Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Indoor Environment Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

2

Modeling the indoor environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling the indoor environment ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research2007 46 (23), 7489-7496 ... Environmental Science & Technology2007 41 (6), 2028-2035 ...

Barbara S. Austin; Stanley M. Greenfield; Bruce R. Weir; Gerald E. Anderson; Joseph V. Behar

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

DISTRIBUTED VISION SYSTEM FOR ROBOT LOCALISATION IN INDOOR ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBUTED VISION SYSTEM FOR ROBOT LOCALISATION IN INDOOR ENVIRONMENT E. Menegatti, G. Gatto, and E. Pagello Department of Information Engineering Faculty of Engineering, The University of Padua in an environment whose appear- ance is changing in time. We propose an extension to the classical image

Menegatti, Emanuele

4

Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Autonomous Flight in Unknown Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are ...

Bachrach, Abraham Galton

6

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Achieving Healthy Indoor Environments via Improved Understanding of Surface-associated Chemical and Biological Processes Speaker(s): Ellison M. Carter Date: February 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diane Douglas Indoor air pollution in the workplace, public buildings, and residential dwellings has the potential to adversely impact human health. Within these diverse indoor environments, chemical and biological processes that occur at surfaces and interfaces strongly influence the fate, transport, and generation of indoor pollutants. A molecular-level understanding of the physical and chemical properties and processes characteristic of indoor surfaces is key to developing resilient building materials that strengthen building integrity and safeguard human health by reducing human exposure to

7

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk 5 Questions for Indoor Environment Group's William Fisk William Fisk January 2014 Quantifying the Economic Implications of Indoor Air on Energy Efficiency, Performance, and Health William Fisk is a senior scientist, mechanical engineer, and leader of the Indoor Environment Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). During his 33 years at the lab, he has researched the interrelated issues of building energy performance, ventilation, indoor environmental quality (IEQ), and occupant health and performance. His research focuses primarily on energy efficient methods of maintaining and improving ventilation and IEQ in buildings and on quantifying the impacts of building ventilation and IEQ on health and performance. He is a fellow of ASHRAE, a member of the

8

Autonomous Flight in Unstructured and Unknown Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents our solution for enabling a quadrotor helicopter, equipped with a laser rangefinder sensor, to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. While these capabilities are ...

Bachrach, Abraham Galton

9

Studying the microbiology of the indoor environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The majority of people in the developed world spend more than 90% of their lives indoors. Here, we examine our understanding of the bacteria that co-inhabit our artificial world and how they might influence hu...

Scott T Kelley; Jack A Gilbert

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Improved Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments Recently completed analyses suggest that improving buildings and indoor environments could reduce health-care costs and sick leave and increase worker performance, resulting in an estimated productivity gain of $30 to $150 billion annually. The research literature provides strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and their indoor environments influence the prevalence of several adverse health effects. These include communicable respiratory disease (e.g., common colds and influenza), allergy and asthma symptoms, and acute sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms such as headaches, and irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin. For example, in six studies, the number of respiratory illnesses in building occupants varied by a factor of 1.2 to

11

A fine-grained geospatial representation and framework for large-scale indoor environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a system and method for extending the current paradigm of geographic information systems (GIS) to support indoor environments. It introduces features and properties of indoor multi-building environments ...

Battat, Jonathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Image Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION Mobile robot exploration is a vital cog in the automa- tion of the mapping process. In recentImage Based Exploration for Indoor Environments using Local Features (Extended Abstract) Aravindhan K Krishnan Madhava Krishna Supreeth Achar ABSTRACT This paper presents an approach to explore

Treuille, Adrien

13

The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Airflow and Pollutant Transport Modeling In Indoor and Built Environment Speaker(s): Teshome Edae Jiru Date: October 12, 2009 - 12:12pm Location: 90-3122 Computer simulation is based on mathematical models developed mostly from theoretical science and helps for studying and prediction of the behavior of engineered systems. The advantages of computer simulation are the ease of varying the desired parameters to investigate various possible design scenarios, explore new theories, and design new experiments to test these theories. It also provides detailed information and serves as a powerful alternative to experimental science and observation when phenomena are not observable or when measurements are impractical or too expensive. This seminar presents the different types of mechanistic modeling approaches

15

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Impact of Indoor Environment Improvement on Comfort and Productivity in a Chipboard Workplace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-147. [7]. Derek C. C, Li Baizhan. productivity and indoor environment [C]. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings. Espoo Finland: Vol.1, 1(2000): 629-634. ...

Li, Z.; Li, D.; Du, H.; Zhang, G.; Li, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

I3WSN: Industrial Intelligent Wireless Sensor Networks for indoor environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) technologies have been successfully applied to a great variety of outdoor scenarios but, in practical terms, little effort has been applied for indoor environments, and even less in the field of industrial applications. This ... Keywords: Indoor environments, Industrial environments, Industrial safety, Sensor Observation Service (SOS), Sensor Web Enablement (SWE), Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs)

Pablo Gimnez; Benjamn Molina; Jaime Calvo-Gallego; Manuel Esteve; Carlos E. Palau

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Policy Name: Closing due to Indoor Temperature Extremes Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management and Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy Name: Closing due to Indoor Temperature Extremes Originating/Responsible Department to be followed in the event that indoor temperature extremes prompt the closing of any building or work area. The closing of any building or work area due to indoor temperatures extremes shall be subject to operational

Dawson, Jeff W.

19

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

20

Impact on the Indoor Environment of the Release and Diffusion of TVOC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-5-4 Impact on the Indoor Environment of the Release and Diffusion of TVOC Xiaochun Cong Yufeng Liu Minghong Wang Civil Engineering and Architecture...

Cong, X.; Liu, Y.; Wang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hybrid Self Localization for a Mobile Robotic Platform for Indoor and Outdoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with the motion state estimate. As Robotics Research: The DOE University Research Program Platform in Indoor and Outdoor Environments," in Transactions of the American Nuclear Society, Vol. 92, San

Abidi, Mongi A.

22

Radioactivity in the indoor building environment in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......using activated carbon. Health Phys (1984) 46(4...indoor radon: a public health perspective, edited...Shannoun. (2009) World Health Organization. ISBN 978...al. Simple method for depleted uranium determination. Jpn J......

Natasa Todorovic; Istvan Bikit; Miroslav Veskovic; Miodrag Krmar; Dusan Mrda; Sofija Forkapic; Jan Hansman; Jovana Nikolov; Kristina Bikit

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tools to improve built environment data collection for indoor microbial ecology investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent studies have greatly increased our knowledge of microbial ecology of the indoor environments in which we live and work. However, the number of studies collecting robust, long-term data using standardized methods to characterize important building characteristics, indoor environmental conditions, or human occupancy collectively referred to as built environment data remain limited. Insufficiently described built environment data can limit our ability to compare microbial ecology results from one indoor environment to another or to use the results to assess how best to control indoor microbial communities. This work first reviews recent literature on microbial community characterization in indoor environments (primarily those that utilized molecular methods), paying particular attention to the level of assessment of influential built environment characteristics and the specific methods and procedures that were used to collect those data. Based on those observations, we then describe a large suite of indoor environmental and building design and operational parameters that can be measured using standardized methods to inform experimental design in future studies of the microbial ecology of the built environment. This work builds upon the recently developed MIxS-BE package that identifies high-level minimal built environment metadata to collect in microbial ecology studies, primarily by providing more justification, detail, and context for these important parameters and others from the perspective of engineers and building scientists. It is our intent to provide microbial ecologists with knowledge of many of the tools available for built environment data collection, as well as some of the constraints and considerations for these tools, which may improve our ability to design indoor microbial ecology studies that can better inform building design and operation.

Tiffanie Ramos; Brent Stephens

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Distribution in Unventilated Indoor Environments Inspected by a Mobile Robot Michael Wandel1@tech.oru.se Abstract Gas source localisation with robots is usually per- formed in environments with a strong in different environments, and the similarities as well as differences in the analyte gas distributions

Zell, Andreas

25

The effect of indoor office environment on the work performance, health and well-being of office workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of indoor environment may have an influence on the performance, productivity health and well-being of office workers.

Komalanathan Vimalanathan

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airflows. ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 90, Part 1B, pp.601-ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division MS 90-

Sherman, Max H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors Cheap Fixes for Beating the Heat Indoors July 25, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Blinds are a great option for cooling your home in the summer. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nycshooter Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Instead of turning on the air conditioning, consider window treatments and fans to cool down your home. If your internal thermostat is melting like the rest of the U.S. right now, you probably could use some fanning, ice, or air conditioning. With that in mind, we are providing a rundown of the cheapest ways to keep your home

28

Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 66966710 Indoor secondary pollutants from cleaning product and air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-in scented-oil air freshener (AFR) was operated for several days. Cleaning products were applied-mail address: BCSinger@lbl.gov (B.C. Singer). #12;1. Introduction Many consumer cleaning products and airAtmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 6696­6710 Indoor secondary pollutants from cleaning product

Short, Daniel

29

The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics Chun Chen...during treatments. indoor environment|computational fluid dynamics...infectious diseases in indoor environments. Previous research indicates...Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE 2003) and the Centers...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Occurrence of a Broad Range of Legacy and Emerging Flame Retardants in Indoor Environments in Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were (1) to undertake a comprehensive monitoring of a wide range of BFRs, PFRs, and dechloranes in indoor air and dust in Norwegian households and schools, (2) to explore the sources of exposure to these FRs in the households, and (3) to assess the total intake of FRs from indoor environments for the mothers and their children living in the household. ... Nevertheless, the PFR concentrations were much lower than the levels detected in residential dwellings in Japan(28) (TCIPP 89.2, TNBP 27.1, and TCEP 15.5 ng/m3) (SI Figure S2). ...

Enrique Cequier; Alin C. Ionas; Adrian Covaci; Rosa Maria Marc; Georg Becher; Cathrine Thomsen

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy Department Announces Indoor Lighting Winners of Next Generation Luminaires Solid-State Lighting Design Competition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of the Obama Administrations efforts to reduce energy waste in U.S. buildings and help save Americans money by saving energy, the Energy Department today announced the winners of the sixth annual Next Generation LuminairesTM (NGL) design competition for indoor lighting at the LED Show in Los Angeles.

32

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yocum, "A Study of Indoor Air Quality," ~_Air Pollut. Contr.discusses the Indoor Air Quality research supported by theAssociation, "Community Air Quality Guides, Aldehydes," Am.

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Marked Point Process Model for the Source Proximity E ect in the Indoor Environment 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor air quality monitors arise because of the source proximity e#11;ect, in which pollutant sources. McBride Abstract In indoor air quality studies, discrepancies between personal and station- ary Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship as well as the Center for Indoor Air Research. The author thanks

West, Mike

34

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Homes Max H. Sherman, Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE Iain S. Walker, Ph.D. P.E. Member ASHRAE Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division MS 90-3074 1

35

Environment and Earth Sciences Department The Environment and Earth Sciences Department was created in 1993 from the Department of Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment and Earth Sciences Department The Environment and Earth Sciences Department was created of the Earth and Vegetal Biology. Following the extension of the educational staff went incorporating of the Geological Society of Spain. It will be organized by the Department of Earth Sciences and the environment

Escolano, Francisco

36

Tips for Reducing Asthma Triggers in Indoor Environments The goal of parents who have children with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

products and pesticides can add pollutants to the indoor air. Keep your home well ventilated when using these #12;products. Consider using less toxic products. Keep foods "in the kitchen" for easier cleaning allergens in the indoor air. Buildings need to have a sufficient amount of outdoor air to dilute and remove

37

IMPACT OF THE URBAN POLLUTION ON THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT -EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A MECHANICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bâtiment (CSTB), Nantes, France ABSTRACT This study aims to assess the transfer of outdoor air pollution and the relationships between outdoor and indoor urban air pollutant concentrations are more and more a subject indoor pollutant sources. At the initial state, the dwelling was naturally ventilated. Air renewal

Boyer, Edmond

38

Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California, Irvine, CA ABSTRACT Indoor air purifiers are advertised as safe household prod- ucts for health. This is a serious concern, because O3 is a criteria air pollutant reg- ulated by health-related federal and state of growing air pollution problems in urban areas, indoor air purification has gained widespread popularity

Nizkorodov, Sergey

39

STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DIVISION, HAZARDOUS WASTE BUREAU, Complainant, v. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, and NUCLEAR WASTE PARTNERSHIP,...

40

Eco-friendly driven remediation of the indoor air environment: the synthesis of novel transition metal doped titania/silica aerogels for degradation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Remediation of the indoor environment led to the development of novel catalysts which can absorb light in the visible range. These catalysts were prepared using (more)

Baker, Schuyler Denton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Motion Compatibility for Indoor Localization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor localization -- a device's ability to determine its location within an extended indoor environment -- is a fundamental enabling capability for mobile context-aware applications. Many proposed applications assume ...

Park, Jun-geun

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

DRAFT 12-5-10 To be submitted to Indoor Air  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with Activated Carbon Fiber (ACF) Filters Meera A. Sidheswaran 1 , Hugo Destaillats 1,2, , Douglas P. Sullivan 1 , Sebastian Cohn 1 , and William J. Fisk 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 Arizona State University School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment Phoenix, AZ April 2011 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5176E 2 Energy Efficient Indoor VOC Air Cleaning with

43

HVAC filtration for controlling infectious airborne disease transmission in indoor environments: Predicting risk reductions and operational costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes and applies a methodology for estimating the impact of recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) particle filters on the control of size-resolved infectious aerosols in indoor environments using a modified version of the Wells-Riley model for predicting risks of infectious disease transmission. Estimates of risk reductions and associated operational costs of both HVAC filtration and equivalent outdoor air ventilation are modeled and compared using a case study of airborne transmission of influenza in a hypothetical office space. Overall, recirculating HVAC filtration was predicted to achieve risk reductions at lower costs of operation than equivalent levels of outdoor air ventilation, particularly for MERV 1316 filters. Medium efficiency filtration products (MERV 711) are also inexpensive to operate but appear less effective in reducing infectious disease risks.

Parham Azimi; Brent Stephens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

EEI Environment Meetings Presentation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EEI Environment Meetings Presentation EEI Environment Meetings Presentation EEI Environment Meetings Presentation More Documents & Publications U.S. Energy Association Presentation...

45

Colorado Department of Health & Environment Nonpoint Source Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Department of Health & Environment Nonpoint Source Webpage Abstract This...

46

Environment and Nuclear Programs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment and Nuclear Programs Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Cooling Tower Reflection | Credit: DOE Archives Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Environment and Nuclear Programs Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Environment (GC-51) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Civilian Nuclear Programs (GC-52 ) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for International and National Security Programs (GC-53) Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) Office of Standard Contract Management (GC-55) Litigation and Enforcement Environment and Nuclear Programs Environment Civilian Nuclear Programs International and National Security Programs NEPA Policy and Compliance Standard Contract Management Technology Transfer and Procurement

47

Anchored Interactive Learning Environments Department of Computer Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based environments facilitate sustained learning by active learners. The design and implementation of Adventure-assisted instruction designed to facilitate generative and sustained learning in an interactive multi-media environmentAnchored Interactive Learning Environments Thad Crews Department of Computer Science Western

48

Safeguarding indoor air quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has created and implemented the first state program devoted exclusively to the investigation of nonindustrial indoor air quality. The program is responsible for promoting and conducting research on the determining factors of healthful indoor environments and is structured to obtain information about emission sources, ventilation effects, indoor concentrations, human activity patterns, exposures, health risks, control measures and public policy options. Data are gathered by a variety of methods, including research conducted by staff members, review of the available scientific literature, participation in technical meetings, contractual agreements with outside agencies, cooperative research projects with other groups and consultation with experts. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Sexton, K.; Wesolowski, J.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence New Mexico Environment Department Presents WIPP Its Highest Recognition for Environmental Excellence April 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill, (575) 234-7270 U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office www.wipp.energy.gov CARLSBAD, N.M., April 30, 2013 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recognized by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) with Green Zia Environmental Leadership Program (GZELP) Gold Level membership for excellence. The GZELP annually recognizes organizations and businesses for their demonstration of environmental leadership in support of pollution prevention and sustainability. The Gold Level is the highest GZELP

50

Monitoring Viable Fungal and Bacterial Bioaerosol Concentrations to Identify Acceptable Levels for Common Indoor Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 CFU/m3 of non-toxigenic or non-pathogenic organisms should be typical for normal, non-immunocompromised environments. With the exception of Cladosporium, no organism should individually contribute more than 150 CFUfm3. Furthermore, it is concluded...

Robertson, L. D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

FAQS Qualification Card - Environment Compliance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment Compliance Environment Compliance FAQS Qualification Card - Environment Compliance A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-EnvironmentalCompliance.docx Description Environment Compliance Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base

52

Environment, Safety, and Health Program for Department of Energy Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE O 5480.1A. Canceled by DOE N 251.4.

1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Indoor Environmental Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image office interior, people talking, computational fluid dynamics image Indoor Environmental Quality EETD conducts a broad program of research, technology development, and dissemination activities directed toward improving the health, comfort, and energy efficiency of the indoor environment. EETD researchers conduct a broad program of research and development with the goals of: reducing the energy used for thermally conditioning and distributing ventilation air in buildings improving indoor air quality (IAQ), thermal comfort and the health and productivity of building occupants understanding human exposures to environmental pollutants found in indoor and outdoor air improving the scientific understanding of factors and processes affecting air quality developing sound science to inform public policy on the most

54

Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of work practices for nanoscale material activities at DOE Laboratories. Representatives from DOE line management organizations - the Office of Science (SC) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) - as well as nanoscale science subject matter experts from national laboratories and representatives from the HSS Office of Health and Safety, contributed to the Special Review.

55

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2013 8, 2013 DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the public comment period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (ULP PEIS) has been extended to May 31, 2013. Under the Uranium Leasing Program, DOE's Office of Legacy Management manages 31 tracts of land in Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel counties in Colorado - approximately 25,000 acres - that are leased to private entities for uranium and vanadium mining. No mining operations are active on these lands at this time. DOE is preparing the ULP PEIS to analyze the reasonably foreseeable potential environmental impacts, including the site-specific and cumulative impacts, of a range of selected alternatives for managing the program. The

56

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9, 2013 9, 2013 DOE Extends Public Comment Period for Uranium Program Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the public comment period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (ULP PEIS) has been extended to July 1, 2013. Under the Uranium Leasing Program, DOE's Office of Legacy Management manages 31 tracts of land in Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel counties in Colorado - approximately 25,000 acres - that are leased to private entities for uranium and vanadium mining. No mining operations are active on these lands at this time. DOE is preparing the ULP PEIS to analyze the reasonably foreseeable potential environmental impacts, including the site-specific and cumulative impacts, of a range of selected alternatives for managing the program. The

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution indoor Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

indoor Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution indoor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Building Energy & Environments (BEE) Dept....

58

Environment, Safety, and Health Program for Department of Energy Operations  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Page Change transmits revised pages of DOE O 5480.1B to renew the authority fo the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health to curtail or suspend operations at Department of Energy facilities. Chg 1 dated 5-10-93. Canceled by DOE N 251.4.

1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

59

Radiation Safety - Protecting the Public and the Environment | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiation Safety - Protecting the Public and the Environment Radiation Safety - Protecting the Public and the Environment Radiation Safety - Protecting the Public and the Environment The Department of Energy has a stringent program for protecting its workers, the public, and the environment from radiation. This web area has links to tools and aids for the radiation protection of the public. Some links apply to the clearance (i.e., radiological release) of property. "Clearance" permits real property (land and buildings) to be released from radiological control for reuse without radiation protection requirements. In addition, there is the clearance of personal property, such as, equipment, materials, wastes, and privately owned property (such as jewelry, clothing, tools, etc.) to be removed from radiological areas for continued use or reuse.

60

How to Save the Environment and Money | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

How to Save the Environment and Money How to Save the Environment and Money How to Save the Environment and Money April 21, 2012 - 12:02pm Addthis Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov On Friday, Secretary Chu hosted a live chat discussion to celebrate the 42nd annual Earth Day. The conversation with an in-person audience, streamed live here on energy.gov, highlighted the fact that we don't have to choose between our economy and our environment. For example, Secretary Chu highlighted how easy it is to save money and the planet at the same time. By making sure that you seal air leaks and add insulation, you're making your home more environmentally friendly and lowering your energy bill. In addition, Secretary Chu spoke about the Energy Department's work to help oil companies make energy efficient cars

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

How to Save the Environment and Money | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Save the Environment and Money to Save the Environment and Money How to Save the Environment and Money April 21, 2012 - 12:02pm Addthis Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov On Friday, Secretary Chu hosted a live chat discussion to celebrate the 42nd annual Earth Day. The conversation with an in-person audience, streamed live here on energy.gov, highlighted the fact that we don't have to choose between our economy and our environment. For example, Secretary Chu highlighted how easy it is to save money and the planet at the same time. By making sure that you seal air leaks and add insulation, you're making your home more environmentally friendly and lowering your energy bill. In addition, Secretary Chu spoke about the Energy Department's work to help oil companies make energy efficient cars

62

Mold: An Indoor Air Pollutant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

threat. Molds are fungi that produce microscopic cells called spores. Mold spores are present everywhere both outdoors and indoors and spread easily through the air. The most common ?problem? mold in indoor environments is Stachybotrys atra (also called S... is kept dry and clean, and efforts are made to reduce the level of mold spores entering the home. Controlling moisture. To control mold for good, you must solve any moisture problems in your home. Because there are mold spores everywhere, and mold grows...

Harris, Janie

2002-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

64

State of North Carolina Department of Environment and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, water, and subsurface resources, protection of water quality in public water systems; remediation of contaminated sites, sediments and ground water; prevention and control of indoor air pollution; and restoration.S. Environmental Protection Agency is charged by Congress with protecting the Nation's land, air, and water

Mukhtar, Saqib

65

Simulation and Comparison of Particle Injection in an Indoor Environment Using the Species Transport and Discrete Phase Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In simulating fluid/solid-particle multiphase -flows, various methods are available. One approach is the combined Euler-Lagrange method, which simulates the fluid phase flow in the Eulerian framework and the discrete phase (particle) motion in the Lagrangian framework simultaneously. The Lagrangian approach, where particle motion is determined by the current state of the fluid phase flow, is also called the discrete phase model (DPM), in the context of numerical flow simulation. In this method, the influence of the particle motions on the fluid flow can be included (two-way interactions) but are more commonly excluded (one-way interactions, when the discrete phase concentration is dilute. The other approach is to treat the particle number concentration as a continuous species, a necessarily passive quantity determined by the fluid flow, with no influences from the particles on the fluid flow (one-way interactions only), except to the extent the discrete phase continuum alters the overall fluid properties, such as density. In this paper, we compare these two methods with experimental data for an indoor environmental chamber. The effects of injection particle numbers and the related boundary conditions are investigated. In the Euler-Lagrange interaction or DPM model for incompressible flow, the Eulerian continuous phase is governed by the Reynolds-averaged N-S (RANS) equations. The motions of particles are governed by Newtons second law. The effects of particle motions are communicated to the continuous phase through a force term in the RANS equations. The second formulation is a pure Eulerian type, where only the particle-number concentration is addressed, rather than the motion of each individual particle. The fluid flow is governed by the same RANS equations without the particle force term. The particle-number concentration is simulated by a species transport equation. Comparisons among the models and with experimental and literature data are presented. Particularly, results with different numbers of released particles in the DPM will be investigated.

Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Wei, Zhenglun A.; Bennett, James S.; Yang, Xiaofan

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Environment, Safety, and Health Policy LM Policy 450.9 - Environment, Safety, and Health Policy (Last ReviewUpdate 11292011 ) LM...

67

Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications...

68

TENNESSEE HISTORICAL COMMISSION DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

June 30, 20 II June 30, 20 II TENNESSEE HISTORICAL COMMISSION DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION 2941 LEBANON ROAD NASHVILLE, TN 37243-0442 Ms. Susanna Sutherland (615) 532·1550 City of Knoxville Posl Office Box 1631 Knoxville, Tennessee, 37901 RE: DOE, SOLAR ASSISTED CHARGING STAnONS, KNOXVILLE, KNOX COUNTY Dear Ms. Sutherland: In response to your request, received on Tuesday, June 28, 2011, we have reviewed the documents you submitted regarding your proposed undertaking. Our review of and comment on your proposed undertaking are among the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. This Act requires federal agencies or applicant for federal assistance to consult with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Office before tbey carry out their proposed undertakings. The Advisory Council on Historic

69

Modeling and adaptive control of indoor unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in constrained indoor environments presents many unique challenges in control and planning. This thesis investigates modeling, adaptive control and trajectory optimization ...

Michini, Bernard (Bernard J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

ENVIRONMENT AL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD U.S. Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ENVIRONMENT AL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD U.S. Department of Energy Advisory Board Charter 1. Committee's Official Designation. Environmental Management Site-Specific...

71

EVALUATION OF THE INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROCEDURE FOR USE IN RETAIL BUILDINGS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings Spencer M. Dutton, Wanyu R. Chan, Mark J. Mendell, Marcella Barrios, Srinandini Parthasarathy, Meera Sidheswaran, Douglas P. Sullivan, Katerina Eliseeva, William J. Fisk Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 February 1, 2013 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program, Energy-Related Environmental Research Program, award number 500-09-049.The study was additionally supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

72

DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring September 19, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill deb.gill@wipp.ws 575-234-7270 Carlsbad, NM - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a grant for an estimated $1.6 million to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The five-year grant funds an agreement for NMED to conduct non-regulatory environmental oversight and monitoring to evaluate activities conducted at DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. NMED evaluates DOE activities related to WIPP's environmental monitoring and cleanup. This award is made in accordance with the Department of Energy

73

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Dose Conversion Coefficients for Radon Progeny for Different Ambient Environments K . N . Y ambient environments on the indoor radon dose (in terms of the dose conversion coefficient or DCC of the human respiratory tract. Epidemiological studies of under- ground miners of uranium and other minerals

Yu, K.N.

74

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

03E 03E Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman*, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang 4 April 2008 Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *Now with the California Energy Commission PIER Program, Sacramento CA. This research was sponsored by the California Energy Commission through the Public Interest Energy Research program as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy research project, CEC Contract Number 500-03-041.

75

Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings Jeff models for the indoor-air environment in control design for energy efficient buildings. In one method by a desire to incorporate models of the indoor-air environment in the design of energy efficient buildings

Gugercin, Serkan

76

Alaska Forum on the Environment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forum on the Environment Alaska Forum on the Environment February 9, 2015 9:00AM AKST to February 13, 2015 5:00PM AKST Anchorage, Alaska Dena'ina Convention Center 600 W. 7th Ave....

77

Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Optimizing Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment at the Department of Energy (DOE), ALARA at DOE Derek Favret*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Edward Regnier, U.S. Department of Energy; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The Department of Energy is drafting a handbook to assist program and field offices in understanding what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) provisions of DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The handbook identifies the goals, requirements and issues that should be addressed in an ALARA process and reviews past case studies from throughout the department to further assist in implementing this process. Utilization of the ALARA process ensures optimization techniques are integrated into the design and analyses of programmatic options to support DOEs diverse missions and protect the public and the environment.

78

Pedestrian localisation for indoor environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion Arrangements Contextual Fusion Activities Figure 2.1: The Location Stack model for location-aware computing. 7 The components of positioning systems that use both single and multiple sensor types can be defined in the context of the bottom three... relevance to this thesis: ? The sensors layer: Defines the physical sensors of a location system. ? The measurements layer: Defines the types of measurements obtained from the physical sensors. ? The fusion layer: Defines the algorithms that combine...

Woodman, Oliver

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative has partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to bring together a special section of the recent issue (November 2012). The section was prepared in association with the Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative-led symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." The section consists of 12 papers which present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

80

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Deep Vadose Zone - Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) partnered with the Vadose Zone Journal to create a special section of the journal's November 2012 issue. DVZ-AFRI conducted a symposium at the annual American Chemical Society meeting on "Understanding Behavior and Fate of Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments." They produced 12 papers that present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments, many of which highlight recent work at the Hanford site. The publications can be accessed here. For more information, contact Skip Chamberlain with the EM's Office of Soil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment Before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment Before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment Committee on Science, Space, and Technology United States House of Representatives By: David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy and International Affairs Subject: Critical Elements: Identifying Research Needs and Strategic Priorities 12-7-11FinalTestimonySandalow.pdf More Documents & Publications Statement of David Sandalow, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy and International Affairs, Before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment, Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, United States House of Representatives Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy

82

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments September 18, 2012, Webinar: Wind Energy in Urban Environments This webinar was held September 18, 2012, and provided information on wind energy installations in Boston Harbor in Hull, Massachusetts, and near downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 128 MB), or read the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Lessons Learned: Milwaukee's Wind Turbine Project This presentation provided information on the A-to-Z basics for constructing a wind turbine in an urban environment as well as the lessons learned. The City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, found that information and transparency were two key items that helped win over local officials and the public when planning their 100-kilowatt urban wind project. Learn more

84

Alaska Forum on the Environment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Forum on the Environment Forum on the Environment Alaska Forum on the Environment February 3, 2014 8:00AM AKST to February 7, 2014 5:00PM AKST Anchorage, Alaska Dena'ina Convention Center The Alaska Forum on the Environment is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders, Alaskan youth, conservationists, biologists, and community elders. The forum offers more than 80 technical breakout sessions and keynote events on topics such as climate change, energy, environmental regulations, cleanup and remediation, fish and wildlife, solid waste, and more. To address the pressing concerns from Alaska rural coastal communities, the event will also cover marine debris, coastal issues, and tsunamis.

85

Before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Statement Before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Washington, D.C. By: Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy Subject: H.R. 2454, the American Clean...

86

Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health Our Commitment to Environment, Security, Safety and Health FE's 2011 ESS&H Annual Report The Office of Fossil Energy is committed to conducting our mission to achieve the greatest benefit for all our stakeholders, including our employees and the public, while actively adhering to the highest applicable standards for environment, security, safety and health (ESS&H). We are working to continuously improve our practices through effective integration of ESS&H into all facets of work planning and execution. We intend to make consistent, measurable progress in implementing this Commitment throughout our operations while striving to eliminate injuries, incidents, and environmental releases.

87

Energy Saving Alignment Strategy: Achieving energy efficiency in urban buildings by matching occupant temperature preferences with a buildings indoor thermal environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Existing strategies for residential energy savings through physical renovation or motivating occupant energy conservation behavior can be costly and/or have transitory effects. Focusing on multi-family dwellings, an important subset of the urban residential sector, we propose an Energy Saving Alignment Strategy (ESAS) that has advantageous cost-effectiveness and a long-lasting influence. By aligning the distribution of residents thermostat preferences with the indoor temperature, ESAS aims to maximize thermal comfort and, accordingly, energy savings in multi-family buildings where indoor temperatures vary between apartments as a function of apartment orientation and floor level. Using a case study of a 1084-apartment public housing complex in New York, we classify both occupants thermostat preferences and apartments operative temperatures into five groups, and optimize energy efficiency by assigning each group of occupants to the group of apartments that best aligns with their thermostat preference. We test ESAS in eight cities representing all four U.S. census regions and six climate zones. Simulation results reveal 2.142.0% in energy savings compared to random apartment assignments depending on geographic location, with the highest energy reductions occurring in cities with mild climates, where the range of occupant thermostat preferences coincides with the natural indoor temperature range. We conclude by providing suggested guidelines on how ESAS might work in practice, and recommendations for extending ESAS research.

Xiaoqi Xu; Patricia J. Culligan; John E. Taylor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the California Healthy Building Study-Phase 1,renovation of schools. Proc. Healthy Buildings / IAQ 1997.1: 81-86. Healthy Buildings / IAQ 1997. Washington, DC.

Fisk, William J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

uWaterloo Annual Faculty/Department Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) Report Reporting Year: 2013 Faculty/Department: ______________________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Work" Poster #82? (05/06 or newer) f. Employee Safety Orientation Booklet (July 2013) g. MOL Health & Safety at Work Prevention Starts Here (June 2012) h. Copy of Occupational Health & Safety ActuWaterloo Annual Faculty/Department Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) Report Reporting Year

Le Roy, Robert J.

90

HOW DANGEROUS IS INDOOR MOLD?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HOW DANGEROUS IS INDOOR MOLD? ... Media coverage, litigation, and health concerns relating to indoor mold have dramatically risen over the past decade. ...

LOUISA WRAY DALTON

2004-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Indoor air environment and night cooling energy efficiency of a southern German passive public school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The recently built school building has adopted a novel heat recovery air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification have been numerically investigated concerning the effects of the heat flow flux of passive cooling within the ceiling concrete in the classroom due to night ventilation in summer which could result in cooling energy storage. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of passive cooling can simultaneously decrease the volume averaged indoor temperatures and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air-cooling unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of exhaust air and the heat flux value for passive cooling within the classroom ceiling concrete. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented.

Yang Wang; Fu-Yun Zhao; Jens Kuckelkorn; Xiao-Hong Li; Han-Qing Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

INDOOR AIR QUALITY QUESTIONNAIRE HUMAN RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDOOR AIR QUALITY QUESTIONNAIRE HUMAN RESOURCES FORM Risk and Compliance | One Washington Square THE AIR QUALITY ISSUE AND LOCATION Name: Date: Department: Phone No: Work Location: Suspected Air Quality, humidity, drafts, stagnant air, odors)? Is there a history of flooding or water damage? If so, please list

Eirinaki, Magdalini

93

Monolayer and multilayer particle resuspension from indoor surfaces : literature review and experimental methodology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Resuspension is an important source of particles in the indoor environment. A variable that may have a significant impact on the fraction of particles removed (more)

Boor, Brandon Emil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control should be the first priority instead of dilution of pollutants by ventilation or by cleaning the air.air quality, could better provide healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutantsair quality, could better document healthful indoor environments, and also reward designers and owners who control indoor pollutants

Mendell, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

73 Federal Register 73 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 48 / Monday, March 12, 2012 / Rules and Regulations adopted by voluntary consensus standards bodies. This rule does not use technical standards. Therefore, we did not consider the use of voluntary consensus standards. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in complying with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (42 U.S.C. 4321-4370f), and have concluded this action is one of a category of actions that do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment. This rule is categorically excluded, under figure 2-1, paragraph (34)(g), of the Instruction. This rule

96

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for energy efficiency in radio over fiber distributed indoor antenna Wi-Fi network Yves Josse communications in indoor environments. In this paper, the power consumption and energy efficiency of a DAS using for different transmission configurations, yielding a distance- dependent energy efficiency model. In a second

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Fully Autonomous Indoor Quadrotor Slawomir Grzonka Giorgio Grisetti Wolfram Burgard Abstract--Recently there has been an increased interest in the development of autonomous flying vehicles. Whereas most system to autonomously operate in indoor environments. To achieve this, we systematically extend

Teschner, Matthias

99

Indoor Sampler Siting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

100

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor Increase energy efficiency in systems and buildings and improve indoor environment: How to validate comfort and energy reduction Speaker(s): Wouter Borsboom Date: December 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 TNO is a research institute which is active in the energy saving and indoor environment. We like to present our research, our goals and discuss the challenges and the opportunities for cooperation. Therefore we like to give a presentation about the following topic and we are also interested in a presentation of LBL and UC Berkeley. An important topic in the building industry is near zero energy buildings. Most countries in Europe implemented programs to advance this goal in one way or another. In near-zero energy buildings, the interaction between building and systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Coupled Airflow and Source/Sink Model for Simulating Indoor VOC and Q. Chen2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection Agency (EPA) have identified indoor air pollution as one of the top environmental risks 1 Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Building Technology Program, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

102

A Review on Indoor Optical Wireless Systems Chaturi Singh, AMIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kanpur, U.P.-208016 Joseph John, FIETE, Y.N.Singh MIETE, MIEEE Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT assistants for indoor use are rapidly growing in offices, manufacturing floors, shopping areas and warehouses cable free communication at very high bit rates (a few Gbps as compared to tens of Mbps supported

Singh Yatindra Nath

103

Indoor air quality: The legal landscape II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s office environment is as different from its predecessor as an automobile is from a horse and buggy. A 1950s office typically contained tile floors, painted walls, plaster ceilings, carbon paper, and plentiful fresh air circulating through windows that were usually open when weather permitted. In the 1990s, the decor has shifted to carpeted floors, synthetic wall coverings, ceiling tile and multiple copiers. Sophisticated building materials and motorized office products can emit unwelcome constituents into the indoor air, yet ventilation is limited by windows that do not open. One result of these changes has been an unprecedented and ever-increasing concern about indoor air quality (IAQ). Some studies rank indoor air pollution as today`s number one environmental health risk. Increased media attention to the topic has increased public awareness, which has increased litigation and regulatory activity in the area. This paper explores the legal landscape of IAQ in the US, ranging from legislative to regulatory activity on both the federal and state levels, and from civil litigation to actions brought before administrative boards. Along the way, the paper defines and discusses such IAQ problems as building-related illness (BRI) and sick building syndrome (SBS), examining the magnitude of the problems and their possible causes. Finally, the paper provides suggestions to those potentially liable for alleged injuries from indoor air pollution, including architects, builders, contractors, building product manufacturers, building owners and managers, building sellers, employers, and engineering and environmental consultants. This paper is an update of a paper presented at the Air and Waste Management Association`s Annual Meeting in 1992.

Neet, J.O. Jr.; Smith, T.A. [Shook, Hardy and Bacon, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES DIVISION INDOOR ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" ­ LBNL 47669 "Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution Systems" ­ LBNL 49293 Residential HVAC and Distribution Research Implementation CIEE/PG&E Final Report Attachments: "Development-Air Heating and Cooling Systems" -LBNL 47309 "Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register

105

Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 LANL has a strategy to clean up the past, control current operations, and move toward a sustainable future in which waste is minimized and other effects on the environment are reduced or eliminated. We work safely, securely, ethically, and in a manner that protects the environment We understand that the health and viability of the Laboratory depend in part on a record of environmental performance, building confidence of the public and our regulators. To gain the right to do what we do, we must work

106

environment  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

After operating for 34 years and training over 14,000 sailors, the Department of Energy S1C Prototype Reactor Site in Windsor, Connecticut, was returned to "green field"...

107

LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years. c) Persons working in the lab who are not radiation safety certified have read and signed the Radiation Safety Guidelines for Non-users. C. Laboratory Housekeeping and Work Practices Criteria yes no nLABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1

Machel, Hans

108

Department of Energy and Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Product development and materials · Energy and environment · Industrial exology Many of our students spend Analysis and Industrial Ecology Industrial Process Technology · Heat and Refrigeration Engineering Energy and Indoor Environment · Energy Consumption and Supply · Building Automation · Indoor Climate

Malinnikova, Eugenia

109

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Colorado Springs School District 11 - Achieving Healthy Indoor Learning Environments Through Energy Efficiency Upgrades Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition

110

Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CLIMATE C 24 ( 1979 ). BOLIN, B.B., GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE 3 ( 1979...CHEM ENV NEWS 0406 ( 1976 ). FISCHHOFF, B, HANDLING HAZARDS, ENVIRONMENT...1978 ). LOWRANCE, W.W., ACCEPTABLE RISK ( 1976 ). MARSH, G.P., EARTH...

Gilbert F. White

1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Title Indoor environmental quality benefits of apartment energy retrofits Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6373E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, Gary Adamkiewicz, William W. Delp, Toshifumi Hotchi, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael Spears, Kimberly Vermeer, and William J. Fisk Journal Building Environment Volume 68 Pagination 170-178 Date Published 10/2013 Keywords Apartments; Energy; Indoor environmental quality; Retrofit; Selection Abstract Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

112

Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories- August 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories

113

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

airconditioning IAQ:Indoorairquality LBNL:LawrenceDegrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms? HDEGRADING INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN CALIFORNIA CLASSROOMS?

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

115

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

116

Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Indoor Air Quality in New Energy-Efficient Houses Figure 1: Measurements of total volatile organic compounds in five new houses in Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Florida and median concentration in U.S. EPA study. In 1993, the Indoor Environment Program began investigating indoor air quality in new energy-efficient houses. Five new houses have been included in the study, all in the eastern U.S. Two had nearly identical floor plans and were part of a demonstration project near Pittsburgh, PA; one was built conventionally, while the other incorporated a number of energy-efficient features. The conventional house was studied for one year following construction, and the energy-efficient house was sampled on three occasions over a two-year period. The other three demonstration houses were in

117

Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Environment Environment Photo Gallery A repository for images showing environmental cleanup and protection efforts around the Lab. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Shipment #159 of TRU waste from LANL to WIPP, 2011 Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Kathy Johns-Hughes oversees Los Alamos National Laboratory's TRU Waste Program Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area

118

indoor | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

indoor indoor Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 17 September, 2013 - 12:39 Are you willing to reply to a text message once a day with information about your comfort level at your indoor location? building comfort design improve incentive indoor message sms text Yes 60% (3 votes) No 0% (0 votes) Maybe if I had an incentive 20% (1 vote) Maybe if my reply is confidential and anonymous 0% (0 votes) Maybe if the data will be used to improve building design 20% (1 vote) Total votes: 5 Buildings account for roughly 40% of all U.S. energy use (70% of all electricity): residential buildings account for 22% of all U.S. energy use and commercial buildings account for 18% of all U.S. energy use[i]. There is an unanswered need for information about buildings in use and how building design affects building occupant comfort, productivity, and, by

119

Movement of Indoor Fine Particle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the pollution control of cleanroom, the airflow force is the most important ... important for the movement of indoor particles in cleanroom comparatively. As for the movement of particles...

Zhonglin Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Payment Of the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau Annual Business and Generation Fees Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to transmit to the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB), the Los alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Annual Business and Generation Fees for calendar year 2011. These fees are required pursuant to the provisions of New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, Chapter 74, Article 4, NMSA (as amended). The Laboratory's Fenton Hill Facility did not generate any hazardous waste during the entire year, and is not required to pay a fee for calendar year 2011. The enclosed fee represents the amount for a single facility owned by the Department of Energy and co-operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS).

Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Carlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad . New Me xico 88221 N OV 1 9 2012 Mr. John E. Kieling, Chief Hazardou s W aste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report Dear Mr. Kieling: The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annua l Waste Minimization Report. This report is required by and has been prepared in accordance with the W IPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Part 2, Perm it Condition 2.4. We certify under penalty of law that this document and all attachments were prepared under our direction or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified personnel properly ga the r and eval uate the information submitted. Based on our inquiry of the person or persons who manage the

124

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Title Improving Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Performance of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Apte, Michael G., Michael Spears, Chi-Ming Lai, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of Sustainable Buildings 2005 Conference Pagination 1432-1437 Conference Location Tokyo, Japan, September 27-29, 2005 Abstract The factory-built relocatable classroom (RC) is a dominant force in the school facility construction industry in the United States (U.S.) and elsewhere. It is estimated that there are approximately 650,000 RCs currently occupied in the U.S., housing about 16 million students. RCs receive public attention due to complaints about poor indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Both measured data and anecdotal evidence in California have suggested excessive acoustical noise from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment as a central factor leading to degraded IEQ. In the U.S., RCs are typically equipped with unitary exterior wall-mount HVAC systems, and interior acoustical noise due to structural and airborne transmission can reach levels of about 58dB(A) with compressor cycling, under unoccupied conditions. Due to these noise levels teachers often simply choose to turn off the HVAC, leading to inadequate ventilation, as well as poor thermal conditioning, and thus to poor indoor air quality. Elevated levels of carbon dioxide and volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde are common. We discuss the acoustic component of our efforts to develop and test energy efficient HVAC systems that address the ventilation, controls, and acoustic requirements necessary to ensure high quality indoor environments in RCs

125

Indoor air quality bill opposed by EPA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air quality bill opposed by EPA ... Sen. George J. Mitchell (D.-Me.) has introduced a bill to protect the quality of indoor air. ... According to J. Craig Potter, assistant EPA administrator for air and radiation, the "Indoor Air Quality Act of 1987," S. 1629, is a bill whose time has not yet arrived. ...

LOIS EMBER

1987-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

127

Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time June 27, 2013 - 12:10pm Addthis Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time How does it work? Green roofs are ideal for urban buildings with flat or shallow-pit roofs, and can include anything from basic plant cover to a garden. The primary reasons for using this type of roof include managing storm water and enjoying a rooftop open space. Green roofs also provide insulation, lower the need for heating and cooling, and can reduce the urban heat island effect. This roof type can be much more expensive to implement than other efficient roof options, so you should carefully assess your property and consult a professional before deciding to install a green roof. Click here for more information on energy-efficient roofs

128

Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time June 27, 2013 - 12:10pm Addthis Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time How does it work? Green roofs are ideal for urban buildings with flat or shallow-pit roofs, and can include anything from basic plant cover to a garden. The primary reasons for using this type of roof include managing storm water and enjoying a rooftop open space. Green roofs also provide insulation, lower the need for heating and cooling, and can reduce the urban heat island effect. This roof type can be much more expensive to implement than other efficient roof options, so you should carefully assess your property and consult a professional before deciding to install a green roof. Click here for more information on energy-efficient roofs

129

Air pollution control: Indoor hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the need for further study of the health effects of indoor air pollution, ranging from radon emitted by building materials to the second-hand effects of cigarette smoke, and the ... overlooked in research on the health effects of environmental pollutants. In some cases,such as radon, the report says that there is an "urgent need" to study such health ...

