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Sample records for indoor environment department

  1. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  2. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  3. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  4. Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address: 591...

  5. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May ...

  6. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  7. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  8. Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Campaign for Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings Energy Department Launches Better Buildings Alliance Indoor Lighting Campaign for Commercial Buildings May 27, 2015 - 7:30am Addthis Today the Energy Department launched a new indoor lighting campaign to increase the use of high efficiency lighting technologies in commercial buildings. Through the Better Buildings Alliance, the Department is working with key

  9. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  10. Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition | Department of Energy Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires(tm) Solid-State Lighting Design Competition September 17, 2014 - 5:45pm Addthis As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department

  11. STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE ... OF NEW MEXICO BEFORE THE SECRETARY OF ENVIRONMENT NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT, ...

  12. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  13. Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment Environment Environment The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) complies with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and establishes its own environmental requirements to ensure workers, the public, and the environment is protected from hazards associated with all Department operations. DOE provides assistance to the field to implement these policies, works in resolving environmental protection issues, and provides feedback to enhance environmental performance throughout the

  14. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  15. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013 iap_rev1.pdf (970.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

  16. New Mexico Environment Department | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Department Jump to: navigation, search Logo: New Mexico Environment Department Name: New Mexico Environment Department Abbreviation: NMED Address: 1190 St. Francis Drive, Suite...

  17. DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on Indoor LED Luminaires | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Indoor LED Luminaires DOE Publishes CALiPER Snapshot Report on Indoor LED Luminaires June 5, 2014 - 10:56am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a Snapshot Report on indoor LED luminaires, which utilizes the LED Lighting Facts® program's extensive product database to help industry stakeholders understand the current state and trajectory of the market for that class of products. Based on data through the first quarter of 2014, the report focuses on

  18. Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air

  19. Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration's efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department today announced the ...

  20. IN THE MATTER OF: STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN THE MATTER OF: STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT ) ... Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department ("NMED") hereby orders the ...

  1. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  2. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists. iap_verification_checklist_rev_1.pdf (261.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev.

  3. STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STATEOFNEWMEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSIDP, LLC Respondents WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) Compliance Order No. HWB-14-21 ORDER GRANTING AN EXTENSION OF TIME TO FILE AN ANSWER AND REQUEST FOR HEARING Responde~ts United States Department of Energy and Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC, on December 22, 2014, filed an unopposed

  4. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT IN THE MATTER OF:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department ("Department") hereby orders ... of this Order shall ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. ...

  5. Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment: Watershed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment: Watershed 319 Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Department of...

  6. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT RESOURCE PROTECTION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) NO. ... Protection Division ("Division") of the New Mexico Environment Department ("NMED"), and ...

  7. Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

  8. Environment and Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Compliance Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment (GC-51) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for International and National Security Programs (GC-53) Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) Office of the Assistant General Counsel General Law (GC-56) Litigation, Regulation and Enforcement Environment and Compliance Environment

  9. Environment and Compliance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment and Compliance Environment and Compliance Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Offices of the Deputy General...

  10. Policy and Regulatory Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs Policy and Regulatory Environment Policy and Regulatory Environment Photo of a man speaking while seated at a table with men and women surrounding him. A favorable ...

  11. New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Excellence | Department of Energy Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence April 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office www.wipp.energy.gov CARLSBAD, N.M., April 30, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recognized by the New

  12. IN THE MATTER OF: STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN THE MATTER OF: STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT ) ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER UNDER THE NEW MEXICO HAZARDOUS WASTE ACT§ 74-4-13 OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR ) WASTE PARTNERSHIP LLC ) ) ) WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ) EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER Pursuant to NMSA 1978, Section 74-4-13(A) ofthe Hazardous Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department ("NMED") hereby orders the Department of Energy ("DOE"), and

  13. Colorado Department of Health & Environment Nonpoint Source Webpage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Source Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Department of Health & Environment Nonpoint Source Webpage Abstract This...

  14. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE ... WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) COMPLIANCE ORDER ) No. HWB-14-21 ...

  15. New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognitio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environment Department (NMED) with Green Zia Environmental Leadership Program (GZELP) Gold Level membership for excellence. The GZELP annually recognizes organizations and...

  16. Environment, Safety and Health Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Environment, Safety and Health Assessments The Department of Energy's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the Office of Enterprise Assessments, is responsible for conducting assessments to provide information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public, and environment from hazards present at Department sites and operations. This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for

  17. Solar Policy Environment: Portland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portland Solar Policy Environment: Portland This document outlines the policies in place affecting solar deployment. City of Portland's Solar Now Program will pursue solar market ...

  18. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    that the participant, U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM), ... care, andor affirmation of future non-residential use are satisfactorily implemented and ...

  19. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  20. Acquisition and the Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition » Guidance » Acquisition and the Environment Acquisition and the Environment The information provide on these pages are meant to be resource and tool for the DOE acquisition community. Please share suggestions for its further development and improvement. Provide your comments to Richard Langston at (202) 287-1339, or e-mail them to richard.langston@hq.doe.gov GREEN PURCHASING OVERVIEW The White House Task Force on Recycling along with the US Army Center for Health Promotion and

  1. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT IN THE MATTER OF:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN THE MATTER OF: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT ) OF ENERGY AND NUCLEAR ) WASTE PARTNERSHIP LLC ) ) ) WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT ) EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER UNDER THE NEW MEXICO HAZARDOUS WASTE ACT§ 74-4-13 ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER Pursuant to NMSA 1978, Section 74-4-13(A) of the Hazardous Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department ("Department") hereby orders the Department of Energy, ("DOE"), and Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC

  2. Environment, Safety, and Health Program for Department of Energy Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-23

    To establish the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE N 251.4.

