aggregate error between

Hazas, Mike

222

Influence of local geology on the concentration of indoor radon in Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 58,000 indoor radon measurements are available for homes in Maryland. A comparative study between compilations of activated-charcoal and alpha-track measurements of indoor radon in zip-code-size geographic areas indicated that both of these methods are useful and are equally able to estimate regional indoor radon. Indoor radon measurements compiled according to zip code areas can be used to create state-size radon hazard maps. In Maryland the area with the highest indoor radon (mostly composed of zip code areas that average over 8 pCi/L) is the western half of the Piedmont Province and the eastern side of the Coastal Plain Province. The eastern half of the Piedmont and the eastern half of the Valley and Ridge mostly have intermediate and high indoor radon levels (4--8 and >8 pCi/L). The Blue Ridge, western side of the Valley and Ridge, and Plateau Province each has relatively few zip code areas, but the data suggest a range from low to high indoor radon levels. The western side of the Coastal Plain has the lowest indoor radon (most of the zip code areas average less than 4 pCi/L).

Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

MAQS: a personalized mobile sensing system for indoor air quality monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors; indoor air quality (IAQ) influences human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. This paper describes MAQS, a personalized mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. In contrast with existing ... Keywords: air quality sensing, location based service, smartphone

Yifei Jiang; Kun Li; Lei Tian; Ricardo Piedrahita; Xiang Yun; Omkar Mansata; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Landmarke: an ad hoc deployable ubicomp infrastructure to support indoor navigation of firefighters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor navigation plays a central role for the safety of firefighters. The circumstances in which a firefighting intervention occurs represent a rather complex challenge for the design of supporting technology. In this paper, we present the results of ... Keywords: Ad hoc deployment, Firefighting, Human---computer interaction, Indoor navigation, Mobile ad hoc network, Navigation, Orientation, Sensor networks, Ubiquitous computing, Wearable computing

Leonardo Ramirez; Tobias Dyrks; Jan Gerwinski; Matthias Betz; Markus Scholz; Volker Wulf

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optical antenna design for indoor optical wireless communication systems: Research Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, the design of the non-imaging totally internally reflecting concentrator family denominated optical antennas (OAs) is discussed, and its use for indoor optical wireless communication systems is explained. The lenses presented here ... Keywords: antenna, communications, indoor, infrared, optical, wireless

R. Ramirez-Iniguez; R. J. Green

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Headio: zero-configured heading acquisition for indoor mobile devices through multimodal context sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heading information becomes widely used in ubiquitous computing applications for mobile devices. Digital magnetometers, also known as geomagnetic field sensors, provide absolute device headings relative to the earth's magnetic north. However, magnetometer ... Keywords: ceiling pictures, digital compass, geolocation, heading, indoor locationing, indoor navigation, mobile sensing, orientation, perspective transformation, task scheduling

Zheng Sun, Shijia Pan, Yu-Chi Su, Pei Zhang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Estimation of Channel Impulse Response Using Modified Ceiling Bounce Model in Non-Directed Indoor Optical Wireless Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a modification to the traditional Ceiling bounce model is proposed for use with non-directed indoor optical wireless systems which takes into account the transceiver separation distances as well as their actual positions while computing ... Keywords: Diffuse indoor optical systems, Indoor channel impulse response, Modified Ceiling bounce model

K. Smitha; Arumugam Sivabalan; Joseph John

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

'Follow me': a web-based, location-sharing architecture for large, indoor environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We leverage the ubiquity of bluetooth-enabled devices and propose a decentralized, web-based architecture that allows users to share their location by following each other in the style of Twitter. We demonstrate a prototype ...

Ypodimatopoulos, Polychronis

229

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mater- ials -- particle board, plywood and urea-formaldehydeformaldehyde foam insulation, plywood, and particle board.method) is 78% on average. Plywood constructed with urea-

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considerations. A heat exchanger will be installed in anAir Heat Exchangers . 14 Subcontractair-to- air heat exchangers; additional subcontract

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Query Processing for Probabilistic State Diagrams Describing Multiple Robot Navigation in an Indoor Environment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the syntax and semantics of multi-level state diagrams to support probabilistic behavior of cooperating robots. The techniques are presented to analyze these diagrams by querying combined robots behaviors. It is shown how to use state abstraction and transition abstraction to create, verify and process large probabilistic state diagrams.

Czejdo, Bogdan [ORNL; Bhattacharya, Sambit [North Carolina Fayetteville State University; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many hospitals for energy audits and for energy-conserving1980, will include an energy audit, modifications to theannotated bibliography of energy audit source materials will

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Potential Nationwide Improvements in Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased thermal insulation in building envelope Thermallyinsulation helps HV AC system satisfy thermal loads and because of reduced radiant heat exchange between occupants and building

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Volatile N-nitrosamines in Environment Tobacco Smoke: Sampling, Analysis, Smission Factors, and Indoor Air Exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Division: Sacramento, CA, 1991. Ruhl, C. ; Adams,Research Division: Sacramento, CA, 1994. 24) Burton, H. R. ;of Health Services: Sacramento, CA, 14) Chortyk, O.T. ;

Mahanama, K.R.R.; Daisey, J.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

236

Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Wireless networking is currently dominated by radio frequency (RF) techniques. However, the soon-to-be ubiquity of LED-based lighting motivated by significant energy savings provides an opportunistic deployment of widespread free-space optical (FSO) communications. LEDbased network transceivers have a variety of competitive advantages over RF including high bandwidth density, security, energy consumption, and aesthetics. They also use a highly reusable unregulated part of the spectrum (visible light). In this paper we describe results from a pilot project to demonstrate the viability of an optical free-space visible light transceiver as a basis for indoor wireless networking. Inexpensive, commercial, off-the shelf LEDs and photodiodes we used to construct two prototypes; a simplex channel as expected as a component of an asymmetric/hybrid RF-FSO system, and a full-duplex channel demonstrating the ability to isolate multiple channels. On— off keying (OOK) was applied without observable flicker in the target modulation ranges. Results indicate the viability of creating inexpensive FSO transceivers that might be embedded in commercial lighting products to support ceiling-to-floor distances of approximately 3m. Index Terms—Wireless networking, indoor communications, free-space optical communications, visible light LED, modulation, OOK, FSO. 1 I.

T. D. C. Little; P. Dib; K. Shah; N. Barraford; B. Gallagher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

User Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You may NOT modify the .bashrc or .cshrc files. These are set to read-only on NERSC systems and specify system specific customizations. Instead you should modify a file called .bashrc.ext or .cshrc.ext. Learn more about the global homes user environment. Important Environment Variables

238

Environment ref  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Support to the identification of potential risks for the environment and human health arising from hydrocarbons operations involving hydraulic fracturing in Europe Report for

Issue Number C; Andrew Lelland

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) forIndoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at LowPart-per-Billion Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Efficient removal of indoor generated airborne particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in office buildings and other large buildings may allow for a reduction in outdoor air supply rates with concomitant energy savings while still maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in these buildings. Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners have the potential to achieve the necessary reductions in indoor VOC concentrations at relatively low cost. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted with a scaled, prototype UVPCO device designed for use in a duct system. The experimental UVPCO contained two 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths coated with titanium dioxide and 3% by weight tungsten oxide. The monoliths were irradiated with 12 UVC lamps arranged in four banks. The UVPCO was challenged with four mixtures of VOCs typical of mixtures encountered in indoor air. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A cleaning product mixture contained three cleaning products with high market shares. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. A fourth mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady-state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate air samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor section. Concentrations of the mixtures were manipulated, with concentrations of individual VOCs mostly maintained below 10 ppb. Device flow rates were varied between 165 and 580 m{sup 3}/h. Production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid as reaction products was investigated. Conversion efficiency data were generated for 48 individual VOCs or groups of closely related compounds. Alcohols and glycol ethers were the most reactive chemical classes with conversion efficiencies often near or above 70% at the low flow rate and near 40% at the high flow rate. Ketones and terpene hydrocarbons were somewhat less reactive. The relative VOC conversion rates are generally favorable for treatment of indoor air since many contemporary products used in buildings employ oxygenated solvents. A commercial UVPCO device likely would be installed in the supply air stream of a building and operated to treat both outdoor and recirculated air. Assuming a recirculation rate comparable to three times the normal outdoor air supply rate, simple mass-balance modeling suggests that a device with similar characteristics to the study unit has sufficient conversion efficiencies for most VOCs to compensate for a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply without substantially impacting indoor VOC concentrations. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid were produced in these experiments as reaction byproducts. No other significant byproducts were observed. A coupled steady-state mass balance model is presented and applied to VOC data from a study of a single office building. For the operating assumptions described above, the model estimated a three-fold increase in indoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations. The outcome of this limited assessment suggests that evaluation of the potential effects of the operation of a UVPCO device on indoor concentrations of these contaminants is warranted. Other suggested studies include determining VOC conversion efficiencies in actual buildings and evaluating changes in VOC conversion efficiency as monoliths age with long-term operation.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A web-based POE tool for measuring indoor environmental quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windsor 2004 A Web-based POE Tool for Measuring IndoorBerkeley, has developed a Web-based survey that can quicklypiece of successful POEs. Web-based surveys can quickly and

Zagreus, Leah; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Markov model for dynamic behavior of ToA-based ranging in indoor localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of undetected direct path (UDP) conditions causes occurrence of unexpected large random ranging errors which pose a serious challenge to precise indoor localization using time of arrival (ToA). Therefore, analysis of the behavior of the ...

Mohammad Heidari; Kaveh Pahlavan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drinking Water as a Source of Indoor Air Pollution: In-Home Formation & Cross-Media Transfer Speaker(s): David Olson Date: April 19, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

244

Reference Handbook for Site-Specific Assessment of Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vapor intrusion is only one of several possible sources for volatile and semi-volatile chemicals in indoor air. This report provides guidance on the site-specific assessment of the significance of subsurface vapor intrusion into indoor air. Topics covered include theoretical considerations, sampling and analysis considerations, recommended strategies and procedures, interpretive tools, mitigation measures, and suggestions for future research. This document reflects a comprehensive understandin...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

247

WESTERN ELECTRIC INDUSTRY LEADERS GROUP | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WESTERN ELECTRIC INDUSTRY LEADERS GROUP WESTERN ELECTRIC INDUSTRY LEADERS GROUP Halting global warming and protecting the environment have properly moved high atop the...

248

Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR and SNS instruments. It will be available in the near future for SNS sample

249

Guide to Energy-Efficient Ventilation Methods for Acceptable Levels of Indoor Air Quality Levels in Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air quality is important in commercial buildings to maintain employee health, well-being, and productivity and avoid employer liability. The most common method to improve indoor air quality in commercial buildings is to use outside ventilation air for dilution of the inside air. Unfortunately, the conditioning of outdoor ventilation air may result in increased energy use for cooling, dehumidification, and heating; and humid outdoor ventilation air also can degrade indoor air quality. Some commerci...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Mechanical Ventilation Exhaust Fans Air-to-Air Heatexpected from exhaust fan A-I Infiltration contribution toIndoor Air Quality -- Exhaust Fan Mitigation" Final Report

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Energy Saving and Good Quality Lighting for Indoor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Lighting in indoor applications is throughout Europe in a lot of cases 20 years or older. That means there are luminaries, lamps and gear in use that are inefficient and so contributing to environmental pollution due to high energy use. These installations one can find in public buildings, offices and industry halls. In offices 75% of the existing installations are old-fashioned and consumes too much energy. A tremendous high potential for energy savings is available. In the past years more and more efficient lighting solutions for these areas where developed. An increase in efficiency but at the same time also in quality of lighting took place. This increase of efficiency can be realized in different ways. In e.g. offices, new fluorescent lamps TL5 with extremely high lamp efficacies, silver-coated aluminum lamellae optics for high luminares efficiency, as well as highly efficient electronic gear take care that the energy consumption is decreasing up to 40%, while the light quality is improving. Latest developments in lighting controls, daylight regulation and presence detection, again reduces the energy bill by another up to 50%.