David Dickson

1981-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

131

University of Colorado Indoor Air Quality Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Image Courtesy of Ohio Image Courtesy of Ohio State University INDOOR AIR QUALITY Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Design Goals Integrate technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies Minimize occupant distraction User-friendly controls Minimize pollutant sources Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features indoor air quality features Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Exhaust Fans Heating And Cooling Systems Passive Ventilation Low VOC materials Each of these features is described in more detail below. Mechanical Systems Energy Recovery Ventilator Knowing that our home has a tight envelope, due to our Bio-SIP construction, we needed to use mechanical ventilation to ensure suitable indoor air

132

Indoor Air Pollution and Its Control in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The status of indoor air pollution and its control in China are reviewed by introducing the pollution characteristics of major indoor air pollutants, the strategies and measures adopted to control indoor air pollution

Jiming Hao; Tianle Zhu; Xing Fan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for studies of indoor air quality and energy utilization inExt. 6782 Indoor Air Quality in Energy- Buildings Craig D.1, 1979) Indoor Air Quality in Energy~Efficient LBL-8892 EEB

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acceptable? Seal when closed? #12;Indoor Air Quality Forms 196 BuildingIndoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building in relation to indoor air quality. Page 1 of 14 Needs Attention Not ApplicableOKComponent Comments Outside Air

135

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to assess the impact of outdoor ozone on indoor air quality (IAQ) during photochemical pollution episodes). Based on the Paris area outdoor air pollution monitoring network (AIRPARIF) daily forecast, specificProceedings: Indoor Air 2005 1739 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY M Nicolas, O

Boyer, Edmond

136

Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to having  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Carbon monoxide that comes from burning propane, other gases and fuels, and charcoal · Household products

137

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monoxide and nitrogen dioxide from gas appliances;health, indoor air quality, nitrogen dioxide, radon The workin residen- (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NOz), formaldehyde (

Hollowell, C.D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy...

139

Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Quality and Energy Education In addition toAPPENDIX A1: Tenant Indoor Environmental Quality and Energyimproving indoor air quality (IAQ), energy efficiency and

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), "copies of contracts entered into between Burns & Roe Industrial Services, Burns & Roe Pacific Incorporated and the Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 MEMORANDUM FOR SCOTT BLAKE HARRIS GENERAL COUNSEL DAVID K. ZAB S Y ACTING PRINCI A EP DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CIV DIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT...

143

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Physics," on May 26-27,2011, in Bethesda, MD (Washington, DC area). This workshop is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Nuclear Physics (NP) and Advanced...

144

Increased Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Levels of Markers of Microbial Exposure in Homes with Indoor Storage of Organic Household...might increase microbial exposure in the home environment. In this study we evaluated...House dust samples were collected in 99 homes in The Netherlands selected on the basis...

Inge M. Wouters; Jeroen Douwes; Gert Doekes; Peter S. Thorne; Bert Brunekreef; Dick J. J. Heederik

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Demonstration abstract: airfeed: indoor real time interactive air quality monitoring system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solutions to outdoor air pollution require societal changes; however, we focus on indoor home air quality to allow for individual control over the breathing environment. We present AirFeed: a real time air quality monitoring system that provides measurements ... Keywords: air quality, human activity, monitoring, real time

Kyeong T. Min, Andrzej Forys, Thomas Schmid

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Indoor Humidity Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools Indoor Humidity Tools logo. Integrated computer program intended to assist in diagnosing and solving problems of indoor air humidity and dryness. Indoor Humidity Tools is comprised of two sections: - Calculations provide humidity calculations. - Reference provides background information on humidity in convenient lookup formats, such as recommended indoor humidity levels for different types of spaces, against which calculations may be compared. Keywords indoor air humidity, dryness, condensation Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required No special expertise required. Users first released in July 1997. Audience engineers, industrial hygienists and safety professionals, architects, building scientists, contractors, government air quality specialists, and

147

Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to suffering from lung  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and charcoal · Household products such as cleaners and pesticides How to Improve Indoor Air Quality · OpenIndoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Fumes

148

Microsoft Word - Indoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3767X_final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct indoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities, laboratory operations, and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced computing, advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, manufacturing, nanotechnology, national security, neutron sciences, chemical sciences, and nuclear physics including but not limited to developing, evaluating and testing: materials and their properties; systems; equipment; instrumentation; renewable energy systems; and

149

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

150

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin Melissa M. Lunden 1 ∗ , Thomas W. Kirchstetter 1 , Tracy L. Thatcher 2 , Susanne V. Hering 3 , and Nancy J. Brown 1 1 Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407, USA 2 Aerosol Dynamics Inc., 2329 4th Street, Berkeley, CA 94710, USA Abstract A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a

151

Department  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

u.s. u.s. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Analysis of Borehole-Radar Reflection Logs from Selected HC Boreholes at the Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada By John W. Lane, Jr., Peter K. Joesten, Greg Pohll, and Todd Mihevic Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4014 Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy Storrs, Connecticut 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Charles G. Groat, Director The use of firm, trade, and brand names in this report is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. For additional information write to: Branch Chief U.S. Geological Survey, Office of Ground Water Branch of Geophysical Applications & Support 11 Sherman Place, U-5015 Storrs Mansfield, CT 06269 http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas Copies of this

152

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor pollutant source control measures and air cleaningof indoor pollutant source control measures or gas phase aircontrol indoor pollutants, by allowing lower energy costs from reduced outdoor air

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable indoor air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Summary: pollutants, human exposure to indoor air pollution, and control of indoor pollutants. Much of the research... building energy, indoor air quality, or...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration indoor air Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Summary: pollutants, human exposure to indoor air pollution, and control of indoor pollutants. Much of the research... building energy, indoor air quality, or...

155

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M. (2009). Indoor air quality in highly energy efficientClayton, R. (2001). Indoor air quality: Residential cookingon acceptable indoor air quality in homes. HVAC&R Research,

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Title Indoor measurements of environmental tobacco smoke Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2004 Authors Apte, Michael G., Lara A. Gundel, S. Katharine Hammond, Raymond L. Dod, Marion L. Russell, Brett C. Singer, Michael D. Sohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, Gee-Minn Chang, and Richard G. Sextro Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract The objective of this research project was to improve the basis for estimating environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposures in a variety of indoor environments. The research utilized experiments conducted in both laboratory and 'real-world' buildings to 1) study the transport of ETS species from room to room, 2) examine the viability of using various chemical markers as tracers for ETS, and 3) to evaluate to what extent re-emission of ETS components from indoor surfaces might add to the ETS exposure estimates. A three-room environmental chamber was used to examine multi-zone transport and behavior of ETS and its tracers. One room (simulating a smoker's living room) was extensively conditioned with ETS, while a corridor and a second room (simulating a child's bedroom) remained smoking-free. A series of 5 sets of replicate experiments were conducted under different door opening and flow configurations: sealed, leaky, slightly ajar, wide open, and under forced air-flow conditions. When the doors between the rooms were slightly ajar the particles dispersed into the other rooms, eventually reaching the same concentration. The particle size distribution took the same form in each room, although the total numbers of particles in each room depended on the door configurations. The particle number size distribution moved towards somewhat larger particles as the ETS aged. We also successfully modeled the inter-room transport of ETS particles from first principles - using size fractionated particle emission factors, predicted deposition rates, and thermal temperature gradient driven inter-room flows, This validation improved our understanding of bulk inter-room ETS particle transport. Four chemical tracers were examined: ultraviolet-absorbing particulate matter (UVPM), fluorescent particulate matter (FPM), nicotine and solanesol. Both (UVPM) and (FPM) traced the transport of ETS particles into the non-smoking areas. Nicotine, on the other hand, quickly adsorbed on unconditioned surfaces so that nicotine concentrations in these rooms remained very low, even during smoking episodes. These findings suggest that using nicotine as a tracer of ETS particle concentrations may yield misleading concentration and/or exposure estimates. The results of the solanesol analyses were compromised, apparently by exposure to light during collection (lights in the chambers were always on during the experiments). This may mean that the use of solanesol as a tracer is impractical in 'real-world' conditions. In the final phase of the project we conducted measurements of ETS particles and tracers in three residences occupied by smokers who had joined a smoking cessation program. As a pilot study, its objective was to improve our understanding of how ETS aerosols are transported in a small number of homes (and thus, whether limiting smoking to certain areas has an effect on ETS exposures in other parts of the building). As with the chamber studies, we examined whether measurements of various chemical tracers, such as nicotine, solanesol, FPM and UVPM, could be used to accurately predict ETS concentrations and potential exposures in 'real-world' settings, as has been suggested by several authors. The ultimate goal of these efforts, and a future larger multiple house study, is to improve the basis for estimating ETS exposures to the general public. Because we only studied three houses no firm conclusions can be developed from our data. However, the results for the ETS tracers are essentially the same as those for the chamber experiments. The use of nicotine was problematic as a marker for ETS exposure. In the smoking areas of the homes, nicotine appeared to be a suitable indicator; however in the non-smoking regions, nicotine behavior was very inconsistent. The other tracers, UVPM and FPM, provided a better basis for estimating ETS exposures in the 'real world'. The use of solanesol was compromised - as it had been in the chamber experiments.

157

DEPARTMENTS:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......other Departments New Products NEW PRODUCTS used as a source of heating. It is de- signed to permit the reactions to pro- ceed under a stream of nitrogen. Re- agents are added by simply removing the Teflon-lined cap. 31 LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHS CHROMATEC......

New Products

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Indoor robot gardening: design and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes the architecture and implementation of a distributed autonomous gardening system with applications in urban/indoor precision agriculture. The garden is a mesh network of robots and plants. The gardening ...

Correll, Nikolaus

159

Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fungal Fragments as Indoor Air Biocontaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of ELISA MicroWell plates (Nalge Nunc International, Naperville, Ill.) and were incubated...Seppanen (ed.), Particles, microbes, radon, vol. 4. Proceedings of Indoor Air...problems in the Netherlands: a pilot project to solve problem in social housing...

Rafa? L. Grny; Tiina Reponen; Klaus Willeke; Detlef Schmechel; Enric Robine; Marjorie Boissier; Sergey A. Grinshpun

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Date: Date: August 28, 2006 Re: LICENSE ACQUISITION UPON CONTRACTING When a contract for supplies or services is negotiated, the contractor sometimes proposes that patent royalties under a license agreement with a third party be recognized as allowable costs. The license agreement may be a pre-existing agreement, or it may be a proposed agreement that is to be entered into contemporaneously with the Government contract for the purpose of the contract work. This letter sets forth the policy to be followed in approving or rejecting such proposed license arrangements. The legal authority for the Department to acquire patent licenses and, hence, to reimburse contractors for patent license costs, is described in the Appendix hereto. In summary, the Department has such legal authority for contracts not requiring patent indemnity under the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR). FAR (48

162

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Economic Economic and Community Development William Snodgrass/Tennessee Tower Building, 11th Floor, 312 8th Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee 37243 615-741-1888/ FAX: 615-741-7306 Matthew Kisber Commissioner January 20, 2009 Phil Bredesen Governor Mr, Paul Gottlieb Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Gottlieb, I am writing to express my strong support for the U.S. Department of Energy's initiative to simplify rules and regulations governing contractual agreements between the state of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Lab. Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen is a physicist by training and both he and I consider ORNL one of the most important assets our state possesses in our effort to gamer new investment into the state and create skilled jobs for our citizens.

163

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economic Economic and Community Development William Snodgrass/Tennessee Tower Building, 11th Floor, 312 8th Avenue North, Nashville, Tennessee 37243 615-741-1888/ FAX: 615-741-7306 Matthew Kisber Commissioner January 20, 2009 Phil Bredesen Governor Mr, Paul Gottlieb Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW. Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Gottlieb, I am writing to express my strong support for the U.S. Department of Energy's initiative to simplify rules and regulations governing contractual agreements between the state of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Lab. Tennessee Governor Phil Bredesen is a physicist by training and both he and I consider ORNL one of the most important assets our state possesses in our effort to gamer new investment into the state and create skilled jobs for our citizens.

164

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department Department of Energy Transmission Congestion Study Workshop Comments of the New York Independent System Operator By John P. Buechler Executive Regulatory Policy Advisor Hartford, CT July 9,2008 GOOD MORNING. ON BEHALF OF THE NYISO, I'D LIKE TO THANK THE DOE FOR THEIR INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE IN TODAY'S WORKSHOP. WE APPRECIATE THE SIGNIFICANT EFFORT THAT THE DOE IS ABOUT TO UNDERTAKE AS PART OF YOUR RESPONSIBILITIES UNDER EPACT 2005. NYISO, IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE ISOIRTO COUNCIL'S PLANNING COMMITTEE, PROVIDED SUBSTANTIAL INFORMATION TO THE DOE IN SUPPORT OF THE FIRST CONGESTION STUDY-ISSUED IN 2006-AND ONCE AGAIN WE STAND READY TO OFFER OUR ASSISTANCE FOR THE 2009 CONGESTION STUDY. NYISO BACKGROUND NYISO IS A STRONG SUPPORTER OF MARKET-BASED SOLUTIONS FOR MEETING BOTH RELIABILITY AND ECONOMIC NEEDS. THIS PHILOSOPHY IS REFLECTED IN THE DESIGN OF THE NYISO'S WHOLESALE MARKETS

165

Indoor unit for electric heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

166

Concentrations of indoor pollutants database: User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes the computer-based database on indoor air pollutants. This comprehensive database alloys helps utility personnel perform rapid searches on literature related to indoor air pollutants. Besides general information, it provides guidance for finding specific information on concentrations of indoor air pollutants. The manual includes information on installing and using the database as well as a tutorial to assist the user in becoming familiar with the procedures involved in doing bibliographic and summary section searches. The manual demonstrates how to search for information by going through a series of questions that provide search parameters such as pollutants type, year, building type, keywords (from a specific list), country, geographic region, author's last name, and title. As more and more parameters are specified, the list of references found in the data search becomes smaller and more specific to the user's needs. Appendixes list types of information that can be input into the database when making a request. The CIP database allows individual utilities to obtain information on indoor air quality based on building types and other factors in their own service territory. This information is useful for utilities with concerns about indoor air quality and the control of indoor air pollutants. The CIP database itself is distributed by the Electric Power Software Center and runs on IBM PC-compatible computers.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Sustainable Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, USA. Indoor Environment Department Environmental Energy Technologies

Destaillats, Hugo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of dust from HVAC filters, indoor surfaces, and indoor air Federico Noris* , Kerry A and Environmental Engineering * Corresponding email: Fedenoris@mail.utexas.edu SUMMARY HVAC filters are long heavy metal (Pb, Cd and As) concentrations. HVAC filter microbial concentrations appear to be consistent

Siegel, Jeffrey

169

Improving Indoor Environmental Quality And Energy Performance Of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFINDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFEnergy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are

Apte, Michael G.; Spears, Michael; Lai, Chi-Ming; Shendell, Derek G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September September 9, 2011 Dr. Donald Bridges, Chair Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board P.O. Box A, Building 730-B, Room 1184 Aiken, South Carolina 29802 Dear Dr. Bridges: Thank you for your August 11, 2011, letter welcoming me as Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM). It is a great honor to return to EM where I spent my early years with the Department of Energy (DOE). I am aware of how valuable the work of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB) is to the EM program. EM SSAB is DOE's only citizen advisory board and serves as a unique forum for EM to connect and involve members of the public in EM cleanup decisions. Considering my past service and your consistent dedication, we will continue to collaborate on cleanup activities at the sites and ensure that communities remain well informed and involved with EM site-specific issues. I look

171

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Nuclear Physics," on May 26-27,2011, in Bethesda, MD (Washington, DC area). This workshop is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Nuclear Physics (NP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The workshop's goal is to characterize NP production computing requirements over the next 3 - 5 years at NERSC,the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. NERSCis the principal provider of production High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and services for the Office of Science (SC). The mission of NERSCis to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing computing, information, data, and communications services for research sponsored by sc. NERSCsupports the largest and most diverse research community of any computing facility within DOE. Requirements collected at the workshop will help NERSCplan for future systems and

172

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Oak Ridge Office P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 January 28, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR SCOTTBLAKEHARRIS GENERALCOUNSEL GC-1, HOJFORS FROM: GERALD SUBJECT: ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICYACT PLANNING SUMMARY FOR2011- OAK RIDGEOFFICE This correspondence transmits the Annual National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Planning Summary for 2011 for the Oak Ridge Office (ORO). This is in accordance with the June 1994 Secretarial Policy Statement on NEPA and Department of Energy Order 451.1B. The attached summary provides a brief description of the status of ongoing NEPA compliance activities. No new Environmental Assessments are expected to be needed in the next 12 months and no Environmental Impact Statements are expected to be required in the next 24 months. The summary will be made available for public review at the Public Reading Room in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. If you have

173

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basic Basic Energy Sciences" on February 9-10,2010 in the Washington, DC, area. This workshop is organized by the Department of Energy's Offices of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The workshop's goal is to characterize BES production computing requirements over the next 5-10 years at NERSC, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center. NERSC is the principal provider of production High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and services for the Office of Science (SC). The mission of NERSC is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing computing, information, data, and communications services for research sponsored by SC. NERSC supports the largest and most diverse research community of any computing facility within DOE. Requirements collected at the workshop will help NERSC plan for future systems

174

Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: DATE: May 21,2008 SUBJECT: Fonnat of Petition for Advance Waiver of Patent Rights The attached document sets forth the fonnat to be used by field patent counsel for a Petition for an Advance Waiver of Patent Rights under 10 CFR 784. ~ Ja ' ,. ~ " " j ", .., lY CQ i -.-- Paul A GotiIi b Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property 1 * Printed with soy ink on recycled paper UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PETITION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART 784 DOE WAIVER NO. (To be supplied by DOE) Notice: If you need help in completin9..1hisform. contact t~atent Counsel assisting the activity that is issuing your award or the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property in the Office of General Counsel in DOE Headauarters. Visit: www.gc.energy.gov/documents/lntellectual Property (IP) Service

175

Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thermal sense value of the occupants, the winter classroom thermal environment was evaluated. Measures for improving the classroom indoor thermal environmental quality were also given. The lower limit air temperature of the non-air conditioned classrooms...

Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Indoor air quality program set up at EPA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has just set up an indoor air quality program within the Office of Air & Radiation. Its charge is to coordinate EPA's effort to address the multitude of indoor air pollution problems and to distribute information on ...

LOIS EMBER

1987-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CONDITION CONTROLLING AND MONITORING OF INDOOR SWIMMING POOLS Nissinen, Kari, VTT Building and Transport, PO Box 18021, FO-90571 Oulu Finland, Kauppinen, Timo, VTT Building and Transport, Hekkanen, Martti, VTT Building and Transport..., technical risk map, operation and maintenance manual, software INTRODUCTION There are about 250 indoor swimming pools and 50 indoor spas in public use in Finland. Typically, the indoor swimming pools are owned by the local community. The public...

Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

180

A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools We recently undertook a survey and critical review of the published literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), ventilation, and IAQ- and building-related health problems in schools, particularly those in the state of California. The survey's objectives included identifying the most commonly reported building-related health symptoms involving schools, and assembling and evaluating existing measurement data on key indoor air pollutants most likely to be related to these symptoms. The review also summarizes existing measurements of ventilation rates in schools and information on the causes of IAQ and health problems in schools. Most of the literature we reviewed (more than 450 articles and reports) dealt with complaint or problem schools. Among the papers were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pharos: enable physical analytics through visible light based indoor localization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor physical analytics calls for high-accuracy localization that existing indoor (e.g., WiFi-based) localization systems may not offer. By exploiting the ever increasingly wider adoption of LED lighting, in this paper, we study the problem of using ... Keywords: LED, indoor localization, mobile, optical channel model, physical analytics, visible light

Pan Hu; Liqun Li; Chunyi Peng; Guobin Shen; Feng Zhao

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation J.M.Logue1,P.H. Sherman, B.C. Singer, Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation; LBNL-4945E #12;Logue et al., Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

183

Indoor air quality in French dwellings Sverine Kirchner1,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Indoor Air Quality (OQAI) aims at collecting data on population exposure to indoor pollutants in various INTRODUCTION Our lack of understanding of the health risks related to air pollutants exposure in buildingsIndoor air quality in French dwellings Séverine Kirchner1,* , Mickael Derbez1 , Cédric Duboudin2

Boyer, Edmond

184

Department Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department Codes Department Codes Code Organization BO Bioscience Department BU Business Development & Analysis Office DI Business Operations NC Center for Functional Nanomaterials CO Chemistry Department AD Collider Accelerator Department PA Community, Education, Government and Public Affairs CC Computational Science Center PM Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department CI Counterintelligence AE Department of Energy DC Directorate - Basic Energy Sciences DK Directorate - CEGPA DE Directorate - Deputy Director for Operations DO Directorate - Director's Office DH Directorate - Environment, Safety and Health DF Directorate - Facilities and Operations DA Directorate - Global and Regional Solutions DB Directorate - Nuclear and Particle Physics DL Directorate - Photon Sciences

185

Radioactivity in the indoor building environment in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7-180 7-240 24-850 Tiles 30-200 20-200 160-1410 Phosphogypsum 4-700 19-360 25-120 Blast furnace slag stone and cement...Serbia, within the projects Nuclear Methods Investigations of Rare Processes and Cosmic No.171002, Biosensing Technologies......

Natasa Todorovic; Istvan Bikit; Miroslav Veskovic; Miodrag Krmar; Dusan Mrda; Sofija Forkapic; Jan Hansman; Jovana Nikolov; Kristina Bikit

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radioactivity in the indoor building environment in Serbia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......exposure to radon and its progeny and the incidence of lung cancer. It was pointed out that 90 % of the dose delivered...165-174. 22 Bikit I. , et al. Simple method for depleted uranium determination. Jpn J. Appl. Phys. (2003) 42......

Natasa Todorovic; Istvan Bikit; Miroslav Veskovic; Miodrag Krmar; Dusan Mrda; Sofija Forkapic; Jan Hansman; Jovana Nikolov; Kristina Bikit

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Towards Practical Probabilistic Location Inference for Indoor Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Taiwan {b92901134, r97942100}@ntu.edu.tw, phuang@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw Abstract In this work, we highlight the truncation effect in Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI) distributions. The effect is often overlooked of the approach is that the RSSI fingerprint captures not only the shadowing but also the multipath effect

Huang, Polly

188

Mechanism of Thermal Comfort and Its Application in Indoor Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was maintained at 60-70% and air velocity was maintained at 0.2m/s during the experiment. The range of ambient temperature is from 16 to 34 . We measured the peak value of electric current of metabolite of dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC... Students T test. Differences were considered statistically significant as Pambient temperature resulted...