  3. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore » mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  4. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  5. AGREEMENT BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AGREEMENT BETWEEN NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU AND WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT PERMITTEES REGARDING A TIME EXTENSION FOR DISPUTE RESOLUTION RELATED TO FINAL AUDIT REPORT A-09-08 OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY/CENTRAL CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT BACKGROUND 1. In a letter dated May 18,2009, the Hazardous Waste Bureau of the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) provided comments on the Idaho National Laboratory/Central Characterization Project (INLlCCP) Audit Report

  6. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT IN THE MATTER OF:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IN THE MATTER OF: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY LLC LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER UNDER THE NEW MEXICO HAZARDOUS WASTE ACT§ 74-4-13 ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER Pursuant to NMSA 1978, Section 74-4-13(A) ofthe Hazardous Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department ("NMED") hereby orders the Department of Energy ("DOE"), and Los Alamos National Security,

  7. Environment Policy, Guidance & Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy, Guidance & Reports Environment Policy, Guidance & Reports The Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance establishes environmental protection policy, requirements and expectations for the Department to ensure that the environment is adequately protected from hazards associated with DOE environmental risks and impacts are minimized and compliant with environmental protection laws, regulations and standards are achieved. Technical experts work proactively with headquarters and

  8. Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments MISSION The Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on programs and performance in protecting our workers, the public and environment from the multiple hazards present at Department sites and operations.This information provides assurance to our stakeholders and identifies areas for improvement to our leadership to support the safe performance

  9. Environment, Safety, and Health Program for Department of Energy Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1986-09-23

    This Page Change transmits revised pages of DOE O 5480.1B to renew the authority fo the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health to curtail or suspend operations at Department of Energy facilities. Chg 1 dated 5-10-93. Canceled by DOE N 251.4.

  10. NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA MARTINEZ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT Hazardous Waste Burealt SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505*6303 Phone (50S) 476-6000 Fax (50S) 476-6030 www.lfmenv.stale.nm.IU RYAN FLYNN Cabinet Secretary Designate JOHN A, SANCHr - :Z Lieutenant Governor CERTIFIED MAIL - RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED SeplelIlber 20, 201 3 Jose Franco, Manager Carlsbad Field Office Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221-3090 M. Farok Sharif, Project

  11. DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring | Department of Energy Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill deb.gill@wipp.ws 575-234-7270 Carlsbad, NM - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a grant for an estimated $1.6 million to the New Mexico Environment Department

  12. An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Employee Work Experience | Department of Energy An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work Environment and Employee Work Experience An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work Environment and Employee Work Experience May 19, 2015 - 3:55pm Addthis Staff at an all-hands Meeting with Secretary Ernest Moniz. | Energy Department Photo. Staff at an all-hands Meeting with Secretary Ernest Moniz. | Energy Department Photo. Natasha Campbell Natasha

  13. Climate Change, Drought & Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change, Drought & Environment Climate Change, Drought & Environment Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and Environment-Michael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge b13_champ_ap-1.pdf (3.87 MB) More Documents & Publications CX-010546: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-013770: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-011227: Categorical Exclusion Determination

  14. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant v. ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT ) OF ENERGY, and ) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC, ) Respondents. ) ) ) ) LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ) LOS ALAMOS COUNTY. NEW MEXICO > COMPLIANCE ORDER NO. HWB-14-20 (CO) U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S REQUEST FOR HEARING AND ANSWER TO ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER REQUIRING COMPLIANCE AND ASSESSING CIVIL PENALTY Respondent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or Respondent) submits the

  15. Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories This report provides the results of a Special Review of work practices associated with nanoscale material ...

  16. Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health FE's 2011 ESS&H Annual Report The Office of Fossil Energy is committed to conducting our mission to achieve the greatest benefit for all our stakeholders, including our employees and the public, while actively adhering to the highest applicable standards for environment, security, safety and health (ESS&H). We are working to continuously improve our practices

  17. Webinar: Biofuels for the Environment and Communities | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Biofuels for the Environment and Communities Webinar: Biofuels for the Environment and Communities Webinar: Biofuels for the Environment and Communities sustainability_webinar_overview_20150422.pdf (1.04 MB) sustainability_webinar_dale_20150422.pdf (2.73 MB) sustainability_webinar_negri_20150422.pdf (5.68 MB) More Documents & Publications 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Sustainability and Strategic Analysis Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability 2013 Peer Review

  18. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building...

  19. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complainant, V. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSHIP, LLC, Respondents. WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO l COMPLIANCE ORDER NO. HWB-14-21 (CO) MOTION FOR EXTENSION OF TIME TO FILE AN ANSWER AND REQ UEST FOR HEARING Come now the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC (Respondents), and move for an extension of time until January 9, 2015, for Respondents to file an Answer and Request for Hearing, pursuant to

  20. Before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statement Before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Washington, D.C. By: Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy Subject: H.R. 2454, the American Clean...

  1. Before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee By: Secretary Steven Chu Subject: Climate Change Legislation PDF icon 10-27-09FinalTestimony(Chu).pdf More Documents &...

  2. USW Health Safety and Environment Conference - HSS Workshop | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy USW Health Safety and Environment Conference - HSS Workshop USW Health Safety and Environment Conference - HSS Workshop Workshop Date: March 7, 2012 Documents Available for Download Workshop Agenda (150.98 KB) Presentation: Regulatory Enforcement (345.86 KB) Presentation: Integrated Approach to Health, Safety and Security (467.13 KB) Presentation: Improving Safety Culture at DOE Sites (256.78 KB) Presentation: 851 Rule Implementation Improvement Efforts (1.48 MB) More Documents &

  3. Integrated Energy Analysis and Validation Environment | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Energy Analysis and Validation Environment Integrated Energy Analysis and Validation Environment Lead Performer: EnergyAnalytics - Avon, CT DOE Funding: $86,147 Cost Share: N/A Project Term: June 2014 - March 2015 Funding Opportunity: Small Business Innovation Research FY 2014 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Project Objective A great deal of progress has been made in delivery of highly mature building systems energy simulation tools. However, application of these highly

  4. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT RESOURCE PROTECTION DMSION,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESOURCE PROTECTION DMSION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant, v. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSHIP, LLC, Respondents. WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) NO. HWB-14-21 (CO) SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT AND STIPULATED FINAL ORDER This Settlement Agreement and Stipulated Final Order ("Settlement Agreement") is entered into between the Hazardous Waste Bureau {"HWB") of the Resource Protection Division

  5. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  6. Environment, Health, Safety & Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment, Health, Safety & Security Worker Safety and Health Training at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve on September 26-29 Worker Safety and Health Training at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve on September 26-29 The Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy will provide outreach training at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to enhance understanding of the requirements of OSHA construction safety standards pursuant to DOE adoption of OSHA standards under DOE O 440.1B. Read more Possible Scam

  7. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complainant UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSHIP, LLC Respondents WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) SCHEDULING ORDER Compliance Order No. HWB-14-21 Pursuant to 74-4-10(H) of the Hazardous Waste Act, NMSA 1978 and NMED's Adjudicatory Procedures, 20.1.5.1 to 600 NMAC (2015), this matter is set for a public hearing as set forth below. 1. The Hearing in this matter is set to begin on July 27, 2015 at 9:00 am in Santa Fe, New