Lange, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Résumé

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (www.hvac.okstate.edu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building that utilizes radiant heating/cooling systems to provide indoor environ- mental control validated by comparing measured data with results predicted by the model for a radiantly heated and cooled predicted by a carefully tunedEnergyPlus model. On the other hand, a high degree ofuncertainty in either

256

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Microsoft Word - Indoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3767X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct indoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities, laboratory operations, and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced computing, advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, manufacturing, nanotechnology, national security, neutron sciences, chemical sciences, and nuclear physics including but not limited to developing, evaluating and testing: materials and their properties; systems; equipment; instrumentation; renewable energy systems; and

258

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

259

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Melissa M. Lunden 1 ∗ , Thomas W. Kirchstetter 1 , Tracy L. Thatcher 2 , Susanne V. Hering 3 , and Nancy J. Brown 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA 2 Aerosol Dynamics Inc., 2329 4th Street, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA Abstract A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a

260

SNS Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment Home › Instruments › SNS › Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment SNS Sample Environment Operations Group SNS Sample Environment Operations Group from left to right: (left to right): Bekki Mills, Mark Loguillo, Saad Elorfi, Randy Sexton, Leland Robbins, Matt Rucker, Cory Fletcher, Todd Sherline, Hans-Jochen Lauter, Ken Kroll The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to SNS to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used. Temperature sensors are located at different locations inside the conditioned space in order to sense dry bulb temperatures, relative humidity to compare it with standard ASHRAE comfort values. The present investigation indicates that the radiant cooling system not only improves the indoor air quality but also reduces the building energy consumption in the conditioned space.

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni [Graduate School of Health Science, Fujita Health University 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Tyoake, Aichi, 470-1192 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Better Indoor Climate With Less Energy: European Energy Performance of Building Directive (EPBD)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Commission's Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (2000) indicated the need for specific measures in the building sector. In response, the European Commission (EC) published the proposed Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings (EPBD) in May 2001. The European Parliament and Council accepted the text, and it was published in the EU Official Journal in January 2003, at which time the Directive became a European Law. The objective of the EPBD is to promote the improvement of the energy performance of buildings, taking into account outdoor climatic and local conditions, as well as indoor climate requirements. The main objective is to achieve better indoor climate with less energy.

Magyar, Z.; Leitner, A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Lighting Group: Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software Software Lighting Software The Lighting Group has developed several computer programs in the course of conducting research on energy efficient lighting. Several of these programs have proven useful outside the research environment. One of the most popular programs for advanced lighting applications is Radiance. For more information on this program and its availability, click on the link below. RADIANCE Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. The primary advantage of Radiance over simpler lighting calculation and rendering tools is that there are no limitations on the geometry or the materials that may be simulated. Radiance is used by architects and engineers to predict illumination, visual quality and appearance of innovative design spaces, and by researchers to evaluate new

265

An indoor air perception method to detect fungi growth in flats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Located in the northwest coast of Spain, A Coruna has a mild climate where humidity is relatively high throughout most of the year, due to the effect of the Atlantic Ocean winds. This high relative humidity is related with mould exposure and allergy ... Keywords: Acceptability, Flats, Fungi, Indoor air, Water-damage

José A. Orosa; Armando C. Oliveira

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Validation of veracity on simulating the indoor temperature in PCM light weight building by energyplus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article surveys the EnergyPlus constructions solution algorithm and heat balance method in EnergyPlus, presents the new conduction finite difference solution algorithm and enthalpy-temperature function features, describes the implementation of the ... Keywords: energyplus, indoor temperature, phase change materials(PCMs), validation

Chun-Long Zhuang; An-Zhong Deng; Yong Chen; Sheng-Bo Li; Hong-Yu Zhang; Guo-Zhi Fan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the mechanisms governing movement of PMs in HVAC systems. Then, the basic equations governing PM deposition in ducts are introduced and investigations on airborne PMs distribution in HVAC systems are reviewed. The influence of PMs on indoor air quality and effectiveness of corresponding controlling measures is discussed extensively in the paper. Finally, recommendations for further research are given.

Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Design and evaluation of a wireless magnetic-based proximity detection platform for indoor applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many indoor sensing applications leverage knowledge of relative proximity among physical objects and humans, such as the notion of "within arm's reach". In this paper, we quantify this notion using "proximity zone", and propose a methodology that empirically ... Keywords: localization, magneto-inductive, tracking, virtual zone

Xiaofan Jiang; Chieh-Jan Mike Liang; Kaifei Chen; Ben Zhang; Jeff Hsu; Jie Liu; Bin Cao; Feng Zhao

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Automatic planning tool for deployment of indoor wireless local area networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an automatic planning software tool for indoor wireless networks. As a consequence of increasing number of wireless interface based systems, automation of deployments becomes actually relevant. There are a lot of parameters that influences ... Keywords: algorithms, network planning, wireless LAN

Mariano Molina García; Alfonso Fernandez-Durán; José I. Alonso

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Improving security applications using indoor location systems on wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fields in which companies are investing more money is security, either personal security to avoid industrial accidents or security against intrusions. There is also the huge effort that the scientific community is doing developing all required ... Keywords: IEEE 802.15.4, ILS, indoor location systems, security applications, wireless sensor networks

Josep Paradells; Jordi Vilaseca; Jordi Casademont

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Performance evaluation of indoor localization techniques based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of networks for indoor localization based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices is evaluated in terms of the accuracy, complexity, and costs. In the active device case, the terminal to be located measures the power transmitted ...

Damiano De Luca; Franco Mazzenga; Cristiano Monti; Marco Vari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A new method for indoor location base on radio frequency identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, there has dramatic proliferation of research concerned with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID). The RFID technologies are getting considerable attentions not only academic research but also the applications of enterprise. One of most ... Keywords: LANDMRC, RFID, RSS, indoor position location, location identification, powel level

Rung-Ching Chen; Sheng-Ling Huang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Design considerations of sub-mW indoor light energy harvesting for wireless sensor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For most wireless sensor networks, one common and major bottleneck is the limited battery lifetime. The frequent maintenance efforts associated with battery replacement significantly increase the system operational and logistics cost. Unnoticed power ... Keywords: Design consideration, PV cells wireless sensor node, energy harvesting, indoor light illuminance, maximum power point tracking, supercapacitor

W. S. Wang; T. O'Donnell; N. Wang; M. Hayes; B. O'Flynn; C. O'Mathuna

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Efficiency Projects for Office and Education Buildings Integrating Indoor Environmental Quality with Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose and Scope of this Report Many building owners and managers are under increased pressure from many circles to provide good indoor environmental quality (IEQ). There are many opportunities to advance IEQ during the course of energy projects without sacrificing energy efficiency. These opportunities

Integrating Indoor; Environmental Quality; Office Of Radiation; Indoor Air

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety, Excavation Safety, Scaffold Safety D. Cubillo: Division Database Programmer J. Durnan: Design. Horn (0.5) ORPS Categorizer S. Moss (Emeritus) S. Kane, Group Manager 9/7/10 Environment, Safety

278

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Title Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Finlayson, Elizabeth U., Ashok J. Gadgil, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Richard G. Sextro Journal Indoor Air Volume 14 Start Page Chapter Pagination 272-283 Abstract This paper reports on an investigation of the adequacy of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), using a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model, for predicting dispersion of neutrally buoyant gas in a large indoor space. We used CFD to predict pollutant (dye) concentration profiles in a water filled scale model of an atrium with a continuous pollutant source. Predictions from the RANS formulation are comparable to an ensemble average of independent identical experiments. Model results were compared to pollutant concentration data in a horizontal plane from experiments in a scale model atrium. Predictions were made for steady-state (fully developed) and transient (developing) pollutant concentrations. Agreement between CFD predictions and ensemble averaged experimental measurements is quantified using the ratios of CFD-predicted and experimentally measured dye concentration at a large number of points in the measurement plane. Agreement is considered good if these ratios fall between 0.5 and 2.0 at all points in the plane. The standard k-epsilon two equation turbulence model obtains this level of agreement and predicts pollutant arrival time to the measurement plane within a few seconds. These results suggest that this modeling approach is adequate for predicting isothermal pollutant transport in a large room with simple geometry

279

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Security Technologies Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Technologies Group. Welcome. Our group develops measurement science in support of performance-based standards ...

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

SciTech Connect

The research reported in this volume was undertaken during FY 1979 within the Energy & Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This volume will comprise a section of the Energy & Environment Division 1979 Annual Report, to be published in the summer of 1980. Work reported relate to: thermal performance of building envelopes; building ventilation and indoor air quality; a computer program for predicting energy use in buildings; study focused specifically on inherently energy intensive hospital buildings; energy efficient windows and lighting; potential for energy conservation and savings in the buildings sector; and evaluation of energy performance standards for residential buildings.

Authors, Various

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

PRIDE (Prediction In Dynamic Environments)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coordination. USARSim is an open source simulation environment which provides realistic environments. The environments ...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

285

Building and Environment - lbl.gov  

?lters for air cleaning in HVAC systems. The parallel aims for the air cleaning system were to enable reduced indoor exposures to volatile organic ...

286

Energy Crossroads: Industry & Professional Organizations | Environment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Consumer Information page for help with selecting AC contractors, how to make your home more comfortable, indoor air quality and much more. American Boiler Manufacturers...

287

Environment/Health/Safety/Security (EHSS): Industrial Hygiene Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do not enter signage Confined Space Program meter image Confined spaces are difficult to enter and exit, and are generally not designed for continuous human occupancy. When a confined space contains a hazard, they can be extremely dangerous. Every year there are a number of fatalities that occur from confined space accidents, and often this includes someone who was just trying to help rescue a coworker. Examples of confined spaces at the LBNL include round manholes, vaults, research vessels, tanks and ducts. The Confined Space Inventory provides a guide to these spaces. The LBNL procedures that must be followed to ensure your safety are in Chapter 34 of PUB 3000. If you, or a coworker, must enter a space that might be a confined space, become familiar with the LBNL procedures that are in place to protect your

288

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Emergency Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Safeguards & Security Management Home ISSM Plan Security at LBNL Clearance Holders Export Control International Visitors Security Updates Contact Us CI Awareness...

289

David Turner! NERSC User Services Group NERSC User Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

So;ware M odules - Doug J acobsen * Compilers - Mike S tewart --- 2 --- Login Nodes * Edison - Six n odes * 16 c ores, 2 .0GHz I ntel S andy B ridge * 512GB * Hopper - Eight n...

290

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dosimeter Information Sheet Dose Lookup Dosimeter image Dosimetry This laboratory provides a comprehensive range of dosimetry services. Personnel dose monitoring (OSL) Area...

291

Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety | Princeton Plasma Physics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact...

292

System and method for secure group transactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

Goldsmith, Steven Y. (Rochester, MN)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Grant Topic Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments. The group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the development of a consolidated funding vehicle for transportation activities, should DOE implement such a program. Some of the major issues under consideration by the Consolidated Grant

294

A model of an intelligent video-based security surveillance system for general indoor/outdoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a decade ago, simply recording a few minutes of CCTV footage required special hardware. Today, with the emergence of new sensors and improved processing hardware, a relatively inexpensive personal computer can process and store video in real-time, ... Keywords: background modelling, motion detection, object tracking, video surveillance

Wayne Chelliah Naidoo; Jules-Raymond Tapamo

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evaluation of indoor environment quality with a web-based occupant satisfaction survey: a case study in northern Italy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

640. 2. ASHRAE, USGBC, CIBSE. 2009. Performance MeasurementGreen Building Council) and CIBSE (Chartered Institution of

Peretti, Clara; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A; De Carli, Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on...