Lian, Z.; Liu, W.; Ye, X.; Ye, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Post-Closure Challenges of U.S. Department of Energy Sites in Desert Environments of the Southwestern United States - 12095  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites located in harsh desert environments of the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States require diligence and continual maintenance to ensure the remediation systems function as designed to protect human health and the environment. The geology and climate of this area create issues that are unique to these sites. Geologic formations contain naturally occurring constituents that are often the same as the residual contaminants remaining from historical milling activities at the sites. Although annual precipitation is low, when precipitation events occur they can be of extreme intensity, resulting in erosion and flooding that can quickly destroy infrastructure and rapidly change site conditions. Winds can cause sand storms and sand mounding that effect site features. These challenging environmental conditions, along with the remote locations of the sites, require active management beyond what was originally envisioned for uranium disposal sites to address concerns in a safe and cost-effective manner. The unique environment of the Four Corners region creates many challenges to the LTSM of LM sites in southwestern United States. The remediation efforts and approaches to infrastructure have to be specifically structured to work in this environment. Often, the systems and structures have to be modified based on lessons learned on how to best adapt to these difficult conditions and remote locations. These sites require continual maintenance and additional efforts compared to many other LM sites. (authors)

Gil, April; Steckley, Deborah [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (United States); Gauthier, Cassie; Miller, David [S.M. Stoller Company, Contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Title Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-63480 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Brett C. Singer, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3177-3181 ISBN Number 1352-2310 Keywords acid-base, cellulose, gypsum, nicotine, pyridine, sorption, surface materials Abstract Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm-1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm-1). During desorption under a stream of N2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm-1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

191

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS Pawel Wargocki 1* , Max Sherman 2 , Willem de Gids 3 , Peter Wouters 4 , Francis Allard 5 , Remi Carrie 6 , Paolo Carrer 7 , and Stylianos Kephalopolous 8 1 International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, DTU Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark 2 Residential Building Systems Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre, Belgium 5 University of La Rochelle, France 6 International Network for Information on Ventilation, Belgium 7 The University of Milan, Italy 8 Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy ABSTRACT Research topics that need to be addressed so that the future highly energy efficient buildings do not compromise

192

Natural ceiling features based self-localisation for indoor mobile robots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a mobile robot navigates in an indoor environment using visual dead reckoning method, its positioning accuracy suffers from accumulated errors. Therefore, it is necessary to use landmarks to make correction. This paper investigates the natural landmark-based localisation for an indoor mobile robot. The landmarks used here include smoke detection sensors, speakers and lights on the ceiling that are widely available in many offices and corridors. To improve the real-time performance, the proposed method utilises global and local strategies to search lines on the ceiling, as well as the line fitting algorithm based on Hough transform and random sample consensus. The pose of mobile robot is estimated with visual dead reckoning method, and then corrected via PnP-based positioning method with natural landmarks. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

Liwei Han; De Xu; Yi Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radon and Its Decay Products in Indoor Air, Wiley, New York.radon daughter products in indoor air, Radiat. Prot. Dosim..and their decay products in indoor air, Health Phys. , 34,

Nero, A.V.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

Young, Rodger A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1989). Residential indoor air quality and energy efficiency.book Residential Indoor Air Quality and Energy Efficiency by2009). Indoor air quality in highly energy efficient homesA

Less, Brennan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure. LawrenceEvaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use innon-prescriptive indoor air quality procedure (IAQP). The

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations -HVAC and Waste Stream Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

included providing accurate floor plans and improve the system for improvement in indoor air qualityPENNSTATE Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering Spring 2013 Solar Innovations - HVAC areas and indoor air quality is below satisfactory. The waste stream was to be analysed to assess

Demirel, Melik C.

199

Superprocesses in a Brownian environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Superprocesses in a Brownian environment Dan Crisan Department of Mathematics...related to an exterior process (the environment). We characterize these superprocesses...branching rates. Superprocesses|Random Environment|Uniqueness In Distribution| 10...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Agency (EPA) to recognize new homes equipped with a comprehensive set of indoor air quality (IAQ) features. They were developed with significant input from stakeholders,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Thresholds for indoor thermal comfort and perceived air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

survey, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009, September.building, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2003 Conference.of the California Healthy Building Study: A Summary, Indoor

Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward A; Pasut, Wilmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing indoor air Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

includes field and chamber studies and modeling to investigate indoor air quality... control strategy impacts on indoor air ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection:...

203

Variation in indoor particle number and PM2.5 concentrations in a radio station surrounded by busy roads before and after an upgrade of the HVAC system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor particle number and PM2.5 concentrations were investigated in a radio station surrounded by busy roads. Two extensive field measurement campaigns were conducted to determine the critical parameters affecting indoor air quality. The results indicated that indoor particle number and PM2.5 concentrations were governed by outdoor air, and were significantly affected by the location of air intake and design of HVAC system. Prior to the upgrade of the HVAC system and relocation of the air intake, the indoor median particle number concentration was 7.4103particles/cm3 and the median PM2.5 concentration was 7?g/m3. After the relocation of air intake and the redesign of the HVAC system, the indoor particle number concentration was between 2.3103 and 3.4103particles/cm3, with a median value of 2.7103particles/cm3, and the indoor PM2.5 concentration was in the range of 35?g/m3, with a median value of 4?g/m3. By relocating the air intake of the HVAC, the outdoor particle number and PM2.5 concentrations near the air intake were reduced by 35% and 55%, respectively. In addition, with the relocation of air intake and the redesign of the HVAC system, the particle number penetration rate was reduced from 42% to 14%, and the overall filtration efficiency of the HVAC system (relocation of air intake, pre-filter, AHU and particle losses in the air duct) increased from 58% to 86%. For PM2.5, the penetration rate after the upgrade was approximately 18% and the overall filtration efficiency was 82%. This study demonstrates that by using a comprehensive approach, including the assessment of outdoor conditions and characterisation of ventilation and filtration parameters, satisfactory indoor air quality can be achieved, even for those indoor environments facing challenging outdoor air conditions.

L. Morawska; M. Jamriska; H. Guo; E.R. Jayaratne; M. Cao; S. Summerville

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 28th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVIII) that were received on or before June 7, 1988. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semiannually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division: Quality assessment program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 27th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXVII) that were received on or before December 3, 1987. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the Quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed, at first Quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participation contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.

Sanderson, C.G.; Feiner, M.S.

1988-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Operational Safety, Health and Environment Division, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 32nd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XXXII) that were received on or before June 5, 1990. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. This is the 39th report of this program.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Vision-based guidance and control of a hovering vehicle in unknown environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a methodology, architecture, hardware implementation, and results of a system capable of controlling and guiding a hovering vehicle in unknown environments, emphasizing cluttered indoor spaces. Six-axis ...

Ahrens, Spencer Greg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 33rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP 33) that were received on or before December 4, 1990. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. The data for the different kinds of samples are given in the following units: air filters in Bq/filter; soil in Bq kg{sup {minus}1}; tissue in Bq kg{sup {minus}1}; vegetation in Bq kg{sup {minus}1}; and water in Bq L{sup {minus}1}. The values for elemental uranium are reported in {mu}g/filter, g, or mL. The EML value' listed in the tables to which the contractors' results are compared is the mean of replicate demonstrations for each nuclide. The EML uncertainty is the standard error of the mean. All other uncertainties are as reported by the participants.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1991-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment, Quality Assessment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from the analysis of the 34th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP 34) that were received on or before June 10, 1991. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML's results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 3 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer. The EML value'' listed in the tables to which the contractors' results are compared is the mean of replicate determination for each nuclide. The EML uncertainty is the standard error of the mean. All other uncertainties are as reported by the participants.

Sanderson, C.G.; Scarpitta, S.C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

3D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localisation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D model-based tracking for UAV indoor localisation C´eline Teuli`ere, Eric Marchand, Laurent Eck set toward the peaks of the distribution. Motivated by the UAV indoor localisation problem where GPS signal is not available, we validate the algorithm on real image sequences from UAV flights. Index Terms

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY to save energy. The major elements influenced by this project: people, energy/air quality and apartments save energy and improve indoor environmental quality conditions. Project Description The broad goals

213

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks A. E. Xhafa, P. Sonthikorn, and O in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts.e., new call blocking and handover dropping probabilities, of an IWN that uses HVAC ducts are up to 6

Stancil, Daniel D.

214

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

215

The 3D jigsaw puzzle: mapping large indoor spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3D jigsaw puzzle: mapping large indoor spaces Ricardo Martin-Brualla1 , Yanling He1 , Bryan C of famous tourist sites. While current 3D reconstruction algorithms often produce a set of disconnected components (3D pieces) for indoor scenes due to scene coverage or matching failures, we make use

Anderson, Richard

216

inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

Mankoff, Jennifer

217

Maintaining Indoor Air Quality During Construction and Renovation Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pollutants that can impact the indoor air quality (IAQ) of a building. These contaminants may be transported communication efforts can successfully control pollutant levels, allay concerns, and maintain occupant comfort to nuisance dusts and odors from a construction site unacceptable. Indoor air pollutants are typically complex

Huang, Jianyu

218

Predicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attributable to air pollution, 1.5 million of these from indoor air pollution. Worldwide there are more deathsPredicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea , Jim Kusznirb , Brian Lambb and Diane J that is often overlooked in maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the air quality of the environment. In this paper

Cook, Diane J.

219

Solar heating for indoor community swimming pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project demonstrates the application of solar technology to an existing public indoor swimming pool. An application makes use of a new type of solar collector material called SolaRoll. The pool water is cycled through collectors made of the material mounted on the pool's dome roof, reducing reliance on natural gas and fuel oil. Approximately 60% of the energy to heat pool water will be provided. The specific objective of the project is to reduce reliance on natural gas and fuel oil consumption used to heat the community's pool and in so doing provide an example for residential applications.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Indoor Residential Chemical Emissions as Risk Factors for Children's Respiratory Health Speaker(s): Mark Mendell Date: February 23, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Most research into the effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. A growing body of research suggests that chemical emissions from common indoor materials and finishes have adverse effects, including increased risk of asthma, allergies, and pulmonary infections. The identified risk factors include specific organic compounds such as formaldehyde, benzene, and phthalates, as well as indoor materials or finishes such as vinyl flooring, carpet, paint, and plastics. This presentation presents a brief review of studies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Title California Demonstration Energy Efficiency-Indoor Environmental Quality Project: Predicted Relocatable Classroom Indoor Air Quality due to Low-Emitting Interior Materials and Enhanced Ventilation Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2001 Authors Apte, Michael G., William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Marion L. Russell, and Derek G. Shendell Conference Name Proceedings of the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Exposure Analysis, Charleston, SC Date Published November 4-8, 20 Publisher International Society for Exposure Analysis, Boston, MA

222

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simultaneous Sampling of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Radioactivity after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident ... Large amts. of radioactive substances were released into the environment from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plants in eastern Japan as a consequence of the great earthquake (M 9.0) and tsunami of 11 March 2011. ... Proceedings of the International Symposium on Environmental Monitoring and Dose Estimation of Residents after Accident of TEPCOs Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station; Shiran Hall, Kyoto, Japan, Dec 14, 2012; http://www.rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp/anzen_kiban/outcome/. ...

Tetsuo Ishikawa; Atsuyuki Sorimachi; Hideki Arae; Sarata Kumar Sahoo; Miroslaw Janik; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Scalable continuous range monitoring of moving objects in symbolic indoor space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor spaces accommodate large populations of individuals. The continuous range monitoring of such objects can be used as a foundation for a wide variety of applications, e.g., space planning, way finding, and security. Indoor space differs from outdoor ... Keywords: continuous range, indoor moving objects, symbolic indoor space

Bin Yang; Hua Lu; Christian S. Jensen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Exploring the consequences of climate change for indoor air quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change will affect the concentrations of air pollutants in buildings. The resulting shifts in human exposure may influence public health. Changes can be anticipated because of altered outdoor pollution and also owing to changes in buildings effected in response to changing climate. Three classes of factors govern indoor pollutant levels in occupied spaces: (a)properties of pollutants; (b) building factors, such as the ventilation rate; and (c) occupant behavior. Diversity of indoor conditions influences the public health significance of climate change. Potentially vulnerable subpopulations include not only the young and the infirm but also those who lack resources to respond effectively to changing conditions. Indoor air pollutant levels reflect the sum of contributions from indoor sources and from outdoor pollutants that enter with ventilation air. Pollutant classes with important indoor sources include the byproducts of combustion, radon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Outdoor pollutants of special concern include particulate matter and ozone. To ensure good indoor air quality it is important first to avoid high indoor emission rates for all pollutants and second to ensure adequate ventilation. A third factor is the use of air filtration or air cleaning to achieve further improvements where warranted.

William W Nazaroff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Indoor Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Testing Indoor Testing Photo of a distant summer view of SERF, FTLB, and OTF/array field. Our indoor testing and R&D equipment can be found in several laboratories across the permanent NREL site, including the Outdoor Test Facility (OTF), the Field Test Laboratory Building (FTLB), and the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). We use an assortment of indoor equipment to test modules and systems under simulated and accelerated conditions, as well as to perform module packaging R&D. Our equipment is housed in several laboratories in buildings across NREL: High-Bay Accelerated Testing Laboratory (OTF) Failure Analysis (OTF) Data Acquisition and Calibration (OTF) Optical Mechanical Characterization Laboratory (FTLB/153-01) Thin-Film Deposition and Sample Preparation Laboratory (FTLB/158-02)

226

INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effect of air pollution on human health, 2) the designgenerated indoor air pollution on human health; and if borneAir Pollution Control Association, Portland, Oregon (June 27-July 1, 1976). vJorld Health

Hollowell, C.D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Magnetic signature of indoor air pollution: Household dust study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of magnetic and geochemical methods was used to determine the mineralogy, grain size and domain structure of magnetic particles in indoor dust collected in 195 sites in Warsaw, Poland. Data sho...

Beata Grka-Kostrubiec; Maria Jele?ska; El?bieta Krl

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Measurement of indoor radon concentration in kindergartens in Sofia, Bulgaria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......significance of the overall factors for indoor radon concentration was tested by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test at a significance level of 95 %. Number of measurements, minimum, median, maximum, GM......

Kremena Ivanova; Zdenka Stojanovska; Martina Tsenova; Viktor Badulin; Bistra Kunovska

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sunlight and LED Hybrid Illumination in Indoor Lighting Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We design a light integrating collector that can collect the sunlight and LED light to illuminate the indoor spaces uniformly, and then use in simulating the sunlight/LED hybrid...

Sun, Wen-Shing; Tsuei, Chih-Hsuan

230

Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists.

231

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Preliminary screening of contaminants in the off-site surface water environment downstream of the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides and of inorganic and organic compounds in the surface water environment off-site of the US Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE/ORR) suggest the presence of a large number of substances of possible concern to the protection of human health and the ecosystem. Screening of these data, as part of the initial scoping phase of the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation, is necessary to develop a field sampling plan for the acquisition of additional data through the identification of potential contaminants of concern for further evaluation and investigation. The results of this report are based on human health risk end points. For the purposes of screening, conservative and nonconservative estimates of potential maximum exposures were used to identify, respectively, definitely low- and definitely high-priority pollutants. Because of relatively high concentrations of contaminants in sediment, the presence of industrial and agricultural wastes not related to DOE/ORR operations, and the use of a lifetime risk for carcinogens of 10{sup {minus}6} as a lower screening criterion, no surface water reach considered in this study was identified as low priority. In contrast to this result, three contaminants, arsenic in water and thallium in fish of McCoy Branch and {sup 137}Cs in the sediment of the White Oak Creek embayment downstream from White Oak Lake, were tentatively identified as definitely high-priority substances. These locations are within the boundaries of ORR. Nonconservative estimates of exposure identified arsenic, antimony, thallium, uranium, polychlorinated biphenyls 1254 and 1260, chlordane, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 234}Pa as potentially high-priority contaminants in at least one or more locations. These are the contaminants that should receive the most scrutiny in future investigations.

Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Etnier, E.L.; Talmage, S.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hook, L.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Preliminary screening of contaminants in the off-site surface water environment downstream of the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previously reported concentrations of radionuclides and of inorganic and organic compounds in the surface water environment off-site of the US Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE/ORR) suggest the presence of a large number of substances of possible concern to the protection of human health and the ecosystem. Screening of these data, as part of the initial scoping phase of the Clinch River Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation, is necessary to develop a field sampling plan for the acquisition of additional data through the identification of potential contaminants of concern for further evaluation and investigation. The results of this report are based on human health risk end points. For the purposes of screening, conservative and nonconservative estimates of potential maximum exposures were used to identify, respectively, definitely low- and definitely high-priority pollutants. Because of relatively high concentrations of contaminants in sediment, the presence of industrial and agricultural wastes not related to DOE/ORR operations, and the use of a lifetime risk for carcinogens of 10{sup {minus}6} as a lower screening criterion, no surface water reach considered in this study was identified as low priority. In contrast to this result, three contaminants, arsenic in water and thallium in fish of McCoy Branch and {sup 137}Cs in the sediment of the White Oak Creek embayment downstream from White Oak Lake, were tentatively identified as definitely high-priority substances. These locations are within the boundaries of ORR. Nonconservative estimates of exposure identified arsenic, antimony, thallium, uranium, polychlorinated biphenyls 1254 and 1260, chlordane, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 234}Pa as potentially high-priority contaminants in at least one or more locations. These are the contaminants that should receive the most scrutiny in future investigations.

Hoffman, F.O.; Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Etnier, E.L.; Talmage, S.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Hook, L.A. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - air diffusion performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Technologies Division, Indoor Environment Department Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 4 Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air...

235

environment and agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

236

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials: Preliminary Results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removal of Indoor Ozone with Reactive Materials air quality. #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 141 Removing ozone from indoor

Siegel, Jeffrey

237

Lecture 9-10 Introduction to energy & environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of air pollution. This health impact represents about 4.3% percent of the total 56M deaths that occurLecture 9-10 HAS222d-09 Introduction to energy & environment Air pollution #12;applying flux annually in the world. Indoor air pollution is found to cause 1.6M of these deaths Smoking is not included

238

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Title Protocol for maximizing energy savings and indoor environmental quality improvements when retrofitting apartments Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6147E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Noris, Federico, William W. Delp, Kimberly Vermeer, Gary Adamkiewicz, Brett C. Singer, and William J. Fisk Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 61 Pagination 378-386 Date Published 06/2013 Keywords apartments, buildings, costs, energy, indoor environmental quality, Protocol, retrofits, Selection Abstract The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

239

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

240

Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Categories of indoor environmental quality and building energy demand for heating and cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maintaining suitable indoor climate conditions is a need for the occupants well being, while requiring very strictly thermal comfort conditions and very high levels of indoor air quality in buildings represents ...

Stefano Paolo Corgnati; Enrico Fabrizio; Daniela Raimondo

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Enhancing CHBE Indoor Air Quality: Biowall Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Enhancing CHBE Indoor Air Quality: Biowall .............................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Indoor Air Quality..................................................................................................................2 2.2 Improve Air Quality, Health and Wellbeing

243

Audit Report: IG-0793 | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

waste in pits, trenches, shafts, and landfills. In March 2005, the Laboratory, the New Mexico Environment Department, and the Department of Energy signed a Consent Order to address...

244

Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that efforts to simultaneously develop energy efficient building technologies and to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are unfeasible. The primary reason for this is that IEQ improvements often require additional ventilation that is costly from an energy standpoint. It is currently thought that health and productivity in work and learning environments requires adequate, if not superior, IEQ. Despite common assumptions, opportunities do exist to design building systems that provide improvements in both energy efficiency and IEQ. This report outlines the selection of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to be used in demonstrating such an opportunity in a field study using relocatable school classrooms. Standard classrooms use a common wall mounted heat pump HVAC system. After reviewing alternative systems, a wall-mounting indirect/direct evaporative cooling system with an integral hydronic gas heating is selected. The anticipated advantages of this system include continuous ventilation of 100 percent outside air at or above minimum standards, projected cooling energy reductions of about 70 percent, inexpensive gas heating, improved airborne particle filtration, and reduced peak load electricity use. Potential disadvantages include restricted climate regions and possible increases in indoor relative humidity levels under some conditions.

Apte, Michael G.; Delp, Woody W.; Diamond, Richard C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Kumar, Satish; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea Valente  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Control of Offshore Indoor Climate Zhenyu Yang and Andrea Valente Abstract-- An optimal indoor climate control is very critical to manned offshore platforms in terms of onboard staffs' comfort limitations, offshore indoor climate control is much more challenging than any on-ground situations

Yang, Zhenyu

246

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ventilation and Air Quality in Indoor Ice Skating Arenas Chunxin Yang, Ph.D.1 Philip Demokritou, and the operation strategy of the ventilation system are significant contributing factors to the indoor air quality contamination levels in the arenas. Keywords: Air distribution, health, skating rink, indoor air quality, space

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

247

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

248

Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402/K-13/001, February 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Indoor airPLUS CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATIONS VERSION 1 (REV. 01) www.epa.gov/indoorairplus Contents About the Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications ................................................................................................................. i What's New in Version 1 (Rev. 01)? ........................................................................................................................................... i Eligibility and Verification Requirements ................................................................................................................................... i Terms Used in This Document ..................................................................................................................................................

250

Analysis of a solar assisted heat pump system for indoor swimming pool water and space heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy application is a good alternative to replace primary energy source especially for large-scale installations. Heat pumps are also effective means to reduce primary energy consumption. This paper describes a case study with a new design of solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) for indoor swimming pool space- and water-heating purposes. The system design procedure was first presented. The entire system was then modeled via the TRNSYS simulation environment and the energy performance was evaluated based on the winter time operation schedule. Economic analysis with a range of collector areas was also performed. The simulation results show that the overall system COP can reach 4.5, and the fractional factor of energy saving is 79% as compared to the conventional energy system. The economical payback period is less than 5years.

T.T. Chow; Y. Bai; K.F. Fong; Z. Lin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATIVE TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR INDOOR AIR QUALITY STUDIES Steven R. Kennedy, C.E.P., REM, project Manager I C. Brandon ~uinn, P.E., C.P.G., Project Manager James E. Henderson, Ph. D., Director of ~nalytical services ' Robert G. ~ickery...

Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An Information Theoretic Analysis on Indoor PLC Channel Characterizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Information Theoretic Analysis on Indoor PLC Channel Characterizations Hao LIN , Aawatif MENOUNI. But the development of Power Line Communications (PLC) highly depends on the knowledge of the channel characterizations. For this reason, a large number of attentions have been payed on the PLC channel analysis using

Gesbert, David

253

Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor Radon Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Long-Term Observations of Indoor and Outdoor...Lapere Two sets of data obtained by long-term observations of radon concentration...phosphogypsum was used. Around a nuclear waste storage place containing radium, 22 dosemeters......

J. Uyttenhove; R. Lapere

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Indoor radon problem in energy efficient multi-storey buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Against Radon at Home and at Work Indoor radon problem in energy efficient multi-storey...amount of the total energy consumption in developed countries...approaches for designing energy-efficient buildings...registration of 1 h average value. Dwellers......