  8. STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy START Site Visit Examines Viability of Tribal Community Solar Project START Site Visit Examines Viability of Tribal Community Solar Project August 21, 2013 - 12:50pm Addthis From left to right: James Jensen, Tom Johnson, Jody Rosier, and Rebecca Kauffman of Southern Ute Alternative Energy, and Otto VanGeet and Alex Dane of NREL, tour a potential solar array site on Southern Ute tribal land in Ignacio, CO. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL From left to right: James Jensen,

  9. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment Events Learn about our science, listen to lectures on environment and climate change at the Bradbury Science Museum or at Cafe Scientific events in your community. Oct 14 Wed 4:00 PM Laboratory's Electronic Public Reading room training J. Robert Oppenheimer Study Center, Room JRO 1&2 - West Jemez Road at Casa Grande The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), are holding training on the contents and use of the Los Alamos National

  10. DOE O 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting DOE O 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting The Department issued a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) for the subject Directive on November 28, 2012. PF2013-15 DOE O 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (13.8 KB) PF2013-15a.pdf (173.22 KB) More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 231.1B, ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH REPORTING Injury and Illness Reporting Guide Memorandum, Reporting of

  11. About the Environment Team 2 (LM-20.2) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart AU Organization Chart: July 20, 2016 AU Organization Chart: July 20, 2016 (85.01 KB) More Documents & Publications USW Health Safety and Environment Conference - HSS Workshop Work Group Telecom (Draft Charters) Senior Technical Safety Manager Status Report

    5 Consolidated Financial Statements OAI-FS-16-01 November 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

  12. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  13. US Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The assessment, which was conducted from July 20 through August 4, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and progress of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices; the DOE Nevada Field Office (NV); and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. This report presents a summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management.

  14. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Indoor Temperature and Humidity Data Collection and Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Indoor Temperature and Humidity Data Collection and Analysis Chuck Booten, NREL Paul Norton, NERD Cheryn Metzger, NREL Why do we care about indoor Temp/RH? "Anecdotal evidence from the field and controlled studies have raised concerns about the accuracy of software-based energy analysis for existing homes. ....

  16. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  17. About the Environment Team 1 (LM-20.1) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environment Team 1 (LM-20.1) About the Environment Team 1 (LM-20.1) Text coming

  18. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  19. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video News Room News Releases Environment newsroomassetsimagesenvi-icon.png Earth, Environment Climate impacts, including global temperatures, drought and forest fires ...

  20. Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories- August 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories

  1. GATEWAY Demonstration Indoor Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LED Wall Washer Retrofit: College Park, Maryland At the University of Maryland, the GATEWAY program looked at LED wall washer options for a demonstration at the Clarice Smith ...

  2. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B

  3. Environment, Safety, and Health Policy for the Department of Energy Complex

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-06-15

    The Vision and Principles for the Protection of the Worker, Public, and Environment. Canceled by DOE P 450.7.

  4. Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc (56.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Major Communications Report May 5, 2009 Major Communications Report April 30, 2009 Major Communications Report April 28, 2009

  5. environment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

  6. Payment Of the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau Annual Business and Generation Fees Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juarez, Catherine L.

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to transmit to the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB), the Los alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Annual Business and Generation Fees for calendar year 2011. These fees are required pursuant to the provisions of New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, Chapter 74, Article 4, NMSA (as amended). The Laboratory's Fenton Hill Facility did not generate any hazardous waste during the entire year, and is not required to pay a fee for calendar year 2011. The enclosed fee represents the amount for a single facility owned by the Department of Energy and co-operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS).

  7. indoor | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building...

  8. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This requirements review is organized by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing ...

  9. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . , Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 FEB 102014 Dear Colleague: We would like to invite you to participate in a Pro'gram Requirements Review entitled "Large Scale...

  10. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  11. Department

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    u.s. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Analysis of Borehole-Radar Reflection Logs from Selected HC Boreholes at the Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada By John W. Lane, Jr., Peter K. Joesten, Greg Pohll, and Todd Mihevic Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4014 Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy Storrs, Connecticut 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Charles G. Groat, Director The use of firm,

  12. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director, Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG-1), U.S. Department of Energy, L'Enfant Plaza Building, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20585-1615, and shall be filed...

  13. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be made in writing to the Director, Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG-1), L'Enfant Plaza Building, US. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, D.C....

  14. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for High Energy Physics" on November 12-13,2009, in the Washington, DC, area. This workshop is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and ...

  15. Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2007-06-25

    A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

  16. Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2008-12-21

    Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

  17. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  18. Manual on indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

  19. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 2 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 2 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: NAVSEA 2002_deer_osborne2.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 4 Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 1

  20. U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3 U.S. Navy Marine Diesel Engines and the Environment - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: NAVSEA 2002_deer_osborne3.pdf (1.1 MB) More Documents & Publications Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies High Fuel Economy Heavy-Duty Truck Engine The Maritime Administration's Energy and Emissions Program - Part 2

  1. 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 11th Annual DOE Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting will be held March 21–25, 2016 in Walnut Creek, California. The meeting will gather together experts and researchers working in energy and environmental genomics and synthetic biology, and it will have a special focus on the work done at the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Bioenergy Technologies Office Technology Manager Daniel Fishman will be in attendance.

  2. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  3. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richland Operations Office . P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 May 17,2010 Certified Mail Mr. Glenn Draper Bergman Draper & Frockt 614 First Avenue, Third Floor Seattle, Washington 98 I 04 Dear Mr. Draper: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2010-01224) You requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), "copies of contracts entered into between Burns & Roe Industrial Services, Burns & Roe Pacific Incorporated and the Department of Energy-Hanford Nuclear

  4. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics," on May 26-27,2011, in Bethesda, MD (Washington, DC area). This workshop is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Nuclear Physics (NP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The workshop's goal is to characterize NP production computing requirements over the next 3 - 5 years at NERSC,the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. NERSCis the principal provider of production High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and services for the

  5. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ener9Y Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 May 11,2010 Certified Mail Ms. Linda Lammendola Christie Pabarue Mortensen and Young 1880 John F. Kennedy Boulevard 10 th Floor Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103 Dear Ms. Larnmendola: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2010-01394) Your Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request dated Apri121, 2010, addressed to the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters FOIA Office has been forwarded to this office for response and was

  6. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  7. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow ...

  8. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air...

  9. Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits of Apartments in California Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Impacts of Energy and Indoor ...