297

Statistical Analysis and Interpretation of Building Characterization, Indoor Environmental Quality Monitoring and Energy Usage Data from Office Buildings and Classrooms in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent tasks had been performed (Stetzenbach 2008, Stetzenbach 2008b, Stetzenbach 2009) to measure a variety of parameters in normative buildings across the United States. For each of these tasks 10 buildings were selected as normative indoor environments. Task 1 focused on office buildings, Task 13 focused on public schools, and Task 0606 focused on high performance buildings. To perform this task it was necessary to restructure the database for the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) data and the Sound measurement as several issues were identified and resolved prior to and during the transfer of these data sets into SPSS. During overview discussions with the statistician utilized in this task it was determined that because the selection of indoor zones (1-6) was independently selected within each task; zones were not related by location across tasks. Therefore, no comparison would be valid across zones for the 30 buildings so the by location (zone) data were limited to three analysis sets of the buildings within each task. In addition, differences in collection procedures for lighting were used in Task 0606 as compared to Tasks 01 & 13 to improve sample collection. Therefore, these data sets could not be merged and compared so effects by-day data were run separately for Task 0606 and only Task 01 & 13 data were merged. Results of the statistical analysis of the IEQ parameters show statistically significant differences were found among days and zones for all tasks, although no differences were found by-day for Draft Rate data from Task 0606 (p>0.05). Thursday measurements of IEQ parameters were significantly different from Tuesday, and most Wednesday measures for all variables of Tasks 1 & 13. Data for all three days appeared to vary for Operative Temperature, whereas only Tuesday and Thursday differed for Draft Rate 1m. Although no Draft Rate measures within Task 0606 were found to significantly differ by-day, Temperature measurements for Tuesday and Thursday showed variation. Moreover, Wednesday measurements of Relative Humidity within Task 0606 varied significantly from either Tuesday or Thursday. The majority of differences in IEQ measurements by-zone were highly significant (pschool buildings S02, S04, and S05, respectively. Although all tasks demonstrated significant differences in sound measurements by zone, some of the buil

Linda Stetzenbach; Lauren Nemnich; Davor Novosel

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Residential electricity use, wood use, and indoor temperature; An econometric model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lagged-dependent variable, simultaneous-equation system model of residential electricity use for space heating and other uses, wood use, and indoor temperature is presented. The model is specified by means of a five-element model-building framework developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Data were collected from 100 households that had end-use metering installed as part of the Hood River Conservation Project. The most important finding is that the dependent variables are relatively independent of each other. Model results also indicate that houses with central heating use more electricity for space heating and that households with favorable attitudes toward conservation prefer lower indoor temperatures and use less energy.

Tonn, B.E.; White, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Douglas Black  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Black Doug Black Indoor Environment Group Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90-3058 Berkeley CA 94720 Office...

300

Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Volume 43 Issue 1 Pagination 128-134 Date Published 102008 Keywords bayesian updating, environmental chemistry, exposure & risk group, indoor environment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Engineered Fire Safety Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered Fire Safety Group. Welcome. ... Employment/Research Opportunities. Contact. Jason Averill, Leader. Engineered Fire Safety Group. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energy Research Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group. Welcome. The newest Group in the CNST develops instruments designed to reveal the nanoscale ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Probing the Environment with Galaxy Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present various projects to study the halo dynamics of elliptical galaxies. This allows one to study the outer mass and orbital distributions of ellipticals in different environments, and the inner distributions of groups and clusters themselves.

Aaron J. Romanowsky

2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

305

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

306

An analysis of the differences between monitored indoor temperatures and reported thermostat settings  

SciTech Connect

We examined differences in reported winter thermostat settings and monitored temperatures, and contrasted those households with little difference, and those with a substantial difference. This analysis was conducted on households participating in Bonneville Power Administration's Residential Standards Demonstration Program (RSDP) in the Pacific Northwest. The reported thermostat settings were obtained from a survey of RSDP participants, and indoor temperatures were read from special recorders inside the house. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Vine, E.; Barnes, B.K.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Nanofabrication Research Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the accumulated emission from a large number of gas phase atoms ... local environmental properties of individual nanoparticles in liquid environments ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is focused on the analysis of indoor conditions for a new commercial building that will be constructed in an East-European country. Based on the initial HVAC design parameters the surface of the building was divided in thermal zones that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A dynamic variation of the PMV (Predicted Mean Vote Index) was obtained for different thermal zones of the building (retails stores, mall circulation, corridors) and in most of the cases the acceptable values of plus/minus 0.5 are exceeded. Among the most important energy efficiency measures it is mentioned a decrease of the heating set point temperature, increase of the walls and roof thermal resistance and the use of a heat recovery on the ventilation system. In this work it is demonstrated how simple measures can enhance the indoor conditions and reduce the energy consumption for this kind of construction.

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Environment, Safety & Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links ESSH Policy Site Environmental Reports Environmental Regulators Upton Ecological and Research Reserve Pollution Prevention Organizations ES&H Directorate Environmental Protection Division Environmental Restoration Division Safety & Health Services Other BNL Site Index Can't View PDFs? Environment, Safety & Health Brookhaven National Lab is committed to continual improvement in environmental, safety, security, and health (ESSH) performance. Full policy description. Restoration Projects Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor decommissioning, High Flux Beam Reactor decommissioning Groundwater Projects Peconic River Cleanup Peconic River Working Group Environmental Restoration Projects green tech ISB-inspired Greening Strategies for Your Home or Office Being green isn't rocket science. Several strategies that earned the ISB its LEED Gold certification can help reduce energy usage and make any building more environmentally friendly.

310

Elecnor Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elecnor Group Elecnor Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Elecnor Group Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28003 Product Engineering conglomerate - specialises in promotion and project administration for energy generation, electricity, installations, gas, telecoms, rail, the environment and water projects. Coordinates 40.4203°, -3.705774° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4203,"lon":-3.705774,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

HFIR Sample Environment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Sample Environment HFIR Sample Environment The Sample Environment Group provides equipment and support for studying materials under controlled conditions (temperature, pressure, magnetic field, chemical environment, etc.). When you come to HFIR to conduct an experiment, our front-line teams are there to support you. Although we currently offer a wide range of capabilities, we realize that these capabilities must continually grow. Therefore, we also have a busy research and development team, and we encourage you to partner with them to develop new equipment and techniques. The online Sample Environment Equipment Database allows you to search for information about the sample environment equipment available for HFIR instruments. Contact HFIR Team Leader Chris Redmon Resources Sample Environment Equipment Database

313

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Title Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2002 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Melissa M. Lunden, Tracy L. Thatcher, David Littlejohn, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Susanne V. Hering, Richard G. Sextro, and Nancy J. Brown Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms -- one in each pair -- based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

314

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

315

Evaluation of Indoor Air Quality Parameters and Airborne Fungal Spore Concentrations by Season and Type of HVAC System in a School Building.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An indoor air quality survey has been conducted in a school building. Samples were collected inone room in each wing and each level on a… (more)

McLeod, Jeffrey D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter experts concerned with secure transport of spent nuclear...

317

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

318

Energy and Environment Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy and Environment Division. ... Selected Publications. Measurement Science Roadmap for Net-Zero Energy Buildings. ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Lighting Group: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New in the Lighting Group For more information on what's new in the Lighting Group, please contact: Francis Rubinstein Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4096...

320

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

synchrotron research in a particular area. View monthly meetings on calendar Groups Catalysis Randall Winans, APS The Catalysis group meets at noon on the second Tuesday of each...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Groups defined by automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is Chapter 24 in the "AutoMathA" handbook. Finite automata have been used effectively in recent years to define infinite groups. The two main lines of research have as their most representative objects the class of automatic groups (including word-hyperbolic groups as a particular case) and automata groups (singled out among the more general self-similar groups). The first approach implements in the language of automata some tight constraints on the geometry of the group's Cayley graph, building strange, beautiful bridges between far-off domains. Automata are used to define a normal form for group elements, and to monitor the fundamental group operations. The second approach features groups acting in a finitely constrained manner on a regular rooted tree. Automata define sequential permutations of the tree, and represent the group elements themselves. The choice of particular classes of automata has often provided groups with exotic behaviour which have revolutioned our perception of infinite finitely ge...

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Bioanalytical Science Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioanalytical Science Group. Welcome. We provide the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

323

Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Research Group overview what's new publications software facilities people contact us links...

324

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS Syllabus: #15; The de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group: motivational ex- amples and special cases. The classical case, compact and discrete quantum groups. #15 for weights. #15; The general de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group and its basic consequences

Schürmann, Michael

326

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group | Focus Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

327

Parametric Evaluation of an Innovative Ultra-Violet PhotocatalyticOxidation (UVPCO) Air Cleaning Technology for Indoor Applications  

SciTech Connect

An innovative Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaning technology employing a semitransparent catalyst coated on a semitransparent polymer substrate was evaluated to determine its effectiveness for treating mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) representative of indoor environments at low, indoor-relevant concentration levels. The experimental UVPCO contained four 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths irradiated with nine UVA lamps arranged in three banks. A parametric evaluation of the effects of monolith thickness, air flow rate through the device, UV power, and reactant concentrations in inlet air was conducted for the purpose of suggesting design improvements. The UVPCO was challenged with three mixtures of VOCs. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. The third mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single-pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor. Thirteen experiments were conducted in total. In this UVPCO employing a semitransparent monolith design, an increase in monolith thickness is expected to result in general increases in both reaction efficiencies and absolute reaction rates for VOCs oxidized by photocatalysis. The thickness of individual monolith panels was varied between 1.2 and 5 cm (5 to 20 cm total thickness) in experiments with the office mixture. VOC reaction efficiencies and rates increased with monolith thickness. However, the analysis of the relationship was confounded by high reaction efficiencies in all configurations for a number of compounds. These reaction efficiencies approached or exceeded 90% for alcohols, glycol ethers, and other individual compounds including d-limonene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. This result implies a reaction efficiency of about 30% per irradiated monolith face, which is in agreement with the maximum efficiency for the system predicted with a simulation model. In these and other experiments, the performance of the system for highly reactive VOCs appeared to be limited by mass transport of reactants to the catalyst surface rather than by photocatalytic activity. Increasing the air flow rate through the UVPCO device decreases the residence time of the air in the monoliths and improves mass transfer to the catalyst surface. The effect of gas velocity was examined in four pairs of experiments in which the air flow rate was varied from approximately 175 m{sup 3}/h to either 300 or 600 m{sup 3}/h. Increased gas velocity caused a decrease in reaction efficiency for nearly all reactive VOCs. For all of the more reactive VOCs, the decrease in performance was less, and often substantially less, than predicted based solely on residence time, again likely due to mass transfer limitations at the low flow rate. The results demonstrate that the UVPCO is capable of achieving high conversion efficiencies for reactive VOCs at air flow rates above the base experimental rate of 175 m{sup 3}/h. The effect of UV power was examined in a series of experiments with the building product mixture in which the number of lamps was varied between nine and three. For the most reactive VOCs in the mixture, the effects of UV power were surprisingly small. Thus, even with only one lamp in each section, there appears to be sufficient photocatalytic activity to decompose most of the mass of reactive VOCs that reach the catalyst surface. For some less reactive VOCs, the trend of decreasing efficiency with decreasing UV intensity was in general agreement with simulation model predictions.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy Research Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group Staff. ... Nikolai Zhitenev, Group Leader Nikolai Zhitenev is the Group Leader of the CNST Energy Research Group. ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the influence of Indoor Environmental Quality, [IEQ] requirements associated with occupation regimes on the criterion of energy demand s for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning) central systems that were constructed for student hostels as a residential building in Cairo, Egypt. The paper focuses on the effects of occupation rate profiles with IEQ thermal parameters; (those are air dry-bulb temperatures, relative humidity, fresh air requirements, and local air velocities), on yearly energy demands. It is applied on, in-service, real project as a case study "10-Stories Hostel of 6000 m2 built-up area" that is utilized by Non-Local students as a transferred Egyptian citizens [ EC ] from different governorates. It was concluded that. during energy simulation, occupation rate schedules and operation profiles for each source of heat inside space shall simulate the reality. These profiles and schedules should be added to the local energy code as a guideline for designers. Although in this case study results from simulation task reach the real bills, but sometimes, with multi-use apartments there is another required schedule for the Pre-Action days. Those days before holidays and feasts on which the air conditioning system shall operate in a certain procedure for cleaning or scavenging. Another important issue is the effect of Effective Temperatures [ET] (Temperature for constant thermal sensations) that could implement to reduce the cooling capacity by increasing the room temperature against indoor relative humidity for the same comfort sensation. These two concepts will save 17% to 22% of the project total energy demand, In addition to introducing new design criteria for acceptable indoor conditions in the new rural developed zones in Egypt and similar regions.

Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Geographical, spatial, and temporal distributions of multiple indoor air pollutants in four Chinese provinces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to indoor air pollution from household energy use depends on fuel, stove, housing characteristics, and stove use behavior. Three important indoor air pollutants - respirable particles (RPM), carbon monoxide (CO), and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) were monitored for a total of 457 household-days in four poor provinces in China (Gansu, 129 household-days; Guizhou, 127 household-days; Inner Mongolia, 65 household-days; and Shaanxi, 136 household-days), in two time intervals during the heating season to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of pollution. The two provinces where biomass is the primary fuel (Inner Mongolia and Gansu) had the highest RPM concentrations (719 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in the single cooking/living/bedroom in Inner Mongolia in December and 351-661 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Gansu); lower RPM concentration were observed in the primarily coal-burning provinces of Guizhou and Shaanxi (202-352 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 187-361 {mu}g/m{sup 3} in different rooms and months in Guizhou and Shaanxi, respectively). Inner Mongolia and Gansu also had higher CO concentrations. Among the two primarily coal-burning provinces, Guizhou had lower concentrations of CO than Shaanxi. In the two coal-burning provinces, SO{sub 2} concentrations were substantially higher in Shaanxi than in Guizhou. Relative concentrations in different rooms and provinces indicate that in the northern provinces heating is an important source of exposure to indoor pollutants from energy use. Day-to-day variability of concentrations within individual households, although substantial, was smaller than variation across households. The implications of the findings for designing environmental health interventions in each province are discussed. 21 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Yinlong Jin; Zheng Zhou; Gongli He [and others] [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). National Institute for Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Experience on Commissioning of Heating/Cooling System and Thermal/Air Quality Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses how the commissioning process should be and the related problems, through a case study of a residential house. The items to be commissioned, measurement methods and the commissioning results are shown. Through the commissioning process, the problems pertaining to residential houses, such as the measurement problems, are clarified and the importance of commissioning established. Development of a simple and appropriate measuring method, monitoring of energy consumption and the verification of that value based on a standard value, enhancement of the resident's interest in the indoor environment and energy consumption and attention to their life style require future study.

Hokoi, S.; Miura, H.; Huang, Y.; Nakahara, N.; Iwamae, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Rational subsets of groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This text, Chapter 23 in the "AutoMathA" handbook, is devoted to the study of rational subsets of groups, with particular emphasis on the automata-theoretic approach to finitely generated subgroups of free groups. Indeed, Stallings' construction, associating a finite inverse automaton with every such subgroup, inaugurated a complete rewriting of free group algorithmics, with connections to other fields such as topology or dynamics. Another important vector in the chapter is the fundamental Benois' Theorem, characterizing rational subsets of free groups. The theorem and its consequences really explain why language theory can be successfully applied to the study of free groups. Rational subsets of (free) groups can play a major role in proving statements (a priori unrelated to the notion of rationality) by induction. The chapter also includes related results for more general classes of groups, such as virtually free groups or graph groups.

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Population and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Coastal and Marine Environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Energy, Air Pollution or growth. Indeed, an overlay of graphs depicting global trends in population, energy consumption, carbon; coastal and marine environments; and energy, air pollu- tion, and climate change. In the concluding

334

Progress on building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a physically-based, semi-empirical model that describes the concentration of indoor concentration of PM-2.5 (particle mass that is less than 2.5 microns in diameter) and its sulfate, nitrate, organic and black carbon constituents, derived from outdoor sources. We have established the methodology and experimental plan for building the model. Experimental measurements in residential style houses, in Richmond and Fresno, California, are being conducted to provide parameters for and evaluation of this model. The model will be used to improve estimates of human exposures to PM-2.5 of outdoor origin. The objectives of this study are to perform measurement and modeling tasks that produce a tested, semi-mechanistic description of chemical species-specific and residential PM-2.5 arising from the combination of outdoor PM and gas phase sources (HNO{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}), and indoor gas phase (e.g. NH{sub 3}) sources. We specifically address how indoor PM is affected by differences between indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. In addition, we are interested in losses of particles within the building and as they migrate through the building shell. The resulting model will be general enough to predict probability distributions for species-specific indoor concentrations of PM-2.5 based on outdoor PM, and gas phase species concentrations, meteorological conditions, building construction characteristics, and HVAC operating conditions. Controlled intensive experiments were conducted at a suburban research house located in Clovis, California. The experiments utilized a large suite of instruments including conventional aerosol, meteorological and house characterization devices. In addition, two new instruments were developed providing high time resolution for the important particulate species of nitrate, sulfate, and carbon as well as important gaseous species including ammonia and nitric acid. Important initial observations include the result that, with rare exceptions, there is virtually no nitrate found inside the house. This nitrate appears to dissociate into ammonia and nitric acid with the nitric acid quickly depositing out. Initial model development has included work on characterizing penetration and deposition rates, the dynamic behavior of the indoor/outdoor ratio, and predicting infiltration rates. Results from the exploration of the indoor/outdoor ratio show that the traditional assumption of steady state conditions does not hold in general. Many values of the indoor/outdoor ratio exist for any single value of the infiltration rate. Successful prediction of the infiltration rate from measured driving variables is important for extending the results from the Clovis house to the larger housing stock.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Littlejohn, David; Fischer, Marc L.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Brown, Nancy J.; Hering, Susanne

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Statistical Analysis and Interpretation of Building Characterization, Indoor Environmental Quality Monitoring and Energy Usage Data from Office Buildings and Classrooms in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Three independent tasks had been performed (Stetzenbach 2008, Stetzenbach 2008b, Stetzenbach 2009) to measure a variety of parameters in normative buildings across the United States. For each of these tasks 10 buildings were selected as normative indoor environments. Task 1 focused on office buildings, Task 13 focused on public schools, and Task 0606 focused on high performance buildings. To perform this task it was necessary to restructure the database for the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) data and the Sound measurement as several issues were identified and resolved prior to and during the transfer of these data sets into SPSS. During overview discussions with the statistician utilized in this task it was determined that because the selection of indoor zones (1-6) was independently selected within each task; zones were not related by location across tasks. Therefore, no comparison would be valid across zones for the 30 buildings so the by location (zone) data were limited to three analysis sets of the buildings within each task. In addition, differences in collection procedures for lighting were used in Task 0606 as compared to Tasks 01 & 13 to improve sample collection. Therefore, these data sets could not be merged and compared so effects by-day data were run separately for Task 0606 and only Task 01 & 13 data were merged. Results of the statistical analysis of the IEQ parameters show statistically significant differences were found among days and zones for all tasks, although no differences were found by-day for Draft Rate data from Task 0606 (p>0.05). Thursday measurements of IEQ parameters were significantly different from Tuesday, and most Wednesday measures for all variables of Tasks 1 & 13. Data for all three days appeared to vary for Operative Temperature, whereas only Tuesday and Thursday differed for Draft Rate 1m. Although no Draft Rate measures within Task 0606 were found to significantly differ by-day, Temperature measurements for Tuesday and Thursday showed variation. Moreover, Wednesday measurements of Relative Humidity within Task 0606 varied significantly from either Tuesday or Thursday. The majority of differences in IEQ measurements by-zone were highly significant (p<0.001), with the exception of Relative Humidity in some buildings. When all task data were combined (30 buildings) neither the airborne culturable fungi nor the airborne non-culturable spore data differed in the concentrations found at any indoor location in terms of day of collection. However, the concentrations of surface-associated fungi varied among the day of collection. Specifically, there was a lower concentration of mold on Tuesday than on Wednesday, for all tasks combined. As expected, variation was found in the concentrations of both airborne culturable fungi and airborne non-culturable fungal spores between indoor zones (1-6) and the outdoor zone (zone 0). No variation was found among the indoor zones of office buildings for Task 1 in the concentrations of airborne culturable fungi. However, airborne non-culturable spores did vary among zones in one building in Task 1 and variation was noted between zones in surface-associated fungi. Due to the lack of multiple lighting measurements for Tasks 13 and 0606, by-day comparisons were only performed for Task 1. No statistical differences were observed in lighting with respect to the day of collection. There was a wide range of variability by-zone among seven of the office buildings. Although few differences were found for the brightest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcBrtst) and the darkest illumination of the worksurface (IllumWkSfcDrkst) in Task 1, there was considerable variation for these variables in Task 13 and Task 0606 (p < 0.001). Other variables that differed by-zone in Task 13 include CombCCT and AmbCCT1 for S03, S07, and S08. Additionally, AmbChromX1, CombChromY, and CombChromX varied by-zone for school buildings S02, S04, and S05, respectively. Although all tasks demonstrated significant differences in sound measurements by zone, some of the buil

Linda Stetzenbach; Lauren Nemnich; Davor Novosel

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Computing environment logbook  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

337

Student Common Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Students interested in the oils and fats industry make valuable networking connections by joining the AOCS Student Common Interest Group. Student Common Interest Group Student Membership achievement aocs application award awards distinguished divi

338

Quantum Chevalley groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to construct quantum analogues of Chevalley groups inside completions of quantum groups or, more precisely, inside completions of Hall algebras of finitary categories.

Berenstein, Arkady

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Brazil's hot humid climate zone. Building and Environmentin moderate thermal climate zones. Building and EnvironmentBrazil's hot humid climate zone. Building and Environment,

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant cooling is credited with improving energy efficiency and enhancing the comfort level as an alternative method of space cooling in mild and dry climates, according to recent research. Since radiant cooling panels lack the capability to remove latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies the dehumidification processes of solid desiccant systems and investigates the factors that affect the humidity levels of a radiantly cooled space. Hourly indoor humidity is simulated at eight different operating conditions in a radiantly cooled test-bed office. The simulation results show that infiltration and ventilation flow rates are the main factors affecting indoor humidity level and energy consumption in a radiantly cooled space with relatively constant occupancy. It is found that condensation is hard to control in a leaky office operated with the required ventilation rate. Slightly pressurizing the space is recommended for radiant cooling. The energy consumption simulation shows that a passive desiccant wheel can recover about 50% of the ventilation load.

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Microanalysis Research Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Microanalysis Research Group Staff. ... Joseph M. Conny, Research Chemist. Jeff M. Davis, Materials Research Engineer. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Retrieval Group Digital Video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site is no longer in use and will soon disappear entirely. The Retrieval Group Information Access Division Last updated ...

