National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for indoor environment group

  1. The Center for Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    review of indoor air pollution in schools requested by the Environment Committee of the Connecticut and evaluating the students' and staff health symptoms, · assessing the building for causes of poor indoor air agencies. Programs have included guidance on the Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools

  2. Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

    2000-01-01

    Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

  3. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    of Medicine (2011) Climate change, the indoor environment,on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality andto work and learn and climate change may make existing IEQ

  4. A System for Building Semantic Maps of Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amigoni, Francesco

    A System for Building Semantic Maps of Indoor Environments Exploiting the Concept of Building of indoor environments refers to the task of build- ing representations of these environments that associate knowledge. Usually, the classifiers that build semantic maps process data coming from laser range scanners

  5. The Center for Indoor Environments and Health's specific mission is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    pollutants and materials Outdoor air contaminants (including diesel particulates) and materials brought for Indoor Environments and Health #12;Why are building communities struggling with managing indoor air air problems? Design Structures built slab on grade, and/or with flat roofs with poor drainage

  6. Autonomous flight in unstructured and unknown indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, implementation, and validation of a system that enables a micro air vehicle to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. Such a vehicle would be of considerable ...

  7. A fine-grained geospatial representation and framework for large-scale indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battat, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a system and method for extending the current paradigm of geographic information systems (GIS) to support indoor environments. It introduces features and properties of indoor multi-building environments ...

  8. Neighborhood Healthy Homes Project The University of Connecticut Center for Indoor Environments and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Neighborhood Healthy Homes Project The University of Connecticut Center for Indoor Environments and Health is a partner on the Connecticut Children's Medical Center's Neighborhood Healthy Healthy Housing Inspection Manual Center for Indoor Environments and Health, University of Connecticut

  9. Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

    2006-01-01

    -147. [7]. Derek C. C, Li Baizhan. productivity and indoor environment [C]. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings. Espoo Finland: Vol.1, 1(2000): 629-634. ...

  10. Movement of outdoor particles to the indoor environment: An analysis of the Arnhem Lead Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thatcher, T.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-03-01

    This paper analyzes the role of soil tracking as a source of indoor particles and quantifies key parameters influencing the transport of soil-derived particles (resuspension rates for particulate matter on floors, deposition velocities of suspended particles in indoor and outdoor air). The paper begins with a brief review of studies of particle transport processes and presents a simple model for studying the transport of particles in the indoor environment. The model is used to examine data on Pb distributions in the indoor and outdoor environments of community adjacent to a secondary lead smelter.

  11. Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air ozone (O3) during operation, either in- tentionally or as a byproduct of air ionization standards. Sev- eral types of air purifiers were tested for their ability to produce ozone in various indoor

  12. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tringe, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air ofthat the indoor air microbes are not random transients fromhealth policies. Airborne microbes are often attached to

  13. Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot Michael Wandel1@tech.oru.se Abstract Gas source localisation with robots is usually per- formed in environments with a strong in different environments, and the similarities as well as differences in the analyte gas distributions

  14. Modeling HSGPS Doppler Errors in Indoor Environments for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Modeling HSGPS Doppler Errors in Indoor Environments for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning Zhe He, Mark The use of high sensitivity GPS (HSGPS) receivers integrated with dead-reckoning sensors for pedestrian navigation has been broadly investigated and applied in the past decade. Pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR

  15. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBL-of combustion-generated indoor air pollution concluded thatTraynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; April,

  16. RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moschandreas, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    ENVIRONMENT DIVISION RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS INLBL-12590 EEB-Vent 81-12 RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS2.1 Monitoring History of Radon Table 2.1. Integrated (PERM)

  17. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    group felt that the building automation or management systemhad issues with the building automation systems, a lack ofbe provided from the building automation systems and no air

  18. Monitoring Viable Fungal and Bacterial Bioaerosol Concentrations to Identify Acceptable Levels for Common Indoor Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, L. D.

    1998-01-01

    Bioaerosol concentrations between 200 - 450 CFU/m3 have remained largely uncharacterized with respect to potential indoor air quality concerns. This research provides for further description of indoor bioaerosol concentrations and concludes that 3 0...

  19. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  20. A Marked Point Process Model for the Source Proximity E ect in the Indoor Environment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    indoor air quality monitors arise because of the source proximity e#11;ect, in which pollutant sources. McBride Abstract In indoor air quality studies, discrepancies between personal and station- ary Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship as well as the Center for Indoor Air Research. The author thanks

  1. IMPACT OF THE URBAN POLLUTION ON THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT -EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A MECHANICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bâtiment (CSTB), Nantes, France ABSTRACT This study aims to assess the transfer of outdoor air pollution and the relationships between outdoor and indoor urban air pollutant concentrations are more and more a subject indoor pollutant sources. At the initial state, the dwelling was naturally ventilated. Air renewal

  2. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  3. Ensuring Healthy American Indian Generations for Tomorrow through Safe and Healthy Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Joseph A.; Pacheco, Christina M.; Lewis, Charley Sabe; Williams, Chandler; Barnes, Charles; Rosenwasser, Lanny J.; Choi, Won S.; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-03-04

    when recruiting AI for a home-and employment-based environmental health assessments, highlight major successes, and propose recommendations for future indoor environmental health studies. The Center for American Indian Community Health (CAICH...

  4. A Coupled Airflow-and-Energy Simulation Program for Indoor Thermal Environment Studies (RP-927)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    for the design of radiative, convective, and hybrid heating and cooling systems. Keywords: Airflow, Air with convective, radiative, and hybrid heating and cooling systems. In the past few years, many investigations for thermal comfort (ASHRAE 1992). In an indoor space with radiative, convective, and hybrid heating

  5. Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

  6. Investigation and Analysis of the Indoor Air Environment of a Large-scale Art Exhibition Hall in Beijing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, X.; Cao, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adopting the method of locale measurement and subjective appraisal, this paper presents a synthesized investigation and analysis of both the indoor thermal and humid indices and the air quality of a specific exhibition hall in Beijing. Indoor air...

  7. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Indoor Air 1993, Helsinki. IPMVP IEQ Committee. 1999. Indooruse can also improve IEQ (IPMVP 1998, Fisk and Rosenfeld

  8. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  9. Low frequency indoor radiolocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Matthew S. (Matthew Stephen), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of electromagnetic wave propagation to the problem of indoor radiolocation. Determining the location of people and objects relative to their environment is crucial for asset tracking, ...

  10. Study of the relationship between indoor daylight environments and patient average length of stay (ALOS) in healthcare facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Joon Ho

    2007-04-25

    of indoor daylight variables in type A from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM. ...........................................................97 xiii TABLE Page 36 Summary of the average values of indoor... daylight variables in type B from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM.............................................................98 37 Significant ALOS comparisons and average illuminance between SE and NW...

  11. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore »mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  12. High-Precision Ad-Hoc Indoor Positioning in Challenging Industrial Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    infrastructure. Several technologies are assessed with regard to these challenges and their shortcomings relatively quickly and easily. Sample environments include chemical plants and oil or gas rigs. These surveys will cause problems for positioning technologies that use radio propagation methods, line-of-sight methods

  13. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  14. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Environment Department Energy Performance of Buildings Group Berkeley, CA 94720 January 2010 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the BuildingTechnologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy under ontract

  15. The Cricket indoor location system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priyantha, Nissanka Bodhi, 1968-

    2005-01-01

    Indoor environments present opportunities for a rich set of location-aware applications such as navigation tools for humans and robots, interactive virtual games, resource discovery, asset tracking, location-aware sensor ...

  16. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone Heather L. Papinchak1 , E for their species effectiveness in reducing ozone concentrations in a simulated indoor environment. Continuously supply system were used to simulate an indoor environment in which ozone concentrations could be measured

  18. NIOSH testimony on indoor air quality: Selected references before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean and Water Protection, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by J. Donald Millar, May 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has compiled the document in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality (IAQ), including sick building syndrome. Included in the publication are: NIOSH Congressional testimony that describes the NIOSH IAQ investigations program and summarizes the results of NIOSH research and findings on IAQ problems, NIOSH guidance for conducting indoor air quality investigations, NIOSH journal article on evaluating building ventilation systems, and list of non-NIOSH publications on indoor air quality. As the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for occupational safety and health standards, NIOSH limits its IAQ activities to the occupational environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducts an IAQ program and can be contacted for information regarding both occupational and non-occupational settings.

  19. Small Group Collaboration and Presence in a Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    , South Africa. jcasanue,edwin @cs.uct.ac.za Abstract Presence in Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs of a distributed architecture and advanced interactive user interfaces to create a `shared' space where multiple

  20. ETH ZurichEngineering Geodesy -Prof. Dr. H. Ingensand Overview of Current Indoor PositioningOverview of Current Indoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments: indoors: household, office & factory outdoors: urban & rural dynamic Positioning Requirements, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry, surveying

  1. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.EngineeringRadiation Protection Group Under the

  2. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.EngineeringRadiation Protection Group Under

  3. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S.EngineeringRadiation Protection Group UnderSafety

  4. Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings Jeff models for the indoor-air environment in control design for energy efficient buildings. In one method by a desire to incorporate models of the indoor-air environment in the design of energy efficient buildings

  5. Pedestrian localisation for indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodman, Oliver

    2010-11-16

    pedestrian tracking that uses on-body inertial sensors rather than relying on fixed infrastructure. It is demonstrated that general purpose inertial navigation algorithms are unsuitable for pedestrian tracking due to the rapid accumulation of errors...

  6. Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold Editor: W. Elliott of indoor environments for mold growth increased dramatically in the past decade. Allergists can now for mold growth and robust enough to reliably detect mold growth. There is no standard method

  7. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

  8. Indoor Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Focus For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health-from cognitive ability to personal comfort...

  9. FreeD A Freehand Digital Sculpting Tool Responsive Environments Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the tool. Author Keywords Computer-Aided Design (CAD); Craft; Digital Fabrication; Carving; Milling. ACMFreeD ­ A Freehand Digital Sculpting Tool Amit Zoran Responsive Environments Group MIT Media Lab@media.mit.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we present an approach to combining digital fabrication and craft, emphasizing

  10. EECG RESEARCH PAPERS from the Energy, Environment, and Climate Group (EECG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 EECG RESEARCH PAPERS from the Energy, Environment, and Climate Group (EECG) Roskilde University, Denmark Final Report Energy Research Programme of the Danish Energy Authority, project EFP05 033001/033001-0021 Comparative assessment of hydrogen stor- age and international electricity trade for a Danish energy system

  11. Estimating Environmental Exposures to Indoor Contaminants using Residential-Dust Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Todd Patrick

    2011-01-01

    K. Polybrominated dioxins (PBDDs/DFs) and polybrominatedflame retardants and dioxin-like activities associated withU.S. indoor environments. Dioxin 2010: 30 th International

  12. Advanced Technology for Economical Dehumidification to Improve Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckwith, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    High humidity can have a detrimental effect on many aspects of indoor environments. Building materials, books, and records deteriorate more rapidly in humidity levels above 60% due to biodegradation. High humidity increases electrical costs...

  13. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is...

  14. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Combustion -Generated Indoor Air Pollution Craigcontrol of air pollution from indoor combustion sources. Ifocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namely

  15. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Sérsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup –1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  17. Swimming Pool (Indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  18. The Effects of Presence on Small Group Collaboration and Interaction in a Collaborative Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    and computer graphics technology, collabora- tive virtual environments are becoming a feasi- ble way to address environment. The user should not per- ceive the existence of any technology between them and the environment Environment Cathryn Johns, Marc Daya, Duncan Sellars, Juan Casanueva, Edwin Blake Collaborative Visual

  19. Targeted Autonomous Indoor Flight of a Rotary-Wing MAV Svetlana Potyagaylo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanza, Yaron

    Targeted Autonomous Indoor Flight of a Rotary-Wing MAV Svetlana Potyagaylo PhD Student Faculty of Aerospace Engineering svetap@tx.technion.ac.il Omri Rand Professor Faculty of Aerospace Engineering omri for Autonomous Rotary-Wing Micro Aerial Vehicles (RW MAVs) in indoor GPS-denied environments. In such missions

  20. Changes in indoor pollutants since the 1950s Charles J. Weschler a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA b International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark Keywords: Air conditioning Body burden Building materials products used indoors. Composite-wood, synthetic carpets, polymeric flooring, foam cushioning, plastic

  1. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  2. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residen-LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D.L,BL-5918 COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION C. D.

  3. Indoor air quality: Selected references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This document was compiled in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality, including sick-building syndrome. Included in the publication are the NIOSH Congressional testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications; two articles describing the results of NIOSH research and findings on indoor air-quality problems; NIOSH guidance on conducting indoor-air-quality investigations; and a description of the NIOSH health-hazard evaluation program, which can provide NIOSH assistance in evaluating indoor-air-quality problems.

  4. Quality of Information Driven Environment Crowdsourcing and its Impact on Personal Wellness Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Jerrid E.

    2014-01-01

    Cloudy • Sun using our data collector mobile applicationsun, shade and indoor environments. Figure 4.23: A data collector

  5. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometNovakov, T. : Formation of Pollution Particulate NitrogenGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.

  6. Indoor-air-quality research. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications and the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, August 2, 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Spokesmen for the environmental health sciences, consumer product safety, medical profession, and conservation discussed current research on whether indoor air quality suffers as a result of weatherization to reduce air leakage at a two-day hearing. Critical areas for research were the identification, measurement, characterization, control and health effects of indoor pollutants. Of particular concern to the committee was the administration's phasing out of some research programs despite DOE authorization and Congressional appropriations to continue. The witnesses discussed contaminants from building materials, household products, and other sources as well as the effects of reduced ventilation. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

  7. THE SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION AND THE EFFECT OF THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT IN LOW-REDSHIFT GALAXY GROUPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Mulchaey, John S.; Bai, Lei; Ponman, Trevor J.; Raychaudhury, Somak; Dariush, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the interaction between galaxies and their surroundings is central to building a coherent picture of galaxy evolution. Here we use Galaxy Evolution Explorer imaging of a statistically representative sample of 23 galaxy groups at z Almost-Equal-To 0.06 to explore how local and global group environments affect the UV properties and dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs) of their member galaxies. The data provide SFRs out to beyond 2R{sub 200} in all groups, down to a completeness limit and limiting galaxy stellar mass of 0.06 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, respectively. At fixed galaxy stellar mass, we find that the fraction of star-forming group members is suppressed relative to the field out to an average radius of R Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mpc Almost-Equal-To 2R{sub 200}, mirroring results for massive clusters. For the first time, we also report a similar suppression of the specific SFR within such galaxies, on average by 40% relative to the field, thus directly revealing the impact of the group environment in quenching star formation within infalling galaxies. At fixed galaxy density and stellar mass, this suppression is stronger in more massive groups, implying that both local and global group environments play a role in quenching. The results favor an average quenching timescale of {approx}> 2 Gyr and strongly suggest that a combination of tidal interactions and starvation is responsible. Despite their past and ongoing quenching, galaxy groups with more than four members still account for at least {approx}25% of the total UV output in the nearby universe.

  8. The Effects of Group Collaboration on Presence in a Collaborative Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    Science University of Cape Town Private Bag, RONDEBOSCH 7701 South Africa e-mail: jcasanue Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) involve the use of a distributed architecture and ad- vanced

  9. Abstract --Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper groups the activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary R.