  10. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, ...

  11. Validation of a zero-equation turbulence model for complex indoor airflow simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srebric, J.; Chen, Q.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1999-07-01

    The design of an indoor environment requires a tool that can quickly predict the three-dimensional distributions of air velocity, temperature, and contaminant concentrations in the room on a desktop computer. This investigation has tested a zero-equation turbulence model for the prediction of the indoor environment in an office with displacement ventilation, with a heater and infiltration and with forced convection and a partition wall. The computed air velocity and temperature distributions agree well with the measured data. The computing time for each case is less than seven minutes on a PC Pentium II, 350 MHz.

  12. Providing better indoor environmental quality brings economicbenefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Seppanen, Olli

    2007-06-01

    This paper summarizes the current scientific evidence that improved indoor environmental quality can improve work performance and health. The review indicates that work and school work performance is affected by indoor temperature and ventilation rate. Pollutant source removal can sometimes improve work performance. Based on formal statistical analyses of existing research results, quantitative relationships are provided for the linkages of work performance with indoor temperature and outdoor air ventilation rate. The review also indicates that improved health and related financial savings are obtainable from reduced indoor tobacco smoking, prevention and remediation of building dampness, and increased ventilation. Example cost-benefit analyses indicate that many measures to improve indoor temperature control and increase ventilation rates will be highly cost effective, with benefit-cost ratios as high as 80 and annual economic benefits as high as $700 per person.

  13. Numerical simulation of solar heat absorption within indoor space by means of composite grid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omori, Toshiaki; Murakami, Shuzo; Kato, Shinsuke

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the method for numerical simulation of solar radiation entering indoor spaces through fenestration. The proposed method can systematically deal with the interception of sunlight by buildings in the outdoor space and obstacles in the indoor space by tracing a large number of particles directed toward the sun. Configuration factors from the fenestration to the sky are also three-dimensionally treated by accounting for outdoor geometries. Distribution of the solar heat absorption in the indoor space is calculated by assuming radiation equilibrium. After the solar heat absorption analysis is carried out, heat transfer analysis in the space is conducted taking account of longwave radiation, convective heat transfer, thermal conduction, and cooling/heating by air conditioning. Then, the indoor thermal environment is evaluated using the resulting temperature distribution of air and indoor surfaces. To evaluate the applicability of these procedures, the thermal environment in a model hall with large glass windows and an overhang is predicted. The analyzed hall is assumed to be located near a tall building.

  14. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  15. Environment Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Videos Environment

  16. DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Label Methodology DOE Challenge Home Label Methodology A document of the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero Energy Ready Home (formerly Challenge Home) program. ch_label_methodology_1012.pdf (222.71 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Resources Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

  17. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  18. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-03-29

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  19. Pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Regulation of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session on S. 656 and S. 657, May 25, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This hearing on pending indoor air quality and radon abatement legislation includes testimony from individuals and representatives of the following groups: Business Council on Indoor Air; American Lung Association; Consumer Federation of America; Radiation Protection Programs, NJ; School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; AFL-CIO; EPA; National Parent Teacher Association. Additional material includes statements from: American Lung Assoc.; Alliance for Radon Reduction; Alliance to Save Energy; American Industrial Hygiene Assoc.; Bowser Morner, Inc.; Building Owners and Managers Assoc. International; Chemical Specialties Manufacturers Assoc.; Council for American Private Education; National Assoc. of Home Builders; National Assoc. of Realtors; National School Boards Assoc.; Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Assoc.

  20. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.; Fagan, Jr., Thomas J.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Humphrey, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  2. NEXT GENERATION LUMINAIRES INDOOR JUDGING 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NEPA Reports and Records of Decision NEPA Reports and Records of Decision Report of the Review of the Hanford Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement regarding Data Quality Control and Management Issues - As part of the litigation involving receipt of offsite waste and the HSW EIS, the Court allowed the State of Washington a limited amount of discovery pertaining to iodine-129, technetium-99, and groundwater analyses. While compiling information to respond to the State discovery request,

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  5. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air Partners: American Gas Association www.aga.org Center of Energy and Environment www.mncee.org Building Performance Institute www.bpi.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org/PARR Building Components: Gas Appliances Application: Retrofit Single Family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate

  6. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  7. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2008-10-01

    Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

  8. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing

  9. Task Group report to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health on oversight of chemical safety at the Department of Energy. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary review of chemical safety within the Department of Energy (DOE). The review was conducted by Chemical Safety Oversight Review (CSOR) Teams composed of Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) staff members and contractors. The primary objective of the CSOR was to assess, the safety status of DOE chemical operations and identify any significant deficiencies associated with such operations. Significant was defined as any situation posing unacceptable risk, that is, imminent danger or threat to workers, co-located workers, the general public, or the environment, that requires prompt action by EH or the line organizations. A secondary objective of the CSOR was to gather and analyze technical and programmatic information related to chemical safety to be used in conjunction with the longer-range EH Workplace Chemical Accident Risk Review (WCARR) Program. The WCARR Program is part of the ongoing EH oversight of nonnuclear safety at all DOE facilities. `` The program objective is to analyze DOE and industry chemical safety programs and performance and determine the need for additional or improved safety guidance for DOE. During the period June 6, 1992, through July 31, 1992, EH conducted CSORs at five DOE sites. The sites visited were Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  10. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building Prev Next Title: Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental...

  11. Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Review of some effects of climate change on indoor environmental quality and health and associated no-regrets mitigation measures Citation Details In-Document Search This content ...

  12. Indoor air quality & airborne disease control in healthcare facilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DISEASES; THERMAL COMFORT; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS Word ...

  13. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  14. Energy Department Announces Winners of Next Generation Luminaires™ Solid-State Lighting Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department announced winners of its seventh annual Next Generation LuminairesTM (NGL) design competition for indoor and outdoor lighting during the LIGHTFAIR® International trade show in New York.

  15. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  16. Causes of Indoor Air Quality Problems in Schools: Summary of Scientific Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayer, C.W.