344

RF & Microwave Systems Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions to Challenging Problems · Robust Communications in Extreme Environments · Tagging, Tracking-mail: ewingpd@ornl.gov Core R&D Area Tagging, Tracking, and Locating · Theater Positioning Systems

345

Working Group 7 Summary  

SciTech Connect

The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Environments of SLACS Gravitational Lenses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on an investigation of the environments of the SLACS sample of gravitational lenses. The local and global environments of the lenses are characterized using SDSS photometry and, when available, spectroscopy. We find that the lens systems that are best modelled with steeper than isothermal density profiles are more likely to have close companions than lenses with shallower than isothermal profiles. This suggests that the profile steepening may be caused by interactions with a companion galaxy as indicated by N-body simulations of group galaxies. The global environments of the SLACS lenses are typical of non-lensing SDSS galaxies with comparable properties to the lenses, and the richnesses of the lens groups are not as strongly correlated with the lens density profiles as the local environments. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of line-of-sight contamination affecting the lens models but do not find a significant over-density of sources compared to lines of sight without lenses.

M. W. Auger

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect

In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}5}, and 10{sup {minus}5} respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10{sup {minus}5}, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

Morrison, Glenn C.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NERSC Modules Software Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment » Modules Environment Environment » Modules Environment Modules Software Environment NERSC uses the module utility to manage nearly all software. There are two huge advantages of the module approach: NERSC can provide many different versions and/or installations of a single software package on a given machine, including a default version as well as several older and newer versions; and Users can easily switch to different versions or installations without having to explicitly specify different paths. With modules, the MANPATH and related environment variables are automatically managed. Users simply ``load'' and ``unload'' modules to control their environment. The module utility consists of two parts: the module command itself and the modulefiles on which it operates. Module Command

349

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ventilation Systems Using Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers G.9. Formaldehyde 10. Heat Exchangers 11. Indoor Air Qualityparticle-gas mixture as a heat exchanger. Work will continue

Cairns, E.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy and the environment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Work on the `Energy and the Environment` project has been focused on completion of two interrelated efforts: (1) development, production, and installation of energy related exhibits in the Ecology and Environment gallery, and (2) creation and implementation of the `Energy Backpack` program. The Energy exhibits have been available to over 1.5 million visitors since the opening of the new St. Louis Science Center. The `Energy Backpack` program will be implemented with students, teachers, and family groups this fall.

1992-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Organizational Reference Groups: A Missing Perspective on Social Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces and empirically explores the concept of an organizational reference group: the set of people an individual perceives as belonging to his or her work environment that defines the social world of work in which he or she engages. The ... Keywords: career achievement, career expectations, career referents, cognition, organizational reference groups, perception, reference groups, social context, social networks

Barbara S. Lawrence

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 535 HVAC filters as "passive" samplers: fate analysis of indoor particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 535 HVAC filters as "passive" samplers: fate analysis: fedenoris@mail.utexas.edu SUMMARY To assess the potential use of HVAC filters as passive indoor samplers, exfiltration, and capture in the HVAC filter. The results suggest that large particles are likely to deposit

Siegel, Jeffrey

353

An Experimental Study of RSS-Based Indoor Localization Using Nonparametric Belief Propagation Based on Spanning Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonparametric belief propagation (NBP) is the well-known method for cooperative localization in wireless sensor networks. It is capable to provide information about location estimation with appropriate uncertainty and to accommodate non-Gaussian distance ... Keywords: Indoor localization, nonparametric belief propagation, spanning tree, breadth first search, sensor networks

Vladimir Savic; Adrián Población; Santiago Zazo; Mariano García

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study  

SciTech Connect

Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Interagency Advanced Power Group, Solar Working Group: Meeting minutes  

SciTech Connect

This report is the minutes of the Solar Working group. The meeting was prompted by the Steering Group`s desire to resolve issues the Solar Working Group.

Not Available

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Indoor Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency response systems in particular require that mobile rescue devices inside a building maintain connectivity to at least three base stations ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

358

Parking Infrastructure and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affects energy demand, the environment, and the social costEngineering and the Built Environment, and A ffiliatespread throughout the built environment. However, LCA is a

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Aprad; Madanat, Samer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Trails Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet and non-motorized alternatives between the Townsite and LANL or between technical areas. The Trails Working Group, established in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA Los

360

1451 Group 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It defines a set of implementaition-independent application programming interface (API) as needed. Website: http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/1451/0/.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR FEEDBACK HOME About the Community Advisory...

362

Image Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Group works to support the needs for Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-12 and the Personal Identity Verification (PIV) card for ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Grid Integration Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Group The Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducts research that advances the near-term adoption of demand response (DR) technologies, policies, programs,...

364

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

365

Electron Physics Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Group conducts wide ranging, cross-disciplinary research ... phenomenon known as spin transfer torque, a ... energy and generates heat, creating two ...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

NERSC Users Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group Teleconferences Annual Meetings NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Operations...

368

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis High Pressure LiquidSoft-Matter Surface Scattering Powder Diffraction SAXS Surface & Interface Scattering XAS X-ray Micros.Imaging Scientific Interest Groups...

369

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Email information on Indian 101 course to Tribal Topic Group * Government panel at future TEC on impacts of broader hazmat transportation spectrum * Set up next conference...

370

MEMS Test Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... p2. Top view of cantilevers in in-plane length group. p1. Unconventional anchor design. Same anchor design as in thickness test structures. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

371

Particle Data Group - Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group HOME: pdgLive Summary Tables Reviews, Tables, Plots Particle Listings Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Pakistan, Russia and all other countries For copies of: ...

372

Standards Working Groups - Logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... group is to define practices and test methods related to the overall deployment procedures and constraints in place for emergency response. ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

TMS Group Savings Plus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A money-saving group discount on auto and homeowners policies; Convenient payment plans Including automatic checking account deduction or direct home ...

374

Fermi UNIX trademark environment  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of UNIX at Fermilab involves multiple platforms and multiple vendors. Additionally, a single user may have to use more than one platform. This heterogeneity and multiplicity makes it necessary to define a Fermilab environment for UNIX so that as much as possible the systems look and feel'' the same. We describe our environment, including both the commercial products and the local tools used to support it. Other products designed for the UNIX environment are also described. 19 refs.

Nicholls, J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Environment/Climate Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... exercises for environmental contaminants in marine specimens were administered in 2007/2008 by the … more. >> see all Environment/Climate ...

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Ideal Environment - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... would surely thrive within the conditions outlined above. That said, there are formidable difficulties to providing and maintaining such an ideal environment.

377

Environment | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Atmospheric and Climate Science Ecological Resources and Systems Environmental Security and Restoration Land and Renewable Resources Radiation and Chemical Risk...

378

Transportation and handling environment  

SciTech Connect

The elements of the environment relating to transportation and handling include temperature, solar radiation, precipitation, humidity, pressure, shock, and vibration. While each of these deserves consideration, the latter two, shock and vibration, are perhaps the least understood. The report discusses all of these elements, but concentrates largely on shock and vibration. Emphasis is upon the necessity of understanding both the product and the environment. To that end, descriptions of the environment which have been derived statistically are discussed. Land, sea, and air transport are considered. Current knowledge of the handling environment is indicated.

Gens, M.B.

1972-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electron Physics Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Physics Group Staff. ... Jabez McClelland, Group Leader Jabez McClelland is the Group Leader of the CNST Electron Physics Group. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Total human exposure and indoor air quality: an automated bibliography (BLIS) with summary abstracts. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bibliographic Literature Information System (BLIS) is a computerized data base with brief abstracts that comprehensively reviews literature on total human exposure to environmental pollution. Unpublished draft reports are listed, as well as final reports of the U.S. Government and other countries, reports by governmental research contractors, journal articles, and other contributions. The bibliography covers publications on exposure models, new field data, and newly emerging research methodologies. Although the bibliography covers the entire field of human-exposure methodology, emphasis is on those field studies measuring all the concentrations to which people may be exposed, including indoors, outdoors, or in-transit. Versions of the data base are available on floppy diskettes that can be accessed on MS-DOS computers with two-floppy-disk or hard-disk systems.

Shackelford, J.M.; Ott, W.R.; Wallace, L.A.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Automatic monitoring of selected indoor air parameters at three apartment complexes  

SciTech Connect

The impact of three different ventilation systems on the temperature and humidity of three similar apartment complexes is investigated in this study. Each complex has six apartments. The ventilation systems are: natural ventilation, mechanical exhaust ventilation, and mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation. The computer controlled data collection system measures the ventilation rate, relative humidity, indoor air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, outdoor temperature, and humidity. The air change rate depends mainly on the habits of the tenants. The mean air change rate of the houses was between 0.1 to 0.8 ac/h. Great daily variation of the air exchange was observed in the data. Negative correlation between relative humidity and ventilation was very significant in 27 out of 47 cases. Only two cases had very significant positive correlation between ventilation and humidity. Mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation have the greatest variation in ventilation/relative humidity relations.

Savolainen, T.; Raunemaa, T (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Wellman, K. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Helsinki (Finland))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Air levels and mutagenicity of PM-10 in an indoor ice arena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report here their results from a preliminary study to evaluate a methodology for surveying air quality by measuring concentrations of PM-10 and the corresponding concentrations of mutagenic activity. The PM-10 was collected, during several hockey games at an ice arena using an Indoor Air Sampling Impactor (IASI) developed by Marple et al. During the course of the study, smoking restrictions were imposed in the stadium and the impact of these restrictions on PM-10 levels was also evaluated. The mutagenic activities of solvent extracts of the PM-10 were determined using the microsuspension modification of the Samonella typhimurium/microsome test. Mutagenic activity has often been used as a rough index of exposure to potential carcinogens and mutagens and to help define their sources.

Georghiou, P.E.; Blagden, P.A. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. Johns (Canada)); Snow, D.A.; Winsor, L. (Geortec Ltd., St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada)); Williams, D.T. (Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A triple hot-wire system for indoor air flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The application of a home made, triple hot-wire system in indoor air flow measurements is presented. Both the anemometer and sensor have been developed at Athens University with the aim to provide a reliable, research tool of reasonable cost, simple construction, and satisfactory performance. All three velocity components above a threshold of 10 cm s{sup {minus}1} can be measured. The system is also equipped with two thermometers for measuring the mean and fluctuating air temperature and for providing a means of temperature compensation of the hot wires` signal. After evaluation of the system in the laboratory, it was used in the measurement of the velocity profile of flows driven by the temperature difference between two internal zones. The implied accuracy of the method allows for its integration with measurements of air volume exchange rates between internal zones, as estimated by tracer gas techniques.

Papadopoulos, K.H.; Soilemes, A.T.; Helmis, C.G.; Santamouris, M.; Dascalaki, E. [Univ. of Athens (Greece); Asimakopoulos, D.N. [Univ. of Athens (Greece)]|[National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment; Argiriou, A. [National Observatory of Athens (Greece). Inst. of Meteorology and Physics of the Atmospheric Environment

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

On A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups. Using homotopy invariance of group homology in one variable, we identify the sections of A^1-fundamental group sheaves of an isotropic reductive group G over an infinite field k with the second homology group of the group G(k). This provides explicit loops representing elements in the A^1-fundamental groups.

Konrad Voelkel; Matthias Wendt

385

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) are the primary USGCRP vehicles for implementing and coordinating research activities within and across agencies. These groups are critical to Program integration and in assessing the Program's progress. The working groups span a wide range of interconnected issues of climate and global change, and address major components of the Earth's environmental and human systems, as well as cross-disciplinary approaches for addressing these issues. IWGs correspond to program functions and are designed to bring agencies together to plan and develop coordinated activities, implement joint activities, and identify and fill gaps in the Program's plans. They allow public officials to communicate with each other on emerging directions within their agencies, on their stakeholder needs, and on best practices learned from agency activities. Together, these functions allow the agencies to work in a more coordinated and effective manner.