    1 Abstract -- Securing a Grid environment presents a distinctive set of challenges. This paper the security requirements of Grids more completely. Index Terms -- Grid security, authentication, authorization, trust management, secure communication, security policy I. INTRODUCTION The goal of Grid Computing

  10. Exploiting Reality with Multicast Groups: A Network Architecture for Large-scale Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zyda, Michael

    Environments Michael R. Macedonia, *Michael J. Zyda, David R. Pratt, Donald P. Brutzman, Paul T. Barham-408-656-2305 {macedonia, zyda, pratt, brutzman, barham}@cs.nps.navy.mil ABSTRACT We describe a network software

  11. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  12. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  13. Student Grouping Strategies In Technology Rich Learning Environments At The Intermediate Grade Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Hare, Jana

    2011-04-18

    in the classroom, the differences were not statistically significant throughout the school year. When analyzed between years, technology rich classrooms showed an increase between Year 1 and Year 2 in Mixed Groups. The results of the correlational analysis...

  14. NNSA ASC Exascale Environment Planning, Applications Working Group, Report February 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Still, C H; Arsenlis, A; Bond, R B; Steinkamp, M J; Swaminarayan, S; Womble, D E; Koniges, A E; Harrison, J R; Chen, J H

    2011-02-25

    The scope of the Apps WG covers three areas of interest: Physics and Engineering Models (PEM), multi-physics Integrated Codes (IC), and Verification and Validation (V&V). Each places different demands on the exascale environment. The exascale challenge will be to provide environments that optimize all three. PEM serve as a test bed for both model development and 'best practices' for IC code development, as well as their use as standalone codes to improve scientific understanding. Rapidly achieving reasonable performance for a small team is the key to maintaining PEM innovation. Thus, the environment must provide the ability to develop portable code at a higher level of abstraction, which can then be tuned, as needed. PEM concentrate their computational footprint in one or a few kernels that must perform efficiently. Their comparative simplicity permits extreme optimization, so the environment must provide the ability to exercise significant control over the lower software and hardware levels. IC serve as the underlying software tools employed for most ASC problems of interest. Often coupling dozens of physics models into very large, very complex applications, ICs are usually the product of hundreds of staff-years of development, with lifetimes measured in decades. Thus, emphasis is placed on portability, maintainability and overall performance, with optimization done on the whole rather than on individual parts. The exascale environment must provide a high-level standardized programming model with effective tools and mechanisms for fault detection and remediation. Finally, V&V addresses the infrastructure and methods to facilitate the assessment of code and model suitability for applications, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods for assessment and quantification of margins of uncertainty (QMU). V&V employs both PEM and IC, with somewhat differing goals, i.e., parameter studies and error assessments to determine both the quality of the calculation and to estimate expected deviations of simulations from experiments. The exascale environment must provide a performance envelope suitable both for capacity calculations (high through-put) and full system capability runs (high performance). Analysis of the results place shared demand on both the I/O as well as the visualization subsystems.

  15. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 ThanksProgramEnricoEnvironment Environment

  16. The Evolution of the Built Environment of the Margi Ethnic Group of Northeastern Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birdling, Emmanuel Awidau

    2013-05-31

    This dissertation is a story of the evolution of the domestic sphere of the Margi ethnic group of northeastern Nigeria. The evolution started with round huts and fences that were constructed mainly with pieces of stones while living in the Mandara...

  17. Mobile Collaboration Environment for u-Healthcare Based on Distributed Object Group Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Su-Chong

    mobile devices, and designed and implemented a healthcare application service over it. Our mobile elements, such as groups of sensors, mobile devices and a home server. Here, mobile devices(e.g. PDAs) are divided into two types; the fixed and the moving-typed mobile devices. The information collected

  18. Development of a modeling framework to predict indoor air concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loy, M.D.; Nazaroff, W.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental and Energy Technologies Div.

    1998-12-31

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are an important but largely unstudied class of indoor air pollutants. SVOCs have been well-studied as outdoor air pollutants, but much less effort has been focused on understanding the factors affecting their concentrations in indoor air. Because of these compounds` low (10-6 to 10 Pa at room temperature) vapor pressures, they readily partition into condensed phases from the gas phase. In outdoor air, this phenomenon is important as a source of secondary organic aerosol and as a mechanism for long range transport and persistence of SVOCs in the atmosphere as particle-phase species. Indoor environments include another potential condensed phase besides the airborne particle phase: surface materials such as carpet, wallboard, upholstery, ceiling tiles, linoleum, and many others. Adsorption to these materials has a markedly different effect on indoor contaminant concentrations because the condensed phase is stationary. Unlike the airborne particle phase, for which ventilation is a significant removal mechanism, the only significant pathway for removal of reversibly sorbed pollutants from the indoor environment is desorption into the gas phase followed by ventilation. Because buildings generally have a large surface area to gas-phase volume ratio, the net removal of SVOCs from the indoor environment via this mechanism is likely to be very slow. Compounds re-emitted from one surface are likely to quickly re-absorb to another. This paper presents an analysis of the factors affecting indoor concentrations of SVOCs including ventilation, gas-particle partitioning, gas phase sorption on indoor surfaces, particle deposition, and oxidative radical chemistry and estimates their relative importance to facilitate simplification of numerical simulations of indoor pollutant concentrations.

  19. Planning in information space for a quadrotor helicopter in a GPS-denied environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Ruijie

    2008-01-01

    Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) have thus far had limited success in flying autonomously indoors, with the exception of specially instrumented locations. In indoor environments, accurate global positioning information is ...

  20. NMR chemical shifts in amino acids: Effects of environments, electric field, and amine group rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Pfrommer, Bernd G.; Louie, Steven G.; Canning, Andrew

    2002-03-03

    The authors present calculations of NMR chemical shifts in crystalline phases of some representative amino acids such as glycine, alanine, and alanyl-alanine. To get an insight on how different environments affect the chemical shifts, they study the transition from the crystalline phase to completely isolated molecules of glycine. In the crystalline limit, the shifts are dominated by intermolecular hydrogen-bonds. In the molecular limit, however, dipole electric field effects dominate the behavior of the chemical shifts. They show that it is necessary to average the chemical shifts in glycine over geometries. Tensor components are analyzed to get the angle dependent proton chemical shifts, which is a more refined characterization method.

  1. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to having

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Carbon such as cleaners and pesticides How to Improve Indoor Air Quality · Open windows when you can to let in fresh air

  2. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 ThanksProgramEnricoEnvironment

  3. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 ThanksProgramEnricoEnvironmentVideo News Room

  4. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010 ThanksProgramEnricoEnvironmentVideo News

  5. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.W. Traynor Introduction Air pollution research has focused

  6. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  7. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): Trends in galaxy colours, morphology, and stellar populations with large scale structure, group, and pair environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpaslan, Mehmet; Robotham, Aaron S G; Obreschkow, Danail; Andrae, Ellen; Cluver, Michelle; Kelvin, Lee S; Lange, Rebecca; Owers, Matt; Taylor, Edward N; Andrews, Stephen K; Bamford, Steven; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brough, Sarah; Brown, Michael J I; Colless, Matthew; Davies, Luke J M; Eardley, Elizabeth; Grootes, Meiert W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kennedy, Rebecca; Liske, Jochen; Lara-Lopez, Maritza A; Lopez-Sanchez, Angel R; Loveday, Jon; Madore, Barry F; Mahajan, Smriti; Meyer, Martin; Moffett, Amanda; Norberg, Peder; Penny, Samantha; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Popescu, Cristina C; Seibert, Mark; Tuffs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    We explore trends in galaxy properties with Mpc-scale structures using catalogues of environment and large scale structure from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. Existing GAMA catalogues of large scale structure, group and pair membership allow us to construct galaxy stellar mass functions for different environmental types. To avoid simply extracting the known underlying correlations between galaxy properties and stellar mass, we create a mass matched sample of galaxies with stellar masses between $9.5 \\leq \\log{M_*/h^{-2} M_{\\odot}} \\leq 11$ for each environmental population. Using these samples, we show that mass normalised galaxies in different large scale environments have similar energy outputs, $u-r$ colours, luminosities, and morphologies. Extending our analysis to group and pair environments, we show galaxies that are not in groups or pairs exhibit similar characteristics to each other regardless of broader environment. For our mass controlled sample, we fail to see a strong dependence of S\\...

  8. 2014 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation, 27th October 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Vinay

    , India Email: vinay@cse.iitd.ernet.in Saurabh Tewari CSR Technologies India Pvt. Ltd. Noida, India Email: Saurabh.Tewari@csr.com Abstract--Indoor maps are highly essential for indoor posi- tioning and location

  9. Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown...

  10. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    for studies of indoor air quality and energy utilization inExt. 6782 Indoor Air Quality in Energy- Buildings Craig D.1, 1979) Indoor Air Quality in Energy~Efficient LBL-8892 EEB

  11. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Union of Air Pollution Prevention Associations,The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976, GeometAnnual Meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association,

  12. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

  13. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 – 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

  14. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402K-13001, February 2013 iaprev1.pdf More Documents...

  15. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

  16. Combination of Indoor and Outdoor PositioningOutdoor Positioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (indoor, outdoor, urban, rural, remote) Active / passive sensors Accuracy (m ­ km) Application (industry of various building materials (L1 = 1500 MHz) Indoors: Positioning Requirements Overview of Systems GNSS

  17. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Quality and Energy Education In addition toAPPENDIX A1: Tenant Indoor Environmental Quality and Energyimproving indoor air quality (IAQ), energy efficiency and

  18. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    focused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on humanpollution sources exist inside buildings, notably sources associated with combustion (

  19. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  20. Bayesian Approach for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    Bayesian Approach for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation Ivan Spassov, EPFL ENAC TOPO Michel Bierlaire for Indoor Pedestrian Localisation Ivan Spassov EPFL ENAC TOPO Lausanne - Switzerland Michel Bierlaire EPFL via GPS or defined by the user. Consider a pedestrian navigation system which contains a GPS receiver

  1. A wireless LAN-based indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    A wireless LAN- based indoor positioning technology Z. Xiang S. Song J. Chen H. Wang J. Huang X services by exploiting user context information. In this paper, we present a wireless-local- area-network-based (WLAN-based) indoor positioning technology. The wireless device deploys a position- determination model

  2. Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy utilities, governmentNuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors

  3. Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of indoor air pollution determinant factors Jean-Baptiste Masson1,2 * , Gérard Govaert2 , Corinne Mandin1 representing different types of indoor air pollution. We restrain to the 20 variables corresponding to indoorClassification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification

  4. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    G.W. , "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBLfocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on human

  5. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

  6. TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, V.

    2008-01-01

    The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program...

  7. Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

  8. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  9. Environment Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the sustainable management of forests and woodlands #12;Applicant's Guidance Strategic Forest Plans - applicant EnvironmentEconomy Strategic Forest Plans applicant's guidance #12;Strategic Forest Plans 2 | Strategic Forest Plans - applicant's guidance A Forest Plan is a strategic long term plan that aims to encourage

  10. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality can cause a stuffy nose, sore throat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products such as cleaners and bug sprays » Outdoor air pollution from factories, vehicles, wildfires allergies may have severe reactions. Common Indoor Air Pollutants Poor indoor air quality comes from many have asthma triggered by outdoor air pollution or pollen, opening windows might not be a good idea

  11. Improving Indoor Environmental Quality And Energy Performance Of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Spears, Michael; Lai, Chi-Ming; Shendell, Derek G.

    2005-01-01

    INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFINDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFEnergy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are

  12. The effects of indoor pollution on Arizona children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, R.

    1982-05-01

    The respiratory health of a large group of Arizona school children who have been exposed to indoor pollutants-tobacco smoke and home cooking fumes-is reported. A significant relationship was found between parental smoking and symptoms of cough, wheeze, and sputum production. Also, children in homes where gas cooking fuel was used had higher rates of cough than children in homes where electricity was used. No differences in pulmonary function or yearly lung growth rates occurred among subjects grouped by exposure to tobacco smoke or cooking fuel. Thus, parental smoking and home cooking fuel affected cross-sectional respiratory symptom rates in a large group of Arizona school children. Study of pulmonary function, however, revealed no lung function or lung growth effects during 4 yr of study.

  13. Environment matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This year's annual review is devoted to the theme of environmental health. It contains: an overview by the Director of the World Bank's Environment Department, J. Warren Evans; viewpoints on health risks of environmental pollution, integrating health concerns into carbon planning, sanitation in the world's poorest countries and impacts of indoor air pollution on health; and reviews on the World Bank's efforts to adapt safeguards to demanding priorities and on the Banks' 2005 environmental portfolio. Feature articles include a review of the Bank's Clean Air Initiative (now active in Africa, South and East Asia and Latin America). Reviews of work in the Bank's six regions focus on efforts to address the linkages among poverty, environmental pollution and human health.

  14. Thermal Insulating Concrete Wall Panel Design for Sustainable Built Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Ao

    Air-conditioning system plays a significant role in providing users a thermally comfortable indoor environment, which is a necessity in modern buildings. In order to save the vast energy consumed by air-conditioning system, ...

  15. Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building in relation to indoor air quality. Page 1 of 14 Needs Attention Not ApplicableOKComponent Comments Outside Air Screen Unobstructed? General condition? Size of mesh? (1 /2" minimum) Outside Air Dampers Operation

  16. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  17. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    and J. D. Wooley. Indoor chemistry: ozone volatile organicTibbetts. Ozone Reactive Chemistry on Interior Latex Paint.and the role of reactive chemistry. Indoor A ir. 16 (2006)7-

  18. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor chemical reactions may be more harmful to habitants. A few building flaws may be key factors...

  19. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore »measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.

  1. Aalborg Universitet Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Aalborg Universitet Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Yang, Zhenyu; Valente, Andrea., & Valente, A. (2010). Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate. I E E E Conference on Control Applications from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 07, 2015 #12;Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea

  2. Indoor air quality in French dwellings Sverine Kirchner1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on Indoor Air Quality (OQAI) aims at collecting data on population exposure to indoor pollutants in various INTRODUCTION Our lack of understanding of the health risks related to air pollutants exposure in buildingsIndoor air quality in French dwellings Séverine Kirchner1,* , Mickael Derbez1 , Cédric Duboudin2

  3. Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavehrad, Mohsen

    Indoor positioning algorithm using light- emitting diode visible light communications Zhou Zhou of Use: http://spiedl.org/terms #12;Indoor positioning algorithm using light-emitting diode visible light. This paper proposes a novel indoor positioning algorithm using visible light communications (VLC

  4. INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) PROGGRAM GUIDELINE HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICE GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    congestion, itching, coughing, and runny nose. Throat symptoms include feelings of dryness and irritation

  5. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fagan, Jr., Thomas J. (Penn HIlls, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Humphrey, Joseph R. (Grand Rapids, MI)

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  6. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Quality - Interviews Credits Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 5 Designer Occupant (7 interviews) Operations/Managementquality standpoint by not always from a thermal comfort standpoint. Operations interviews: All three buildings management

  7. Mechanism of Thermal Comfort and Its Application in Indoor Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lian, Z.; Liu, W.; Ye, X.; Ye, Y.