I. V. Yarmoshenko; A. V. Vasilyev; A. D. Onishchenko; S. M. Kiselev; M. V. Zhukovsky

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

Campbell, G.W.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Department of Energy Oversight Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Review Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 7, 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy - March 2006 Report on Safety System Engineer and Oversight Programs April 3, 2006 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

259

Assessment Documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 7, 2006 Status Report, Department of Energy - March 2006 Report on Safety System Engineer and Oversight Programs April 3, 2006 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

260

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrasonic tone from the computer's speaker while using the microphone to listen for variations in the tone to determine their location while indoors by listening to ambient sounds. No new hardware is required on the device and no infrastructure is required in the environment. Sensing is entirely passive, using

Shahriar, Selim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark NERI Technical Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark NERI Technical Report No. 604, 2006 Fauser, Malene Nielsen Department: Department of Policy Analysis Publisher: National Environmental

262

Biota | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Biota Biota BIOTA Welcome to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Biota Web site There is increasing interest in protection of the environment against ionizing radiation. DOE...

263

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

264

Careers | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Careers Careers Careers Come Join the Best The Office of Inspector General (OIG) identifies opportunities to improve the performance of the Department of Energy's (Department) programs and operations. Given the Department's mission, we are directly involved in current efforts to move energy and environment to the forefront of our national agenda. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 has infused more than $60 billion into clean energy investments. The Department plays an important role in these recovery efforts and is striving to create the blueprint for tomorrow's energy solutions. Professional Auditors, Criminal Investigators and Inspectors help guide the Department's enormous challenges into reality. Join our team and gain valuable experience while

265

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

266

Indoor air and human health revisited: A recent IAQ symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor Air and Human Health Revisited was a speciality symposium examining the scientific underpinnings of sensory and sensitivity effects, allergy and respiratory disease, neurotoxicity and cancer. An organizing committee selected four persons to chain the sessions and invite experts to give state-of-the-art presentations that will be published as a book. A summary of the presentations is made and some critical issues identified.

Gammage, R.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminants. Later one plays a vital role in IAQ of hospitals. Indoor contaminants can be further classified as Chemical contaminants and Biological contaminants. Tobacco smoke, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), Radon, Inorganic gases, Carbon dioxide... of 50 ? 260 OC and hence existing in vapour form at room temperature. ASHRAE Standard 62 (1999) suggests that complaints are unlikely to arise for total VOC concentrations below 3000 mg/m3, whereas above 3000 mg/m3 complaints are likely. Radon is a...

Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and ozone depletion. The concern having the highest potential negative health impact was indoor air pollution, while the second ranking was indoor radon (Huelman, 2004, pp. 10-21). Indoor environmental quality problems in earth sheltered buildings... selections. Some common pollutants found in homes are VOCs, mold, dust (pollen, dust mites, insulation fibers, etc.), carbon monoxide and other combustion products, radon, pesticides, and household chemicals (Barcik, 2005, pp. 30-1). There are three...

Sheta, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed a Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories. The Special Review included onsite field reviews of work practices at the 8 of the 16 laboratories currently performing nanoscale activities. The eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. This volume is a compilation of field reports of the eight selected DOE sites, which were reviewed during May-July 2008. The field reviews focused on collecting data by reviewing nanomaterial program documents, observing activities involving nanomaterials, conducting facility walkthroughs, and interviewing personnel. The data for each site was analyzed and subject to an internal HSS quality review board. Reports were validated with site representatives and revised as appropriate to ensure factual accuracy. Closeout meetings were conducted with DOE site managers and laboratory management to discuss results. The individual sites are responsible for evaluating and addressing weaknesses identified on the field reviews.

270

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lurmann.2010. "Air pollution, health and economic benefits-health impact factors from the literature are used to quantify total harm attributable to indoor air pollution.

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

AN INVESTIGATION OF WALKING INDUCED ELECTROSTATIC FIELD EFFECTS ON INDOOR PARTICLE RESUSPENSION.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Airborne concentration of particulate matter (PM) is an important index of indoor air quality. Researches have demonstrated the strong correlation between airborne particulate concentration and (more)

Hu, Bin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complexes between nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, nitrous1992) Indoor ozone and nitrogen dioxide: A potential pathwaybed of SiO 2 pellets. Nitrogen dioxide is introduced from a

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

274

10 Mbps Ethernet Access for Indoor Personal Local Area Network based on a Phosphorescent White LED  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports a visible light communication application system realizing 10 Mbps Ethernet access for indoor personal area network based on a phosphorescent white LED, operating...

Li, Honglei; Chen, Xiongbin; Tang, Danying; Chen, Hongda

275

Indoor Air Pollution in China: Analysis of Global Warming Contributions and Exposure to Particles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??About 60% of the Chinese population lives in rural areas, where biomass and coal are the main sources of energy for cooking and heating. Indoor (more)

Alnes, Line Winther Hansen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Air quality and thermal comfort in office buildings: Results of a large indoor environmental quality survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ambient Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon,Vol.and operation of healthy buildings Introduction Indoor airdatabase Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon,Vol.

Huizenga, C; Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Arens, Edward A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Indoor and soil gas radon simultaneous measurements for the purpose of detail analysis of radon entry pathways into houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......on the modification of the standard BD method described in detail...concentration is variable during the standard indoor measurement campaign...symmetric against each other and standard indoor radon measurement...householder activities, including HVAC (heating, ventilation and......

A. Fronka

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor air pollutants from unvented kerosene heater emissions in mobile homes: studies on particles, semivolatile organics, carbon monoxide, and mutagenicity ...

Judy L. Mumford; Ron W. Williams; Debra B. Walsh; Robert M. Burton; David J. Svendsgaard; Jane C. Chuang; Virginia S. Houk; Joellen Lewtas

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Indoor-Outdoor Concentrations and Correlations of PM10-Associated Mutagenic Activity in Nonsmokers' and Asthmatics' Homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor-Outdoor Concentrations and Correlations of PM10-Associated Mutagenic Activity in Nonsmokers' and Asthmatics' Homes ...

Norman Y. Kado; Steven D. Colome; Michael T. Kleinman; Dennis P. H. Hsieh; Peter. Jaques

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Indoor air quality implications of using ion generators in residences Michael S. Waring*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air quality implications of using ion generators in residences Michael S. Waring characterizes the indoor air quality implications of an ion generator in a 27 m3 residential room, with a matrix exposure and health professionals to make justified recommendations about the use of these ozone

Siegel, Jeffrey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

Siegel, Jeffrey

282

Exploring Personal Mobile Phones and Digital Display Systems to Support Indoor Navigation by Formative Study Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A significant difference exists between wayfinding support services available in outdoor and indoor locations. Users in outdoor locations can access services like Google Maps via a mobile phone and in-car GPS, which allows them to examine unknown locations ... Keywords: 3D Fly-Throughs, Digital 2D Maps, Hand-Held Devices, Indoor Wayfinding, Personal Mobile Devices, Pervasive Digital Displays

Faisal Taher; Keith Cheverst; Mike Harding

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Exploring user preferences for indoor navigation support through a combination of mobile and fixed displays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we explore, through a formative study, user preferences for indoor navigation support using a combination of mobile and fixed displays along with a range of navigation content such as digital 2D maps, 3D route visualizations (presented ... Keywords: 3D visualization, digital displays, digital maps, graphical directional signage, indoor navigation, mobile phones

Faisal Taher; Keith Cheverst

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2118 REACTIONS BETWEEN OZONE AND BUILDING PRODUCTS: IMPACT ON PRIMARY of reactions of ozone on building products and on their emissions in indoor air. For this purpose, 12 building products were exposed to ozone in a dedicated experimental setup. The measured ozone removal rate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

285

Indoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted in the frame of BUMA (Prioritization of Building Materials Emissions as indoor pollution sourcesIndoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b , N. Michael b , E.I. Tolis a , J.G. Bartzis a a University of West Macedonia, Environmental Technology

Short, Daniel

286

Indoor Air Quality Forms 169 This section of the document is a collec-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor Air Quality Forms 169 This section of the document is a collec- tion of the forms the investigator collect his or her thoughts. Indoor Air Quality Forms #12;: to be used in con- junction with the Zone/Room Record when calculating quantities of outdoor air

287

PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROPOSED RESEARCH AGENDA FOR ACHIEVING INDOOR AIR QUALITY SUPPORTING HEALTH AND COMFORT IN HIGHLY efficient buildings; Research priorities; Effort; Indoor air quality; Ventilation 1 INTRODUCTION Buildings Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA 3 VentGuide, the Netherlands 4 Air Infiltration

288

Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as possible in winter. Meanwhile, indoor thermal comfort should be considered. This paper will establish the optimal indoor air temperature for an air-conditioning system aiming at both energy savings and thermal comfort in the Shanghai area, based on the PMV...

Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Indoor air quality; hazard analysis; residential; criteria pollutants; VOCs; air toxics Citation Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control through

290

Multi-Link Level Simulation Model of Indoor Peer-to-Peer Radio Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multi-Link Level Simulation Model of Indoor Peer-to-Peer Radio Channels Paolo Castiglione, Claude presents a link-simulation model for cooperative indoor communication systems at 2.4 GHz, based of this paper is to propose a multi-link simulation model for peer-to-peer cooperative (a.k.a. distributed

Gesbert, David

291

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Title Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions in the Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-58785 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Destaillats, Hugo, Melissa M. Lunden, Brett C. Singer, Beverly K. Coleman, Alfred T. Hodgson, Charles J. Weschler, and William W. Nazaroff Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4421-4428 Abstract Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 × 105 molecules cm-3 were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1 - 25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products

292

A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paharpur Business Centre and Software Technology Incubator Park (PBC) is a 7 story, 50,400 ft{sup 2} office building located near Nehru Place in New Delhi India. The occupancy of the building at full normal operations is about 500 people. The building management philosophy embodies innovation in energy efficiency while providing full service and a comfortable, safe, healthy environment to the occupants. Provision of excellent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is an expressed goal of the facility, and the management has gone to great lengths to achieve it. This is particularly challenging in New Delhi, where ambient urban pollution levels rank among the worst on the planet. The approach to provide good IAQ in the building includes a range of technical elements: air washing and filtration of ventilation intake air from rooftop air handler, the use of an enclosed rooftop greenhouse with a high density of potted plants as a bio-filtration system, dedicated secondary HVAC/air handling units on each floor with re-circulating high efficiency filtration and UVC treatment of the heat exchanger coils, additional potted plants for bio-filtration on each floor, and a final exhaust via the restrooms located at each floor. The conditioned building exhaust air is passed through an energy recovery wheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat to the incoming air to increase the HVAC energy efficiency. The management uses 'green' cleaning products exclusively in the building. Flooring is a combination of stone, tile and 'zero VOC' carpeting. Wood trim and finish appears to be primarily of solid sawn materials, with very little evidence of composite wood products. Furniture is likewise in large proportion constructed from solid wood materials. The overall impression is that of a very clean and well-kept facility. Surfaces are polished to a high sheen, probably with wax products. There was an odor of urinal cake in the restrooms. Smoking is not allowed in the building. The plants used in the rooftop greenhouse and on the floors were made up of a number of species selected for the following functions: daytime metabolic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) absorption, nighttime metabolic CO{sub 2} absorption, and volatile organic compound (VOC) and inorganic gas absorption/removal for air cleaning. The building contains a reported 910 indoor plants. Daytime metabolic species reported by the PBC include Areca Palm, Oxycardium, Rubber Plant, and Ficus alii totaling 188 plants (21%). The single nighttime metabolic species is the Sansevieria with a total of 28 plants (3%). The 'air cleaning' plant species reported by the PBC include the Money Plant, Aglaonema, Dracaena Warneckii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm with a total of 694 plants (76%). The plants in the greenhouse (Areca Palm, Rubber Plant, Ficus alii, Bamboo Palm, and Raphis Palm) numbering 161 (18%) of those in the building are grown hydroponically, with the room air blown by fan across the plant root zones. The plants on the building floors are grown in pots and are located on floors 1-6. We conducted a one-day monitoring session in the PBC on January 1, 2010. The date of the study was based on availability of the measurement equipment that the researchers had shipped from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab in the U.S.A. The study date was not optimal because a large proportion of the regular building occupants were not present being New Year's Day. An estimated 40 people were present in the building all day during January 1. This being said, the building systems were in normal operations, including the air handlers and other HVAC components. The study was focused primarily on measurements in the Greenhouse and 3rd and 5th floor environments as well as rooftop outdoors. Measurements included a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and aldehydes, with a more limited set of observations of indoor and outdoor particulate and carbon dioxide concentrations. Continuous measurements of Temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) were made selected indoor and outdoor locations.

Apte, Michael G.; Apte, Joshua S.

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

293

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

294

Indoor air pollution in rural China: Cooking fuels, stoves, and health status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid fuels are a major source of indoor air pollution, but in less developed countries the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution are poorly understood. The authors conducted a large cross-sectional study of rural Chinese households to determine associations between individual health status and domestic cooking as a source of indoor air pollution. The study included measures of health status as well as measures of indoor air-pollution sources, such as solid cooking fuels and cooking stoves. Compared with other fuel types, coal was associated with a lower health status, including negative impacts on exhaled carbon monoxide level, forced vital capacity, lifetime prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, and health care utilization. Decreasing household coal use, increasing use of improved stove technology, and increasing kitchen ventilation may decrease the short-term health effects of indoor air pollution.

Peabody, J.W.; Riddell, T.J.; Smith, K.R.; Liu, Y.P.; Zhao, Y.Y.; Gong, J.H.; Milet, M.; Sinton, J.E. [Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA (United States)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Measurement of indoor-outdoor carbonyls at four residential homes in Mexico City metropolitan area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propionaldehyde and butyraldehyde were measured in indoor and outdoor air at three houses and one apartment in the Mexico city metropolitan area (MCMA). Formaldehyde presented the highest concentration in indoor and outdoor air, followed by acetone and acetaldehyde. Indoor carbonyl concentrations were higher than outdoor concentrations at all sampling sites. Indoor exposure factors were estimated for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, ranging from 202 µg day??1 to 554 µg day??1 for formaldehyde and from 82 µg day??1 to 202 µg day??1 for acetaldehyde. Indoor-outdoor correlations were significant at all sites. However, these correlations were the highest in the Miguel Hidalgo house, which was naturally well ventilated, and where very few activities like cooking, were done. Concerning the Tlalnepantla house, although it was also well ventilated, the correlations were not as high as those observed at the Miguel Hidalgo house, possibly because its inhabitants cook a lot more and throughout the whole day.

Armando P. Baez; Hugo Padilla; Rocio Garcia; Raul Belmont; Ma. Del Carmen Torres

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Stanford University Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the development of a sustainable built environment, including buildings, infrastructure, renewable energy systems Sustainability and the Built Environment The Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Stanford the CEE Department's strategic goal of Engineering for Sustainability and engage with colleagues

Prinz, Friedrich B.

297

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Indoor and Outdoor Environments and Factors Affecting Their Concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

43?000 cars/day in 1999; diesel vehicle, 46%; gasoline fuel vehicle, 54%), and an expressway (ca. ... Cretney et al. proposed that the ratio of [BbF] + [BkF] (=BFs) to [BghiP] was a more reliable signature for distinguishing between automobiles (0.20?0.29 in car park air particulate) and domestic soot (1.5?14 in domestic open-fire soot) (31). ... (23)?Panther, B. C.; Hooper, M. A.; Tappen, N. J. Atmos. ...

Takeshi Ohura; Takashi Amagai; Masahiro Fusaya; Hidetsuru Matsushita

2003-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat rate estimated by the Edison Electric Institue for 1975). In addition, 9% electrical transmission-distribution losses

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Query Processing for Probabilistic State Diagrams Describing Multiple Robot Navigation in an Indoor Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the syntax and semantics of multi-level state diagrams to support probabilistic behavior of cooperating robots. The techniques are presented to analyze these diagrams by querying combined robots behaviors. It is shown how to use state abstraction and transition abstraction to create, verify and process large probabilistic state diagrams.

Czejdo, Bogdan [ORNL; Bhattacharya, Sambit [North Carolina Fayetteville State University; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Enhanced Detection of Surface-Associated Bacteria in Indoor Environments by Quantitative PCR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminated flooring materials were removed and the...room were disinfected. Diagram of the experimental...location of flooring material sections. Contamination...spores, the room air-handling system was turned off...settle onto the flooring materials. The levels of contamination...

Mark P. Buttner; Patricia Cruz-Perez; Linda D. Stetzenbach

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.22 Gaseous Emissions: Nitrogen Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide,3- 4 GASEOUS EMISSIONS: NITROGEN DIOXIDE, CARBON MONOXIDE,

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rubber and resins Chloro Benzenes Strong narcotic; possible lung. liver, and kidney damage Used in production

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improving the representation of thermal boundary conditions of livestock during CFD modelling of the indoor environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evaluate the climate distribution in agricultural buildings has grown in importance in recent years. Convection and radiation are the dominant forms of heat transfer from an animal's body, and accurately ... Keywords: Airflow, Animal house, CFD, Computational fluid dynamics, Livestock building, Optimisation, Simulation, Temperature, Ventilation

Toms Norton; Jim Grant; Richard Fallon; Da-Wen Sun

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, plywood, and particleand urea- formaldehyde foam insulation. It is apparent thatand urea-formaldehyde insulation foam; also generated by

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

many hospitals for energy audits and for energy-conserving1980, will include an energy audit, modifications to theannotated bibliography of energy audit source materials will

Cairns, Elton J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A model to estimate the cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements in office work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

premises. Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000 Conference,Conference of Healthy Buildings 2003, Singapore. Vol 3 pp.for presentation at Healthy Buildings 2003, December 7 11

Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A conceptual model to estimate cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000, vol. 1, 635 640,building. Proc of Healthy Buildings 2000, vol.1 pp.665-660,

Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

359-374. --- . 1993. Healthy buildings and their impact onand secondary schools. In: Healthy Buildings 2000: Exposure,in healthy children. In: Healthy Buildings 2000: Exposure,

Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

Not Available

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Monitoring building energy consumption, thermal performance, and indoor air quality in a cold climate region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings are major consumers of the world's energy. Optimizing energy consumption of buildings during operation can significantly reduce their impact on the global environment. Monitoring the energy usage and performance is expected to aid in reducing the energy consumption of occupants. In this regard, this paper describes a framework for sensor-based monitoring of energy performance of buildings under occupancy. Different types of sensors are installed at different locations in 12 apartment units in a building in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada to assess occupant energy usage, thermal performance of the building envelope, and indoor air quality (IAQ). The relationship between heating energy consumption and the thermal performance of building envelope and occupant comfort level is investigated by analyzing the monitoring data. The results show that the extent of heat loss, occupant comfort level, and appliance usage patterns have significant impacts on heating energy and electricity consumption. This study also identifies the factors influencing the poor IAQ observed in some case-study units. In the long term, it is expected that the extracted information acquired from the monitoring system can be used to support intelligent decisions to save energy, and can be implemented by the building management system to achieve financial, environmental, and health benefits.

Tanzia Sharmin; Mustafa Gl; Xinming Li; Veselin Ganev; Ioanis Nikolaidis; Mohamed Al-Hussein

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessment of indoor air quality and thermal comfort in Portuguese secondary classrooms: Methodology and results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work shows the results of a field study about indoor thermal comfort, based on investigations in Portuguese secondary schools' classrooms. The surveys herein presented were carried out in a school in Beja, in the South-East of Portugal. The field study was conducted by physical parameters monitoring and survey questionnaires. Both field monitoring and subjective surveys were performed at the same time during the regular class period (either at the end or at the beginning of the class). The measurement campaign consisted in measuring the environmental parameters air temperature (Ta), air relative humidity (RH), CO2 concentrations. Outdoor air temperature values were registered hourly at the nearest climatological station. Through these data, along with the actual people clothing and metabolic rate being know, both Fanger's comfort indices were calculated (predicted mean vote and predicted percentage of dissatisfied people). The subjective survey investigated the thermal acceptability, the thermal sensation and the thermal preference. The judgments about the thermal environment were compared with the results of the field measurements. Draught preference votes, air stiffness and global air quality votes were also collected. The results show that the students found temperature range beyond the comfort zone acceptable, and revealed the occupants' accommodation to CO2 exposure, confirming the results obtained in other studies. Moreover, it was verified that running on naturally ventilation mode, CO2 concentration limits were highly exceeded.

Lusa Dias Pereira; Daniela Raimondo; Stefano Paolo Corgnati; Manuel Gameiro da Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

IN TELLIGENT CONTROLLING SYSTEM OF AQUICULTURE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

network, Decoupling control 1. INTRODUCTION Aquiculture environment is a complex system engineering which, the PLC ,engineers stations and director #12;In telligent Controlling System of aquiculture Environment 3IN TELLIGENT CONTROLLING SYSTEM OF AQUICULTURE ENVIRONMENT Deshen Zhao ,*1 1 Department of Electric

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

313

111IIT Graduate Bulletin 20062008111 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Paul R. Anderson Liaison, Environmental Management Program: Fouad Teymour The mission of the Department Indoor Air Quality Water and Wastewater Treatment Environmental Engineering Certificate Programs #12: Master of Science in Environmental Management (degree is offered by the Stuart School of Business

Heller, Barbara

314

Commercial Buildings Cooperative Agreements | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

will retrofit building ventilation systems with modules that remove indoor air pollutants such as carbon dioxide. This enables the indoor air to be recycled while greatly...

315

User Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Environment Environment on Genepool When you log into the Genepool system you will land in your $HOME directory on NERSC's "global homes" file system. The global homes file system is mounted across all NERSC computation systems with the exception of PDSF. The $HOME directory has quota of 40GB and 1,000,000 inodes. To customize your environment, by setting environment variables or aliases, you will need to modify one of the "dot" files that NERSC has created for you. You may NOT modify the .bashrc or .cshrc files. These are set to read-only on NERSC systems and specify system specific customizations. Instead you should modify a file called .bashrc.ext or .cshrc.ext. Learn more about the global homes user environment. Important Environment Variables

316

Implementation of Department of Energy Oversight Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order implements the policy that establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

CX-011971: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Title V air permit renewal application has been submitted and is currently under review by the... Department of Natural Resources and Environment. The application includes...

