National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for indoor air quality

  1. Indoor Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Focus For decades, teams of Berkeley Lab scientists have investigated the ways that indoor air quality affects human health-from cognitive ability to personal comfort...

  2. Indoor air quality: Selected references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This document was compiled in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality, including sick-building syndrome. Included in the publication are the NIOSH Congressional testimony presented before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications; two articles describing the results of NIOSH research and findings on indoor air-quality problems; NIOSH guidance on conducting indoor-air-quality investigations; and a description of the NIOSH health-hazard evaluation program, which can provide NIOSH assistance in evaluating indoor-air-quality problems.

  3. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  4. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    in the Netherlands, Indoor Air 2, 127 – 136. BuildingPaliaga, G. (2009) Moving air for comfort. ASHRAE Journal,ventilation system on perceived air quality, Indoor Air

  5. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead to having

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Fact Sheet Poor indoor air quality comes from many sources. It can lead Indoor Air Pollutants · Molds · Pollen · Dander from pet fur · Secondhand smoke · Formaldehyde · Carbon such as cleaners and pesticides How to Improve Indoor Air Quality · Open windows when you can to let in fresh air

  6. TEAMS: Indoor Air Quality (IAR) Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, V.

    2008-01-01

    The Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District (“CFBISD”) found the need to reduce air quality concerns and complaints, and find an effective and efficient method to reduce the rising cost of utilities. An Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) program...

  7. Investigative Tools and Techniques for Indoor Air Quality Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, S. R.; Quinn, C. B.; Henderson, J. E.; Vickery, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor air quality problems are diverse and often complex. Adverse indoor air quality problems can exist which create symptomatic conditions for building occupants. Often, the exact cause, or causes, of the substandard indoor air quality are unknown...

  8. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    for studies of indoor air quality and energy utilization inExt. 6782 Indoor Air Quality in Energy- Buildings Craig D.1, 1979) Indoor Air Quality in Energy~Efficient LBL-8892 EEB

  9. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School...

  10. Operation & Maintenance for Quality Indoor Air 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, C.; Bayer, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    The results of numerous Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) building investigations conducted by the Georgia Tech Research Institute have shown that building Operation and Maintenance (O&M) is a very common source of IAQ problems. This paper presents...

  11. Indoor Air Quality Poor indoor air quality can cause a stuffy nose, sore throat,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products such as cleaners and bug sprays » Outdoor air pollution from factories, vehicles, wildfires allergies may have severe reactions. Common Indoor Air Pollutants Poor indoor air quality comes from many have asthma triggered by outdoor air pollution or pollen, opening windows might not be a good idea

  12. Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building: _________________________________________________________ File Number: ________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Air Quality Forms 195 Building in relation to indoor air quality. Page 1 of 14 Needs Attention Not ApplicableOKComponent Comments Outside Air Screen Unobstructed? General condition? Size of mesh? (1 /2" minimum) Outside Air Dampers Operation

  13. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  14. Indoor air quality in French dwellings Sverine Kirchner1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on Indoor Air Quality (OQAI) aims at collecting data on population exposure to indoor pollutants in various INTRODUCTION Our lack of understanding of the health risks related to air pollutants exposure in buildingsIndoor air quality in French dwellings Séverine Kirchner1,* , Mickael Derbez1 , Cédric Duboudin2

  15. Factors Analysis on Safety of Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Q.; Liu, Z.; Xiong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Influence factors on safety of indoor air quality (IAQ) were analyzed in this paper. Some regeneration compositions resulting from potential indoor chemical reactions may be more harmful to habitants. A few building flaws may be key factors...