    2001-02-22

    In the modern urban setting, most individuals spend about 80% of their time indoors and are therefore exposed to the indoor environment to a much greater extent than to the outdoors (Lebowitz 1992). Concomitant with this increased habitation in urban buildings, there have been numerous reports of adverse health effects related to indoor air quality (IAQ) (sick buildings). Most of these buildings were built in the last two decades and were constructed to be energy-efficient. The quality of air in the indoor environment can be altered by a number of factors: release of volatile compounds from furnishings, floor and wall coverings, and other finishing materials or machinery; inadequate ventilation; poor temperature and humidity control; re-entrainment of outdoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and the contamination of the indoor environment by microbes (particularly fungi). Armstrong Laboratory (1992) found that the three most frequent causes of IAQ are (1) inadequate design and/or maintenance of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, (2) a shortage of fresh air, and (3) lack of humidity control. A similar study by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH 1989) recognized inadequate ventilation as the most frequent source of IAQ problems in the work environment (52% of the time). Poor IAQ due to microbial contamination can be the result of the complex interactions of physical, chemical, and biological factors. Harmful fungal populations, once established in the HVAC system or occupied space of a modern building, may episodically produce or intensify what is known as sick building syndrome (SBS) (Cummings and Withers 1998). Indeed, SBS caused by fungi may be more enduring and recalcitrant to treatment than SBS from multiple chemical exposures (Andrae 1988). An understanding of the microbial ecology of the indoor environment is crucial to ultimately resolving many IAQ problems. The incidence of SBS related to multiple

  17. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from the U.S. EPA BASE Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study You ...

  18. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  19. Next Generation Luminaires Design Competition Announces 2014 Indoor Winners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Winners in the Indoor category of the sixth annual Next Generation LuminairesTM Design Competition were announced today at The LED Show in Los Angeles. Sponsored by DOE, the Illuminating...

  20. Indoor Localization Algorithms for an Ambulatory Human Operated 3D Mobile Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corso, N; Zakhor, A

    2013-12-03

    Indoor localization and mapping is an important problem with many applications such as emergency response, architectural modeling, and historical preservation. In this paper, we develop an automatic, off-line pipeline for metrically accurate, GPS-denied, indoor 3D mobile mapping using a human-mounted backpack system consisting of a variety of sensors. There are three novel contributions in our proposed mapping approach. First, we present an algorithm which automatically detects loop closure constraints from an occupancy grid map. In doing so, we ensure that constraints are detected only in locations that are well conditioned for scan matching. Secondly, we address the problem of scan matching with poor initial condition by presenting an outlier-resistant, genetic scan matching algorithm that accurately matches scans despite a poor initial condition. Third, we present two metrics based on the amount and complexity of overlapping geometry in order to vet the estimated loop closure constraints. By doing so, we automatically prevent erroneous loop closures from degrading the accuracy of the reconstructed trajectory. The proposed algorithms are experimentally verified using both controlled and real-world data. The end-to-end system performance is evaluated using 100 surveyed control points in an office environment and obtains a mean accuracy of 10 cm. Experimental results are also shown on three additional datasets from real world environments including a 1500 meter trajectory in a warehouse sized retail shopping center.

  1. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  2. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as part of your whole-house design -- an approach for building an energy-efficient home. Indoor Lighting Design When designing indoor lighting for energy efficiency,...

  3. Department of Energy fiscal year 1984 budget on environment programs. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment, U. S. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 19 Apr 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    DOE Director Alvin W. Trivelpiece and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health Robert W. Davies testified on why the administration made major budget cuts in nonnuclear health and environment programs when a 50% increase above the current $300 million budget is needed just to maintain the current reduced staff. Research on the health and environment effects and risk analyses associated with energy technologies were either scaled down or eliminated in the 1984 budget. Trivelpiece argued that programs were consolidated to eliminate duplication, and that the $210 million request will be adequate for data compilation and analysis. Davies reviewed DOE health and safety goals for the year, which will focus on personnel at DOE facilities. Both defended the administration's approach to such issues as acid rain, toxic wastes, and cancer research. An appendix with questions and answers for the record follows the testimony.

  4. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  5. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  6. Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of Energy Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of ...

  7. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  8. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate Summary | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Savings and Cost Estimate Summary DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate Summary The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home Savings and Cost Estimate Summary, October 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home - Cost & Savings Summary OCT 2015.pdf (652.24 KB) More Documents & Publications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Washington DOE ZERH

  10. Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Delp, Woody W.; Diamond, Richard C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Kumar, Satish; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

    2001-10-11

    It is commonly assumed that efforts to simultaneously develop energy efficient building technologies and to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are unfeasible. The primary reason for this is that IEQ improvements often require additional ventilation that is costly from an energy standpoint. It is currently thought that health and productivity in work and learning environments requires adequate, if not superior, IEQ. Despite common assumptions, opportunities do exist to design building systems that provide improvements in both energy efficiency and IEQ. This report outlines the selection of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to be used in demonstrating such an opportunity in a field study using relocatable school classrooms. Standard classrooms use a common wall mounted heat pump HVAC system. After reviewing alternative systems, a wall-mounting indirect/direct evaporative cooling system with an integral hydronic gas heating is selected. The anticipated advantages of this system include continuous ventilation of 100 percent outside air at or above minimum standards, projected cooling energy reductions of about 70 percent, inexpensive gas heating, improved airborne particle filtration, and reduced peak load electricity use. Potential disadvantages include restricted climate regions and possible increases in indoor relative humidity levels under some conditions.

  11. Careers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Careers Careers Come Join the Best The Office of Inspector General (OIG) identifies opportunities to improve the performance of the Department of Energy's (Department) programs and operations. Given the Department's mission, we are directly involved in current efforts to move energy and environment to the forefront of our national agenda. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has infused more than $60 billion into clean energy investments. The Department plays an important role in

  12. 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting 11th Annual Energy Department Joint Genome Institute Genomics of Energy & Environment ...

  13. RAPID/Geothermal/Environment/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None ContactsAgencies: Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation State Environment Process...

  14. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ContactsAgencies: Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation State Environment Process...

  15. NNMCAB Committee Meeting Agendas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Pojoaque Agenda for the November 12, 2015 Special Meeting Presentations by New Mexico Environment Department and The Department of Energy, on Revisions to the 2005 Order on ...

  16. OREM News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    before the official founding of the Department's EM. May 7, 2013 Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner Robert Martineau, left to right, U.S. Sen. Lamar...

  17. Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sealing Your Home Sealing Your Home Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Air leakage, or infiltration, occurs when outside air enters a house uncontrollably through cracks and openings. Properly air sealing can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs, improve building durability, and create a healthier indoor environment. In addition to air sealing, you'll also want

  18. NNMCAB Presentations | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Salt Waste Storage at LANL. Information on the Administrative Order Issued by the New Mexico Environment Department was also Discussed. May 21, 2014 Associate Directorate for...