    2006-01-01

    -70% and air velocity was maintained at 0.2m/s during the experiment. The range of ambient temperature is from 16 to 34 . We measured the peak value of electric current of metabolite of dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC) in PO.... Differences were considered statistically significant as Pambient temperature resulted in the fluctuation of DOPAC. Since...

  8. Human Trajectory Forecasting In Indoor Environments Using Geometric Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addressing this problem, we have built a model to estimate the occupancy behavior of humans based enhancement in the accuracy of trajectory forecasting by incorporating the occupancy behavior model. Keywords Trajectory forecasting, human occupancy behavior, 3D ge- ometric context 1. INTRODUCTION Given a human

  9. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    maintenance programs, water and energy use, environmentallySustainable Sites, Energy and Atmosphere, Water Efficiency,

  10. RADON AND ALDEHYDE CONCENTRATIONS IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moschandreas, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    present study controlled only the air infiltration rate, i tinfiltration rates and contaminant levels. The objectives of the study

  11. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Potential recommendations for LEED, Buildings, Designers,of IEQ-related satisfaction in LEED buildings, however, theyThere was a time gap between LEED cert and occupant survey –

  12. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    review for each building based on their design approach to LEED,reviews of project and site documentation. The air-quality LEED

  13. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  15. Algorithms for GPS operation indoors and downtown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    Algorithms for GPS operation indoors and downtown Nainesh Agarwal Æ Julien Basch Æ Paul Beckmann Æ Piyush Bharti Æ Scott Bloebaum Stefano Casadei Æ Andrew Chou Æ Per Enge Æ Wungkum Fong Æ Neesha Hathi. Casadei Æ A. Chou Æ P. Enge Æ W. Fong N. Hathi Æ W. Mann Æ J. Stone Æ J. Tsitsiklis Æ B. Van Roy

  16. ION GNSS12 Conference, Session F1, Nashville, TN (Sep 18-21, 2012) Investigating Indoor GPS Doppler and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    1/10 ION GNSS12 Conference, Session F1, Nashville, TN (Sep 18-21, 2012) Investigating Indoor GPS School of Engineering Position, Location and Navigation (PLAN) Group University of Calgary BIOGRAPHY of the Department of Geomatics Engineering at the University of Calgary. He received his BSc from the Isfahan

  17. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  18. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    1989). Residential indoor air quality and energy efficiency.book Residential Indoor Air Quality and Energy Efficiency by2009). Indoor air quality in highly energy efficient homes—A

  19. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

  20. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building Prev Next Title: Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental...

  2. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Swainson, M. (2009). Indoor air quality in highly energyClayton, R. (2001). Indoor air quality: Residential cookingSacramento, CA: California Air Resources Board. Fugler, D. ,

  3. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    2002; 7. Goldmann DA. Transmission of viral respiratoryScheme of Infection Transmission Indoors 34. Krauter P,nosocomial tuberculosis transmission. Indoor Air, 1998; 8(

  4. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika

    2012-01-01

    caused by indoor air pollution, thermal load and noise.thermal load, low-frequency venti- lation noise and indoor air pollution.

  5. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  6. Vision-based guidance and control of a hovering vehicle in unknown environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Spencer Greg

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents a methodology, architecture, hardware implementation, and results of a system capable of controlling and guiding a hovering vehicle in unknown environments, emphasizing cluttered indoor spaces. Six-axis ...

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA The indoor microbiome is a complex system that is thought to depend on dispersal from the outdoor biome and the occupants' microbiome

  8. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  9. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  10. Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order...

  11. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation J.M.Logue1,P Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation LBNL-4945E Disclaimer This document.H. Sherman, B.C. Singer, Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  12. Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini B;Modeling and Adaptive Control of Indoor Unmanned Aerial Vehicles by Bernard Michini Submitted for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract The operation of unmanned aerial

  13. Assessing Savings from Group Measures Proposed by Houston Ammendments for the 2009 IECC (Residential Provisions) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gain: 75% Energy Star CFL Indoor Lamps Improved DHW System Efficiency: Tankless Water Heater, Energy Factor: 0.748 Measures Solar Domestic Hot Water System (32 sq.ft. collector area/unit) Photovoltaic Array for 6kW Improved Windows: Decreased U...-Factor (U-0.35) Groups Group 1 13% Group 2 22% Group 3 11% Group 4 10% Group 5 3% Group 6 9% Group 7 14% Site Energy Reduced Internal Heat Gain: 75% Energy Star CFL Indoor Lamps Improved DHW System Efficiency: Tankless water heater, Energy Factor: 0...

  14. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT, 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budnitz, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residentialG. W. Traynor, Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution,at LBL concerning combustion generated indoor air pollution

  15. Predicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    attributable to air pollution, 1.5 million of these from indoor air pollution. Worldwide there are more deathsPredicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea , Jim Kusznirb , Brian Lambb and Diane J that is often overlooked in maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the air quality of the environment. In this paper

  16. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2008-01-01

    strategies for identifying high-radon homes· . . . . . . . .C. Behavior of radon indoors: generalgeographic radon modeling •••••••••••. •••••. •..•••. ••• D.

  17. Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer5250E #12;Logue et al, Health Hazards in Indoor air LBNL5250E Health Hazards in Indoor Air J, Singer BC, 2010 Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010 31st AIVC Conference, Low Energy

  18. Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheta, S.

    2010-01-01

    , while the second ranking was indoor radon (Huelman, 2004, pp. 10-21). Indoor environmental quality problems in earth sheltered buildings can take many forms but the main way to look at problems is to remember the three ?P?s? of indoor....), carbon monoxide and other combustion products, radon, pesticides, and household chemicals (Barcik, 2005, pp. 30-1). There are three basic aspects of indoor environmental quality that will be covered in this article?the sources of indoor air...

  19. We used both a J48 decision tree and a Nave Bayes Classifier to analyze how well the CO2 levels in the smart environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    . Indoor air quality is often described by the presence or absence of various pollutants. These pollutants be learned with a reasonable amount of accuracy and therefore used as a partial indicator of air quality. Acknowledgement & Citing Jones, A. P. "Indoor air quality and health." Atmospheric Environment 33 (1999): 4535

  20. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  1. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  2. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists.

  3. Clean-up of Contaminated Indoor Air Using Photocatalytic Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hingorani, S.; Greist, H.; Goswami, T.; Goswami, Y.

    2000-01-01

    to be completely effective. Dark control experiments were performed for each condition to confirm the validity of each experiment. The photocatalytic technology tested in these experiments was demonstrated to completely oxidize acetone at normal indoor air...

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM Chapter from the Energy and Environment Division Annual Report 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Authors, Various

    1981-05-01

    The aim of the Energy Efficient Buildings Program is to conduct theoretical and experimental research on various aspects of building technology that will permit such gains in energy efficiency without decreasing occupants' comfort or adversely affecting indoor air quality. To accomplish this goal, we have developed five major research groups. The foci of these groups are: Energy Performance of Buildings; Building Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality; Building Energy Analysis; Energy Efficient Windows and Lighting; and Building Energy Data, Analysis and Demonstration.

  5. ION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor Magnetic Field Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    ION GNSS 2010, Session F1, Portland, Oregon, 21-24 September 2010 Page 1 of 9 Assessment of Indoor Lachapelle Position Location and Navigation (PLAN) Group Department of Geomatics Engineering, University Engineering. He received his B.E. degree in Computer Systems Engineering from NED University of Engineering

  6. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  7. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  8. Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology for energy, environment, and health. NRG offers a wide range of services to energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindken, Ralph

    Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG) develops and provides sustainable nuclear technology organizations and various branches of industry - including the nuclear, financial services and medical sectors: Better prediction of the flow and heat transfer in liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors will contribute

  9. -Search-Register Submit News Blogs Protocols Forum Groups Shop All Health Bioscience Physical Science Environment Space Tech Life Origins Misc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    -Search- Register Submit News Blogs Protocols Forum Groups Shop All Health Bioscience Physical Blog articles Vladimir R BaruchChani Ahmed Michal Labspaces.net on Facebook 1,238 people like Labspaces.net. Like Facebook social plugin Email Forgot password? Not a member?News Blogs Featured Blogs 3-dimensional

  10. Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor...

  11. Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

  12. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  13. Lecture 9-10 Introduction to energy & environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lecture 9-10 HAS222d-09 Introduction to energy & environment Air pollution #12;applying flux of air pollution. This health impact represents about 4.3% percent of the total 56M deaths that occur annually in the world. Indoor air pollution is found to cause 1.6M of these deaths Smoking is not included

  14. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  15. THE ZURICH ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY (ZENS) OF GALAXIES IN GROUPS ALONG THE COSMIC WEB. V. PROPERTIES AND FREQUENCY OF MERGING SATELLITES AND CENTRALS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pipino, A.; Cibinel, A.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Lilly, S. J.; Miniati, F. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-PauiI-Strasse 27, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Silverman, J. D. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Van Gorkom, J. H. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Finoguenov, A., E-mail: anna.cibinel@cea.fr [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Hällströmin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-12-20

    We use the Zurich Environmental Study database to investigate the environmental dependence of the merger fraction ? and merging galaxy properties in a sample of ?1300 group galaxies with M > 10{sup 9.2} M {sub ?} and 0.05 < z < 0.0585. In all galaxy mass bins investigated in our study, we find that ? decreases by a factor of ?2-3 in groups with halo masses M {sub HALO} > 10{sup 13.5} M {sub ?} relative to less massive systems, indicating a suppression of merger activity in large potential wells. In the fiducial case of relaxed groups only, we measure a variation of ??/?log (M {sub HALO}) ? –0.07 dex{sup –1}, which is almost independent of galaxy mass and merger stage. At galaxy masses >10{sup 10.2} M {sub ?}, most mergers are dry accretions of quenched satellites onto quenched centrals, leading to a strong increase of ? with decreasing group-centric distance at these mass scales. Both satellite and central galaxies in these high-mass mergers do not differ in color and structural properties from a control sample of nonmerging galaxies of equal mass and rank. At galaxy masses of <10{sup 10.2} M {sub ?} where we mostly probe satellite-satellite pairs and mergers between star-forming systems close pairs (projected distance <10-20 kpc) show instead ?2 × enhanced (specific) star formation rates and ?1.5 × larger sizes than similar mass, nonmerging satellites. The increase in both size and star formation rate leads to similar surface star formation densities in the merging and control-sample satellite populations.

  16. Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships Jean-Christophe Zufferey-Christophe.Zufferey@epfl.ch Abstract Because of their ability to naturally float in the air, indoor airships (often called blimps) con physics-based dynamic modelling of indoor airships including a pragmatic methodology for parameter

  17. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane [TIAX LLC., Lexington, MA (United States)

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  18. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  19. Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air quality dependent ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air online 19 May 2015 Keywords: Ventilation control system Indoor air quality Indoor air pollution control Outdoor air quality Passenger health promotion Ventilation energy a b s t r a c t Indoor air quality (IAQ

  20. Experimental Evaluation of an Angle Based Indoor Localization System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nasipuri, Asis

    Experimental Evaluation of an Angle Based Indoor Localization System Asis Nasipuri and Ribal El available off-the-shelf components. Wireless sensor nodes equipped with photo sensors determine is required at the sensor nodes. The system also does not involve any centralized server or off

  1. A Sensor Placement Approach for the Monitoring of Indoor Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    needed by research projects on energy management (ERGDOM [1]) and on the medical monitoringA Sensor Placement Approach for the Monitoring of Indoor Scenes Pierre David, Vincent Idasiak of a French project, which aims at developing a new human presence sensor, we intend to design a sensor system

  2. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  3. Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental measurements and collect energy consumption data. Based on analyses of the data collected fromEnergy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/environmental August 2011 The Issue

  4. Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts point to serve one floor and its staircase region achieves the best handover performance for IWN]. An alternative approach to transmitt/receive the RF signal is to use heating, ventilation, and airconditioning

  5. LuxTrace -Indoor Positioning Using Building Illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigations evaluate the potential for using solar modules alone as a low-cost alternative for estimating constraints of practical systems including, but not limited to, global cost, device volume and weight and used indoors. We investigate the use of wearable solar cells to track changing light conditions (a

  6. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    of researchers in combustion, pollution chemistry, massTraynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; Apr~l,Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBL-

  7. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acutekerosene fuel combustion Indoor air pollution from biomasscombustion emits naphthalene [44, 46, 83, 84] and formaldehyde [42, 45, 85]. In the indoor air pollution

  8. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  9. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    caused by office's thermal Environment, J. Archit. Plann.Standard 55- 2010. Thermal environment conditions for humanindoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and

  10. Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    38961 Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon ConcentrationsRadon Potential Assessment of New Hampshire, Geologic Radoncollected in the New Hampshire Radon Survey. Fig. 2. The

  11. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and...

  12. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  13. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoor release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-01-01

    Indoor C in Deposition Resuspension Exhaust Figure 1deposition loss rate to areas where resuspension may occur (h -1 ) r: resuspension rate from “temporary” areas (h -1 ) D

  14. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    surfaces, and resuspension activities lead to significantnear a secondary lead smelter, indicates that resuspensionresuspension. However, even moderate indoor activity, such as walking, can lead

  15. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  16. Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthma and Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, indoor materials or finishes such as carpet, flexible flooring, paint,

  17. Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

    2010-01-01

    ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

  18. High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes White + GreenSpec SHEET PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS #12;High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes NIST GCR 14 Division provides scientific leadership to help the U.S. achieve its vision of net zero energy (NZE

  19. Vol. 39, No. 11 ACTA AUTOMATICA SINICA November, 2013 A Comprehensive UAV Indoor Navigation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    Vol. 39, No. 11 ACTA AUTOMATICA SINICA November, 2013 A Comprehensive UAV Indoor Navigation System for an indoor quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system. Three main sensors are used onboard the quadrotor. With this setup, the UAV is able to estimate its own velocity and position robustly, while flying along

  20. Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A) Austin, TX 78758, USA ABSTRACT Most ozone exposure occurs indoors even though some surfaces consume ozone and reduce its concentration relative to outdoors. Ozone consumption often results in emissions of secondary

  1. Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU, {muellerj, burgard}@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Abstract In recent years, autonomous miniature airships have navigation, sonar, IMU 1 Introduction Miniature airships as autonomous mobile systems for indoor navigation

  2. Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

  3. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition

  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Integration of WiFi and MEMS Sensors for Indoor Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY Integration of WiFi and MEMS Sensors for Indoor Navigation by Yuan Zhuang of MEMS sensors and WiFi offer an efficient integration for indoor navigation applications. Two automatic-coupled) integration and TC (Tightly-coupled) integration are implemented for WiFi and MEMS sensors to further limit

  5. Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Characterization of the Impact of Indoor Doppler Errors on Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Valérie, University of Calgary 2500 University Drive NW Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 1N4 Abstract--Indoor pedestrian on a Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) navigation filter is investigated. Doppler errors are simulated using

  6. MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    -Fi fingerprints; (2) an air exchange rate based IAQ sensing method, which measures general IAQ using only CO2MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yifei Jiang , Kun Li,omkar}@umich.edu, § dickrp@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT Most people spend more than 90% of their time in- doors; indoor air

  7. Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target Discovery and Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mission Specification and Control for Unmanned Aerial and Ground Vehicles for Indoor Target of unmanned vehicles in mixed indoor/outdoor reconnaissance scenarios. We outline the tools and techniques microautonomous vehicles become available. In the scenarios that serve as the focus of this paper, an unmanned

  8. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonderegger, R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Traynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; April,W. Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," inof combustion-generated indoor air pollution concluded that

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    NOVAKOV INDOOR AIR POLLUTION STUDIES U COMBUSTION RESEARCHat LBL concerning combustion generated indoor air pollutionG. W. Traynor, Combustion-Generated Indoor Ajr Pollution,

  11. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  13. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    and radon from the outgassing of building materials. Theproblems with the outgassing of formaldehyde from One methodbecause of formaldehyde outgassing from building materials

  14. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    1de hyde Adhesives Organics Paint Mercury, Organics Buildingorganics emitted from common building materials such as adhesives, sealants, paints,of paint, var- nish. pesticides, and various organic

  15. Potential Nationwide Improvements in Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of BuildingEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building

  16. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    as 0.5 ppm when one top burner was operated for less than 300.25 ach) when using two bUrners for 16 minutes. Similargas stove overs and top burners are shown in Tables 4 and 5,

  17. Impact on the Indoor Environment of the Release and Diffusion of TVOC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01

    source. The control function of the mechanism mode is put forward according to the process of the TVOC under dry conditions within the room in this study. The function is made up of three parts: the diffusion transport function of VOCS in the material...