386

Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Steering Group Report Fermilab Director Pier Oddone convened the Fermilab Steering Group in March 2007. Members comprised particle and accelerator scientists from Fermilab and the national community. Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim served as chair. The Steering Group subsequently formed subgroups to provide advice on the best physics opportunities that new facilities could offer. These subgroups drew upon university and laboratory scientists largely from outside Fermilab. The Steering Group took a number of steps to obtain as much input as possible from a broad spectrum of the U.S. particle- and accelerator-physics community. The Steering Group chair gave presentations and conducted town-hall-style sessions at meetings of all the major collaborations at Fermilab (CDF, DZero, MINOS, MINERνA,

387

Topic Group Participants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Group Report Topic Group Report Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group April 5, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona Recent 180(c) Topic Group Activities Issue Papers 1. Funding Distribution Method 2. Allowable Activities 3. Definitions 4. Pass-Through Requirements 5. Contingency Plans 6. 180(c) Policy or Rulemaking 7. Timing and Eligibility* 8. Funding for Related Activities* 9. State Fees* 10. Funding Allocation Approach* 180(c) Policy & Procedures * Executive Summary * Draft Policy & Procedures * Draft Grant Application Pckg * Appendix *Papers 7-10 still under discussion Today's Discussion Items * Reviewed Topic Group member comments on a variety of issues * Key issues included: - Funding allocation and timing of grants - Planning grants - State fees/matching requirements - Related non-training activities

388

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group May 17, 2007 January 16, 2007 August 31,...

391

Environment and Climate in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory's work in the areas of environment and climate ... soil, atmosphere, marine and aquatic environments, and environmental threats, and ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

E3: Economy, Energy Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E3: Economy, Energy, and Environment. "Our goal is to ... in 2012. Download E3: Economy, Energy, Environment. For more ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) (Redirected from Stockholm Environment Institute) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stockholm Environment Institute Name Stockholm Environment...

394

Environment, Safety, Health, & Security | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers/ Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Environment, Safety, Health, & Security About PPPL ESH&S The Environment, Safety, Health, & Security Department provides safety oversight and assistance for the wide variety of plasma and fusion research projects undertaken at the Laboratory as well as stewardship for the environment and our property and assets. The department is comprised of four divisions: Environmental Services, Safety, Health Physics, and Site

395

SI Group Scheduling Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personnel On-Call Page Beamline Validation Schedule Group Organizational Chart Reviews Presentations Group Scheduling Page Project Scheduling Information Ops Scheduling Info Project / Scheduling Info APS fy2005 Annual Schedule ( html ) PSS Validation Schedule APS fy2006 Annual Schedule (html) PSS Validation Teams Latest Machine Studies Schedule (pdf) (html) New Builds Schedule (For SI GROUP Reference Only) Parasitic Beam Operations Schedule Ops Scheduling Page Shutdown Information Work Schedules August/September Shutdown Shutdown Work List Validation Schedule Safety Info Work Request Links ISM Core Functions Enter / Search Work Requests APS Safety Page Modify / Approve Work Requests Radiation Safety Policy APS TMS Training Profiles MSDS Search This page maintained by Joe Budz

396

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Group Steering Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania Joel Butler Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sally Dawson Brookhaven National Laboratory Helen Edwards Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Himel Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stephen Holmes Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Young-Kee Kim, Chair Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory/ University of Chicago Andrew Lankford University of California, Irvine David McGinnis Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sergei Nagaitsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Vladimir Shiltsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Maury Tigner Cornell University Hendrik Weerts Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Neutrino Physics Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania

397

Group key management  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Chemical Reference Data Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Reference Data Group. Welcome. The Chemical Reference Data Group compiles, evaluates, correlates and measures ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Welcome. The Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group conducts research in ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

400

Cyber Infrastructure Group Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Infrastructure Group. Welcome. The Cyber Infrastructure Group (775.04) addresses the integration and interoperability ...

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NIST Laser Applications Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Group. Welcome. The Laser Applications Group advances laser technology for applications in optical ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Dr. Marc Salit (Group Leader). Autumn ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

Simplifying Component Development in an Integrated Groupware Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

components. Our solution, based on Tcl/Tk and GroupKit, uses multiple interpreters and a shared window in different environments. KEYWORDS: Groupware, CSCW, Tcl/Tk, GroupKit, component architecture INTRODUCTION developed in Tcl/Tk. GroupKit has been shown to be useful in developing stand- alone groupware applications

Greenberg, Saul

404

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

405

Focus Group I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF ATTITUDES IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA Sheila K. Hanson, Energy & Environmental Research Center Daniel J. Daly, Energy & Environmental Research Center Edward N. Steadman, Energy & Environmental Research Center John A. Harju, Energy & Environmental Research Center June 2005 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In April 2005, representatives of the Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, held two focus groups in Williston, North Dakota. A total of sixteen people participated; seven on April 20 and nine on April 21. The purpose of the focus group research was to gain insight into the public perception of carbon sequestration from

406

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

407

File Groups at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another user "jimi", but does not want other members of bigsci to be able to see the data, the PI for Big Science could create a new group (for example, "ejdata", for elvis...

408

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

page 1 - Go to home page 2 - Go to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR...

409

The Ren Group - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ren Group Home Research Members Publications ContactsLinks NEWS Dec 15, 2012 Host an Electron Tomography Workshop with Peter Ercius at NCEM from Jan. 16-18th, 2013. Nov 20, 2012...

410

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK Top B. Krusche Institute of Physics University of Basel CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland Top Yu. Kuyanov COMPAS Group IHEP Protvino, RU-142284...

411

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

412

European Environment Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Agency Environment Agency Jump to: navigation, search Logo: European Environment Agency Name European Environment Agency Address Kongens Nytorv 6 1050 Place Copenhagen, Denmark Phone number (+45) 33 36 71 00 Website http://www.eea.europa.eu/ Coordinates 55.6811436°, 12.5866457° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.6811436,"lon":12.5866457,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Topic Group Summary - July 1999...

414

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup Tracking Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup...

415

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAGIS Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries TRAGIS Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup April 11, 2006 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

416

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

417

Why Sequence a Group 4 Verrucomicrobium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Group 4 Verrucomicrobium? a Group 4 Verrucomicrobium? It is a disturbing reality that we have only fragmentary understanding of the enormous microbial diversity that exists on our planet. This applies not merely to microbes living in extreme environments, which would be expected to possess unusual and perhaps not yet fully characterized properties, but also to those microbes in more mundane habitats, like a gram of soil. One bacterial phylum that has few cultivated representatives, but is found routinely in clone libraries of amplified 16S rRNA genes, is Verrucomicrobia. More than 200 unique verrucomicrobial 16S rRNA genes have been identified from terrestrial and aquatic environments and associated with a variety of eukaryotic hosts. The Verrucomicrobia, most of whose sequences are more than 75% identical to one another, form a monophyletic

418

Edison Programming Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

unless your code in some way relies on the PGI compilers. The default programming environment on Edison uses the Intel compiler suite. Cray and GNU compilers are also available....

419

Severe Convective Wind Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nontornadic thunderstorm winds from long-lived, widespread convective windstorms can have a tremendous impact on human lives and property. To examine environments that support damaging wind producing convection, sounding parameters from Rapid ...

Evan L. Kuchera; Matthew D. Parker

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Development Languages and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It combines many of the best features of the standard UNiX working environment like C, sed, awk, csh and sh. Similar to sh and csh, it is used as a scripting ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Environment Feature Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Environment Feature Stories /community-environment/_assets/images/icon_earthday.jpg Environment Feature Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will clean up the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. - 7/10/13 Haze of smoke emanating from the 2011 Las Conchas, NM fire. Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted They suggest that fire emissions could contribute a lot more to the

422

Visualization Design Environment  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the performance and capabilities of computer software and hardware system, combined with advances in Internet technologies, have spurred innovative developments in the area of modeling, simulation and visualization. These developments combine to make it possible to create an environment where engineers can design, prototype, analyze, and visualize components in virtual space, saving the time and expenses incurred during numerous design and prototyping iterations. The Visualization Design Centers located at Sandia National Laboratories are facilities built specifically to promote the ''design by team'' concept. This report focuses on designing, developing and deploying this environment by detailing the design of the facility, software infrastructure and hardware systems that comprise this new visualization design environment and describes case studies that document successful application of this environment.

Pomplun, A.R.; Templet, G.J.; Jortner, J.N.; Friesen, J.A.; Schwegel, J.; Hughes, K.R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Interactive collaborative media environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual reality (VR) provides a revolutionary interface between man and machine. However, present display and interface peripherals limit the potential of virtual environments within many activities or scenarios. Mainstream immersive VR is centred on ...

D. M. Traill; J. D. Bowshill; P. J. Lawrence

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Environment induced incoherent controllability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the environment induced entanglement between two non interacting, two-dimensional quantum systems S and P can be used to control the dynamics of S by means of the initial state of P. Using a simple, exactly solvable model, we show that both accessibility and controllability of S can be achieved under suitable conditions on the interaction of S and P with the environment.

Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

425

Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

The China Energy Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The China Energy Group A city-owned cogeneration plant, built in 1989 in Weihai, Shandong, received an award from the Chinese government as an advanced energy-efficient enterprise. The Energy Analysis Program's China Energy Group-a core team of four Mandarin-speaking U.S. and Chinese researchers, plus leader Mark Levine and a dozen other staff members-has worked closely with energy policymakers in China for nearly a decade. Their goal is to better understand the dynamics of energy use in China and to develop and enhance the capabilities of institutions that promote energy efficiency in that country. This unique collaboration began as a joint effort with the Energy Research Institute of China's State Planning Commission, but the Group's network has expanded to

427

DOE STGWG Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STGWG Group STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas. The tribal membership is composed of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Navajo Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Santa Clara Pueblo, Pueblo de San Ildefonso, Seneca Nation of Indians, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the

428

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizing Framework Organizing Framework CAG Organizing Framework The Community Advisory Group Organizing Framework is composed of three primary components: CAG Purpose and Charge CAG Member Responsibilities Operating Principles CAG Membership and Participation Download a pdf of the CAG Organizing Framework. Purpose and Charge The purpose of the LBNL Community Advisory Group (CAG) is to provide input into the Lab's physical plans and development projects. The specific charge to this group is to: Advise LBNL staff on issues related to the environmental impacts of proposed planning and development projects; Articulate key community planning and design principles to be considered in the review of individual projects as well as to guide the physical development of LBNL overall; Identify recommended strategies and actions for addressing community

429

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

430

Specific Group Hardware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores with hyperthreading). The total local disk space is 1.9 TB. It is running Scientific Linux SL release 5.5 (Boron) and is disk booted. It is in rack 17. palicevo2 The Virtual Organization (VO) server testbed. It's a Dell PowerEdge R410 with 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors, each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores

431

Illinois Wind Workers Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

David G. Loomis

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

433

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

434

Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinocome Group Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Solar Product A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector References Sinocome Group1 LinkedIn Connections...