  19. NNMCAB Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The purpose of this document is to provide the Plan required by the New Mexico Environment ... the Hazardous Waste Act ("HWA"), the New Mexico Environment Department hereby orders the ...

  20. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    be implemented by all state executive agencies. The Pennsylvania Department of Environment Protectio... Eligibility: State Government Savings Category: Equipment Insulation,...

  1. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  2. Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES{ampersand}H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neglia, A. V., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and an `End Gate` filter diagram that integrates the three Vean diagrams. It is intended that this paper will act as a starting point for implementing a particular system or in establishing a comprehensive site-wide integrated ES&H management system. Obviously, the source documents for each system would need to be reviewed to assure proper implementation of a particular system. The matrix compares nine ES&H management systems against a list of elements generated by identifying the unique elements of all the systems. To simplify the matrix, the elements are listed by means of a brief title. An explanation of the matrix elements is provided in Attachment 2 entitled, `Description of System Elements.` The elements are categorized under the Total Quality Management (TQM) `Plan, Do, Check, Act` framework with the added category of `Policy`. (The TQM concept is explained in the `DOE Quality Management implementation Guidelines,` July 1997 (DOE/QM- 0008)). The matrix provides a series of columns and rows to compare the unique elements found in each of the management systems. A `V` is marked if the element is explicitly identified as part of the particular ES&H management system. An `X` is marked if the element is not found in the particular ES&H management system, or if it is considered to be inadequately addressed. A `?` is marked if incorporation of the element is not clear. Attachment I provides additional background information which explains the justification for the marks in the matrix cells. Through the Vean diagrams and the `End Gate` filter in Section 3, the paper attempts to pictorially display the focus of

  3. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    can improve the effectiveness of natural and whole-house ventilation by removing indoor air pollution andor moisture at its source. Spot ventilation includes the use of...

  4. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spot ventilation can improve the effectiveness of natural and whole-house ventilation by removing indoor air pollution andor moisture at its source. Spot ventilation includes the ...

  5. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  6. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decision Making Performance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance You are ...

  7. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC) Country of Publication: United States ...

  8. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways ... Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the ...

  9. Acquisition and the Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... increased use of alternative fuel vehicles and the use of alternative fuels in these vehicles. ... hyperlinks to related industrial Web sites. (Exits Energy.gov) NOTE: Non-Government ...

  10. Environment, Health, Safety & Security | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is the SPLC's highest honor and recognizes a purchasing organization whose overall sustainable purchasing program exemplifies leadership-for DOE's GreenBuy Award Program....

  11. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  12. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2010-04-27

    The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The

  13. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  14. RAPID/Geothermal/Environment/Oregon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None ContactsAgencies: Oregon State Historic Preservation Office, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality State Environment Process...

  15. An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work Environment and Employee Work Experience An Employee Think Tank to Improve the Department of Energy Work Environment ...

  16. Low-Friction Hard Coatings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Innovation | Department of Energy drawing shows simple and cost-effective ventilation strategies for homes. As high-performance homes get more air tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research by Building Science Corporation to develop simple whole-house ventilation systems for builders that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements. To address ventilation issues arising in

  17. 2016 Connected Lighting Systems Workshop Presentations | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Connected Lighting Systems Workshop Presentations 2016 Connected Lighting Systems Workshop Presentations Pre-Workshop Session: Communications Fundamentals - Michal Koenig, Qualcomm (340.01 KB) Pre-Workshop Session: Communications Fundamentals - Shane Dewing, Intel (2.79 MB) Pre-Workshop Session: Cybersecurity - Ken Modeste, UL (1.28 MB) Workshop Introduction - James Brodrick, U.S. Department of Energy (2 MB) Opening Remarks - Tanuj Mohan, Enlighted (7.75 MB) Leading-Edge Indoor

  18. Department of Energy Facilities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Facilities Department of Energy Facilities Department of Energy Facilities View All Maps Addthis...

  19. Department of Energy Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Facilities Department of Energy Facilities Department of Energy Facilities

  20. Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing

  1. The effects of indoor pollution on Arizona children

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, R.

    1982-05-01

    The respiratory health of a large group of Arizona school children who have been exposed to indoor pollutants-tobacco smoke and home cooking fumes-is reported. A significant relationship was found between parental smoking and symptoms of cough, wheeze, and sputum production. Also, children in homes where gas cooking fuel was used had higher rates of cough than children in homes where electricity was used. No differences in pulmonary function or yearly lung growth rates occurred among subjects grouped by exposure to tobacco smoke or cooking fuel. Thus, parental smoking and home cooking fuel affected cross-sectional respiratory symptom rates in a large group of Arizona school children. Study of pulmonary function, however, revealed no lung function or lung growth effects during 4 yr of study.

  2. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  3. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-06-01

    Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

  4. Department of Energy Oversight Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-25

    The Policy establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement. Cancels DOE P 226.1. Canceled by DOE P 226.1B

  5. Department of Energy Oversight Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25

    The Policy establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement. Supersedes DOE P 226.1A

  6. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a 50% reduction in building energy consumption. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings (890.97 KB) More Documents & ...

  7. Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low to Moderate CO2 ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  8. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014. Watch the presentation.

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Equipment Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program Pathway Lending is currently working with the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation's Office of Energy...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reflective Roofs Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program Pathway Lending is currently working with the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation's Office of Energy...

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Direct-Use Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program Pathway Lending is currently working with the Tennessee Department of Environment & Conservation's Office of Energy...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deduction To qualify for the exemption, the owner of a qualified generating facility must first obtain a certificate of eligibility from the Department of Environment. The owner...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Integrators Savings Category: Solar Water Heat, Solar Photovoltaics Solar Advantage Plus Program DC District Department of Environment (DDOE) offers Solar Advantage Plus...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential, Low Income Residential Savings Category: Solar Photovoltaics Solar Advantage Plus Program DC District Department of Environment (DDOE) offers Solar Advantage Plus...

  15. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plus Program DC District Department of Environment (DDOE) offers Solar Advantage Plus program, which fully subsidizes the cost of installation of solar PV system for...

  16. User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You

  17. Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology Energy and Environment Subcommittee U.S. House of Representatives, October 3, 20

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology, Energy and...

  18. Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology Energy and Environment Subcommittee U.S. House of Representatives October 3, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology, Energy and...