  18. Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

    2004-01-01

    1989. Determinants of school performance in children withtreatment to school performance and student behavior. AnnSchool attendance and school performance: a population-based

  19. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    and DiMattio, American Industrial Hygiene Association, "76:471. American Industrial Hygiene Association, "Community

  20. Interactive 3D Modeling of Indoor Environments with a Consumer Depth Camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at SeattleUniversity of

    are far from accessible to average consumers. Recently, image-based 3D modeling has become feasible, with Photo Tourism [28] being a prominent example how 3D structures can be recovered by analyzing

  1. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    operating system and the INGRES data base management system,management system to support a single controlled vocabulary able to index any bibliographic citation maintained in the data base.

  2. 3D Modeling of Indoor Environments for a Robotic Security Guard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    and a panoramic camera. The data are processed in a pipeline that comprises automatic, semiautomatic and manual security operations and reduce the risk of injury to human workers. The design philosophy is based

  3. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    RESIDENTiAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 18,95 Quadsregulations; COMMERCIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL

  4. Tips for Reducing Asthma Triggers in Indoor Environments The goal of parents who have children with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animal dander, feathers, dust, food, and cockroaches. If your child can avoid being exposed to trigger materials weekly or more often if needed. Vacuum and wet mop hard-surface flooring often to reduce dust these #12;products. Consider using less toxic products. Keep foods "in the kitchen" for easier cleaning

  5. Emergency Guiding and Monitoring Applications in Indoor 3D Environments by Wireless Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    : floor/stair gateway D: floor/roof gateway (0, 0) (0, 1) (1, 0) (0, 0) (0, 2)(0, 0) (0, 1) (0, 1)(0, 1 of research works have been dedicated to WSN, including energy-efficient MAC protocols [12, 27], routing

  6. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  7. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  8. Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catalina, T.

    2011-01-01

    that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

  9. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    models for fine particle resuspension from indoor surfaces.Reed J, Hall D. On the resuspension of small parti- cles byFichman M, Gutfinger C. Resuspension of par- ticulates from

  10. Improve Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Building Performance: Leveraging Technology to Improve All Three 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, D.

    2011-01-01

    suburban-- locations, outdoor air is actually far more polluted than indoor air. Appropriate application of air cleaning technologies and monitoring can allow many buildings to achieve both improved IAQ and lower operating costs....

  11. Analysis of realistic ultrawideband indoor communication channels by using an efficient ray-tracing based method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malik, Wasim Q.

    A fundamental step in ultrawideband (UWB) communication system design involves the characterization of the indoor propagation channel. In this paper, we show that the UWB propagation channel parameters can be accurately ...

  12. Determining the Depositional Environment of the Lower Eagle Ford Group in Lozier Canyon, Antonio Creek, and Osman Canyon: An Out Crop Study of Bedding Features a Study of Bedding Features at Outcrop Scale or in the Outcrop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyon, Trey Saxon

    2015-05-13

    The Eagle Ford Formation is currently the most economically significant unconventional resource play in the state of Texas. There has been much debate as to the environment of deposition for the lowermost Facies A of the Eagle Ford in outcrop...

  13. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  14. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  15. sustainable environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change · Build management skills for policy development sustainable resource management Cefas helpssustainable resource management environment fisheries aquaculture Cefas capability statement #12;sustainable resource management 4 managing environmental resources 4 institutional development 5 an integrated

  16. MCSE Project Report COMPUTER SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE WORK (CSCW) ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology research because a conventional CSCW environment normally supports a group of users working of online 3D technology include electronic commerce, collaborative working environment, educationMCSE Project Report COMPUTER SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE WORK (CSCW) ENVIRONMENT USING VRML AND CGI

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Indoor Air and Environmental Tobacco Smoke Measured with a New Integrated Organic Vapor-Particle Sampler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, C.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental tobaccoof polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Indoor Air 1991;1:497-NK. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives

  18. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  19. Automata groups 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muntyan, Yevgen

    2010-01-16

    automata over the alphabet of 2 letters and 2-state automata over the 3-letter alphabet. We continue the classification work started by the research group at Texas A&M University ([BGK+07a, BGK+07b]) and further reduce the number of pairwise nonisomorphic...

  20. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

  1. Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

  2. BID NO: SKA SSLE 009/2011 SUPPLY, DELIVERY AND INSTALLATION OF ROTARY UPS, MV INDOOR SWITCHGEAR AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    SWITCHGEAR AND POWER TRANSFORMERS AT THE MeerKAT SITE NEAR CARNARVON, NORTHERN CAPE TENDER NOTICE and Installation of Rotary UPS, MV Indoor Switchgear and Power Transformers at the MeerKAT Site near Carnarvon, alternator and kinetic module on shared base frame) diesel rotary UPSs, 22 kV and 33 kV indoor switchgear

  3. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in ''real-world'' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in ''real-world'' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the ''real world''. The use of solanesol was compromised--as it had been in the chamber experiments.

  4. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10

  5. Sensing by Proxy: Occupancy Detection Based on Indoor CO2 Concentration Ming Jin, Nikolaos Bekiaris-Liberis, Kevin Weekly, Costas Spanos, Alexandre Bayen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing by Proxy: Occupancy Detection Based on Indoor CO2 Concentration Ming Jin, Nikolaos Bekiaris on indoor CO2 concentration. We propose a link model that relates the proxy measurements with unknown human, small particulates (PM2.5), CO2, illumi- nation, temperature, and humidity [6], [8], [9]. Indoor CO2

  6. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  7. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  8. Performance of Multiple Pulse Multiple Delay Modulated UWB Signals in a Multiple Access Indoor Wireless Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekoogar, F

    2003-06-12

    In this paper, the performance of a two user UWB multiple access (UWB-MA) system based on multiple-pulse multiple-delay (MPMD) modulation scheme in an indoor wireless channel is evaluated by computer simulations. The indoor multipath propagation channel model used in this study is based on the modified statistical Saleh-Valenzuela model proposed by Foerester and Li from Intel. The simulation results indicate that the multipath performance of MPMD modulated signals in a multiple access system outperforms the nonmultipath case as the number of autocorrelation function (ACF) sampling points increases for each user. This is an unusual but important result, since MPMD receiver exploits multipath phenomenon in indoor wireless channels to increase the BER performance, hence the transmission rate in a UWB-MA system.

  9. Modeling, Real-Time Estimation, and Identification of UWB Indoor Wireless Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL] [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Yanyan [ORNL] [ORNL; Fathy, Aly [University of Tennessee (UT)] [University of Tennessee (UT)

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, stochastic differential equations (SDEs) are used to model ultrawideband (UWB) indoor wireless channels. We show that the impulse responses for time-varying indoor wireless channels can be approximated in a mean square sense as close as desired by impulse responses that can be realized by SDEs. The state variables represent the inphase and quadrature components of the UWB channel. The expected maximization and extended Kalman filter are employed to recursively identify and estimate the channel parameters and states, respectively, from online received signal strength measured data. Both resolvable and non-resolvable multipath received signals are considered and represented as small-scaled Nakagami fading. The proposed models together with the estimation algorithm are tested using UWB indoor measurement data demonstrating the method s viability and the results are presented.

  10. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  11. Who are Climbing the Walls? An Exploration of the Social World of Indoor Rock Climbing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurten, Jason Henry

    2011-02-22

    .B.A., Texas A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. C. Scott Shafer Dr. David Scot This study is an exploratory look at the social world of indoor rock climbers, specifically, those at Texas A&M University. A... ARE CLIMBING THE WALLS? AN EXPLORATION OF THE SOCIAL WORLD OF INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING A Thesis by JASON HENRY KURTEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  12. INDOOR POSITIONING AN AD-HOC POSITIONING SYSTEM Rainer Mautz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to enable continuous tracking of the location of devices in all environments. Highly accurate, reliable 3D computers, printers, or simple tags with wireless radio connections that are `intelligent' enough to be able

  13. Community, Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibilitydefault SignEnvironment

  14. A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    A Measurement Study of Zigbee-based Indoor Localization Systems Under RF Interference Seng 802.11) and Zigbee (IEEE 802.15.4) all operate in the 2.4x GHz fre- quency bands. The stability and availability of RSSI infor- mation for WiFi- or Zigbee-based localization systems may vary depending

  15. Indoor airborne bacterial communities are influenced by ventilation, occupancy, and outdoor air source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    , is an energy-efficient way to simultaneously cool building mass and avoid overnight and weekend microbial an intensive temporal study of indoor airborne bacterial communities in a high-traffic university building associated with differing ventilation strategies relevant to modern building design. Our results indicate

  16. Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Technical note Barriers and opportunities for passive removal of indoor ozone Elliott T. Gall presents a Monte Carlo simulation to assess passive removal materials (PRMs) that remove ozone of homes in Houston, Texas, were taken from the literature and combined with back- ground ozone removal

  17. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  18. Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

  19. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building Indoor Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    An Experimental Investigation of Occupancy-Based Energy-Efficient Control of Commercial Building of the effect on indoor climate, we verify that the controller achieves the energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems [1]. Energy-efficient control of HVAC systems

  1. Impact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    air pollution study (CITEPA), France * Corresponding email: Eva.Leoz@ineris.fr SUMMARY Data pollutants in ambient air. Consequently our study aims at describing both emission factors and inerisImpact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1 , Jacques Ribéron2

  2. Formaldehyde in residences: long-term indoor concentrations and influencing factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Formaldehyde in residences: long-term indoor concentrations and influencing factors Introduction Formaldehyde is a hazardous air pollutant that is widespread in residential buildings. It is a potent irritant. (2009) and Sax et al. (2006) concluded that formaldehyde was the highest contrib- utor to the cumulative

  3. LocSens -An Indoor Location Tracking System using Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerer, Theo

    proved itself for outdoor usage. But it is not suitable for indoor applications due to poor coverage: fbagci@uci.edu F. Kluge is with the Department of Computer Science, University of Augsburg, Germany, University of Augsburg, Germany, email: Theo.Ungerer@informatik.uni-augsburg.de N. Bagherzadeh

  4. Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helal, Abdelsalam

    . Dif- ferent from image sensor and sound sensor, MEMS accelerometer sensor can measure some biomedical, Localization of footstep source, MEMS accelerometer, Personal health care, Sensor net- work, Smart home. 1Estimation of Indoor Physical Activity Level Based on Footstep Vibration Signal Measured by MEMS

  5. Improving Indoor Air Quality Improves the Performance of Office Work and School Work 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wargocki, P.

    2008-01-01

    strong incentive for providing indoor air of a quality that is better than the minimum levels required by present standards. IAQ can be improved by reducing the pollution load on the air by selecting low-polluting building and furnishing materials...

  6. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  7. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01

    In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

  8. Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Lisa pollution in rural areas of developing countries. It is estimated that about half (53%) of all households in the poor countries of Latin American use biofuels (wood, dung and/or crop residues) to cook. Combustion by

  9. Ris-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION Jørn Roed Abstract. Beryllium-7 the pollution episode and airing shortly after is also investigated. Earlier relevant literature is reviewed descriptors; AEROSOLS; AIR FILTERS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR QUALITY; BUILDINGS; CONTAMINATION; DEPOSITION

  10. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boudreaux, Philip R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof assemblies against moisture. The key variables investigated were the leakage area from the attic to the outside, leakage area from the attic to the interior, leakage area from the interior to the outside, supply duct leakage in the attic, and interior moisture generation. These investigations are described in this report.

  11. Metrics-driven development of an autonomous indoor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Differential drive Ground-truth camera Sonars and IR Pan-tilt unit IMU Platform: depth-only perception #12 Obstacle avoidance Lag estimator Drive controller Differential drive Horizontal scan Path tracking in large environments #12;Key metric of autonomy: mean time to failure #12;10 Atrium Lounge Hallway

  12. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01

    and natural gas that may affect indoor air quality and (3)Natural Gas Fuel Oil/ Kerosene demand, in an effort to improve the quality

  13. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  14. Indoor climate control accounts for over 40% of the energy used in US residential buildings1, much of which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    ) Annual Energy Outlook 2011. 2. Li, V.C. "ECC­ Material, Structural, and Durability Performance," ConcreteIndoor climate control accounts for over 40% of the energy used in US residential buildings1, much

  15. System and method for secure group transactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y. (Rochester, MN)

    2006-04-25

    A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

  16. Very low temperature radiant heating/cooling indoor end system for efficient use of renewable energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Jianbo; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Congrong; Xiong, Weicheng; Zhu, Li

    2010-06-15

    Solar or solar-assisted space heating systems are becoming more and more popular. The solar energy utilization efficiency is high when the collector is coupled with indoor radiant heating suppliers, since in principle, lower supply temperature means lower demand temperature and then the system heat loss is less. A new type radiant end system is put forward for even lower supply temperature compared to the conventional radiant floor heating systems. A three dimensional model was established to investigate its energy supply capacities. Simulation results show that 50 W per meter length tube can be achieved with the medium temperature of 30 C for heating and 15 C for cooling. The predicted results agree well with the actual data from a demonstration building. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a supply temperature of 22 C in winter and of 17 C in summer already met the indoor requirements. The new end system has good prospects for effective use of local renewable resources. (author)

  17. PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Yu-Chen Chang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    PipeProbe: Mapping Spatial Layout of Indoor Water Pipelines Yu-Chen Chang1 , Tsung-Te Lai1 , Hao}@csie.ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract--We propose PipeProbe, a mobile sensor system for mapping water- sule into the source of the water pipelines. As the PipeProbe cap- sule traverses the pipelines

  18. Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Christopher P.; Ducati, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    and Photobiology A.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry Christopher P. Ireland* and Caterina Ducati Department of Materials... such as deodorizers or floor cleaners, removal of these is a key priority, particularly as many VOCs are known to be mutagenic or carcinogenic [11]. Whilst air purification techniques such as filtration via activated carbon [12] or thermal advanced oxidation processes...