319

Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

S.M. Stoller Corporation and US Department of Energy PINELLAS ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for: for: S.M. Stoller Corporation and US Department of Energy PINELLAS ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PROJECT YOUNG - RAINEV STAR CENTER EVALUATION OF SUBSURFACE VAPOR INTRUSION BUILDING 100 LARGO, FLORIDA Prepared b y : 1 3 0 Research Lane, Suite 2 Guelph, Ontario N I G 5G3 GeoSyntec Project Number TR0 1 5 0 2 6 June 2 0 0 3 GeoSyntec Consultants TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 2. BACKGROUND .................................................................................................. 2 3. CONSIDERATION OF THE RECENT OSWER GUIDANCE DOCUMENT.. 4 4. APPROACH AND RATIONALE ....................................................................... 5 5 . ESTIMATED INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATIONS - ENTIRE BUILDING ... 6 6. ESTIMATED INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATIONS - BUILDING SUBSECTION ..................................................................................... .............. 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Department of Energy Oversight Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Policy establishes a Department-wide oversight process to protect the public, workers, environment, and national security assets effectively through continuous improvement. Cancels DOE P 226.1. Canceled by DOE P 226.1B

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

322

Biofuels | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuels Biofuels Biofuels America is the largest biofuels producer in the world -- accounting for 48 percent of global output. Learn how the Energy Department is investing in projects that address critical barriers to continued growth. America is the largest biofuels producer in the world -- accounting for 48 percent of global output. Learn how the Energy Department is investing in projects that address critical barriers to continued growth. Learn how the Energy Department is supporting research into biofuels, which could help improve our environment, grow our economy and reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Featured Secretary Moniz: Biofuels Important to America's Energy Future Watch the video of Secretary Moniz speaking about the importance of

323

An environment for font design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ENVIRONMENT FOR FONT DESIGN A Thesis by LILY BARKOVIC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Computer Science... AN ENVIRONMENT FOR FONT DESIGN A Thesis by LILY BARKOVIC Approved as to style and content by: S. Bart Childs (Chair of Committee) Udo W, Pooch (Member) Norman W. uncle (Member Glen N. Williams (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRACT...

Barkovic, Lily

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is devoted to the influence of Indoor Environmental Quality, [IEQ] requirements associated with occupation regimes on the criterion of energy demand s for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning) central systems that were...

Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Indoor fungal composition is geographically patterned and more diverse in temperate zones than in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...companies (8, 9). Increasingly strict standards for indoor sanitation have resulted in...cultivable on artificial media are now standard, and a US Environmental Protection Agency-developed...microcosms isolated by weatherstripping and HVAC filters, but rather as compositional...

Anthony S. Amend; Keith A. Seifert; Robert Samson; Thomas D. Bruns

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Design of an omnidirectional multibeam transmitter for high-speed indoor wireless communications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For future high speed indoor wireless communication, diffuse wireless optical communications offer more robust optical links against shadowing than line-of-sight links. However, their performance may be degraded by multipath dispersion arising from surface ...

Jaw-Luen Tang; Yao-Wen Chang

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Heated indoor swimming pools, infants, and the pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a neurogenic hypothesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a case-control study a statistically significant association was recorded between the introduction of infants to heated indoor swimming pools and the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis ... explain ...

Marianne E McMaster

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Design parameters for indoor swimming-pool heating using solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present an analysis of an indoor swimming-pool with solar collector panels. An analytical expression is derived for the system efficiency in terms of heat-exchanger and collector designs and climatic parameters.

G.N. Tiwari; S.B. Sharma

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using aquality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energyquality procedure (IAQP), with both objective and subjective components, intended to provide greater flexibility and potentially enable energy

Dutton, Spencer M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Indoor atmospheric corrosion of conventional weathering steels in the tropical atmosphere of Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One year indoor atmospheric corrosion examinations have been carried out on two conventional weathering steels for a year, at two test sites, Tocumen and Sherman Breakwater in Panama. They are environmentally cla...

Juan A. Jan; Josefina Iglesias; Olga Adames

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Indoor fungal composition is geographically patterned and more diverse in temperate zones than in the tropics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Therefore, we suggest that indoor habitats should not be thought of as microcosms isolated by weatherstripping and HVAC filters, but rather as compositional subsets of a larger biome. Materials and Methods Dust Collection. Protocols were adapted...

Anthony S. Amend; Keith A. Seifert; Robert Samson; Thomas D. Bruns

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Urban Air Quality Management: Detecting and Improving Indoor Ambient Air Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current air pollution management and air quality control are primarily focused on outdoor and ... which act as public spaces, contaminated indoor air could be public health hazards. In Singapore ... spend a subst...

T. L. Tan; Gissella B. Lebron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Comparison of Conventional and Fuzzy Control of Indoor Air Quality in Buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article compares various techniques for the control of indoor air quality in a naturally ventilated building: ON-OFF, proportional-integral-derivative PID, proportional-integral with deadband PIdb, and fuzzy control. The control system for the fuzzy ...

A. I. Dounis; M. Bruant; M. Santamouris; G. Guarracino; P. Michel

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hybrid sunlight/LED illumination and renewable solar energy saving concepts for indoor lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hybrid method for using sunlight and light-emitting diode (LED) illumination powered by renewable solar energy for indoor lighting is simulated and presented in this study. We can...

Tsuei, Chih-Hsuan; Sun, Wen-Shing; Kuo, Chien-Cheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

STATE OF NEW MEXICO ENVIRONMENT DEPARTMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

contamination of surface and shallow subsurface soils by radionuclides, metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Surface cleanup activities occurred during 1968-69, 1977- 1979, and...

337

Policy and Regulatory Environment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

levels, a complex set of interdependent policies define the extent to which renewable energy markets are able to develop and thrive. DOE has identified the following key...

338

Integrated Energy Analysis and Validation Environment | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy simulation engine to demonstrate closed loop communications with building automation systems to provide a fully integrated life cycle approach enabling dynamic model...

339

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Title Using Regional Data and Building Leakage to Assess Indoor Concentrations of Particles of Outdoor Origin Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hering, Susanne V., Melissa M. Lunden, Marc L. Fischer, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 41 Pagination 639-654 Abstract Time-resolved fine particle concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were examined to assess the appropriateness of using regional data and calculated air exchange rates to model indoor concentrations of particles from outdoor sources. The data set includes simultaneous, sub-hourly aerosol composition measurements at three locations: a regional monitoring site in Fresno, California, inside of an unoccupied residence in Clovis, California, located 6 km northeast of the regional site, and immediately outside of this same residence. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and black carbon were modeled using varying sets of inputs to determine the influence of three factors on model accuracy: the constraints of the simplified indoor-outdoor model, measured versus modeled air exchange rates, and local versus regional outdoor measurements.

340

Indoor air quality issues related to the acquisition of conservation in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of indoor air in commercial buildings is dependent on the complex interaction between sources of indoor pollutants, environmental factors within buildings such as temperature and humidity, the removal of air pollutants by air-cleaning devices, and the removal and dilution of pollutants from outside air. To the extent that energy conservation measures (ECMs) may affect a number of these factors, the relationship between ECMs and indoor air quality is difficult to predict. Energy conservation measures may affect pollutant levels in other ways. Conservation measures, such as caulking and insulation, may introduce sources of indoor pollutants. Measures that reduce mechanical ventilation may allow pollutants to build up inside structures. Finally, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may provide surface areas for the growth of biogenic agents, or may encourage the dissemination of pollutants throughout a building. Information about indoor air quality and ventilation in both new and existing commercial buildings is summarized in this report. Sick building syndrome and specific pollutants are discussed, as are broader issues such as ventilation, general mitigation techniques, and the interaction between energy conservation activities and indoor air quality. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this review to aid the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its assessment of potential environmental effects resulting from conservation activities in commercial buildings. 76 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Hadley, D.L.; Marseille, T.J.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Workshop Emerging contaminants and microorganisms into the environment: contamination pathways Environmental Engineering Division Surname _____________________Name____________________ Job Environmental Engineering Division (SEED) Department of Civil Engineering University of Salerno Via Ponte don

Costagliola, Gennaro

342

Annual Report 2003 Plant Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Department DLF-Risø Biotechnology Programme Plant Environment Interactions Programme Plant the unique opportunity to be the only life science department located in an environment that is largely to increase knowledge to develop crops with improved agronomic traits and to engineer high-value compound

343

Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California: Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 III. Current ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (satisfied with indoor air quality in office buildings inthe U.S. in taking indoor air quality seriously, in the same

Mendell, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sample Environment Plans and Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 � 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group Leader Neutron Scattering Science Division #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy-stage CCR for Reflectometry � SNAP-customized CCR rig � Vulcan furnace, baby load frame � Low-Q air furnace

Pennycook, Steve

345

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Have you decided to install a solar water heater? Learn how to correctly orient and tilt the heater. May 30, 2012 A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Whole-House Ventilation Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house -- ventilation to maintain a healthy, comfortable indoor environment. May 30, 2012 Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Solar energy systems require periodic inspections and routine maintenance to keep them operating efficiently. Learn how to maintain your solar water

346

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Solar water heaters should be placed facing due south. Siting Your Solar Water Heating System Have you decided to install a solar water heater? Learn how to correctly orient and tilt the heater. May 30, 2012 A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Whole-House Ventilation Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house -- ventilation to maintain a healthy, comfortable indoor environment. May 30, 2012 Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar Water Heating System Maintenance and Repair Solar energy systems require periodic inspections and routine maintenance to keep them operating efficiently. Learn how to maintain your solar water

347

Participant Assisted Data Collection Methods in the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as high performance green homes. (Masters Thesis). Retrievedinside and outside 137 homes and implications for ambientin the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of

Mullen, Nasim A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014.

349

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategy, developed by Honeywell, Inc. , is describeda separate report. [Honeywell, 1986]. Ref erences ASHRAE (Atlanta, pp. 422-452. Honeywell (1986). "Indoor Air

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the California Healthy Building Study, Phase 1.ASHRAE IAQ 91 Healthy Buildings, Atlanta, GA, ASHRAE, 228-1 of the California Healthy Building Study. Indoor Air, 3:

Daisey, Joan M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The relationship between filter pressure drop, indoor air quality, and energy consumption in rooftop HVAC units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract HVAC filters are commonly used to decrease exposure to particulate matter, yet little is known about the energy impacts and air quality consequences of high efficiency filters installed in commercial buildings. To explore these effects, system airflow, filter and coil pressure drop, fan pressure rise, and power draw were measured, and cooling capacity and compressor power were modeled for at least four filter pressure drops in 15 rooftop units equipped with and without fan speed control. Energy implications and clean-air-delivery-rate were estimated for a large dataset of filters divided into four efficiency (MERV) categories. Field measurements conducted on units without fan speed control showed that increased filter pressure drop decreased flow, cooling capacity, and power. For a unit with fan speed control, the same increase in pressure drop resulted in the same magnitude change of fan power but in the opposite direction, and other parameters were unchanged. Replacing MERV 8 with MERV 13/14 resulted in higher energy consumption (24%) during cooling mode for both unit types, energy savings during fan-only mode (813%) in units without fan speed control, and increased energy consumption in fan-only mode (1118%) in the unit with fan speed control. Energy consumption increases were offset by improvement in clean-air-delivery-rate, especially for PM2.5 (2.93.8 times increase going from MERV 8 to MERV 13/14), with larger benefits achieved for the unit with fan speed control. A comprehensive understanding of the impact of filtration is essential to selecting the appropriate efficiency of filters that ensures low-energy use and a healthy indoor environment.

Marwa Zaatari; Atila Novoselac; Jeffrey Siegel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environ. 15, List of Acronyms Energy Commission:CaliforniaEnergyCommission CREL:Chronicreferenceby the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007)OzoneRemovalbyHVACFilters. Atmos. Environ. HVACfiltersozonedepositionin HVACfiltersandbyproductformation,

Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology Energy and Environment Subcommittee U.S. House of Representatives, October 3, 20  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Patricia A. Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology, Energy and...

356

Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology Energy and Environment Subcommittee U.S. House of Representatives October 3, 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Statement of Patricia Hoffman, Deputy Director R&D, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability, Department of Energy before the Committee on Science and Technology, Energy and...

357

s Earth and environment s Living resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 s Earth and environment s Living resources s Societies and health s Expertise and consulting of this trend is the acquisition, on a joint proposal from the Earth and Environment department and the Living phenomena so as to improve forecasting of the attendant hazards. The earth's crust: processes and natural

358

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

Indoor Coal Combustion Emissions, GSTM1 and GSTT1 Genotypes, and Lung Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study in Xuan Wei, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Research Articles Indoor Coal Combustion Emissions, GSTM1 and GSTT1...associated with exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain high levels of...subjects who used less than 130 tons of smoky coal during their lifetime, heavier users...

Qing Lan; Xingzhou He; Debra J. Costa; Linwei Tian; Nathaniel Rothman; Guizhou Hu; Judy L. Mumford

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine collected indoor and outdoor 3-4 day samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2

Paciorek, Chris

362

Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAPs low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and conventional materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPAs Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide lessons learned that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 24380 of 26,764 results. 71 - 24380 of 26,764 results. Download CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008817-categorical-exclusion-determination Page Long-Term Stewardship Resource Center The purpose of this web site is to provide the public and the Department of Energy's (DOE) community with a variety of information resources for long-term stewardship (LTS) responsibilities. LTS... http://energy.gov/em/services/communication-engagement/long-term-stewardship-resource-center Download Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities

364

We used both a J48 decision tree and a Nave Bayes Classifier to analyze how well the CO2 levels in the smart environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attribute. Learning CO2 levels as a Partial Indicator of Air Quality in Smart Environments: A Data Mining. Indoor air quality is often described by the presence or absence of various pollutants. These pollutants the CO2 data along with motion sensor data using Weka, a data mining tool. TOKYO's Fluke 975 Air

Collins, Gary S.

365

Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants

Kammen, Daniel M.

367

Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

Boyer, Edmond

368

Indoor Residential Chemical Exposures as Risk Factors for Asthmaand Allergy in Infants and Children: a Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most research into effects of residential indoor air exposures on asthma and allergies has focused on exposures to biologic allergens, moisture and mold, endotoxin, or combustion byproducts. This paper briefly reviews reported findings on associations of asthma or allergy in infants or children with risk factors related to indoor chemical emissions from residential materials or surface coatings. Associations, some strong (e.g., odds ratios up to 13), were reported. The most frequently identified risk factors were formaldehyde, aromatic organic compounds such as toluene and benzene, plastic materials and plasticizers, and recent painting. Exposures and consequent effects from indoor sources may be exacerbated by decreased ventilation. Identified risk factors may be proxies for correlated exposures. Findings suggest the frequent occurrence of important but preventable effects on asthma and allergy in infants and children worldwide from modern residential building materials and coatings.

Mendell, M.J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10 of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal

Kammen, Daniel M.

370

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. ... In a later stage, indoor exposure to radioactive gases such as radon can also be incorporated within the impact category radiation in LCIA methods such as Eco-Indicator 99, similarly to the framework shown in this paper. ... The work for this project was carried out on a voluntary basis and financed by in-kind contributions from the home institutions of the authors and scientists mentioned above, which are therefore gratefully acknowledged. ...

Stefanie Hellweg; Evangelia Demou; Raffaella Bruzzi; Arjen Meijer; Ralph K. Rosenbaum; Mark A. J. Huijbregts; Thomas E. McKone

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear Safety Information Agreement Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, and the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On December 15, Matt Moury, Associate Under Secretary, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS DOE) and EHSS Office of Nuclear Safety staff met with the NRC Executive Director for Operations, the Deputy Executive Director for Operations, and the Director, Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards to sign a nuclear safety information exchange agreement between NRC Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards and the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

372

Oversight | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oversight Oversight Oversight The Independent Oversight Program is implemented by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Enforcement and Oversight. The mission of this program is to provide DOE line management, Congress, and other stakeholders with an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of DOE policy and line management performance in safety and security, and other critical areas as directed by the Secretary of Energy. The Office of Enforcement and Oversight performs this mission by conducting activity, facility, site, and Department-wide performance-based assessments that are designed to verify that the Department's safeguards and security interests are protected, that the Department can effectively respond to emergencies, and that Departmental employees, the public, and the environment are

373

Ms.ElizabethCotsworth,Director Officeof Radiationand IndoorAir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FC:5400 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. o. Box 3000 Carlsbad. New Mexico 88221 #12;4th,areemplaced within therepository. Specificplansto meetpresentrequirementsarebeingdevelopedby theCarlsbad. Documentation of the functionality and test problems is available in the Sandia Carlsbad RecordsCenter: WIPP PA

374

Macrocyclic-, polycyclic-, and nitro musks in cosmetics, household commodities and indoor dusts collected from Japan: Implications for their human exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reported the occurrence and concentrations of macrocyclic-, polycyclic- and nitro musks in cosmetics and household commodities collected from Japan. The high concentrations and detection frequencies of Musk T, habanolide, and exaltolides were found in commercial products, suggesting their large amounts of production and usage in Japan. Polycyclic musks, HHCB and OTNE, also showed high concentrations in cosmetics and products. The estimated dairy intakes of Musk T and HHCB by the dermal exposure to commercial products were 7.8 and 7.9?g/kg/day in human, respectively, and perfume and body lotion are dominant exposure sources. We also analyzed synthetic musks in house dusts. Polycyclic musks, HHCB and OTNE, showed high concentrations in samples, but macrocyclic musks were detected only in a few samples, although these types of musks were highly detected in commercial products. This is probably due to easy-degradation of macrocyclic musks in indoor environment. The dairy intakes of HHCB by dust ingestions were 0.22ng/kg/day in human, which were approximately five orders of magnitudes lower than those of dermal absorption from commercial household commodities.

Haruhiko Nakata; Mari Hinosaka; Hayato Yanagimoto

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Audit Report: IG-0788 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Audit Report: IG-0788 February 28, 2008 Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and development program in 200 1. As a part of the Initiative, the Department of Energy (Energy) is in the process of constructing Nanoscale Science Research Centers at six national laboratories. In addition to funding the construction and operation of these facilities, the Department funds nanotechnology projects at six other national laboratories. Topic: Human Resources Audit Report: IG-0788 More Documents & Publications Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review, Department of Energy Laboratories - August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices

376

Secretary Chu and Energy Department Officials to Continue Post...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the Energy Department's Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oil and Natural Christopher Smith will deliver keynote remarks at the Energy, Utility and Environment Conference in...

377

Corporate Analysis of DOE Safety Performance | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis of DOE Safety Performance Current Safety Performance Trends The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis provides analysis of Department of...

378

Environment, Safety and Health Reporting  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12, cancels DOE O 231.1B.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environment, Safety and Health Reporting  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order addresses DOE/NNSA receiving timely, accurate information about events that have affected or could adversely affect the health, safety and security of the public or workers, the environment, the operations of DOE facilities, or the credibility of the Department. Cancels DOE O 231.1A Chg 1, DOE M 231.1-1A Chg 2 and DOE N 234.1. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-28-12.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

The effect of penetration factor, deposition, and environmental factors on the indoor concentration of PM2.5 sulfate, nitrate, and carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin constitutes an important exposure pathway. We conducted an intensive set of indoor particle measurements in an unoccupied house under differing operating conditions. Real-time measurements were conducted both indoors and outdoors, including PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. Because the time-scale of the fluctuations in outdoor particle concentrations and meteorological conditions are often similar to the time constant for building air exchange, a steady state concentration may never be reached. The time-series experimental data were used to determine the effect of changes in air exchange rate and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity differences on indoor particle concentrations. A multivariate regression was performed to investigate the difference between measured indoor concentrations and results from a simple time-dependent physical model. Environmental conditions had a significant effect on indoor concentrations of all three PM2.5 species, but did not explain all of the model variation.

Thatcher, T.L.; Lunden, M.M.; Sextro, R.G.; Hering, S.; Brown, N.J.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Observer-based control of a tethered wing wind power system: indoor real-time experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observer-based control of a tethered wing wind power system: indoor real-time experiment Ahmad, a novel wind power system based on a tethered wing is presented. An observer-based control strategy WindPower, Joby energy [8] or Makani Power [9], is composed of one or several airborne wind turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluating Indoor Exposure Modeling Alternatives for LCA: A Case Study in the Vehicle Repair Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluating Indoor Exposure Modeling Alternatives for LCA: A Case Study in the Vehicle Repair Industry ... Alternatives for modeling occupational exposure in LCA are evaluated using experimental monitoring data in the vehicle-repair industry. ... In addition to their use in occupational hygiene, exposure models may also be applied in environmental assessments, such as risk assessment (RA) and life-cycle assessment (LCA). ...

Evangelia Demou; Stefanie Hellweg; Michael P. Wilson; S. Katharine Hammond; Thomas E. McKone

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

Wang, J.; Chen, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ENERGY IMPACTS OF ENERGY AND INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RETROFITS OF APARTMENTS IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

apartments to energy use changes of control apartments, total measured savings of gas energy plus site.S. is implementing many energy retrofits in homes with the goal of reducing building energy consumption and carbon1 ENERGY IMPACTS OF ENERGY AND INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY RETROFITS OF APARTMENTS IN CALIFORNIA

386

Who are Climbing the Walls? An Exploration of the Social World of Indoor Rock Climbing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and attention has been focused on completing my study. I would like to thank the rock climbing community at Texas A&M for being so welcoming and for being willing to open up their community and share themselves with the leisure studies world. They have... ................................................................................. 39 Serious Leisure .................................................................... 44 Indoor Rock Climbing Social World ? The Climbing Community...

Kurten, Jason Henry

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Sidheswaran a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon fiber (ACF) filters for air cleaning in HVAC systems. The parallel aims for the air cleaningEnergy efficient indoor VOC air cleaning with activated carbon fiber (ACF) filters Meera A. Velocities through the ACF media were typical of those in normal particle filter systems (w0.5 m s?1

388

Evaluation of HVAC filters as a sampling mechanism for indoor microbial communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of HVAC filters as a sampling mechanism for indoor microbial communities Federico Noris Fungi Microbial community HVAC filter Settled dust Air a b s t r a c t HVAC filters are in place of bacterial and fungal concentrations and communities in HVAC filter dust and other sampling locations

Siegel, Jeffrey

389

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Impact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution study (CITEPA), France * Corresponding email: Eva.Leoz@ineris.fr SUMMARY Data pollutants in ambient air. Consequently our study aims at describing both emission factors and inerisImpact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1 , Jacques Ribéron2

Boyer, Edmond

392

Identification of Brominated and Chlorinated Phenols as Potential Thyroid-Disrupting Compounds in Indoor Dusts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor sources of 2,4,6-TriBPh might be brominated flame retardants currently used in household materials such as electrical appliances. ... Briefly, house dust samples were collected from 19 households (n = 19) and office and laboratory dust samples (hereafter called office samples) from three institutions (n = 14) in Japan between May and December 2005. ...

Go Suzuki; Hidetaka Takigami; Mafumi Watanabe; Shin Takahashi; Kazutoshi Nose; Misuzu Asari; Shin-ichi Sakai

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

Siegel, Jeffrey

394

DEPART.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EMENT C ENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tamarac Tamarac u.s. DEPART.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EMENT C ENTER NEPA DETERMINATION PROJECT TITLE: Solar Panel and Induction lighting Project Page 1 of2 STATE:FL Funding Opportuoity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number FY 2010 COP GFO-OOO3187-OO1 0 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Offi<:er (authorized under DOE Ordu451.1A),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conselVe energy, demonstrate potential energy conselVation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

395

Autonomous Battery Recharging for Indoor Mobile Robots Seungjun Oh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occasional local intervention required. With a battery life of approximately 6 hours the requirement and environment map, guides the robot into its recharging station. The robot has special hardware that enables recharging of a robot, the constraint of minimum hardware modification to the robot restricts the range

396

DSW Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Southwest Intertie Project - South Southwest Intertie Project - South Western is considering whether to provide partial financing in the amount of $354 million for the southern portion of the Southwest Intertie Project. SWIP-South consists of approximately 235 miles of 500-kV transmission line and would extend from Harry Allen Substation near Las Vegas, Nev., northward to the proposed Thirtymile Substation near Ely, Nev. Western is considering partial financing of the project under provisions of our Transmission Infrastructure Program, which was created to implement section 406 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, was the lead agency in the preparation of the Southwest Intertie Project Final Environmental Impact Statement and Proposed Plan Amendment (July 1993). BLM also prepared the Southwest Intertie Project Southern Portion Environmental Assessment (July 2008). Western is proposing to adopt the BLM's previous EIS and EA to meet its obligations under the National Enviromental Policy Act. The BLM's EIS and EA and Western's cover sheet together serve as Western's EIS NEPA documentation for the proposed SWOP-South financing.