435

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

436

Bell, group and tangle  

SciTech Connect

The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u [Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-203E LBNL-203E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Appendix Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 A-1 Tables Table A-1. Thermal Comfort Results - May 2005, September 2005, November 2005 Room 13 - 9/19/2005 AM/PM Time Period Operative T and RH Acceptable (% of time) Operative T and RH, and Air Velocity acceptable (% of time) Average Indoor Air T (°C) Average Indoor Air RH (%) AM AM1 66.7 0.0 21.3 67.1 PM PM1 40.0 0.0 24.9 46.8 Room 13 - 5/16/2005 AM AM1 0.0 0.0 21.1 0.4 PM PM1 0.0 0.0 20.8 55.5 Room 13 - 12/1/2005 AM AM1 0.0% 0.0% 17.8 38.5

438

The role of the US Department of Energy in indoor air quality and building ventilation policy development  

SciTech Connect

Building ventilation consumes about 5.8 exajoules of energy each year in the US The annual cost of this energy, used for commercial building fans (1.6 exajoules) and the heating and cooling of outside air (4.2 exajoules), is about $US 33 billion per year. Energy conservation measures that reduce heating and cooling season ventilation rates 15 to 35% in commercial and residential buildings can result in a national savings of about 0.6 to 1.5 exajoules ($US 3-8 billion) per year assuming no reduction of commercial building fan energy use. The most significant adverse environmental impact of reduced ventilation and infiltration is the potential degradation of the buildings indoor air quality. Potential benefits to the US from the implementation of sound indoor air quality and building ventilation reduction policies include reduced building-sector energy consumption; reduced indoor, outdoor, and global air pollution; reduced product costs; reduced worker absenteeism; reduced health care costs; reduced litigation; increased worker well-being and productivity; and increased product quality and competitiveness.

Traynor, G.W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Talbott, J.M.; Moses, D.O. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Group Nearest Neighbor Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given two sets of points P and Q, a group nearest neighbor(GNN) query retrieves the point(s) of P with the smallestsum of distances to all points in Q. Consider, for instance,three users at locations q1, q2 and q3 that want to find a meeting point (e.g., ...

Dimitris Papadias; Qiongmao Shen; Yufei Tao; Kyriakos Mouratidis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

BCDA Group Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dohn Arms 2-0272 - 401B1161 9:00AM - 5:30PM EPICS application development and support, CAT contact Marianne Binetti 2-5023 - 401C1239-C 8:30AM - 5:00PM Group Secretary Jeff...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Universal features of polymer shapes in crowded environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the universal characteristics of the shape of a polymer chain in an environment with correlated structural obstacles, applying the field-theoretical renormalization group approach. Our results qualitatively indicate an increase of the asymmetry of the polymer shape in crowded environment comparing with the pure solution case.

Viktoria Blavatska; Christian von Ferber; Yurij Holovatch

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

442

Reviren: augmenting virtual environments with personal digital assistants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our research group is currently embarked on building cheap display-based virtual environments. With the use of Personal Digital Assistants becoming more widespread and commonplace, there is a need to investigate ways of allowing them to integrate better ... Keywords: design, dynamic interface, human factors, mobile interface, virtual environment control

Richard Schroder; Marc Bosma; Andrew Cousins; Gary Marsden

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cell Systems Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Cell Systems Science Group. Dr. John T. Elliott (Group Leader). Dr. Donald H. Atha ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

GEMS in the environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEMS in the environment GEMS in the environment Name: de tar Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many years will it be before Genetically Engineered Microorganisms are released into the environment? Replies: Some already have been in controlled and government-approved tests. So have some non-micro organisms, mainly some food crop plants and cattle strains. moodywj In addition to the previous response, I might add that although there are several examples of GEMS which have been released for beneficial purposes, caution must be exercised in order that a potentially harmful organism does not escape into the environment without extremely careful supervision and complete control over its spread. An example of this is the engineered bacteria which make use of crude oil as a carbon source, patented for use on oil spills. Although spraying a solution with these organisms in it can help clean up spills and decrease the OIL'S impact on the environment, you have to be careful about knowing in advance what the organisms will turn to for food once the oil is gone -- will it attack the hydrocarbons of other living organisms?

445

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL/PUB-3092 LBNL/PUB-3092 Guidelines for Generators to Meet HWHF Acceptance Requirements for Hazardous, Radioactive, and Mixed Wastes at Berkeley Lab Waste Management Group Environment, Health, and Safety Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 Revision 7.1 October 2011 1. Hazardous Wastes. 1- 1 Summary of Hazardous Waste Requirements. 1- 2 1.1 How Do I Know If My Waste Is Hazardous?. 1- 3 1.1.1 Characteristic Waste. 1- 4 1.1.1.1 Ignitability. 1- 4 1.1.1.2 Corrosivity. 1- 4 1.1.1.3 Reactivity. 1- 5 1.1.1.4 Toxicity. 1- 5 1.1.2 Listed Waste. 1- 6 1.1.3 Chemical Compatibility. 1- 7 1.1.4 Excess Laboratory Chemicals and Laboratory Cleanouts. 1- 10 1.1.5 Unknowns. 1- 10

446

United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: geodata.grid.unep.ch/ United Nations Environment Programme: Global Environment Outlook Screenshot References: UNEP Data[1] Overview "The GEO Data Portal is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global

447

Energy demand and indoor climate of a traditional low-energy building in a hot climate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Energy demand in the built environment is quite important. China holds a large population and the energy use in the building sector is about… (more)

Li, Ang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Brunnian subgroups of mapping class groups and braid groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we continue our study of the Delta-group structure on the braid groups and mapping class groups of a surface. We calculate the homotopy groups of these Delta-groups and prove some results about Brunnian braid groups and Brunnian mapping class groups. This is the second of a pair of papers on these structures. 1 Introduction and statement of results In this paper we study the sequences

A. J. Berrick; E. Hanbury; J. Wu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NERSC User Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Environment NERSC User Environment Home Directories, Shells and Startup Files All NERSC systems (except PDSF) use global home directories, which are are pre-populated with startup files (also known as dot files) for all available shells. NERSC fully supports bash, csh, and tcsh as login shells. Other shells (ksh, sh, and zsh) are also available. The default shell at NERSC is csh. Changing Your Default Login Shell Use the NERSC Information management (NIM) portal if you want to to change your default login shell. To do this, select Change Shell from the NIM Actions pull-down menu. Managing Your Startup Files The "standard" dot-files are symbolic links to read-only files that NERSC controls. For each standard dot-file, there is a user-writable ".ext" file.

450

Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.

Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.; Prud'Homme, D.; Allaire, S. (Centre hospitalier de l'Universite Laval, Quebec City (Canada))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Group Vision Care Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision Vision Care Policy Group Name: LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC. RETIREES Group Number: 12284390 Divisions 0005 & 0006 Effective Date: JANUARY 1, 2011 EVIDENCE OF COVERAGE Provided by: VISION SERVICE PLAN INSURANCE COMPANY 3333 Quality Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 (916) 851-5000 (800) 877-7195 EOC NM 03/02 11/25/08 CLD In addition to the information contained in this Benefit Program Summary, the LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees Summary Plan Description contains important information about your LANS health and welfare benefits. For additional information: For Retirees: Customer Care Center (866) 934-1200 www.ybr.com/benefits/lanl LANL Benefits Website for Retirees: http://www.lanl.gov/worklife/benefits/retirees/

452

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Icon Fermilab Icon Photo Home About About the Steering Group Members & Contributors Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Acknowledgement Contents Contents Chapter 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Chapter 2 Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Chapter 3 Fermilab and the ILC Chapter 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier Chapter 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier Chapter 6 Beyond the ILC and the LHC Chapter 7 A Fermilab Plan for Discovery Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix A Steering Group charge Appendix B Fermilab and the ILC Appendix C The international neutrino program Appendix D Neutrino science with 8 GeV and 800 GeV protons Appendix E Muon-to-electron conversion in nuclei Appendix F Precision physics experiments with kaon beams Appendix G Facilities considered Appendix H Steps toward a muon collider

453

NERSC User Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC User Group Meeting NERSC User Group Meeting Oct 18, 2010 Outline * About OpenMP * Parallel Regions * Worksharing Constructs * Synchronization * Data Scope * Tasks * Using OpenMP at NERSC 2 3 Common Architectures * Shared Memory Architecture - Multiple CPUs share global memory, could have local cache - Uniform Memory Access (UMA) - Typical Shared Memory Programming Model: OpenMP, Pthreads, ... * Distributed Memory Architecture - Each CPU has own memory - Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) - Typical Message Passing Programming Model: MPI, ... * Hybrid Architecture - UMA within one SMP node - NUMA across nodes - Typical Hybrid Programming Model: mixed MPI/OpenMP, ... What is OpenMP * OpenMP is an industry standard API of C/C++ and Fortran for shared memory parallel programming.

454

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS ON NON-PGM CATALYSTS * INK FORMULATION * CCM VS. GDE * DELAMINATION PERFORMANCE * BACKUP POWER APPLICATION - STATUS: 60C, 0.5V, 0.2W/CM2 (DEGRADATION ISSUES) - TARGETS: SHOULD BE SET CONSISTENT WITH DOE STATIONARY TARGETS (2015) * AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATION - INCREASE POWER DENSITY TO >0.5W/CM2

455

AEC GROUP SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

As a result of atomic shelter tests and field experiments condueted over the past nine years, it has been conclusively shown that shelters provide the only promising means of civilian protection in the event of a nuclear war. Design details are presented for a group shelter to accommodate 100 persons of all age groups and both sexes. The shelter structure is a multiplate corrugated- steel arch set on a concrete slab with end walls of bridge plate sheathing. The entire structure is covered with a minimum of 3 feet of earth. The shelter combines outstanding protection against radioactive fall-out with good protection against blast and thermal radiation. Drawings are included. General operating procedures are outlined. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Environment, Safety and Health Standards Set for LBNL Due to a recent Contract 31 action, the Necessary and Sufficient process...

457

CHA Guidelines Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Community Health Assessment Guidelines have been updated from the original document published in 1997. The revisions reflect various published sources, as well as accumulated experience with community health assessment within the province of Manitoba. Special thanks to the members of the CHA Guidelines Working Group, composed of representatives of regional health authorities from across the province and Manitoba Health and Healthy Living staff. These guidelines are made

Jody Allan; Sonia Busca Owczar; Ingrid Botting; Maggie Campbell; Bunmi Fatoye; Bill Funk; Tannis Erickson; Sue Lockhart; Ales Morga; Deborah Malazdrewicz; Leonie Stranc

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

459

Environment scattering in GADRAS.  

SciTech Connect

Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Green's Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean James; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Clark Energy Group ESCO Qualification Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction to Clark Energy Group Introduction to Clark Energy Group Clark Energy Group offers comprehensive, turn-key energy and water solutions with a focus on renewable energy and building efficiency. We partner with public and private clients to deliver projects that enhance energy security, protect the environment, and save our customers money. Our $5 billion Super ESPC contract with the U.S. Department of Energy allows us to contract with any federal agency for energy-related projects. On the private side, we work on a wide variety of institutional facilities such as data centers, laboratories, multi-family housing, campuses, and high-performance office buildings. Clark's long history of success on complex projects allow us to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Meeting Summaries Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington DC TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 15, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Minneapolis TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 21, 2004 Albuquerque TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 22, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Jacksonville TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 20, 1999 Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1998

462

Geoscience/Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience/Environment Geoscience/Environment Geoscience/Environment Print From the high pressures at the Earth's core to the vacuum of outer space, the ALS has tools for investigating samples from either environmental extreme. "Geoscience" at the ALS covers a wide range of topics, from carbon sequestration and air quality to cometary composition and the formation of the solar system. To narrow the focus a bit, the ALS has an important role to play in addressing a number of environmental issues, including environmental remediation, hazardous-waste management, global climate change, agricultural sustainability, and trace-element cycling in ecosystems. These problems present major scientific challenges, in part because natural systems are extremely complex at a range of scales. Moreover, the behavior of these systems is determined by a complex interplay of chemical, physical, and biological processes in spatially heterogeneous environments. The ALS can contribute to the knowledge base needed to address a variety of environmental issues by enabling a variety of investigations, including analytical chemistry, microscopy of heterogeneous media, and reaction kinetics in natural systems.