  19. AC System Equipment Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirey, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Specification, Installation and Operational Options for Improved Indoor Humidity Control Don B. Shirey, III Program Manager Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, Florida ABSTRACT High-efficiency home designs have significantly reduced sensible...: Florida Solar Energy Center. James, P., J.E. Cummings, J. Sonne, R. Vieira, J. Klongerbo. 1997. The Effect of Residential Equipment Capacity on Energy Use, Demand, and Run-Time, FSEC-PF-328-97. Cocoa, FL: Florida Solar Energy Center. Lennox...

  20. Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

    2006-01-01

    The classrooms in Chongqing are taken as a study subject in this paper. Measurements of the indoor thermal environmental parameters, e.g., indoor dry/wet bulb temperature, and air velocity, were taken. Combined with the questionnaire, which included...

  1. GROUP STUDY ROOMS GROUP STUDY ROOMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    STAFF AREA LEVEL 2 LOBBY bookBot GROUP STUDY ROOMS GROUP STUDY ROOMS GROUPSTUDYROOMS RAIN GARDEN LIBRARY TECHNOLOGY AND MEDIA SPACES GROUP STUDY EVENT AND MEETING SPACES STAFF ONLY STAIRS INSTITUTES AND UNIVERSITY CENTERS #12;GROUP STUDY ROOMS MAKER SPACE LEARNING COMMONS LOCKERS LOCKERS LOCKERS TEACHING

  2. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function in children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neas, L.M.; Dockery, D.W.; Ware, J.H.; Spengler, J.D.; Speizer, F.E.; Ferris, B.G. Jr. )

    1991-07-15

    The effect of indoor nitrogen dioxide on the cumulative incidence of respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function level was studied in a cohort of 1,567 white children aged 7-11 years examined in six US cities from 1983 through 1988. Week-long measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained at three indoor locations over 2 consecutive weeks in both the winter and the summer months. The household annual average nitrogen dioxide concentration was modeled as a continuous variable and as four ordered categories. Multiple logistic regression analysis of symptom reports from a questionnaire administered after indoor monitoring showed that a 15-ppb increase in the household annual nitrogen dioxide mean was associated with an increased cumulative incidence of lower respiratory symptoms (odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (95% Cl) 1.1-1.7). The response variable indicated the report of one or more of the following symptoms: attacks of shortness of breath with wheeze, chronic wheeze, chronic cough, chronic phlegm, or bronchitis. Girls showed a stronger association (OR = 1.7, 95% Cl 1.3-2.2) than did boys (OR = 1.2, 95% Cl 0.9-1.5). An analysis of pulmonary function measurements showed no consistent effect of nitrogen dioxide. These results are consistent with earlier reports based on categorical indicators of household nitrogen dioxide sources and provide a more specific association with nitrogen dioxide as measured in children's homes.

  3. Indoor risk factors for cough and their relation to wheeze and sensitization in Chilean young adults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potts, J.F.; Rona, R.J.; Oyarzun, M.J.; Amigo, H.; Bustos, P.

    2008-04-15

    We assessed the effects of indoor risk factors, including smoking, on different types of cough and on cough and wheeze in combination. Our sample was composed of 1232 men and women residing in a semi-rural area of Chile. We used a standardized questionnaire, sensitization to 8 allergens, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine to assess cough and wheeze characteristics. Information was gathered on dampness, mold, ventilation, heating, housing quality, smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Most exposures were associated with cough alone or cough in combination with wheeze. Smoking, past smoking, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were strongly associated with dry cough and wheeze. The use of coal for heating was associated with dry cough. Leaks, mold, and lack of kitchen ventilation were associated with cough and wheeze. Nocturnal cough and productive cough were associated with specific types of sensitization, but dry cough was not. Productive cough was associated with hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Several different types of indoor exposures, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, are important contributors to morbidity associated with cough and wheeze. A vigorous preventive strategy designed to lower exposures to indoor risk factors would lower rates of respiratory morbidity.

  4. Distant microphone speech recognition in a noisy indoor environment: combining soft missing data and speech fragment decoding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barker, Jon

    of competing sources; the combined noise energy may be comparable to or even greater than that of the speech fragments (time-frequency regions dominated by a single sound source) should be included in the target; there will be significant room reverberation effects that will hinder source separation techniques. There exists

  5. Characteristics of Indoor Disaster Environments and their impact on Simultaneous Localization and Mapping for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Siddharth

    2015-07-30

    Localization and Mapping UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle UGV Unmanned Ground Vehicle CD Characteristic Dimension US&R Urban Search and Rescue EM Expectation Maximization DOF Degrees of Freedom RMSE Root Mean Squared Error v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT...

  6. Finding Hidden Group Structure in a Stream of Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaki, Mohammed Javeed

    in a communication network is a group of individuals planning an activity over a communication medium with- out group. The algorithms construct larger hidden groups by build- ing them up from smaller ones activity provides the ideal environment for groups to plan their activity undetected: the related

  7. Properties of Group Five and Group Seven transactinium elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilk, Philip A.

    2001-01-01

    of Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elementsof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements byof Group Five and Group Seven Transactinium Elements by

  8. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group NERSC User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteoC.Publications ContactDavidDataUser

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on...

  10. Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won't Last Real Price Projections, Selected Commodities 2007-2017 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 and Environment Institute (GDAE), Tufts University Project of Working Groups on Development and Environment, Tufts University Three-year Collaborative Project Rationale: assess the promise of agro

  11. Silent Study Group Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    36/72 36/7236/72 36/72 36/72 Silent Study Room 108C Group Study Room 108J Office Room 108A Office Room 108B Staff Room Room 108K Group Study Room 108I Group Study Room 108H Group Study Room 108G Group Study Room 108F Group Study Room 108E Group Study Room 108D Service Area Research Help / Circulation

  12. ENVIRONMENT AVIATION, ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT AND CEO, CONGRESSIONAL TESTIMONY, 200712 Aviation, environment, and energy

  13. A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P. Dick, Michael Hannigan, Qin Lv, Li Shang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    .shang}@colorado.edu Abstract--Indoor air quality is important. It influences human productivity and health. Personal pollution pollutant exposure is important. Currently, stationary and accurate air quality monitoring sen- sors [30A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P

  14. Monitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase of a pilot survey.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . KEYWORDS Air pollution, air stuffiness, formaldehyde, benzene. 1 INTRODUCTION Indoor air quality to determine an air stuffiness index as an indirect mean to assess pollutants accumulation in a closed spaceMonitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase

  15. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulate- cyclic organic matter, including carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene (5­9). Exposure to indoor air

  16. Matrix Groups Max Neunhffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer Introduction GAP examples Matrix groups in GAP Schreier-Sims Problems Group algebras SLPs Constructive recognition The problem Troubles Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer University of St Andrews GAC 2010, Allahabad #12;Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer Introduction GAP examples

  17. GROUP THERAPY Syracuse University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    your individual needs. In a group, up to eight students meet with one or two group therapists. MostGROUP THERAPY Syracuse University Counseling Center 200 Walnut Place Phone: 315-443-4715 Fax: 315-443-4276 counselingcenter.syr.edu WHAT STUDENTS SAY ABOUT GROUP THERAPY I was really anxious about joining a group

  18. Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372. A Dual Airflow Window for Indoor Air with exhausted indoor air. The energy needed to condition outdoor air is reduced because of the counterflow heat, the dual airflow window has a great potential for conserving energy and improving indoor air quality

  19. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  20. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2012-06-18

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  1. GRAYSTONE GROUP ADVERTISING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    and GRAYSTONE GROUP ADVERTISING Partnership The University Central Florida has partnered with the Graystone Group for the purposes of facilitating recruitment advertising services. Benefits of partnering evaluations. Placing Recruitment Advertising: · Graystone Group is available to support all your recruitment

  2. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Communications Topic Group was convened in April 1998 to improve internal and external strategic level communications regarding DOE shipments of radioactive and other hazardous materials.

  3. Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    and energy storage. #12;Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group 2, catalytic chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes, nanowire (silicon, germanium) growth, nanocom

  4. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments...

  5. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Transportation Protocols Topic Group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the protocols process. The Topic Group was formed to review a series of transportation protocols developed in response to a request for DOE to be more consistent in its approach to transportation.

  6. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  7. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  8. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  9. Evaluation of control strategies for volatile organic compounds in indoor air (journal article)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, K.; Debler, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses research which evaluates the application of adsorption techniques to the control of indoor organic vapors. The adsorption on activated carbon of three compounds representing three classes of organic species was studied at 30 C in the concentration range zero to 200 ppb using a microbalance. The three were benzene (aromatic), acetaldehyde (oxygenated aliphatic), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (halogenated aliphatic). Three sorbents (a wood base carbon, a coal base carbon, and a coconut shell base carbon) were examined. Uptakes for all the compounds on all the carbons were low (on the order of 10 to the minus 7th power gmol/g carbon). Simulation of a packed bed of carbon indicated that carbon adsorption may not be practical for continuous removal, but may be applicable to sudden releases (e.g., spills). Potential alternatives to activated carbon adsorption are discussed. Potentially toxic organic vapors are emitted from a wide variety of building materials, consumer products, and human activities. Control of indoor organic vapors generally involves removing the source and/or increasing the ventilation rate. The ubiquitous nature of sources of organic vapors generally makes source removal impractical. Increased ventilation causes increased energy usage with its resultant economic penalties. Therefore, practical removal methods are needed.

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  11. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  12. 2011 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Indoor Navigation (IPIN), 21-23 September 2011, Guimares, Portugal Figure 1. The camera pose can be estimated in respect to the laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * * Institute of Geodesy and Photogrammetry, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. Email: tilchs@ethz.ch Abstract--This paper demand on positioning capabilities in applications such as healthcare, disaster management, metrology, logistics or housekeeping. A growing market in indoor positioning technologies appoints the research

  13. Lesson 34a: Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasifiki [Pacific Ocean] Bahari Aktiki [Arctic Ocean] Bahari ya Mediterani [Mediterranean Sea] Bahari yaLesson 34a: Environment Environment [mazingira] bahari / bahari [ocean / sea / oceans / seas / farms] Bahari [ocean / sea] Bahari Hindi [Indian Ocean] Bahari Atlantiki [Atlantic Ocean] Bahari

  14. Engineering & the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    Engineering & the Environment Energy MSc Programmes MSc Energy & Sustainability (Including Energy, Resources and Climate Change; Energy, Environment and Buildings) MSc Sustainable Energy Technologies (SET of aeronautics & astronautics, mechanical engineering, ship science; audiology and acoustics; and civil

  15. Computing environment logbook

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  16. Environment and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  17. A crossover design study to evaluate the effectiveness of appliance inspection and servicing for lowering indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colome, S.D. ); Billick, I.H. ); Baker, P.E.; Beals, S.A.; Rubio, S.A.; Cunningham, S.J. ); Wilson, A.L. )

    1988-01-01

    Some researchers have suggested that natural gas appliances are significant contributors to indoor air pollution. Indoor unvented combustion appliances, such as gas-fired ranges, unvented space heaters, and portable kerosene space heaters, have been associated with a wide variety of pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), formaldehyde (HCHO), and respirable particles. Previous indoor air quality studies have demonstrated that indoor NO{sub 2} concentrations often exceed outdoor ambient levels when gas- burning appliances are used. Cooking with gas has been the focus of many of these studies, although other unvented appliances, such as space-heaters, have also been associated with elevated NO{sub 2} concentrations. Some epidemiologic studies of exposure to NO{sub 2} in homes with gas ranges have indicated a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and illness. However, other studies contradicted these findings and failed to show any significant effects associated with gas cooking.

  18. Demo Abstract: QiLoc--A Qi-Wireless Based Platform for Robust User-Initiated Indoor Location Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wireless charging protocol, a QiLoc Station is able to extract the unique IDs from phones placedLoc, we explore the use of the Qi wireless charg- ing protocol [2] for precise desk-level indoor location and identification. Qi is a widely adopted wireless charging stan- dard, which is based on electromagnetic induction

  19. Towards a Fully Autonomous Indoor Helicopter Slawomir Grzonka, Samir Bouabdallah, Giorgio Grisetti, Wolfram Burgard and Roland Siegwart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Towards a Fully Autonomous Indoor Helicopter Slawomir Grzonka, Samir Bouabdallah, Giorgio Grisetti the interest of the scientific community in the Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAV), fully autonomous micro-helicopters semi- autonomous coaxial helicopter which is able to fly for three minutes. Unfortunately, none

  20. ISTS'06 4th-6th September 2006, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Bayesian Inference for Autonomous Personal Localisation Indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    1 ISTS'06 4th-6th September 2006, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Bayesian Inference for Autonomous Personal Localisation Indoors Ivan Spassov EPFL ENAC TOPO Lausanne - Switzerland ivan.spassov@epfl.ch Prof. Michel Bierlaire EPFL SB IMA ROSO Lausanne - Switzerland michel.bierlaire@epfl.ch Prof. Bertrand Merminod

  1. 2013 International Conference on Indoor Positioning and Navigation, 28-31 October 2013, Montbliard-Belfort, France Demo Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinalipour, Demetris

    the building. The onboard smartphone sensors (i.e., accelerometer, gyroscope and digital compass to the back-end database in order to efficiently store metadata regarding indoor POIs and provide navigation the blueprint of a building on top of Google Maps with multi-floor support. The user can later add, annotate

  2. Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006) Radiation Protection Division works to address hazards posed by technologically enhanced naturally occurring #12;1 URANIUM LOCATION DATABASE COMPILATION Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA

  3. Mechanistic modeling of the interrelationships between indoor/outdoor air quality and human exposure in a GIS framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Purushothaman, V.; Georgopoulos, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of human exposure to atmospheric contaminants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM) is often based on measured data from fixed ambient (outdoors) Air Monitoring Stations. This results in an artificial characterization of indoor exposures, as concentrations and physicochemical attributes of indoor pollutants vary significantly and are different from corresponding outdoor values. A mechanistically-based modeling approach is presented here that aims to improve estimates for the outdoor/indoor relationships of photochemical pollutants and of associated fine particles and, subsequently, of human exposure assessments. New approaches for refining the spatial, temporal, and indoor/outdoor patterns of gas phase photochemical contaminants and PM are currently being developed and tested. These approaches are combined with information from either ambient monitoring networks or from ambient air quality models that consider aerosol physics and chemistry coupled with gas phase photochemistry (e.g. UAM-AERO). This process utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Relational Database (RD) methods, to facilitate detailed exposure scenario construction (involving e.g. the geographic location of an individual considered in time) and to aid in the estimation of population exposure over selected geographic areas. The combination of monitor data or air quality modeling with microenvironmental modeling in a GIS framework can potentially provide a useful platform for more accurate assessments of human exposure to co-occurring gas and particulate phase air pollutants.