397

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Title Pollutant Dispersion in a Large Indoor Space Part 2 -- Computational Fluid Dyamics (CF) Predictions and Comparisons with a Model Experiment for Isothermal Flow Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2004 Authors Finlayson, Elizabeth U., Ashok J. Gadgil, Tracy L. Thatcher, and Richard G. Sextro Journal Indoor Air Volume 14 Start Page Chapter Pagination 272-283 Abstract This paper reports on an investigation of the adequacy of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), using a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model, for predicting dispersion of neutrally buoyant gas in a large indoor space. We used CFD to predict pollutant (dye) concentration profiles in a water filled scale model of an atrium with a continuous pollutant source. Predictions from the RANS formulation are comparable to an ensemble average of independent identical experiments. Model results were compared to pollutant concentration data in a horizontal plane from experiments in a scale model atrium. Predictions were made for steady-state (fully developed) and transient (developing) pollutant concentrations. Agreement between CFD predictions and ensemble averaged experimental measurements is quantified using the ratios of CFD-predicted and experimentally measured dye concentration at a large number of points in the measurement plane. Agreement is considered good if these ratios fall between 0.5 and 2.0 at all points in the plane. The standard k-epsilon two equation turbulence model obtains this level of agreement and predicts pollutant arrival time to the measurement plane within a few seconds. These results suggest that this modeling approach is adequate for predicting isothermal pollutant transport in a large room with simple geometry

398

International lighting in controlled environments workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lighting is a central and critical aspect of control in environmental research for plant research and is gaining recognition as a significant factor to control carefully for animal and human research. Thus this workshop was convened to reevaluate the technology that is available today and to work toward developing guidelines for the most effective use of lighting in controlled environments with emphasis on lighting for plants but also to initiate interest in the development of improved guidelines for human and animal research. There are a number of established guidelines for lighting in human and animal environments. Development of new lighting guidelines is necessary for three reasons: (1) recent scientific discoveries show that in addition to supporting the sensation of vision, light has profound nonvisual biological and behavioral effects in both animals and humans; (2) federal regulations (EPACT 1992) are requiring all indoor environments to become more energy efficient with a specific emphasis on energy conservation in lighting; (3) lighting engineers and manufacturers have developed a wealth of new light sources and lighting products that can be applied in animal and human environments. The workshop was aimed at bringing together plant scientists and physical scientists to interact in the discussions. It involved participation of biological scientists involved in studying mechanisms of light reactions and those involved in utilizing lighting for production of plants and maintenance of animals in controlled environments. It included participation of physical scientists from universities and government involved in research as well as those from industry involved in producing lamps and in construction of controlled growth facilities. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Simple automatic supervisory control system for office building based on energy-saving decoupling indoor comfort control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work proposes a simple automatic supervisory control system (ASCS) that is based on an energy-saving decoupling indoor comfort control (ESDICC) for regulating the indoor comforts of an office building. Three energy-saving indoor comfort control algorithms are modified to yield the ESDICC algorithms. The ESDICC-based ASCS is modeled using a Petri net (PN), whose graph is presented in detail and whose dynamics are thoroughly described. Results of two test cases demonstrate the simplicity of the operations of ESDICC-based ASCS and the energy-saving effect of the ESDICC algorithms.

Shin-Yeu Lin; Shih-Ching Chiu; Wei-Yuan Chen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Department of Energy Announces Accelerator Symposium | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Announces Accelerator Symposium Department of Energy Announces Accelerator Symposium Department of Energy Announces Accelerator Symposium September 23, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- On Monday, October 26, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science will host a Symposium on Accelerators for America's Future in Washington, DC. The symposium--drawing participants from science, industry, medicine, and the national security community--will focus on challenges and opportunities in maximizing the potential of next-generation accelerator technologies to energize the U.S. economy, strengthen American competitiveness, and help the nation achieve more in science, industry, medicine, energy and the environment, and national security. Organized by the department's Office of High Energy Physics, the symposium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

It is the policy of the Department of Energy to design, construct, operate, and decommission its nuclear facilities in a manner that ensures adequate protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Cancels SEN-35-91.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

About Us | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Us About Us About Us Background: On October 1, 2006, the Secretary of Energy created the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) to integrate Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters-level functions for health, safety, environment, and security into one unified office. To accomplish this important responsibility, HSS is focused on providing the Department with effective and consistent policy development, technical assistance, education and training, complex-wide independent oversight, and enforcement. Additionally, HSS addresses Department-wide cross-cutting issues and enhances collaboration and sharing of technical expertise. Organization: We have organized HSS to promote the sharing and integration of information and to ensure clear responsibilities and accountability for

403

IEC documents | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IEC documents IEC documents IEC documents The U.S. Department of Energy has longstanding cooperative arrangements with foreign governments and international organizations in all areas of its mission - energy supply and security, science and technology, non-proliferation, and the environment, including promoting clean energy technologies to address climate change. The Department has over one hundred active commitments with 70-plus countries and 11 international organizations. Through this site, you can search and access the Department's library of active and historic (expired) commitments. Country or International Organization Algeria Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Bangladesh Belarus Belgium Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Canada CERN Chile China Colombia Costa Rica CSLF

404

Department of Energy Home Page  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Search Home Page Contents US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Search Home Page Contents [ABOUT DOE] About The Department of Energy (Learn about the Department of Energy, its mission, plans, organizational structure, accomplishments and the Secretary of Energy Federico Peña.) [DEPARTMENTAL RESOURCES] Departmental Resources (Look for information across the Department, connect to other Departmental Home Pages, or search for scientific and technical information through such systems as the DOE Information Bridge, containing searchable citations of worldwide energy research as well as bibliographic citations with links to DOE sponsored or acquired full-text reports; EnergyFiles, DOE's virtual library environment containing energy-related STI and tools to facilitate information use in the R&D process; and the DOE Reports Bibliographic

405

DEPART~IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEPART~IENT OF ENERGY DEPART~IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT: Illinois Department of Commerce & Econom ic Opportunity PROJECT TITLE: Edwardsville CUSD 7 Solar Pholovoltaic Project Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOOOS2 PrOCUNment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number o Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and tecrmical

406

Evaluation Report: IG-0738 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38 38 Evaluation Report: IG-0738 September 18, 2006 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program-2006 To help accomplish its strategic goals in the areas of defense, energy, science and the environment, the Department utilizes numerous interconnected computer networks and individual systems. Virtually all of the Department's systems are increasingly subjected to sophisticated attacks designed to circumvent security measures, trick unsuspecting users into divulging sensitive information or propagate harmful programs. A strong cyber security program is essential to minimizing adverse impacts on Department mission associated with successful attacks or intrusions and protecting operational, personally identifiable and other sensitive data from compromise. Overall, the Department expects to invest over $295

407

Airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel: trichloramine exposure, exhaled NO and protein profiling of nasal lavage fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Occurrence of airway irritation among indoor swimming pool personnel was investigated. The aims of this ... relation to the prevalence of airway symptoms in swimming pool facilities and to determine protein effec...

Louise Fornander; Bijar Ghafouri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

THE EFFECTS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY AT AN OHIO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indoor concentration of nitrogen dioxide was approximatelyof carbon monoxide~ nitrogen dioxide as well as on theL5 pg/m Lead (Pb) Nitrogen dioxide (N0 ) 11g/m year (50

Berk, J.V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 535 HVAC filters as "passive" samplers: fate analysis of indoor particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 535 HVAC filters as "passive" samplers: fate analysis the effectiveness of using HVAC filters as an indoor sampling technique. #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009

Siegel, Jeffrey

410

US Department  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Safety Risks to Workers and the Environment at Savannah River Sites Tank Farms Lockout Tagout (LOTO) Processes and Electrical Safety Prevention During Excavations and...

411

Procedures for Departing Employees | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Procedures for Departing Employees Procedures for Departing Employees RM Exit Procedures (2)3.12.12.pdf More Documents & Publications Procedures for Departing Employees Records...

412

Procedures for Departing Employees | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Procedures for Departing Employees Procedures for Departing Employees RM Exit Procedures.doc More Documents & Publications Procedures for Departing Employees Records Management...

413

Emission of Oxygenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Indoor Solid Fuel Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(17) The relatively high OPAH emissions from indoor burning can be explained by the different amount of oxygen supply resulting in lower combustion efficiencies and relatively high temperature in the enclosed residential stoves due to low heat loss. ... hydrocarbon (PAH) emission source in developing countries; however, PAH emission factor (EF) data for indoor crop residue combustion, particularly field-measured data, are scarce, leading to large uncertainties in emission inventories. ... Shen, G.; Wang, W.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, C.; Min, Y.; Xue, M.; Ding, J.; Li, W.; Wang, B.; Shen, H.; Wang, R.; Wang, X.; Tao, S.Emission factors and particulate matter size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential coal combustions in rural Northern China Atmos. ...

Guofeng Shen; Shu Tao; Wei Wang; Yifeng Yang; Junnan Ding; Miao Xue; Yujia Min; Chen Zhu; Huizhong Shen; Wei Li; Bin Wang; Rong Wang; Wentao Wang; Xilong Wang; Armistead G. Russell

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Indoor and Outdoor in Situ High-Resolution Gamma Radiation Measurements in Urban Areas of Cyprus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ, high-resolution, gamma-ray spectrometry of a total number of 70 outdoor and 20 indoor representative measurements were performed in preselected, common locations of the main urban areas of Cyprus. Specific activities and gamma absorbed dose rates in air due to the naturally occurring radionuclides of Th-232 and U-238 series, and K-40 are determined and discussed. Effective dose rate to the Cyprus population due to terrestrial gamma radiation is derived directly from this work. The results obtained outdoors match very well with those derived previously by high-resolution gamma spectrometry of soil samples, which were collected from the main island bedrock surface. This implies that the construction and building materials in urban areas do not affect the external gamma dose rate; thus they are mostly of local origin. Finally, the indoor/outdoor gamma dose ratio was found to be 1.4 +- 0.5.

E. Svoukis; H. Tsertos

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environment, Safety, Health, & Security | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Contact Us Lab Leadership Directory Careers/ Human Resources Environment, Safety & Health Sustainable PPPL Joint Working Group for Fusion Safety Procurement Division Technology Transfer Furth Plasma Physics Library Environment, Safety, Health, & Security About PPPL ESH&S The Environment, Safety, Health, & Security Department provides safety oversight and assistance for the wide variety of plasma and fusion research projects undertaken at the Laboratory as well as stewardship for the environment and our property and assets. The department is comprised of four divisions: Environmental Services, Safety, Health Physics, and Site

416

Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sealing Your Home Sealing Your Home Sealing Your Home Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Caulking can reduce heating and cooling costs and improve comfort in your home. Air leakage, or infiltration, occurs when outside air enters a house uncontrollably through cracks and openings. Properly air sealing can significantly reduce heating and cooling costs, improve building durability, and create a healthier indoor environment. In addition to air sealing, you'll also want to consider adding additional insulation and moisture control and ventilation strategies to ensure your home is comfortable and efficient. Featured Detecting Air Leaks For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test.

417

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

418

Air Sealing Your Home | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Your Home Your Home Air Sealing Your Home November 26, 2013 - 6:22pm Addthis Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. Save on heating and cooling costs by checking for air leaks in common trouble spots in your home. What does this mean for me? Save money and energy by air sealing your house. Caulking and weatherstripping are simple, effective ways of sealing air leaks in your home. Reducing the amount of air that leaks in and out of your home is a cost-effective way to cut heating and cooling costs, improve durability, increase comfort, and create a healthier indoor environment. Caulking and weatherstripping are two simple and effective air-sealing techniques that offer quick returns on investment, often one year or less. Caulk is

419

Air-Conditioning Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Air conditioning is one of the most common ways to cool homes and buildings. How Air Conditioners Work Air conditioners employ the same operating principles and basic components as refrigerators. Refrigerators use energy (usually electricity) to transfer heat from the cool interior of the refrigerator to the relatively warm surroundings; likewise, an air conditioner uses energy to transfer heat from the interior space to the relatively warm outside environment. An air conditioner uses a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and condenser coils are serpentine tubing surrounded by aluminum fins. This tubing is usually made of copper.

420

Ecology and environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

Sussex, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-59293 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks.

422

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Title Indoor Air Quality Impacts of a Peak Load Shedding Strategy for a Large Retail Building Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Hotchi, Toshifumi, Alfred T. Hodgson, and William J. Fisk Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract Mock Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) events were implemented in a Target retail store in the San Francisco Bay Area by shutting down some of the building's packaged rooftop air-handling units (RTUs). Measurements were made to determine how this load shedding strategy would affect the outdoor air ventilation rate and the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the sales area. Ventilation rates prior to and during load shedding were measured by tracer gas decay on two days. Samples for individual VOCs, including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, were collected from several RTUs in the morning prior to load shedding and in the late afternoon. Shutting down a portion (three of 11 and five of 12, or 27 and 42%) of the RTUs serving the sales area resulted in about a 30% reduction in ventilation, producing values of 0.50-0.65 air changes per hour. VOCs with the highest concentrations (>10 μg/m3) in the sales area included formaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, toluene and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane. Substantial differences in concentrations were observed among RTUs. Concentrations of most VOCs increased during a single mock CPP event, and the median increase was somewhat higher than the fractional decrease in the ventilation rate. There are few guidelines for evaluating indoor VOC concentrations. For formaldehyde, maximum concentrations measured in the store during the event were below guidelines intended to protect the general public from acute health risks

423

Heat Pipe Impact on Dehumidification, Indoor Air Quality and Energy Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

units hot water and space heating from flue-gas, fireplaces industrial process heat recycle utility boiler preheater aircraft wing deicing solar energy collectors warming carburetors & intakes geothermal energy recovery Sterling engines...HEAT PIPE IMPACT ON DEHUMIDIFICATION, INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY SAVINGS by J. Thomas Cooper Heat Pipe Technology, Inc Alachua, Florida, USA TENTH SYMPOSIUM ON IMPROVING BUILDING SYSTEMS IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES MAY 13-14, 1996 FT...

Cooper, J. T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Investigation and Analysis of the Indoor Air Environment of a Large-scale Art Exhibition Hall in Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wang Jian Wang Associate Postgraduate Associate Postgraduate Professor Professor Beijing Institute of Civil Engineering and Architecture Beijing China, 100044 HXJ@bicea.edu.cn Abstract: Adopting the method...

Hao, X.; Cao, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

SOA formation study from limonene ozonolysis in indoor environment: gas and particulate phases chemical characterization and toxicity prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-00973677,version1-4Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "10. International Conference Healthy Buildings

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

426

Evaluation of indoor environment quality with a web-based occupant satisfaction survey: a case study in northern Italy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Lisbon, Portugal,in offices, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000, Vol 1, pp

Peretti, Clara; Schiavon, Stefano; Goins, John; Arens, Edward A; De Carli, Michele

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

ENERGY ABSORBER HEAT PUMP SYSTEM TO SUPPLEMENT HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS IN AN INDOOR SWIMMING POOL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Compared with convontional indoor swimming pools with traditional plant engineering, the Schwalmtal indoor swimming pool has a final energy consumption of just 40%. This low consumption is achieved by improved insulation of the building's enveloping surface, through the operation of systems for the recovery of heat from drain water and waste air as well as by the operation of a heat pump system to gain ambient heat. The decentralised heat recovery systems met between 40 and 80% of the heat requirements in the supply areas where they were used. The electric heat pump system, which is operated in the bivalent mode in parallel to a heating boiler, could generate 75% of the heat provided by the central heating circuit to meet the residual heat requirements. The report illustrates the structure of the residual heat requirements of the central heating circuit. A description is given of the measured coefficients of performance of the brine/water heat pump connected by a brine circuit with two different energy absorber types - energy stack and energy roof. Finally, the ambient energy gained with the absorbers is broken down into the various kinds of heat gains from radiation, convection, condensation etc. KEYWORDS Energy absorber; energy stack; energy roof; heat pump; heat recovery systems; indoor swimming pool; energy engineering concept.

K. Leisen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mines and Mining (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mines and Mining (Maryland) Mines and Mining (Maryland) Mines and Mining (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment It is the policy of the state to encourage the development of mined resources in Maryland while protecting the environment and public health and safety. This legislation establishes the Bureau of Mines within the Department of the Environment and provides for the establishment of rules and regulations governing mining activity. The legislation addresses the

429

Department of Energy No | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy No Department of Energy No Department of Energy No More Documents & Publications ALFAL 99-01 No AUTHORITY...

430

Use of Personal-Indoor-Outdoor Sulfur Concentrations to Estimate the Infiltration Factor and Outdoor Exposure Factor for Individual Homes and Persons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of Personal-Indoor-Outdoor Sulfur Concentrations to Estimate the Infiltration Factor and Outdoor Exposure Factor for Individual Homes and Persons ...

Lance Wallace; Ron Williams:?

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

431

DCE DANISH CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental economics · Air · Climate · The Arctic Hanne Bach · hba@dmu.dk · +45 8715 1348 Biodiversity Vibeke Vestergaard Nielsen · vive@dmu.dk · + 45 8715 1304 DEPARTMENT OF BIOSCIENCE Arctic marine environment Anders Mosbech · amo@dmu.dk · +45 8715 8686 Biodiversity and conservation Rasmus Ejrnæs · rej

432

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Title Building a predictive model of indoor concentrations of outdoor PM-2.5 for a residential research house in Clovis, California Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2002 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Melissa M. Lunden, Tracy L. Thatcher, David Littlejohn, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Susanne V. Hering, Richard G. Sextro, and Nancy J. Brown Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms -- one in each pair -- based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

433

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Title Final methodology for a field study of indoor environmental quality and energy efficiency in new relocatable classrooms in Northern California Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-51101 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Shendell, Derek G., Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, William J. Fisk, Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Seung-Min Lee, Douglas P. Sullivan, Michael G. Apte, and Leo I. Rainer Abstract The prevalence of relocatable classrooms (RCs) at schools is rising due to federal and state initiatives to reduce K-3 class size, and limited capital resources. Concerns regarding inadequate ventilation and indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ) in RCs have been raised. Adequate ventilation is an important link between improved IEQ and energy efficiency for schools. Since students and teachers spend the majority of a 7-8 hour school day inside classrooms, indoor contaminant concentrations are assumed to drive personal school-day exposures. We conducted a demonstration project in new relocatable classrooms (RCs) during the 2001-02 school year to address these issues. Four new 24' x 40' (960 ft2) RCs were constructed and sited in pairs at an elementary school campus in each of two participant school districts (SD) in Northern California. Each RC was equipped with two heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, one per module. The two HVAC systems were a standard heat pump with intermittent 25-50% outdoor air ventilation and an energy-efficient advanced system, based on indirect-direct evaporative cooling with an integrated natural gas-fired hydronic heating loop and improved particle filtration, providing continuous 100% outdoor air ventilation at = 15 ft3 min-1 occupant-1. Alternate carpets, wall panels, and ceiling panels were installed in two classrooms - one in each pair - based on the results of a laboratory study of VOC emissions from standard and alternate materials. Numerous IEQ and outdoor air quality and meteorological parameters were measured either continuously over the school year or as integrated school day samples during the fall cooling and winter heating seasons. Details of the RC designs, the field monitoring methodology including handling, storage, transport and management of chemical samples and data, and analyses to be conducted are presented

434

MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: History and Philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: History and Philosophy Department Head: Dr. Brett L. Walker, Professor and Chair, Department of History and Philosophy Assessment Coordinator: Dr-SETS (science, environment, technology, society) Philosophy-Philosophy Option Philosophy-Religious Studies

Maxwell, Bruce D.

435

Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Health Services Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environment, Safety, and Health Environment, Safety, and Health Oversight Review of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Health Services Department March 2001 Office of Environment, Safety and Health i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ACRONYMS................................................................................................................. iii 1.0 INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................. 1 2.0 RESULTS .............................................................................................................. 2 3.0 CONCLUSIONS.................................................................................................... 4 APPENDIX A.................................................................................................................

436

Audit Report: IG-0518 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Audit Report: IG-0518 August 30, 2001 Evaluation of Classified Information Systems Security Program All information processed, transmitted, stored, or disseminated by or on behalf of the Department of Energy (Department) on automated information systems requires some level of protection. The loss or compromise of information entrusted to the Department or its contractors may affect the nation's economic competitive position, the environment, national security, Department missions, or citizens of the United States. In response to the increasing threat to Federal information systems, the Government Information Security Reform Act (GISRA) was enacted in October 2000. GISRA specifically requires that national security or other classified information systems be evaluated annually by an independent

437

Evaluation Report: IG-0738 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evaluation Report: IG-0738 Evaluation Report: IG-0738 Evaluation Report: IG-0738 September 18, 2006 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program-2006 To help accomplish its strategic goals in the areas of defense, energy, science and the environment, the Department utilizes numerous interconnected computer networks and individual systems. Virtually all of the Department's systems are increasingly subjected to sophisticated attacks designed to circumvent security measures, trick unsuspecting users into divulging sensitive information or propagate harmful programs. A strong cyber security program is essential to minimizing adverse impacts on Department mission associated with successful attacks or intrusions and protecting operational, personally identifiable and other sensitive data

438

Ministry of Environment and Energy National Environmental Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ministry of Environment and Energy National Environmental Research Institute NERI Report Status report of seabird surveys at Horns Rev, 2000-2001 #12;National Environmental Research Institute Ministry Department: Department of Coastal Zone Ecology Serial title: NERI report Publisher: National Environmental

439

Securing Trusted Execution Environments with PUF Generated Secret Keys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA mareno@ece.unm.edu Jim Plusquellic University of New Mexico Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA jimp@ece.unm.edu Abstract--Trusted Execution Environments are quickly becom- ing

Plusquellic, James

440

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

North Carolina Department of Commerce, Stale Energy Office North Carolina Department of Commerce, Stale Energy Office Page 1 of2 STATE: NC PROJECT TITLE: Energy Conservation Programs in Transportation· Westem Piedmont Community College Funding Opportunity Announttmenf Number PrIK:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Numbtr DE-EEOOOO771 GF~771-017 0 Based on my review ofthe Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Review Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2005 6, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Sandia National Laboratories - May 2005 Inspection of Emergency Management at the Sandia Site Office and Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Volume III April 4, 2005 Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant, Volume I- February 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Pantex Plant March 15, 2005 Independent Oversight Lessons Learned Report, Department of Energy - January 2005 Lessons Learned Report Electrical Safety During Excavation and Penetrations March 1, 2005 Independent Oversight Lessons Learned Report, Department of Energy - December 2004 Lessons Learned Report Management of Legacy Hazards December 21, 2004 Independent Oversight Inspection, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory,

442

On Planning and Design of Logistics Systems for Uncertain Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Planning and Design of Logistics Systems for Uncertain Environments Carlos F. Daganzo Department and design of logistics systems when the environment in which they are to be operated cannot be modeled introduced by uncertainty in the planning and design of logistics systems, and (ii) to suggest approximate

Daganzo, Carlos F.