  19. SUN CATCHER COTTAGE TEAM ILLINOIS U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUN CATCHER COTTAGE TEAM ILLINOIS U.S. Department of Energy Race to Zero Student Design Competition SUN CATCHER COTTAGE TEAM ILLINOIS U.S. Department of Energy Race to Zero Student Design Competition 1 7 21 26 31 37 44 50 59 1. TEAM QUALIFICATIONS 2. DESIGN GOALS & PROJECT CONTEXT 3. ENVELOPE DURABILITY ANALYSIS 4. INDOOR AIR QUALITY EVALUATION 5. SPACE CONDITIOINING DESIGN & ANALYSIS 6. ENERGY ANALYSIS 7. FINANCIAL ANALYSIS 8. DOMESTIC HOT WATER, LIGHTING & APPLIANCES 9. INDUSTRY

  20. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  1. Lighting Design | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Lighting Design Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of lighting. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/chandlerphoto. Energy-efficient indoor and outdoor lighting design focuses on ways to improve both the quality and efficiency of

  2. US Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... fraud, waste, and abuse, and protect public health and safety. The OIG Whistleblower Ombudsman educates Department employees about prohibitions on retaliation for whistleblowing, ...

  3. Connecticut: Bridgeport Multifamily Weatherization | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the building and addressed health and safety issues, including improving indoor air quality, increasing domestic hot water temperature, ventilating the boiler room, and...

  4. Building Envelopes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to demonstrate the impact of cool roofs in reducing energy use and improving thermal comfort (e.g., by reducing indoor air and radiant temperatures) Database of radiative ...

  5. Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An air conditioner cools your home with a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and ...

  6. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  7. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  8. Energy and indoor environmental quality in relocatable classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael; Hodgson, Alfred; Shendell, Derek; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Hochi, Toshifumi; Kumar, Satish; Lee, Seung-Min; Liff, Shawna; Rainer, Leo; Schmidt, Richard; Sullivan, Douglas; Diamond, Richard; Fisk, William

    2002-02-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are commonly utilized by school districts with changing demographics and enrollment sizes. Four energy-efficient RCs were designed and constructed for this study to demonstrate technologies that simultaneously attempt to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Two were installed at each of two school districts, and energy use and IEQ parameters were monitored during occupancy. Two (one per school) were finished with materials selected for reduced emissions of toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Each RC had two HVAC systems, alternated weekly, consisting of a standard heat-pump system and an indirect-direct evaporative cooling (IDEC) system with gas-fired hydronic heating. The hypothesized advantages of the IDEC include continuous outside air ventilation at {ge}7.5 L s{sup -1} per person, {approx}70% less cooling energy and efficient particle filtration. Measurements include: carbon dioxide, particles, VOCs, temperature, humidity, thermal comfort, noise, meteorology, and energy use. Preliminary IEQ monitoring results are reported.

  9. Leadership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leadership Leadership Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy As United States Secretary of Energy, Dr. Ernest Moniz is tasked with implementing critical Department of Energy missions in support of President Obama's goals of growing the economy, enhancing security and protecting the environment. More about Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall Deputy Secretary of Energy Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall was nominated by President Obama to be Deputy Secretary of Energy on July 8, 2014, and

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive

  11. Mission | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mission Mission Our mission is to remove environmental legacies resulting from more than 60 years nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Each of Oak Ridge's three primary cleanup sites face unique challenges that threaten safety and hinder the Department's missions. Protecting the Region's Health and Environment Our employees understand that their progress enhances the health and safety of the region. At ETTP, we are removing contaminated facilities. At

  12. US Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US Department of Energy Office of Inspector General FY 2014 Annual Performance Report FYs 2015 & 2016 Performance Plan U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Inspector General Annual Performance Report FY 2014 Annual Performance Plan FYs 2015 & 2016 Page i Table of Contents Page Message from the Inspector General ii At a Glance: Performance Results for FY 2014 iii Overview 1 Our Organization 2 External Factors Challenging Our Organization 4 Our Management Challenges 4 Measuring Our

  13. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  14. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  15. Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-08-19

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, and DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 232.2.

  16. Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy | Department of Energy Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of Energy Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of Energy Derek Favret*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Edward Regnier, U.S. Department of Energy; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The Department of Energy is drafting a handbook to assist program and field offices in understanding what is necessary and

  17. Indoor Measurements of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Final Report to the Tobacco Related Disease Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Gundel, Lara A.; Dod, Raymond L.; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.; Sohn, Michael D.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Chang, Gee-Minn; Sextro, Richard G.

    2004-03-02

    The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and ''real-world'' buildings to (1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, (2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and (3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles--using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on

  18. I/O values for determination of the origin of some indoor organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otson, R.; Zhu, J.

    1997-12-31

    To reduce human health risks resulting from exposure to toxic chemicals, it is important to determine the origin of such substances. The ratio (I/O) of indoor to outdoor concentrations of selected airborne vapor phase organic compounds (VPOC) was used to estimate the contribution of indoor sources to levels of the compounds in the air of 44 homes selected randomly in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Average I/O values for all of the homes were greater 1.5 for 10 of the 20 detected target compounds, and it could be concluded that indoor VPOC sources had a greater impact on indoor air quality than outdoor air in these instances. A significant finding, which aptly demonstrates the importance of indoor sources and pollution, was the overall I/O value of 5.2 for the 44 representative GTA homes. Possible indoor sources for most of the 10 compounds could be identified, based on information collected by means of a questionnaire, as well as from the scientific literature. However, possible sources for some compounds could not be determined as readily, probably because of the presence of multiple sources, and sources which had not been previously noted, such as foods and beverages. The sensitivity of I/O values to various factors (e.g., source strength, air exchange rates, precision of measurements, unanticipated sources), and the reliability of determining the origin of pollutants by use of I/O values alone were examined, with some examples. If used judiciously, the I/O value can be a useful tool for IAQ investigations.

  19. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low

  20. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  1. Procedures for Departing Employees | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procedures for Departing Employees Procedures for Departing Employees RM Exit Procedures (2)3.12.12.pdf (39.89 KB) More Documents & Publications Procedures for Departing Employees ...

  2. Procedures for Departing Employees | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procedures for Departing Employees Procedures for Departing Employees RM Exit Procedures.doc (337 KB) More Documents & Publications Procedures for Departing Employees Records ...