  4. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

    2008-06-01

    Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

  5. Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder Wolkoff , Gunnar D. Nielsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Review Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder 2010 Accepted 25 May 2010 Available online 16 June 2010 Keywords: Airways Asthma Children Formaldehyde Sensory irritation Susceptible subgroups There is considerable recent focus and concern about formaldehyde

  6. Indoor Pictures Monitoring System using a Mobile Robot Tsutomu TAKESHITA, Akihisa OHYA and Shin'ichi YUTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Indoor Pictures Monitoring System using a Mobile Robot Tsutomu TAKESHITA, Akihisa OHYA and Shin, section 3, will explain this method in detail. Furthermore, this paper will discuss the developed Picture picture which is necessary for the modification. #12;standard image test image (a) (b) (c) Fig.1

  7. Indoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    will be placed in the basement. Carbon dioxide CO2 tank and monitors: A CO2 tank will be placed in a first floor closet, and programmed to release CO2 gas four times a day for 15 minutes each time. Two CO2 monitorsIndoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded

  8. Horticulture -Landscape Design programs1 teach individuals how to design gardens and whole landscapes, both indoors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    landscapes, both indoors and outdoors, which will enhance the beauty and practicality of a building, they design small gardens or a land management plan and learn how to develop the sketches and specifications; Forde Nursery & Landscaping; Morrison Design and Land- scaping Inc.; Silver Wind Landscaping

  9. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  10. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This group is responsible for the update of DOE Manual 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual.  This manual was issued on September 23, 2002, and establishes a set of...

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments.

  12. Tritium Focus Group- INEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014.

  13. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 24: Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 24: Training Quick Start Summary Product ID: 520-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/trainingQuickstart.pdf 1 Who needs to know about these requirements The requirements of Training apply to all persons on-site, employees and non-employees, their SLAC

  14. RESEARCH GROUP MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psarrakos, Panayiotis

    RESEARCH GROUP MANUFACTURING ADDITIVE www.lboro.ac.uk/amrg PhD Studentships in Additive by the Additive Manufacturing Research Group is based around a family of processes comprising of adding layers Additive Manufacturing Research Group in the Wolfson School of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering

  15. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  16. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  17. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  18. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  19. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  20. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment—Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  1. Carver User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting Started Configuration User Environment Programming Running Jobs File Storage Software and Tools Performance and Optimization Retirement Plans PDSF Genepool Testbeds...

  2. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT: CONFLICT OR COMPLEMENT?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, L.

    2011-01-01

    removing combustion-related pollution to electric powerstrategies reduce combustion-related pollution considerablyand G. Traynor, Combustion Generated Indoor Air Pollution,

  3. Organelle-selective energy transfer: A fluorescent indicator of intracellular environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Kevin

    Organelle-selective energy transfer: A fluorescent indicator of intracellular environment Aurore emission wavelength of a dye changes significantly with its intra- cellular environment. Probes monitoring dynamic organelle specific functions. Our group has an ongoing interest in `energy transfer

  4. Economic Environment - Arniban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc. Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1315Arniban Basu Microsoft PowerPoint - 03 Wyss Economic Outlook Compatibility Mode...

  5. BOINC-MR: MapReduce in a Volunteer Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Paulo

    BOINC-MR: MapReduce in a Volunteer Environment Short Paper Fernando Costa, Lu´is Veiga, and Paulo Ferreira Distributed Systems Group, INESC-ID Technical University of Lisbon R. Alves Redol, 9 1000

  6. Engineering & the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    (A&C) MSc Race car Aerodynamics (RCA) MSc Space Systems Engineering (SSE) MSc Unmanned VehicleEngineering & the Environment Aerospace Engineering MSc Programmes MSc Aerodynamics & Computation to the Faculty of Engineering & the Environment. We hope that you will find your stay here in Southampton both

  7. Sustainability Statement Environment Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metropolitan University www.mmu.ac.uk/environment MMU Annual Sustainability Statement 2008/2009 CO2 2 Contents 6 MMU Environment Strategy 7 Key Area 1 ­ Environmental Management Systems & Reporting 8 ­ 9 Key Area 2 ­ Energy and Carbon Emissions 10 ­ 11 Key Area 3 ­ Sustainable Buildings 12 Key Area 4 ­ Water

  8. Detector Support Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    browser. Concerns? Hall B Navigation DSG Home Staff Presentations Notes print version Detector Support Group Spotlight Archive Index Rotation test for the SVT detector EPICS...

  9. JLab Users Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UserResearcher Information print version UG Resources Background & Purpose Users Group Wiki By Laws Board of Directors Board of Directors Minutes Directory of Members Events...

  10. Welcome to CCIS: An Introduction to the CCIS environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    , and energy-efficient environment. The 40,000 sq. ft terrazzo floor, designed by Scott Parsons, is a signature-conditioning, resulting in a more comfortable, sustainable, and energy-efficient environment. By providing optimum low between academic space and PDF/graduate student space; the common areas grouped at the ends of building

  11. A Data Mining Framework for Activity Recognition In Smart Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    the useful features from sensor data collected in the smart home environment and select the most important algorithms and analyze the prediction results of two different group experiments performed in the smart home, data mining and pervasive computing. In the smart home environment research, most attention has been

  12. Applying Artificial Intelligence to Virtual Reality: Intelligent Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luck, Michael

    Applying Artificial Intelligence to Virtual Reality: Intelligent Virtual Environments Ruth Aylett intelligence and artificial life on the other has largely been carried out by two different groups of people combining artificial intelligence and artificial life techniques with those of virtual environments

  13. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 24: Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 24: Training Badging Procedure Product ID: http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/trainingProcedBadging.pdf 1 Purpose that indicates their minimum environment, safety, and health (ESH) training. It covers obtaining a SLAC

  14. Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

    2011-03-30

    The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

  15. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LASP's mechanical analysts also lead mechanical verification testing including: random vibration, forceMechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Protocols Topic Group Summary - July 1999 Jacksonville TEC Meeting,...

  17. Low Luminosity Activity in Hickson Compact Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Martinez; A. del Olmo; J. Perea; R. Coziol

    2006-11-02

    With the aim of studying the influence of environment on the nuclear activity of galaxies, we have selected a well defined sample of 65 Compact Groups of galaxies with concordant redshift in the Hickson Catalog. In this proceeding, we present the results of the classification of nuclear activity for 42 galaxies, based on newly obtained spectral observations. In this subsample, 71% of the galaxies turned out to have emission lines in their nuclei. 73% of these emission-line galaxies were found to have characteristics consistent with low luminosity AGN (LLAGN), which makes compact groups extremely rich in such objects.

  18. PCs in Business Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colak, Mijo Todor

    1994-07-29

    "PCs in Business Environment" is a project that contains two parts. First part is a real life application developed for Nordic Meat Inc. a small food - manufacturer in the KC area, developed in MS Excel 5.0 spreadsheet ...

  19. Polymers in disordered environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; N. Fricke; W. Janke

    2014-11-18

    A brief review of our recent studies aiming at a better understanding of the scaling behaviour of polymers in disordered environments is given. The main emphasis is on a simple generic model where the polymers are represented by (interacting) self-avoiding walks and the disordered environment by critical percolation clusters. The scaling behaviour of the number of conformations and their average spatial extent as a function of the number of monomers and the associated critical exponents $\\gamma$ and $\

  20. Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyInformationVulnerabilitiesEnergyPlus LogoEnvironment Environment

  1. Rhodes 801-A Rhodes 801-B Group 1: Group 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahay, Marc

    Marie Group 3: Group 3: Bennett, Christopher Paul Davenport, Austin Lovell Creech, Nathan Alan Colburn Worcester, Austin Thomas Group 8: Group 8: TableATableBTableCTableD TableATableBTableCTableD #12;Rhodes 801

  2. Central extensions of Current Groups and the Jacobi Group 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Docherty, Pamela Jane

    2012-11-28

    A current group GX is an infinite-dimensional Lie group of smooth maps from a smooth manifold X to a finite-dimensional Lie group G, endowed with pointwise multiplication. This thesis concerns current groups G§ for compact ...

  3. The genotoxic contribution of wood smoke to indoor respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, P.M. (John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory, New Haven, CT (USA)); Rossman, T.G. (New York Univ. Medical Center, New York (USA)); Daisey, J.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of wood burning stoves on the genotoxicity of indoor respirable organic matter was investigated for four homes during the winter and spring of 1986. Paired samples, one collected when the stove was not used and one when wood was burned, were extracted with dichloromethane and acetone. Aliquots of the dichloromethane extracts were analyzed with and without metabolic activation using the Microscreen bioassay. The Microscreen is a rapid, sensitive bioassay which measures a broad genotoxic endpoint, {lambda}-prophage induction. Per nanogram of organic material, wood smoke proved to be a major source of indirect (observed with metabolic activation) but not direct genotoxins in homes. The increase in indirect genotoxicity for extracts from aerosol containing wood smoke is probably due to higher concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the wood smoke aerosol as well as other unidentified classes. The direct genotoxicity observed for extracts of aerosol not containing wood smoke decreased with metabolic activation. This direct genotoxicity may be related to cooking activities in the homes. The trends in genotoxicity observed per nanogram of organic material are more pronounced when expressed per m{sup 3} of air due to the higher percentage of extractable material in aerosol containing wood smoke.

  4. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  5. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  6. Towards improved characterization of high-risk releases using heterogeneous indoor sensor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreedharan, Priya; Sohn, Michael D.; Nazaroff, William W.; J. Gadgil, Ashok

    2010-06-30

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardous to building occupants. For an acutely toxic contaminant, the speed of the emergency response strongly influences the consequences to occupants. The design of a real time sensor system is made challenging both by the urgency and complex nature of the event, and by the imperfect sensors and models available to describe it. In this research, we use Bayesian modeling to combine information from multiple types of sensors to improve the characterization of a release. We discuss conceptual and algorithmic considerations for selecting and fusing information from disparate sensors. To explore system performance, we use both real tracer gas data from experiments in a three story building, along with synthetic data, including information from door position sensors. The added information from door position sensors is found to be useful for many scenarios, but not always. We discuss the physical conditions and design factors that affect these results, such as the influence of the door positions on contaminant transport. We highlight potential benefits of multisensor data fusion, challenges in realizing those benefits, and opportunities for further improvement.

  7. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    loss in venti- lation ducts. Atmospheric Environment, 2003;36. Zuraimi M. Is ventilation duct cleaning useful? A reviewin the ven- tilation duct after an artificial release: For

  8. Global Properties of Neutral Hydrogen in Compact Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lisa May; Gallagher, Sarah C; Privon, George C; Kepley, Amanda A; Whelan, David G; Desjardins, Tyler D; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2015-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the evolution of galaxies amid frequent gravitational encounters. These nearby groups have conditions similar to those in the earlier universe when galaxies were assembled and give us the opportunity to witness hierarchical formation in progress. To understand how the compact group environment affects galaxy evolution, we examine the gas and dust in these groups. We present new single-dish GBT neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of 30 compact groups and define a new way to quantify the group HI content as the HI-to-stellar mass ratio of the group as a whole. We compare the HI content with mid-IR indicators of star formation and optical [g-r] color to search for correlations between group gas content and star formation activity of individual group members. Quiescent galaxies tend to live in HI-poor groups, and galaxies with active star formation are more commonly found in HI-rich groups. Intriguingly, we also find "rogue" galaxies whose star forma...

  9. Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict...

  10. Environment scattering in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean James; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

    2013-09-01

    Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Green's Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

  11. Energy/Environment/Commissioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahara, N.

    2006-01-01

    Nobuo NakaharaNobuo Nakahara ICEBO/APCBCAsia Pacific Conference on Building Commissioning 2006.11.7 Opening AddressOpening AddressEnergy/Environment/CommissioningEnergy/Environment/Commissioning Call for Call for partipationpartipation...%45%42%39%36%15%10%10%9%9%7%12%13%14%15%12%18%19%20%21%4%4%5%5%6%1%4%4%5%5%4%5%5%6%7% 02,0004,0006,0008,00010,00012,00014,00016,00018,00019712002201020202030 ?????????? 5,53610,34512,19414,40416,487OECD?????????????????????????????? ????IEA/World Energy Outlook 2004 Actual and Estimated Energy Demand in the World Africa Middle East...

  12. Geoscience/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not findGeoscience/Environment Geoscience/Environment Print From the

  13. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  14. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  15. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  16. The Learning Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    As a 4-H volunteer, you have tremendous influence in determining the learning that takes place within your 4-H club or group. Adult volunteers also have the task of making the learning experiences attractive to young people. ...

  17. Preprint version, final version at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/ 2014 IEEE Int. Conf. on Robotics and Automation, Hong Kong, China A Semi-autonomous UAV Platform for Indoor Remote Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Automation, Hong Kong, China A Semi-autonomous UAV Platform for Indoor Remote Operation with Visual present the development of a semi-autonomous quadrotor UAV platform for indoor teleoperation using RGB- D in order to stabilize the UAV velocity and track the desired velocity commanded by a remote operator though

  18. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Environment #12;Engineeringhas always been an essential element of society, and interaction. The engineer of the future is charged with revolutionizing the ways that we impact the world around us in order to build a healthy future. With respect to natural sciences and the engineering

  19. Multiprocessor programming environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  20. Author's personal copy Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    . The easternmost main islands of the Canary archipelago (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, North Atlantic Ocean, Spain Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Arid environments; Canary islands; Cream-coloured courser) harbour a stable population. The species showed an intense habitat selection pattern in these islands. Its

  1. Making the Link Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    advantage of economic opportunities offered in cities, or because of degraded environments in rural areas waste, sewage, and air pollution, as well as demands for energy, food, and other resources. In many infrastructure and regulatory mechanisms for coping with these side effects of growth, Demands on natural

  2. Population, Consumption & the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    consumes the 77 trillion barrels of oil energy equivalent per year ­ Fossil fuel consumption (oil, coal12/11/2009 1 Population, Consumption & the Environment Alex de Sherbinin Center for International of carbon in 2001 · The ecological footprint, a composite measure of consumption measured in hectares

  3. Interactive Virtual Environments Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    sensor data or by animation scripts. Human users can interact and directly manipulate objects within Reality Interactive Virtual Reality Virtualized Reality Augmented Reality #12;HUMAN PERCEPTION OF REALITY REAL WORLD / ENVIRONMENT HUMAN (sentient living animal able of sensible reasoning) #12;Real

  4. Environment, Heritage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    , heritage sites around Falkirk, and locations within Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Links with industry are strong and the programme benefits from visits from guest speakers who are experts in the field the Scottish environment first hand. 4. You will be taught by a strong team, with excellent industry links

  5. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; McNeil, Michael; Dunham_Whitehead, Camilla; Letschert, Virginie; della_Cava, Mirka

    2008-02-28

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) influences the market for plumbing fixtures and fittings by encouraging consumers to purchase products that carry the WaterSense label, which certifies those products as performing at low flow rates compared to unlabeled fixtures and fittings. As consumers decide to purchase water-efficient products, water consumption will decline nationwide. Decreased water consumption should prolong the operating life of water and wastewater treatment facilities.This report describes the method used to calculate national water savings attributable to EPA?s WaterSense program. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet model, the National Water Savings (NWS) analysis model, accompanies this methodology report. Version 1.0 of the NWS model evaluates indoor residential water consumption. Two additional documents, a Users? Guide to the spreadsheet model and an Impacts Report, accompany the NWS model and this methodology document. Altogether, these four documents represent Phase One of this project. The Users? Guide leads policy makers through the spreadsheet options available for projecting the water savings that result from various policy scenarios. The Impacts Report shows national water savings that will result from differing degrees of market saturation of high-efficiency water-using products.This detailed methodology report describes the NWS analysis model, which examines the effects of WaterSense by tracking the shipments of products that WaterSense has designated as water-efficient. The model estimates market penetration of products that carry the WaterSense label. Market penetration is calculated for both existing and new construction. The NWS model estimates savings based on an accounting analysis of water-using products and of building stock. Estimates of future national water savings will help policy makers further direct the focus of WaterSense and calculate stakeholder impacts from the program.Calculating the total gallons of water the WaterSense program saves nationwide involves integrating two components, or modules, of the NWS model. Module 1 calculates the baseline national water consumption of typical fixtures, fittings, and appliances prior to the program (as described in Section 2.0 of this report). Module 2 develops trends in efficiency for water-using products both in the business-as-usual case and as a result of the program (Section 3.0). The NWS model combines the two modules to calculate total gallons saved by the WaterSense program (Section 4.0). Figure 1 illustrates the modules and the process involved in modeling for the NWS model analysis.The output of the NWS model provides the base case for each end use, as well as a prediction of total residential indoor water consumption during the next two decades. Based on the calculations described in Section 4.0, we can project a timeline of water savings attributable to the WaterSense program. The savings increase each year as the program results in the installation of greater numbers of efficient products, which come to compose more and more of the product stock in households throughout the United States.