463

Environment analysis via ?CFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a new program-analysis framework, based on CPS and procedure-string abstractions, that can handle critical analyses which the k-CFA framework cannot. We present the main theorems concerning correctness, show an application analysis, ... Keywords: CPS, continuations, delta-CFA, environment analysis, flow analysis, functional languages, inlining, lambda calculus, program analysis, super-beta

Matthew Might; Olin Shivers

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

465

Renormalization group functional equations  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, Thomas L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-8046 (United States); Zachos, Cosmas K. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4815 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Renormalization group functional equations.  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, T. L.; Zachos, C. K. (High Energy Physics); (Univ. of Miami)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

467

SPPR Group Proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal June 23, 2010 Agenda Purpose of Meeting Presenters Background Information  Three Terminal Plan & Market Access  Business Case  Transmission Infrastructure Program ED5-Palo Verde Project Potential Rate Impacts Discussion / Comments 2 Purpose of Meeting Provide background information Share the SPPR Group's current proposal and how it might affect Parker-Davis Project (P-DP) customers Obtain your feedback on the proposal 3 Presenters Background Information - Todd Rhoades ED5-PV Project Description - Todd Rhoades Project Marketability - John Steward Project Cost & Financing - Jack Murray Potential Rate Impacts - Jack Murray Next Steps - Todd Rhoades 4 Three Terminal Plan November 2009 5 Business Case

468

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Albuquerque TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Presentation - April 21, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Portland TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - February 6, 2001 Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1999

469

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Rail Topic Group Task Plan Final Rail Topic Group Paper Strawman Report Comments Matrix 2002 Summary of the Rail Topic Group Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison...

470

The Birth Environment of the Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews our current understanding of the possible birth environments of our Solar System. Since most stars form within groups and clusters, the question becomes one of determining the nature of the birth aggregate of the Sun. This discussion starts by reviewing Solar System properties that provide constraints on our environmental history. We then outline the range of star-forming environments that are available in the Galaxy, and discuss how they affect star and planet formation. The nature of the solar birth cluster is constrained by many physical considerations, including radiation fields provided by the background environment, dynamical scattering interactions, and by the necessity of producing the short-lived radioactive nuclear species inferred from meteoritic measurements. Working scenarios for the solar birth aggregate can be constructed, as discussed herein, although significant uncertainties remain.

Adams, Fred C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Lighting Group: People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Lighting Group Staff Phone Mailstop Email Group Leader [area code 510] Rubinstein, Francis 486-4096 90R3111 FMRubinstein@lbl.gov Staff Scientists Berman, Sam 5682 90R3111 Clear, Robert 486-4286 90R3111 RDClear@lbl.gov Research Associates Enscoe, Abby (510) 486 6077 90R3111 AIEnscoe@lbl.gov Fritz, Randolph M. (510) 495 2532 90R3111 RFritz@lbl.gov Ghatikar, Girish 486-6768 90R3111 GGhatikar@lbl.gov Granderson, Jessica 486-7692 90R3111 JGranderson@lbl.gov Howells, Jack 4096 46R0125 MRHowells@lbl.gov Kiliccote, Sila 495-2615 90R3111 SKiliccote@lbl.gov Liu, Gao 7207 70R0108B GLiu@lbl.gov Wen, Yao-Jung 4702 90R3111 YJWen@lbl.gov Yazdanian, Mehry 486-4701 90R3111 MYazdanian@lbl.gov Research Technicians Galvin, James 486-4661 47R0112 JEGalvin@lbl.gov Technical Support DiBartolomeo, Dennis 486-4702 90R3111

472

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup Tracking Subgroup March 27, 2006 March 6, 2006...

473

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries...

474

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

475

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup Rail Planning Timeline Benchmarking Project: AREVA Trip...

476

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup April 6, 2006 February 23, 2006 Draft January 24, 2006...

477

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup July 17, 2007 September 19, 2007 December 12, 2007 More...

478

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup March 30, 2006 February 15, 2006 Draft...

479

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

480

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup October 11, 2007 More...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment group" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

Deng Xinfa [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Yu Guisheng [Department of Natural Science, Nanchang Teachers College, Jiangxi 330103 (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

482

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents ARCHIVED DOCUMENTS Inspections Summary Matrix TEC Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison Regulatory Summary Matrix More...

483

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page intentionally left blank) Low-Level JVllsfe Disposal Fllcili~l' Federal Review Group il1allUlli Revision 3, June 200S Concurrence The Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual, Revision 3, is approved for use as of the most recent date below. Date Chair, Low-Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group Andrew WalJo, 1II Deputy Director, Otlice of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance, and Environment Department of Energy OHlce of Health, Safety, and Security e C. WilJiams Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Environment National Nuclear Security Administration Low-Level 'Vaste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group J1aJll/ai

484

Key distribution and update for secure inter-group multicast communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Group communication has become an important component in wireless networks. In this paper, we focus on the environments in which multiple groups coexist in the system, and both intra and inter group multicast traffic must be protected by secret keys. ... Keywords: inter-group communication, key distribution and update, security

Weichao Wang; Bharat Bhargava

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

486

Microsoft Word - Survey-All-Groups.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Summary of Fermilab Diversity Focus Group The following is a summary of a three-hour discussion held with Fermilab employees some time between November 21, 2008 and January 9, 2009. Ten individuals, all of whom were female, attended this discussion. No responses have been attributed to any individuals and specific information that would personalize a response, such as names or departments have been deleted or generalized, but otherwise this summary represents that actual conversation. All wording in italics represent direction or questions provided by the facilitator. The Fermilab Work Environment Without giving it much thought, I want you to write down the first word or two that comes to mind when you think about the work environment here at Fermilab.

487

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Facilities for the Intensity Frontier SuperNuMI (SNuMI) Project X Existing rings Project X and the ILC Project X and longer term facilities Summary Facilities for the Intensity Frontier The Steering Group considered a variety of accelerator facilities and programs using the following criteria: Support for physics research goals, effective use of accelerator assets freed up at the end of Tevatron operations, Alignment with the ILC R&D program, Potential for achievement over the next decade. Twelve facilities received consideration using some or all of these criteria. Appendix G sorts those facilities not described in this chapter based on relevance to proton- or electron-based programs. This chapter describes the facilities that would support neutrino science and precision physics at the intensity frontier. The facilities include an intense proton source and its injection to the existing rings at Fermilab for a variety of programs.

488

# Energy Measuremenfs Group  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ri EECE ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of Energy, was used during November 1976 to conduct an exploratory aerial radiological survey in-the greater Niagara Fails area. The purpose of that survey was to identify locations having concentrations of terrestrial radioactivity not typical of the radiation

489

Particle Data Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About PDG About PDG About the PDG PDG authors Order PDG products PDG citation Encoder tools Job at LBNL Contact Us Downloads Resources Errata Archives Atomic Nuclear Properties Online HEP Info Non-PDG Databases Durham-RAL databases Current experiments Guide to Data Partial-wave analyses Contact Us News The "Reviews, Tables, Plots" section has been updated. The next book edition is due in early summer 2014, and the booklet in late summer 2014. Funded By: US DOE US NSF CERN MEXT (Japan) INFN (Italy) MEC (Spain) IHEP & RFBR (Russia) Mirrors: USA (LBNL) Brazil CERN Indonesia Italy Japan (KEK) Russia (Novosibirsk) Russia (Protvino) UK (Durham) The Review of Particle Physics J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 partial update for the 2014 edition.

490

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

491

Working Group Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K. Zorika G. Zhang Focus of Discussion The session convened on March 2, with brief introductions by Bill Clements. The purpose of the session was to discuss the scientific merits of retrofitting TOGA/TAO buoys with shortwave radiometers. Three questions were posed at the outset of the session to focus the discussion.

492

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 61 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.11.150 © 2012 Future Science Ltd In 1950 Reese et al. proposed a mechanism for cel- lulose hydrolysis, which involved two general com- ponents, C 1 and C x , acting in sequence [1]. According to the model, the C 1 component first disrupted and swelled the crystalline cellulose, possibly releasing soluble oligo saccharides into solution. The C x compo- nent, which was shown to have endoglucanase activity, was then able to effectively hydrolyze the previously inaccessible substrate along with the soluble oligo- saccharides. Furthermore, the activity of the mixture was found to be higher than the activity of each com- ponent acting alone, indicating that the components were acting synergistically. In the following years, a number of groups began to identify and characterize

493

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

494

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab In This Section: Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Guidelines The Steering Group's proposed plan Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOνA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac.

495

The seamless computing environment  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) are in the midst of a project through which their supercomputers are linked via high speed networks. The goal of this project is to solve national security and scientific problems too large to run on a single machine. This project, as well as the desire to maximize the use of high performance computing systems, has provided the impetus to develop and implement software tools and infrastructure to automate the tasks associated with running codes on one or more heterogeneous machines from a geographically distributed pool. The ultimate goal of this effort is the Seamless Computing Environment (SCE). SCE is a production environment to which a user submits a job and receives results without having to worry about scheduling resources or even which resources the system uses. The compilation, data migration, scheduling, and execution will take place with minimal user intervention.

Sheehan, T.J.; Papadopoulos, P.M.; Alexander, R. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Environment control system  

SciTech Connect

A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

Sammarone, Dino G. (Edgewood Borough, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Geoscience/Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience/Environment Print Geoscience/Environment Print From the high pressures at the Earth's core to the vacuum of outer space, the ALS has tools for investigating samples from either environmental extreme. "Geoscience" at the ALS covers a wide range of topics, from carbon sequestration and air quality to cometary composition and the formation of the solar system. To narrow the focus a bit, the ALS has an important role to play in addressing a number of environmental issues, including environmental remediation, hazardous-waste management, global climate change, agricultural sustainability, and trace-element cycling in ecosystems. These problems present major scientific challenges, in part because natural systems are extremely complex at a range of scales. Moreover, the behavior of these systems is determined by a complex interplay of chemical, physical, and biological processes in spatially heterogeneous environments. The ALS can contribute to the knowledge base needed to address a variety of environmental issues by enabling a variety of investigations, including analytical chemistry, microscopy of heterogeneous media, and reaction kinetics in natural systems.

498

Galaxy Evolution and Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of galaxies are strongly correlated with their environment, with red galaxies dominating galaxy clusters and blue galaxies dominating the general field. However, not all field galaxies are young: studies of the colors, line strengths, and M/L ratios of massive early-type galaxies at 0environment. There is good evidence that the growth of these galaxies does continue longer in the field than in clusters, via (nearly) dissipationless mergers of already old galaxies. These results are consistent with predictions of recent galaxy formation models, which incorporate AGN feedback to suppress star formation in the most massive halos. Systematic studies of the relation of galaxies with their environment beyond z=1 are difficult, and still somewhat contradictory. Intriguingly both the DEEP2 and VVDS surveys find that the color-density relation disappears at z~1.3, unfortunately just at the point where both surveys become highly incomplete. On the other hand, clustering studies at z~2.5 have shown that red galaxies cluster more strongly than blue galaxies, implying that the color-density relation was already in place at that redshift.

Pieter van Dokkum; Ryan Quadri

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Swatch Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swatch Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Swatch Group Place Switzerland Product String representation "The Swatch Grou ... ther industries" is too long. References Swatch...

500

Parabolic subgroups of Garside groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Garside monoid is a cancellative monoid with a finite lattice generating set; a Garside group is the group of fractions of a Garside monoid. The family of Garside groups contains the Artin-Tits groups of spherical type. We generalise the well-known notion of a parabolic subgroup of an Artin-Tits group into th