  3. Statement of Vernon Daub, Acting Manager of DOEs Carlsbad Field Office, Regarding New Mexico Environment Departments Issuance of a Draft Hazardous Waste Facility Permit for WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neile L. Miller Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and Acting Administrator National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy on the Fiscal Year 2014 President's Budget Request Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Senate Committee on Appropriations April 24, 2013 INTRODUCTION Chairman Feinstein, Ranking Member Alexander, and distinguished members of the Subcommittee, thank you for having me here to discuss the President's Fiscal Year 2014 budget

  4. Audit Report: IG-0518 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Audit Report: IG-0518 August 30, 2001 Evaluation of Classified Information Systems Security Program All information processed, transmitted, stored, or disseminated by or on behalf of the Department of Energy (Department) on automated information systems requires some level of protection. The loss or compromise of information entrusted to the Department or its contractors may affect the nation's economic competitive position, the environment, national security, Department missions, or citizens

  5. Audit Report: IG-0787 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Audit Report: IG-0787 January 16, 2008 The Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program The Department of Energy operates numerous interconnected computer networks and systems to help accomplish its strategic missions in the areas of energy, defense, science, and the environment. These systems are frequently subjected to sophisticated cyber attacks that could potentially affect the Department's ability to carry out its mission. During Fiscal Year 2006, the Department experienced 132

  6. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27

    The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12, Supersedes DOE O 231.1B.

  7. Judi Greenwald | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Judi Greenwald About Us Judi Greenwald - Deputy Director for Climate, Environment, and Energy Efficiency and Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Climate Change Judi Greenwald Judi Greenwald is the Deputy Director for Climate, Environment, and Energy Efficiency in the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis. In this capacity, she oversees technical, economic and policy analysis related to climate mitigation and resilience, environmental protection, and energy

  8. About Us | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Us About Us Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security Background On May 5, 2014 the Office of the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) was established within the Office of the Under Secretary for Management and Performance to strengthen the effectiveness and efficiency of primary mission-support organizations of the Department and institute enterprise-wide solutions to common challenges across the complex. AU is

  9. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us » News » Congressional Testimony Congressional Testimony October 6, 2011 Statement Before the Subcommittee on Children's Health and Environmental Responsibility, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate (10/6/2011) Statement Before the Subcommittee on Children's Health and Environmental Responsibility, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate By: David Geiser, Director, Office of Legacy Management, Department of Energy Subject: UMTRCA

  10. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  11. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  12. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  13. Temperature and productivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... and performance of office work under combined exposure to temperature, noise and air pollution. PhD Thesis. International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Department of ...

  14. Environment, Safety and Health Reporting

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-01-01

    To ensure timely collection, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of information on environment, safety, and health issues as required by law or regulations or as needed to ensure that the Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration are kept fully informed on a timely basis about events that could adversely affect the health and safety of the public or the workers, the environment, the intended purpose of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 210.1, DOE O 231.1, DOE O 232.1A. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B. DOE O 231.1B cancels all portions pertaining to environment, safety, and health reporting. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information provisions remain in effect until January 1, 2012.

  15. Webinar: Biofuels for the Environment and Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department (DOE) will present a live webinar titled “Biofuels for the Environment and Communities” on Wednesday April 22, 2015, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

  16. Line Environment, Safety and Health Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-06-26

    Sets forth the Department's expectations line management environment, safety and health (ES&H) oversight and for the use of contractor self-assessment programs as the cornerstone for this oversight. Canceled by DOE O 226.1.

  17. RADIATION PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AND THE ENVIRONMENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security DOE ... under the control of the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act ...

  18. Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department...

  19. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Environment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Act (HEPA) Hawaii Department of Health Office of Environmental Quality Control Bulk Transmission Environment in Idaho Varies by local municipality Varies by...

  20. Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale ...

  1. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economyof the ... Representatives Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of ...

  2. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommttee on Energy and Environment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommttee on Energy and Environment of the Committee on ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General Department of Energy Request to ...

  3. The Geophysical Environment Around Waunita Hot Springs | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Report: The Geophysical Environment Around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Organization Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S. Department...

  4. NIF and OMEGA X-Ray Environments Summary (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NIF and OMEGA X-Ray Environments Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: NIF and OMEGA X-Ray Environments Summary You are accessing a document from the Department of ...

  5. Brian Grabowski | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Brian Grabowski About Us Brian Grabowski - Argonne National Laboratory Brian Grabowski is public information officer who covers computing, the environment and life sciences for Argonne National Laboratory, one of the Department of Energy's 17 National Laboratories. Most Recent PHOTOS: 10 Years, 10 Breakthroughs at Argonne's Fastest Supercomputer February 24

  6. Indoor climate and moisture durability performances of houses with unvented attic roof constructions in a mixed-humid climate.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pallin, Simon B.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Jackson, Roderick K.

    2014-10-01

    A sealed or unvented attic is an energy-efficient envelope component that can reduce the amount of energy a house consumes for space conditioning if the air handler and/or ducts are located in the attic. The attic is typically sealed by using spray foam on the underside of the roof deck and covering the soffit, ridge and gable vents to minimize air leakage from the attic to the outside. This approach can save up to 10% in space-conditioning energy when ducts are located in the attic (DOE 2013). Past research done by ORNL and Florida Solar Energy Center suggests that in more hot, humid climates, an unvented attic could potentially create a more humid, uncomfortable living environment than a vented attic (Colon 2011, Boudreaux, Pallin et al. 2013). Research showed that controlling the higher indoor humidity could reduce the energy savings from the sealed, unvented attic, which in turn would decrease the energy savings payback. Research also showed that the roof assembly (5.5 inches of open-cell foam, 1inch of closed-cell foam, OSB, felt paper, and asphalt shingles) stored moisture, thus acting as a moisture buffer. During the fall and winter, the roof assembly stored moisture and during the spring and summer it released moisture. This phenomenon is not seen in a vented attic, in which the air exchange rate to the outside is greater and, in the winter, helps to dehumidify the attic air. It was also seen that in a vented attic, the direction of water vapor diffusion is on average from the attic to the interior of the house. Air leakage from the attic to the interior also occurs during more of the year in a house with an unvented attic than in one with a vented attic. These discoveries show that the moisture dynamics in a house with an unvented attic are much different from those in a house with a vented attic. This study reports on a series of computer model investigations completed to determine the key variables impacting indoor comfort and the durability of roof

  7. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-02-08

    It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Supersedes SEN-35-91.

  8. Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-25

    This Order implements the policy that establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement. Supersedes DOE O 226.1A.

  9. Environmental Policy and Assistance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Assistance Environmental Policy and Assistance The Department of Energy’s (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. The Department of Energy's (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. DOE Headquarters works with field offices to foster continuous improvement in environmental protection before incidents occur. Headquarters provides corporate

  10. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).