  6. Applied Estimation of Mobile Environments Kevin Weekly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a whole, measuring the water flow via drifters and producing flow fields of the river. The mobile the environmental sensing platform for indoor occupant stud- ies. The platform includes a design of a battery measurements from the sensors show that they can operate for over 5 years on a single battery. Discussed is how

  7. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in the ZEBRAlliance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, D.; Jackson, M.; Shrestha, S.

    2013-09-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. In this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in research houses located in Oak Ridge, TN, that were less than 2 years old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built, unoccupied, and unfurnished. The team identified air pollutants of concern in the test homes that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern from initial air sampling surveys. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74°F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused minimal to modest increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  8. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, Diana E; Jackson, Mark C; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  9. 12. Automatic Groups Suppose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilman, Robert

    for the generator a to the automaton in Figure 1, we obtain a synchronized automaton which accepts a linear language12. Automatic Groups Suppose : G is a choice of generators, and R is a rational language which are all synchronous and rational. We will define synchronous presently. R and are called an automatic

  10. Data Mining Group VNG Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Data Mining Group VNG Corporation Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 1 #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 2 1 ·Introduction 2 ·Edge Rank 3 ·Parameter Estimate 4 ·Conclusion #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 3 #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 4 #12; User's self activity Update status Write blogs

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summary April...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES January 31, 2008 December 6, 2007 October 4, 2007...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries August 17, 2006 (Draft) July 18, 2006 (Draft) June 20, 2006...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

  15. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - March 15, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Minneapolis TEC Meeting, Rail...

  17. Environment and Protostellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yichen

    2014-01-01

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of resulting star and planetary systems. Here we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focussing on low-mass, Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), to very high pressures that may be found in the densest Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) or in the Galactic Center (GC). We present unified analytic and numerical models for collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution and bipolar outflows, coupled to radiative transfer (RT) calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting...

  18. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  19. (Managing the global environment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.

    1989-10-03

    The conference was stimulated by concern that policy makers increasingly have to make environmental management decisions in the absence of solidly established scientific consensus about ecological processes and the consequences of human actions. Often, as in the case of climate change, some decisions may have to be made in the absence of information that is desirable but may not be available for years to come, if ever. Six topics were identified as running throughout the Congress. These were: the epistemology and history of the sciences or disciplines concerned with the environment, including the scientific basis of rationality and modes of dealing with uncertainty and complexity; the social, economic, and institutional conditions for the production of knowledge bearing on the environment, including the politics of research and the improvement of scientific data; the structuring and institutionalization of expert assessments on national and international levels, including the global distribution of expertise; the means of establishing scientific information, the role of the media in transmitting and processing knowledge about the environment, and the organization of public environmental debate; and decision making and management under conditions of uncertainty; and, finally the relationship between science and ethics. 13 refs.

  20. Power Systems Group Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Division Search APS ... Search Button About ASD General Information ASD Groups ESHQA Operations Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Power Systems Group This page is...

  1. Indoor air pollution from portable kerosene-fired space heaters. [Effects of wick height and fuel consumption rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Dillworth, J.F.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-02-01

    Indoor use of unvented combustion appliances is known to cause an increase in indoor air pollutant levels. Laboratory tests were conducted on radiant and convective portable kerosene-fired space heaters to identify the pollutants they emit and to determine their emission rates. Laboratory-derived CO and NO/sub 2/ emission rates from unvented portable kerosense-fired space heaters are summarized and the effect of wick height and fuel consumption rate on CO and NO/sub 2/ emissions is given. Pollutant concentration profiles resulting from the use of kerosene heaters in a 27m/sup 3/ environmental chamber and a 240m/sup 3/ house are presented. When such heaters are operated for one hour in a 27m/sup 3/ chamber with 0.4 air changes per hour, the resultant CO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above the U.S. occupational standard, and NO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above California's short-term outdoor standard. Further data on parameters such as heater usage patterns and air exchange rates are needed to determine the actual pollutant exposure that kerosene heater users experience.

  2. Spacecraft environment during the GIOTTO-Halley encounter: a summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D.T.

    1983-01-01

    A summary of the present volume is presented in which the separate disciplines are drawn together to give an overview of the spacecraft environment during the GIOTTO-Halley interaction. Specific recommendations are made as to how the work of the Plasma Environment Working Group might continue to contribute to the GIOTTO program during encounter and post-encounter data analysis. 28 references, 3 tables.

  3. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  4. Bayesian based design of real-time sensor systems for high-risk indoor contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sreedharan, Priya; Sreedharan, Priya

    2007-12-01

    The sudden release of toxic contaminants that reach indoor spaces can be hazardousto building occupants. To respond effectively, the contaminant release must be quicklydetected and characterized to determine unobserved parameters, such as release locationand strength. Characterizing the release requires solving an inverse problem. Designinga robust real-time sensor system that solves the inverse problem is challenging becausethe fate and transport of contaminants is complex, sensor information is limited andimperfect, and real-time estimation is computationally constrained.This dissertation uses a system-level approach, based on a Bayes Monte Carloframework, to develop sensor-system design concepts and methods. I describe threeinvestigations that explore complex relationships among sensors, network architecture,interpretation algorithms, and system performance. The investigations use data obtainedfrom tracer gas experiments conducted in a real building. The influence of individual sensor characteristics on the sensor-system performance for binary-type contaminant sensors is analyzed. Performance tradeoffs among sensor accuracy, threshold level and response time are identified; these attributes could not be inferred without a system-level analysis. For example, more accurate but slower sensors are found to outperform less accurate but faster sensors. Secondly, I investigate how the sensor-system performance can be understood in terms of contaminant transport processes and the model representation that is used to solve the inverse problem. The determination of release location and mass are shown to be related to and constrained by transport and mixing time scales. These time scales explain performance differences among different sensor networks. For example, the effect of longer sensor response times is comparably less for releases with longer mixing time scales. The third investigation explores how information fusion from heterogeneous sensors may improve the sensor-system performance and offset the need for more contaminant sensors. Physics- and algorithm-based frameworks are presented for selecting and fusing information from noncontaminant sensors. The frameworks are demonstrated with door-position sensors, which are found to be more useful in natural airflow conditions, but which cannot compensate for poor placement of contaminant sensors. The concepts and empirical findings have the potential to help in the design of sensor systems for more complex building systems. The research has broader relevance to additional environmental monitoring problems, fault detection and diagnostics, and system design.

  5. Aspects of a Collaborative Learning Environment using Distributed Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the last few years to incorporate information technology in the learning environment. The growing needAspects of a Collaborative Learning Environment using Distributed Virtual Environments C. Bouras, Computer Engineering and Informatics Dept., Univ. of Patras & Computer Technology Institute GR-26500 Rion

  6. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See Energy Level79AJ01)19^ U N I T ECommunications Group

  7. Working Group Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubictheThepresented in1: Model or Working Group

  8. Helms Research Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-Duty Waste HaulerHeikoHe,Helms Group

  9. Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclearPrincipalResearchResearchResearch Groups

  10. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftopRunning Jobs by Group

  11. DOE STGWG Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10nominateEnergyThis memo fromDepartment ofSTGWG Group

  12. A Probabilistic Sonar Sensor Model for Robust Localization of a Small-size Blimp in Indoor Environments using a Particle Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    -- In recent years, autonomous miniature airships have gained increased interest in the robotics community of miniature airships come from their limited payload which introduces substantial constraints monitoring, surveillance, and search and rescue. Many applications, however, require that the airships

  13. A Review of the Empirical Literature on the Relationships Between Indoor Environment and Stress in Health Care and Office Settings Problems and Prospects of Sharing Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Mahbub

    2008-03-01

    in office settings Air supply, odor, and pollutants determine the air quality within a building. Numerous workplace studies have shown that air quality can cause stress among workers. In a review of current literature, Seppanen, Fisk, and Mendell (1999... the offices and after 1 hour of occupation indicated less dissatisfaction in the offices with polyolefine flooring, which also had the lowest pollution load on the air. Pejtersen et al. (1999) reported a significant decrease of adverse perceptions of air...

  14. Characterizing Ultrafine Particle Exposures in Two Types of Indoor Environments: San Francisco Bay Area Classrooms and Beijing High-Rise Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Nasim Ayoubzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Beijing comes from coal (14%) and liquid petroleum gas (9%).the city vary from coal to liquid petroleum gas to naturalliquid petroleum gas followed by electricity; however, in rural residences the primary energy source remains coal (

  15. QCD in Extreme Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John B. Kogut

    2002-08-30

    I review present challenges that QCD in extreme environments presents to lattice gauge theory. Recent data and impressions from RHIC are emphasized. Physical pictures of heavy ion wavefunctions, collisions and the generation of the Quark Gluon Plasma are discussed, with an eye toward engaging the lattice and its numerical methods in more interaction with the experimental and phenomenological developments. Controversial, but stimulating scenarios which can be confirmed or dismissed by lattice methods are covered. In the second half of the talk, several promising developments presented at the conference Lattice 2002 are reviewed.

  16. Geoscience/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunities NuclearlongGeneralGeorge T.Geoscience/Environment

  17. March, 2001 Neutron Scattering Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    March, 2001 Neutron Scattering Group A High Performance Hybrid Spectrometer for theA High of the instrument performance · Igor Zaliznyak · Laurence Passell OutlineOutline #12;Neutron Scattering GroupNeutron states in single crystals.single crystals. #12;Neutron Scattering GroupNeutron Scattering Group What

  18. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  19. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 1999 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program APPENDIX A: DATA REQUESTS ..................................... 11 #12;Data Management Group 1999 Annual Report Page 1 of 14 INTRODUCTION The Data Management Group is a research project located at the Joint

  20. Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless T.D.C. Little, P. Dib, K. Shah, N. Barraford, and B. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Thomas

    1 Using LED Lighting for Ubiquitous Indoor Wireless Networking T.D.C. Little, P. Dib, K. Shah, N communications, free-space optical communications, visible light LED, modulation, OOK, FSO. #12;2 I. Introduction-based communication into these illumination devices. The LED-based visible-light optical channel becomes a very

  1. United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190 "Environmental Radiation Protection Standards discussion about whether to revise the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power

  2. Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paciorek, Chris

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data Lisa Longwood Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA Abstract Previous studies have identified associations between traffic

  3. School of Environment and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    School of Environment and Sustainability Room 323, Kirk Hall 117 Science Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 Telephone: (306) 966-1985 E-mail: sens.info@usask.ca Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity Sustainability Science in the Delta Dialogue Network The School of Environment and Sustainability

  4. of Public Attitudes Energy & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Energy and the Environment 77 Massachusetts Avenue, the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment (LFEE) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MITA Survey of Public Attitudes towards Energy & Environment in Great Britain March 2005 MIT LFEE 2005

  5. Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group This is an eight-week parent group series starting Monday, January 12, 2015 Future parent group sessions to be held: January 26 (no group 19th ) February 2, 9 and 23 (no group 16th ) and March 2, 9 and 16 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Room 145 of the Clinical Services

  6. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  7. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Energy Group Consol Net Zero Energy Certified The ThousandEnergy Institute, 2012) Net-Zero Energy Certified (Zero Netare: Passive House Net-zero energy home Green certified home

  8. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika

    2012-01-01

    2 by means of light; he placed it in the home of one family2 by means of light; he placed it in the home of one familyhome and office environment: behaviour in relation to window opening, adjusting heating and turning the lights

  9. UHF Propagation in Indoor Hallways Dana Porrat and Donald C. Cox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Donald C.

    materials, hallway guidance is the most significant propagation mechanism at medium and large distances from DRAFT February 24, 2003 #12;3 about the environment, and provides accurate predictions of the major phenomena. The in- put parameters used by the model are few and describe the construction of walls

  10. MCYT TIC2001-4936-E RESEARCH GROUPS ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Luis

    MCYT TIC2001-4936-E RESEARCH GROUPS ROADMAP November, 2002 #12;#12;Contents 1 Grupo SEPIA 7 2 Grupo Scheduling and Temporal Reasoning (RNPST, TIC2001-4936-E) and it is devoted to spread the information about Research Projects CICYT TIC95-0453 Machine learning methods in uncertain and imprecise environments

  11. Neil 65 Group Picture Neil 65 Group Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohar, Bojan

    Neil 65 Group Picture Neil 65 Group Picture December 14, 2003 Row 1: Tom Dowling, Nolan Mc Glover, Mike Lohman, Sangil Oum, Blair Dowling http://www.math.ohio-state.edu/~maharry/Neil65/pictures/Neil65GroupPicture.html25.9.2004 18:19:04 #12;

  12. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  13. Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

    2005-01-01

    non-uniform thermal environments", European Journal of7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination offor assessing complex thermal environments,” Building and

  14. Digital Immersive Virtual Environments and Instructional Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Immersive virtual environment technology as a research toolimmersive virtual environment technology (IVET) is the mostthat digital virtual environment technology permits and that

  15. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 2000 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program PROCESSING ...................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs'.................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS).....................3 Complex Data Requests

  16. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    iv Data Management Group Annual Report 2003 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located ........................................................................................................ 3 Text-based Data Retrieval System `drs

  17. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 2001 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program..............................................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ..........................................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS)..............................................3 Complex Data

  18. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 2002 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ............................................... 3 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS) .................................. 4 Complex Data Requests

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group, Serenbe...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    monitoring equipment tracks the PV, solar thermal water heater, ERV, mini-split heat pump with 3 indoor heads, solar water heater, and LED and CFL lighting....

  20. High flux heat transfer in a target environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlationHigh flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford · Radiation Cooling · Forced Convection · Nucleate Boiling · Critical Heat Flux · Other ideas · Summary #12

  1. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 24: Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, HEALTH, AND QUALITY DIVISION Chapter 24: Training Minimum Training November 2013 URL: http://www-group.slac.stanford.edu/esh/eshmanual/references/trainingReqMinimum.pdf 1 Purpose The purpose of these requirements is to ensure that everyone has the minimum training necessary

  2. APCS: Autonomous Position Correction System Using Ultrasonic Sensing for Indoor Mobile Robot Navigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    ; R2 ERP (Estimated Re ection Points) ERP 3 ERP ERP DWV (Detected Wall Vector) 3 #12;R2 R1 x y O P1 P2 r1 2r Robot RE P Wall Robot's Trajectory #12;g. 2: ERP 3.2 WVEM (Wall Vector in a Environment Map) 5 x Robot RE P Cluster Fitted Line Cluster RE P Fitted Line #12;g. 3: ERP #12;g. 4: A #12;g. 5: WVEM

  3. Interagency Sustainability Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability Working Group Interagency Sustainability Working Group The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable federal...