443

Asbestos, Environment, Fire, Health, Safety, and Security Policy 1. INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environment conducive to the accomplishment of the mission of the CEE Department, the College of Engineering engineering shall be responsible for this policy's administration in environmental laboratories, waterAsbestos, Environment, Fire, Health, Safety, and Security Policy 1. INTRODUCTION This document

Gelfond, Michael

444

A wildland fire modeling and visualization environment , Jonathan D. Beezley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

§ , and Christopher R. Johnson§ Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver environment, consisting of a coupled atmosphere-wildfire model, utilities for visualization, data processing. 1 #12;Figure 1: An overview of the wildfire simulation environment (Mandel et al. 2010). 2. COUPLED

Utah, University of

445

AL KHALIL, O., NOUR EL DIN, M., GRUSSENMEYER, P. (2001) 3D indoor modeling of buildings based on photogrammetry and topologic approaches. , XVIII CIPA International Symposium, Potsdam,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AL KHALIL, O., NOUR EL DIN, M., GRUSSENMEYER, P. (2001) 3D indoor modeling of buildings based , 2001, 7 pages. 1 3D INDOOR MODELING OF BUILDINGS BASED ON PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND TOPOLOGIC APPROACHES Omar information systems. Modeling is used to document, preserve, restore or rebuild buildings. Properties

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Demonstration of wide-angle beam steering optics in wavelength-division-multiplexing indoor optical wireless LAN with dedicated CMOS imager  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are developing a new indoor optical wireless LAN system, in which dedicated CMOS imagers are utilized to offer location-aware visually-intuitive wireless communications, wavelength- or space-division-multiplexing high-speed data transfer, and compact ... Keywords: CMOS imager, beam steering, free-space optical communications, indoor optical wireless LAN, wavelength multiplexing

Keiichiro Kagawa; Jun Tanida

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Use of Personal-Indoor-Outdoor Sulfur Concentrations to Estimate the Infiltration Factor and Outdoor Exposure Factor for Individual Homes and Persons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Use of Personal-Indoor-Outdoor Sulfur Concentrations to Estimate the Infiltration Factor and Outdoor Exposure Factor for Individual Homes and Persons ... Indoor?outdoor comparisons of sulfur concentrations thus provide a direct way to estimate Finf for each individual home. ... Of 36 homes, 22 had intercepts not significantly different from zero, indicating no apparent source of sulfur in the home. ...

Lance Wallace; Ron Williams

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Monitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase of a pilot survey.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. KEYWORDS Air pollution, air stuffiness, formaldehyde, benzene. 1 INTRODUCTION Indoor air quality to determine an air stuffiness index as an indirect mean to assess pollutants accumulation in a closed spaceMonitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase

Boyer, Edmond

449

Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, authorizes DOE to protect the health and safety of the public against radiation. It is the Department's objective to operate its facilities and conduct activities so that radiation exposures to members of the public and the environment are maintained as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA), within limits established in DOE O 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment.

450

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Title Quantitative room-temperature mineralization of airborne formaldehyde using manganese oxide catalysts Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Hugo Destaillats, Douglas P. Sullivan, Joern Larsen, and William J. Fisk Journal Applied Catalysis B - Environmental Issue 107 Pagination 34-41 Date Published 2011 Keywords commercial building ventilation & indoor environmental quality group, commercial building ventilation and indoor environmental quality group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, indoor environment department, indoor environment group DOI 10.1016/j.apcatb.2011.06.032 Attachment Size

451

Optical properties across the solar spectrum and indoor thermal performance of cool white coatings for building energy efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two single-layer, waterborne cool white coatings for building envelopes were recently developed for use in improving building energy efficiency. After the coatings were manufactured, their optical properties over the solar spectrum and their indoor temperature reduction effect were systematically investigated using appropriate tools, and the advantages/disadvantages of single layer cool white coatings over multilayer ones were discussed in detail. The preparation process enables these two coatings to integrate multiple cooling principles and thereby exhibit high solar heat reflectance and good indoor temperature reduction. The predicted industrial limit of solar heat reflectance for practical reflective cool white coatings is 0.91. Use of cool white coatings significantly reduces radiant heat flux. The temperature reduction effects evaluated by a self-developed device cannot describe adequately the indoor cooling performance of cool coatings.

Zhongnan Song; Weidong Zhang; Yunxing Shi; Jianrong Song; Jian Qu; Jie Qin; Tao Zhang; Yanwen Li; Hongqiang Zhang; Rongpu Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Washington - SEP | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sealing, the program will also help pay for a new unit that does not use indoor air. Energy Performance Scores Provide Market Information The program not only works with local...

453

Indoor Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Homes with or without Wood Burning for Heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indoor Levels of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Homes with or without Wood Burning for Heating ... One wood-burning home had a boiler located in a shelter outside the house and was excluded from the study. ... The concentrations of BaP in the wood-burning homes (0.52 ng/m3) were within the range reported for an American home during operation of different airtight wood stoves (20) and for seven homes during wood burning in airtight wood stoves (21). ...

Pernilla Gustafson; Conny stman; Gerd Sllsten

2008-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Ozone-Initiated Secondary Emission Rates of Aldehydes from Indoor Surfaces in Four Homes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozone-Initiated Secondary Emission Rates of Aldehydes from Indoor Surfaces in Four Homes ... For example, the nonanal SER from the living room carpet was 80 ?g m-2 h-1 in a 1 year old home, but only 8?20 ?g m-2 h-1 in two homes that were greater than 10 years old. ... Living room carpets in homes H1 and H2 also emitted 2-nonenal, denoted 9 in Figure 2. SERs of individual aldehydes ranged from less than the method detection limits (MDL), for most aldehydes emitted from walls, to 208 ?g m-2 h-1 for nonanal emitted from kitchen countertop in home H2. ...

Hong Wang; Glenn C. Morrison

2006-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Long-Term Characterization of Indoor and Outdoor Ultrafine Particles at a Commercial Building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle size distributions between 10 and 500 nm were measured both indoor and outdoor simultaneously using a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS, model M-1000XP, MSP Inc.). ... This work was supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant RD83107801, a Syracuse Center of Excellence CARTI project award, which is supported by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [award X-83232501-0], the Electric Power Research Institute under agreement W06325, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) through contracts 8650 and 10604. ...

Yungang Wang; Philip K. Hopke; David C. Chalupa; Mark J. Utell

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

EM News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2012 1, 2012 DOE Carlsbad Field Office Deputy Manager Ed Ziemianski presents a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) team with the Green Zia Program Silver Level Leader award from the New Mexico Environment Department earlier this month in recognition of environmental initiatives. Shown right of Ziemianski is Farok Sharif, Washington TRU Solutions LLC, the WIPP management and operating contractor, President and General Manager. Carlsbad Field Office Receives New Mexico's Silver Award for Environmental Excellence CARLSBAD, N.M. - For the second year in a row, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) recognized the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) for its environmental stewardship by implementing pollution prevention practices and for excellence in long-term environmental and economic sustainability

457

Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Us » News » Congressional Testimony About Us » News » Congressional Testimony Congressional Testimony October 6, 2011 Statement Before the Subcommittee on Children's Health and Environmental Responsibility, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate (10/6/2011) Statement Before the Subcommittee on Children's Health and Environmental Responsibility, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate By: David Geiser, Director, Office of Legacy Management, Department of Energy Subject: UMTRCA March 16, 2010 Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations (3/16/2010) Statement Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, Committee on Appropriations, United States House of Representatives By David Geiser, Director, Office of Legacy Management, Department of

458

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con-parameter experiments in RERAF. Systems Analysis Department The objective of the research is to de- velop and apply are systems reliability, organisation, toxi- cology, informatics, simulation methods, work studies, economics

459

Department Safety Representatives Department Safety Representative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department Safety Representatives Overview Department Safety Representative Program/Operations Guidance Document The Department Safety Representative (DSR) serves a very important role with implementation of safety, health, and environmental programs on campus. The role of the DSR is to assist

Pawlowski, Wojtek

460

106 The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) 107The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) Graduate Catalogue 201415 Graduate Catalogue 201415  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

106 The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) 107The Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 The Environment and Sustainable collaboration on sustainable development initiatives among departments at AUB and with a wide variety of other

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home Energy Bills Federal Agencies Combine Efforts to Protect Environment and Reduce Home Energy Bills July 11, 2005 - 2:07pm Addthis Department of Housing and Urban Development; Department of Energy; Environmental Protection Agency WASHINGTON, DC- The Bush administration today announced a major new partnership aimed at reducing household energy costs by 10 percent over the next decade. The Partnership for Home Energy Efficiency will provide energy saving solutions for all households across the country and support research and implementation of a new generation of energy efficiency technologies. The Department of Energy (DOE), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will

462

Department of Energy EPA\\OAR\\Office of Radiation and Indoor Air U. S. Environmental Protection Agency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency Ariel Rios Building, 6601 J 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. Washington, DC 20460 Subject: Hanford Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) staff asked some additional questions concerning the Hanford Tank and K (DOE) staff, EPA staff and Hanford site personnel on April 13, 2005. Three questions remain

463

Planning Specialist III (Rainscapes Planner) Department of Environmental Protection, Montgomery County Government  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in landscape architecture, environmental engineering, environmental education, natural resources managementPlanning Specialist III (Rainscapes Planner) Department of Environmental Protection, Montgomery in the Department of Environmental Protection. The position works in a team environment with other staff

464

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Subcommittee on Energy and Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives August 1, 1996 Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services Department of Energy Invitation to testify on funding for Department of Energy research and development in a constrained budget environment. The Office of Inspector General has completed a number of audits in the general area of cooperative agreements, cost sharing arrangements and the Department's recoupment decisions. One of our objectives has been to determine if the interests of

465

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives August 1, 1996 Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Committee on Science U.S. House of Representatives Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services Department of Energy Invitation to testify on funding for Department of Energy research and development in a constrained budget environment. The Office of Inspector General has completed a number of audits in the general area of cooperative agreements, cost sharing arrangements and the Department's recoupment decisions. One of our objectives has been to determine if the interests of

466

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economyof the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economyof the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives June 1, 2011 Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economyof the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testimony on matters relating to the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. As you know, issues surrounding the termination of the Project have been widely publicized. They directly impact the Department's responsibilities to manage legacy waste generated from

467

Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and Conservation the Division of

468

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures Department of Energy Technical Standards Procedures The following procedures should be used to write, revise, or maintain a DOE...

469

Department of Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - AL 2010-07 Acquistion Letters Remaining in Effect May 2010 revision 1 June 2010 Microsoft...

470

Energy Department Awards Geothermal Student Scholarships | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Department Awards Geothermal Student Scholarships Energy Department Awards Geothermal Student Scholarships January 28, 2015 - 3:39pm Addthis Aurelie Roche at the University...

471

Energy Department Launches Veterans Mentoring Program | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Launches Veterans Mentoring Program Energy Department Launches Veterans Mentoring Program May 29, 2012 - 4:18pm Addthis The American flag flying over the Veterans...

472

David Sandalow | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sandalow Sandalow About Us David Sandalow - Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow As Under Secretary of Energy (Acting), David Sandalow helped to oversee the Department's renewable energy, energy efficiency, fossil energy, nuclear energy and electricity delivery programs. As Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs, he helped coordinate policy and manage international activities at the Department. Prior to his service at the Department, Mr. Sandalow was Energy & Environment Scholar and a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program of the Brookings Institution, as well as Energy & Climate Change Working Group Chair at the Clinton Global Initiative. He is the author of Freedom from Oil (McGraw-Hill, 2008)

473

Vehicles News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

News News Vehicles News RSS September 4, 2013 Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies Thirty-eight projects will accelerate the research and development of technologies to improve vehicle fuel efficiency, lower transportation costs, and cut carbon pollution. Energy Department Announces $45 Million to Advance Next-Generation Vehicle Technologies Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan to build a 21st century transportation sector and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the Energy Department announced today more than $45 million for thirty-eight new projects that accelerate the research and development of vehicle technologies to improve fuel efficiency, lower transportation costs, and protect the environment in communities nationwide.

474

Water News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

News News Water News RSS August 29, 2013 Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy Seventeen Projects to Boost Device Performance, Ensure Sustainable Development. August 29, 2013 Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Develop Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides, and currents. Together, these projects will increase the power production and reliability of wave and tidal devices and help gather valuable data on how deployed devices interact with the surrounding environment. April 17, 2012

475

Glossary of Environment, Safety and Health Terms  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-HDBK-1188-2006 DOE-HDBK-1188-2006 January 2006 DOE HANDBOOK GLOSSARY OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY AND HEALTH TERMS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1188-2006 2 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1188-2006 3 Table of Contents 1. INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................................4 1.1 Purpose.............................................................................................................................................................................4

476

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41 - 24550 of 29,416 results. 41 - 24550 of 29,416 results. Article SRS Seals Access to P and R Reactors, Marking End to Nearly 60-Years of History: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Project Progress AIKEN, S.C. - With investments from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the U.S. Department of Energy and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, (SRNS) today sealed the access to the historic P and R Reactors as part of footprint reduction and legacy cleanup at the Savannah River Site. http://energy.gov/em/articles/srs-seals-access-p-and-r-reactors-marking-end-nearly-60-years-history Article DOE Awards Grant to New Mexico Environment Department for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Oversight, Monitoring Carlsbad, NM - The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a grant for an estimated $1.6 million to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The

477

Gas and Oil (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Oil (Maryland) and Oil (Maryland) Gas and Oil (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the Department is required prior to the drilling of a well for exploration, production, or underground storage of oil or gas. An environmental assessment must be submitted along with the permit application, and the Department may deny permits that propose drilling which may pose a substantial threat to public safety or

478

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Generalized geologic province information and data on house construction were used to predict indoor radon concentrations in New Hampshire (NH). A mixed-effects regression model was used to predict the geometric mean (GM) short-term radon concentrations in 259 NH towns. Bayesian methods were used to avoid over-fitting and to minimize the effects of small sample variation within towns. Data from a random survey of short-term radon measurements, individual residence building characteristics, along with geologic unit information, and average surface radium concentration by town, were variables used in the model. Predicted town GM short-term indoor radon concentrations for detached houses with usable basements range from 34 Bq/m{sup 3} (1 pCi/l) to 558 Bq/m{sup 3} (15 pCi/l), with uncertainties of about 30%. A geologic province consisting of glacial deposits and marine sediments, was associated with significantly elevated radon levels, after adjustment for radium concentration, and building type. Validation and interpretation of results are discussed.

Apte, M.G.; Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

Brand, L.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Concentrations of indoor pollutants (CIP) database user's manual (Version 4. 0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the latest release of the database and the user manual. The user manual is a tutorial and reference for utilizing the CIP Database system. An installation guide is included to cover various hardware configurations. Numerous examples and explanations of the dialogue between the user and the database program are provided. It is hoped that this resource will, along with on-line help and the menu-driven software, make for a quick and easy learning curve. For the purposes of this manual, it is assumed that the user is acquainted with the goals of the CIP Database, which are: (1) to collect existing measurements of concentrations of indoor air pollutants in a user-oriented database and (2) to provide a repository of references citing measured field results openly accessible to a wide audience of researchers, policy makers, and others interested in the issues of indoor air quality. The database software, as distinct from the data, is contained in two files, CIP. EXE and PFIL.COM. CIP.EXE is made up of a number of programs written in dBase III command code and compiled using Clipper into a single, executable file. PFIL.COM is a program written in Turbo Pascal that handles the output of summary text files and is called from CIP.EXE. Version 4.0 of the CIP Database is current through March 1990.

Apte, M.G.; Brown, S.R.; Corradi, C.A.; Felix, S.P.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Smith, B.V.; Traynor, G.W.; Woods, A.L.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indoor environment department" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Variability of chlorination by-product occurrence in water of indoor and outdoor swimming pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Swimming is one of the most popular aquatic activities. Just like natural water, public pool water may contain microbiological and chemical contaminants. The purpose of this study was to study the presence of chemical contaminants in swimming pools, in particular the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and inorganic chloramines (CAMi). Fifty-four outdoor and indoor swimming pools were investigated over a period of one year (monthly or bi-weekly sampling, according to the type of pool) for the occurrence of DBPs. The results showed that DBP levels in swimming pools were greater than DBP levels found in drinking water, especially for HAAs. Measured concentrations of \\{THMs\\} (97.9 vs 63.7?g/L in average) and \\{HAAs\\} (807.6 vs 412.9?g/L in average) were higher in outdoor pools, whereas measured concentrations of \\{CAMi\\} (0.1 vs 0.8mg/L in average) were higher in indoor pools. Moreover, outdoor pools with heated water contained more \\{DBPs\\} than unheated pools. Finally, there was significant variability in tTHM, HAA9 and \\{CAMi\\} levels in pools supplied by the same municipal drinking water network, suggesting that individual pool characteristics (number of swimmers) and management strategies play a major role in DBP formation.

Sabrina Simard; Robert Tardif; Manuel J. Rodriguez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

483

U.S. Department of Energy's Request for Hearing and Answer to...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Energy (DOE or Respondent) and Requests a Hearing and Answers the State of New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) Administrative Order Requiring Compliance and...

484

Environment and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

Galles, David

485

Enterococci in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...review-article Reviews Enterococci in the Environment Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli a Meredith...understanding of their ecology in natural environments, as well as their roles as opportunistic...interactions that occur in aquatic environments. Furthermore, the use of single laboratory-grown...

Muruleedhara N. Byappanahalli; Meredith B. Nevers; Asja Korajkic; Zachery R. Staley; Valerie J. Harwood

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Furnaces | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

select products that feature sealed combustion. Condensing furnaces should not use indoor air, which frequently contains contaminants from common household products, for...

487

CX-006067: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office The DOE's Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection propose to conduct indoor bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, and small-scale...

488

Energy Incentive Programs, Idaho | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Commercial Lighting Incentive Program offers increased incentives for most T12 conversions. Incentives are also available for other types of efficient indoor and outdoor...

489

Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Department of Energy Employee Concerns Program Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes that free and open expression of DOE Federal and contractor and subcontractor employee concerns is essential to safe and efficient accomplishment of DOE's missions. DOE employees and any contractor or subcontractor fulfilling DOE's mission have the right and responsbility to report concerns relating to the environment, safety, health, or management of Department operations. The guide provides methods of implementing requirements of DOE O 442.1.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

492

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

493

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

494

Services | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Services Services Services Office of Inspector General Hotline: The Office of Inspector General (OIG) maintains a Hotline to facilitate the reporting of allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, or mismanagement in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs or operations. If you wish to report such allegations, you may call, send a letter, or email the OIG Hotline as identified at the right. Allegations may be reported by DOE employees, DOE contractors, or the general public. Issues that should be reported: Abuse of funds Contract, Procurement, and Grant Fraud Environment, Health, and Safety Violations Computer Crimes Product Substitution and Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Bribery, Kickbacks, and Gratuities False Statements and False Claims Conflicts of Interest and Ethics Violations

495

Department of Educational Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne's mission is to lead the world in providing scientific and engineering solutions to the grand challenges of our time: sustainable energy, a healthy environment and a secure nation. In concert with the laboratory's sustainable energy mission, the Sustainability Workshop for Middle School Teachers provides seminars by scientists, discussions, tours, hands-on activities, and group planning to grow the participant's energy literacy and develop instructional materials for sustainability topics. Sustainability Workshop For Middle School Teachers Since this project exemplifies the innovation and commitment to sustainability that DOE likes to recognize, this program has been selected to receive a 2012 Department of Energy Sustainability Award on Thursday September 27 at the Office of Science in Washington DC.

496

Mission | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mission Mission Mission The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's Southeastern Power Administration is to market and deliver Federal hydroelectric power at the lowest possible cost to public bodies and cooperatives in the southeastern United States in a professional, innovative, customer-oriented manner, while continuing to meet the challenges of an ever-changing electric utility environment through continuous improvements. Market and deliver economical and dependable hydropower to customers The objectives of Southeastern are to market the electric power and energy generated by the Federal reservoir projects and toe encourage widespread use of the power at the lowest possible cost to consumers. Make Southeastern an employer of choice Strategies to achieve this goal include: Promote SEPA as an "Employer of

497

Leadership | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Us » Leadership Us » Leadership Leadership Jonathan Elkind Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs (Acting) Jonathan Elkind serves as Acting Assistant Secretary for the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) and has served as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for PI since June 2009. Prior to joining the Energy Department, Mr. Elkind worked as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, focusing on energy security and foreign policy issues. He also founded and headed EastLink Consulting, LLC, an independent consultancy focusing on energy, environment, and investment. From 1998 to 2001, Elkind served on the staff of the U.S. More about Acting Assistant Secretary Elkind Andrea Lockwood Deputy Assistant Secretary for Eurasia, Africa, and the Middle East

498

Utilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utilities Utilities Utilities Below are resources for Tribes about utilities. The Economics of Electric System Municipalization Looks at the economic environment in California to determine whether municipalization would be a beneficial option for many California cities. Source: Bay Area Economic Forum. Establishing a Tribal Utility Authority Handbook Provides an introduction to electric utility operation and general guidance for the steps required to form a tribal utility authority. Funded by an economic development grant awarded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development to the Ak-Chin Indian Community and its tribal utility authority, Ak-Chin Energy Services. Source: Leonard S. Gold, Utility Strategies Consulting Group,

499

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 29, 2013 July 29, 2013 Excerpts of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's Remarks at National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown On Monday, July 29, 2013, Secretary Moniz will visit the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, W. Va. July 8, 2013 New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring Researchers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have teamed up with their Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) colleagues to develop a new hybrid nanostructure that could make it easier to monitor blood sugar. When used as a sensing tool in a breath analyzer, the new material could offer a way for millions of diabetics to avoid the pain and hassle of finger sticks. June 27, 2013 Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time

500

Department of Physics Department of Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Physics Department of Physics Life Sciences Building 3101 S. Dearborn St. Chicago, IL 60616 312.567.3480 www.iit.edu/csl/physics Chair: Grant Bunder The Department of Physics offers B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics. Within the department, there are many opportunities for interdisciplinary

Heller, Barbara