  4. Interagency Sustainability Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Areas Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Interagency Sustainability Working Group Interagency Sustainability Working Group The Interagency Sustainability Working Group...

  5. Water Resources Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

  6. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

  7. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 2004 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located of the funding partners: Ministry of Transportation, Ontario #12;SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG

  8. Data Management Group Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Data Management Group Annual Report 2000 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program ...........................................18 #12;i SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG), in cooperation with the funding agencies, has. In addition, there were 26 complex requests for data that required a customized computer program. Eight

  9. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  10. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment (AFE) is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders,...

  11. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2011-03-01

    We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

  12. Marine Studies Initiative (MSI) Research Working Group Report (draft) I. Overview and Motivation for MSI Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    1 Marine Studies Initiative (MSI) Research Working Group Report (draft) I. Overview and Motivation connected to the world's ocean and marine environment. For centuries oceans have provided jobs, goods. As much as oceans and the marine environment have shaped human culture, we have effected them. The Oregon

  13. A decentralized control policy for adaptive information gathering in hazardous environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dames, Philip

    This paper proposes an algorithm for driving a group of resource-constrained robots with noisy sensors to localize an unknown number of targets in an environment, while avoiding hazards at unknown positions that cause the ...

  14. Building the Digital Library Environment at the University of Kansas - Lawrence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digital Library Technical Infrastructure Task Force

    2000-11-10

    In May 2000, the Digital Library Executive Group formed the Digital Library Technical Infrastructure Task Force. This report is a result of Task Force discussions on the technical issues involved in creating a digital library environment...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training- Medical Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The TEC Training and Medical Training Issues Topic Group was formed to address the training issues for emergency responders in the event of a radioactive material transportation incident.

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the following links: Communicatons Consolidated Grant Topic Group Training - Medical Training Protocols Route Identificaiton Process Mechanics of Funding and Technical Assistance...

  17. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    group members will be to provide stakeholder perspectives and input to the Office of Logistics Management (OLM) in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive...

  18. Airborne Pollution In urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broday, David

    Airborne Pollution In urban environments What are the real health effects of urban pollution Air Pollution- relevant Human Exposure in Urban Environments" Funded under the "City of Tomorrow" programme of the European Union: Contract number EVK4-CT-2002-00090 URBAN POLLUTION Airborne pollutants

  19. Environment-induced Population Displacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    The impact of migration on the environment Interactions between migration, environmental change, human change's impact on the environment in areas of destination G. Human security challenges of environmental change and migration B. Migration at advanced stages of gradual environmental change F. Migration's impact

  20. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 1: REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John R. Jensen (2007) Second Edition Pearson Prentice Hall What is Remote Sensing? #12;2 Photogrammetry ­ the art of identifying objects and judging their significance (Colwell, 1966). Remote Sensing ­ the measurement

  1. Citation Environment of Angewandte Chemie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornmann, Lutz; Marx, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Recently, aggregated journal-journal citation networks were made accessible from the perspective of each journal included in the Science Citation Index see (http://www.leydesdorff.net/). The local matrices can be used to inspect the relevant citation environment of a journal using statistical analysis and visualization techniques from social network analysis. The inspection gives an answer to the question what the local impact of this and other journals in the environment is. In this study the citation environment of Angewandte Chemie was analysed. Angewandte Chemie is one of the prime chemistry journals in the world. Its environment was compared with that of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The results of the environment analyses give a detailed insight into the field-embeddedness of Angewandte Chemie. The impacts of the German and international editions of this journal are compared.

  2. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  3. On The Harmonic Oscillator Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raquel M. Lopez; Sergei K. Suslov; Jose M. Vega-Guzman

    2011-12-04

    We discuss the maximum kinematical invariance group of the quantum harmonic oscillator from a view point of the Ermakov-type system. A six parameter family of the square integrable oscillator wave functions, which seems cannot be obtained by the standard separation of variables, is presented as an example. The invariance group of generalized driven harmonic oscillator is shown to be isomorphic to the corresponding Schroedinger group of the free particle.

  4. BCG Response to UC Davis Policy Institute on Energy, Environment and the Economy May 8, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    BCG Response to UC Davis Policy Institute on Energy, Environment and the Economy May 8, 2013 We appreciate the work the US Davis Institute for Energy, Environment and the Economy put into its review of the Boston Consulting Group analysis of the cumulative impacts of AB 32 policies on California refiners

  5. Ad Hoc Curriculum Implementation Working Group Ad Hoc Working Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Ad Hoc Curriculum Implementation Working Group MINUTES Ad Hoc Working Group 4 December 2002 Friedman on her visit next week. ONE CURRICULUM OR TWO? Information presented by Trudeau shows that PSE and other programs cannot be merged into a single curriculum. The Faculty Senate website states

  6. Acterra Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Acterra Group provides consulting, project financing, services and support to energy, natural resource, and sustainability companies. Coordinates: 44.671312,...

  7. Filling factors and Braid group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We extract the Braid group structure of a recently derived hierarchy scheme for the filling factors proposed by us which related the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, to statistics, $\

  8. Where is the Neutral Atomic Gas in Hickson Groups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Verdes-Montenegro; M. S. Yun; B. A. Williams; W. K. Huchtmeier; A. Del Olmo; J. Perea

    2001-08-13

    We have analyzed the total HI contents of 72 Hickson compact groups of galaxies (HCGs) and the detailed spatial distributions and kinematics of HI within a subset of 16 groups using the high angular resolution observations obtained with the VLA in order to investigate a possible evolutionary scenario for these densest systems in the present day galaxy hierarchy. For the more homogeneous subsample of 48 groups, we found a mean HI deficiency of DefHI = 40 (40% of the expected HI for the LBs and morphological types of the member galaxies). The individual galaxies show larger degrees of deficiency than the groups globally, DefHI = 0.62 (24% of the expected HI), due in most cases to efficient gas stripping from individual galaxies into the group environment visible in the VLA maps. The degree of deficiency is found to be similar to the central galaxies of Virgo and Coma cluster, and Coma I group, in spite of the significantly different characteristics of these environments. Phase transformation of the HI should explain the deficiency. The detection rate of HCGs at X-ray wavelengths is larger for HI deficient groups. In the evolutionary scenario we propose, the amount of detected HI would decrease further with evolution, by continuous tidal stripping and/or heating. The H2 content also tends to be lower than expected for the galaxies in HI deficient groups, this may suggest that the HI stripping by frequent tidal interaction breaks the balance between the disruption of molecular clouds by star formation and the replenishment from the ambient HI.

  9. ANNUAL REPORT 1998 PHOTOVOLTAICS GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    ANNUAL REPORT 1998 UNSW PHOTOVOLTAICS GROUP ANNUAL REPORT 1998 UNSW PHOTOVOLTAICS GROUP #12;THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES THE PHOTOVOLTAICS SPECIAL RESEARCH CENTRE IS A SPECIAL RESEARCH CENTRE OF THE AUSTRALIAN RESEARCH COUNCIL THE KEY CENTRE FOR PHOTOVOLTAIC ENGINEERING IS A KEY CENTRE OF THE AUSTRALIAN

  10. Neutron Scattering Group February, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Neutron Scattering Group February, 2001 A High Performance Instrument for the Single Crystal Igor Zaliznyak Outline #12;Neutron Scattering Group Neutron spectrometer for studies of the low-energy coherent excitations in single crystals. Common requirements for a single crystal neutron spectrometer

  11. FEATURE ARTICLES Group Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEATURE ARTICLES Group Decision Making in Honey Bee Swarms When 10,000 bees go house hunting, how a neighboring colony. A striking example of decision mak- ing by an animal group is the choice of a nesting site paper on house hunting by honey bees. Lindauer was then a postdtx:toral stu- dent at the University

  12. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment (AFN) is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals to cover sessions on climate change, energy, environmental regulations, cleanup and remediation, fish and wildlife, solid waste, and more.

  13. Robot Manipulation in Human Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edsinger, Aaron

    2007-01-16

    Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

  14. Robot manipulation in human environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edsinger, Aaron Ladd, 1972-

    2007-01-01

    Human environments present special challenges for robot manipulation. They are often dynamic, difficult to predict, and beyond the control of a robot engineer. Fortunately, many characteristics of these settings can be ...

  15. _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training-based Training Frequency: One Time Course Purpose: This training contains general requirements and information. This training will familiarize you with the hazards of electricity and the requirements for electrical safety

  16. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  17. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  18. A colalborative environment for information driven safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Mark R; Michel, Kelly D

    2010-09-15

    For two decades, the IAEA has recognized the need for a comprehensive and strongly integrated Knowledge Management system to support its Information Driven Safeguards activities. In the past, plans for the development of such a system have progressed slowly due to concerns over costs and feasibility. In recent years, Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a knowledge management system that could serve as the basis for an IAEA Collaborative Environment (ICE). The ICE derivative knowledge management system described in this paper addresses the challenge of living in an era of information overload coupled with certain knowledge shortfalls. The paper describes and defines a system that is flexible, yet ensures coordinated and focused collaboration, broad data evaluation capabilities, architected and organized work flows, and improved communications. The paper and demonstration of ICE will utilize a hypothetical scenario to highlight the functional features that facilitate collaboration amongst and between information analysts and inspectors. The scenario will place these two groups into a simulated planning exercise for a safeguards inspection drawing upon past data acquisitions, inspection reports, analyst conclusions, and a coordinated walk-through of a 3-D model of the facility. Subsequent to the conduct of the simulated facility inspection, the detection of an anomaly and pursuit of follow up activities will illustrate the event notification, information sharing, and collaborative capabilities of the system. The use of a collaborative environment such as ICE to fulfill the complicated knowledge management demands of the Agency and facilitate the completion of annual State Evaluation Reports will also be addressed.

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting:...

  20. Groups

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydroLegal DocumentsGroton Deptgroups/all/feed

  1. Midwest Hydro Users Group Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Midwest Hydro Users Group will be holding their annual Fall meeting on November 12th and 13th in Wausau, Wisconsin.  An Owners-only meeting on the afternoon of the 12th followed by a full...

  2. Galois Groups of Schubert Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Del Campo Sanchez, Abraham

    2012-10-19

    The Galois group of a Schubert problem is a subtle invariant that encodes intrinsic structure of its set of solutions. These geometric invariants are difficult to determine in general. However, based on a special position argument due to Schubert...

  3. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  4. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  5. Depositional facies and environments of the lower Mineral Wells formation, Pennsylvanian Strawn group, north central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradshaw, Susan Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    , black mudstones with phosphate nodules, and limestones. The prodelta facies is largely nonfossiliferous and consists of massive mudstones, massive silty mudstones with occasional siltstone lenses, and horizontal planar-and lenticular-laminated muddy...

  6. A hierarchical heuristic approach for machine loading problems in a partially grouped environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Hwan

    2004-09-30

    The loading problem in a Flexible Manufacturing System (FMS) lies in the allocation of operations and associated cutting tools to machines for a given set of parts subject to capacity constraints. This dissertation proposes a hierarchical approach...

  7. The Effects of Group Collaboration on Presence in a Collaborative Virtual Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Edwin

    , University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa jcasanue,edwin @cs.uct.ac.za Abstract architecture and advanced interactive user interfaces to create a `shared' space where multiple users, located

  8. Economic Environment 0 Anirban Basu, Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA,EnergystudentThis theEVERETTAmostInc. | Department

  9. Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization (TaTEDO) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanzania Traditional Energy Development and Environment Organization...

  10. Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sediment Transport, and Water Quality) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, Sediment Transport, and Water Quality) Effects on the Physical Environment...

  11. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  12. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  13. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  14. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  15. environment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field" conditions.  Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program...

  16. environment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46A NAME6/%2A/%2A9/%2A4/%2A6/%2A en

  17. A scoping study on the costs of indoor air quality illnesses:an insurance loss reduction perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allan; Vine, Edward L.

    1998-08-31

    The incidence of commercial buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and the frequency of litigation over the effects of poor IAQ is increasing. If so, these increases have ramifications for insurance carriers, which pay for many of the costs of health care and general commercial liability. However, little is known about the actual costs to insurance companies from poor IAQ in buildings. This paper reports on the results of a literature search of buildings-related, business and legal databases, and interviews with insurance and risk management representatives aimed at finding information on the direct costs to the insurance industry of poor building IAQ, as well as the costs of litigation. The literature search and discussions with insurance and risk management professionals reported in this paper turned up little specific information about the costs of IAQ-related problems to insurance companies. However, those discussions and certain articles in the insurance industry press indicate that there is a strong awareness and growing concern over the "silent crisis" of IAQ and its potential to cause large industry losses, and that a few companies are taking steps to address this issue. The source of these losses include both direct costs to insurers from paying health insurance and professional liability claims, as weIl as the cost of litigation. In spite of the lack of data on how IAQ-related health problems affect their business, the insurance industry has taken the anecdotal evidence about their reality seriously enough to alter their policies in ways that have lessened their exposure. We conclude by briefly discussing four activities that need to be addressed in the near future: (1) quantifying IAQ-related insurance costs by sector, (2) educating the insurance industry about the importance of IAQ issues, (3) examining IAQ impacts on the insurance industry in the residential sector, and (4) evaluating the relationship between IAQ improvements and their impact on energy use.

  18. Galaxy Groups at Intermediate Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; S. L. Morris; H. Lin; P. B. Hall; D. R. Patton; M. Sawicki; C. W. Shepherd

    2000-08-14

    Galaxy groups likely to be virialized are identified within the CNOC2 intermediate redshift galaxy survey using an iterative method. The number-velocity dispersion relation is in agreement with the low-mass extrapolation of the cluster normalized Press-Schechter function. The two-point group-group correlation function has r_0=6.8+/- 0.3 Mpc, which is larger than the correlations of individual galaxies at the level predicted from n-body calibrated halo clustering. The groups are stacked in velocity and position to create a sample large enough for measurement of a density and velocity dispersion profile. The stacked mean galaxy density profile falls nearly as a power law with r^{-2.5} and has no well-defined core. The projected velocity dispersion is examined for a variety of samples with different methods and found to be either flat or slowly rising outwards. The combination of a steeper-than-isothermal density profile and the outward rising velocity dispersion implies that the mass-to-light ratio of groups rises with radius. The M/L can be kept nearly constant if the galaxy orbits are nearly circular, although such strong tangential anisotropy is not supported by other evidence. The segregation of mass and light is not dependent on galaxy luminosity but is far more prominent in the red galaxies than the blue. The M/L gradient could arise from orbital ``sloshing'' of the galaxies in the group halos, dynamical friction acting on the galaxies in a background of ``classical'' collisionless dark matter, or, more speculatively, the dark matter may have a true core.

  19. Engineering creative environment portfolio application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, IlJoong, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    Richard Florida's argument about creative class as the most powerful engine for economic growth of cities is validity; however, this thesis argues it is not creative class or a certain group of individuals but creative ...

  20. Racial environment and political participation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsubayashi, Tetsuya

    2009-05-15

    . The power-threat hypothesis predicts that a larger size of different racial groups in local areas increases citizen participation because of more intensive interracial con- flicts, while the relational goods hypothesis predicts that a larger size...