  16. Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air quality dependent ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor air quality control for improving passenger health in subway platforms using an outdoor air online 19 May 2015 Keywords: Ventilation control system Indoor air quality Indoor air pollution control Outdoor air quality Passenger health promotion Ventilation energy a b s t r a c t Indoor air quality (IAQ

  17. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Swainson, M. (2009). Indoor air quality in highly energyClayton, R. (2001). Indoor air quality: Residential cookingSacramento, CA: California Air Resources Board. Fugler, D. ,

  18. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation J.M.Logue1,P Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation LBNL-4945E Disclaimer This document.H. Sherman, B.C. Singer, Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  19. Classification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification of indoor air pollution determinant factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of indoor air pollution determinant factors Jean-Baptiste Masson1,2 * , Gérard Govaert2 , Corinne Mandin1 representing different types of indoor air pollution. We restrain to the 20 variables corresponding to indoorClassification of dwellings into profiles regarding indoor air quality, and identification

  20. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    1989). Residential indoor air quality and energy efficiency.book Residential Indoor Air Quality and Energy Efficiency by2009). Indoor air quality in highly energy efficient homes—A

  1. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    UC-95d INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATIONVentilation on Indoor Air Quality and Energy Use in Schoo s,EEB~Vent INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION

  2. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of MechanicalIndoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical

  3. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mankoff, Jennifer

    evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  4. inAir: Sharing Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    the outdoor air pollution in even the largest and most industrialized cities. For example, the California Air evidence has indicated that indoor air pollution within homes and other buildings can be worse than Resources Board estimates that indoor air pollutant levels are 25-62% greater than outside levels [4

  5. An Innovative Reactor Technology to Improve Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempel, Jane [TIAX LLC., Lexington, MA (United States)

    2013-03-30

    As residential buildings achieve tighter envelopes in order to minimize energy used for space heating and cooling, accumulation of indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), becomes a major concern causing poor air quality and increased health risks. Current VOC removal methods include sorbents, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO), and increased ventilation, but these methods do not capture or destroy all VOCs or are prohibitively expensive to implement. TIAX's objective in this program was to develop a new VOC removal technology for residential buildings. This novel air purification technology is based on an innovative reactor and light source design along with UVPCO properties of the chosen catalyst to purify indoor air and enhance indoor air quality (IAQ). During the program we designed, fabricated and tested a prototype air purifier to demonstrate its feasibility and effectiveness. We also measured kinetics of VOC destruction on photocatalysts, providing deep insight into reactor design.

  6. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    focused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on humanpollution sources exist inside buildings, notably sources associated with combustion (

  7. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    caused by office's thermal Environment, J. Archit. Plann.Standard 55- 2010. Thermal environment conditions for humanindoor air quality, thermal environment, lighting and

  8. Indoor Air Quality Observations in Public Schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    pressurize the crawl space. Sane of the llnderfloor fans were not opera* (failed) an3 this results in mist ~OQI: air flawing into the building through the apenFngs in the pip* chases anl aperative underfloor fan ducts. Turn off the underfloar fans, sedl...

  9. Modeling VOC sorption of building materials and its impact on indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinsong, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Sorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by building materials can have significant effect on the indoor VOC concentration levels and indoor air quality in buildings. The objective of this study was to investigate ...

  10. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings - Building America Top Innovation ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and...

  11. EIS-0127: New Energy-Efficient Homes Programs, Assessing Indoor Air Quality Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this EIS to explore whether different building techniques will control indoor air quality and still maintain cost-effective energy savings.

  12. High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes White + GreenSpec SHEET PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS #12;High Performance Indoor Air Quality Specification for Net Zero Energy Homes NIST GCR 14 Division provides scientific leadership to help the U.S. achieve its vision of net zero energy (NZE

  13. MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    -Fi fingerprints; (2) an air exchange rate based IAQ sensing method, which measures general IAQ using only CO2MAQS: A Personalized Mobile Sensing System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yifei Jiang , Kun Li,omkar}@umich.edu, § dickrp@eecs.umich.edu ABSTRACT Most people spend more than 90% of their time in- doors; indoor air

  14. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    Traynor, "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBL-of combustion-generated indoor air pollution concluded thatTraynor, Combustion- Generated Indoor Air Pollution; April,

  15. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    G.W. , "Combustion-Generated Indoor Air Pollution," LBLfocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namelyimpact of combustion-generated indoor air pollution on human

  16. Method, system and apparatus for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Tremblay, Paul L.; Fryer, Michael O.; Hohorst, Frederick A.

    2004-03-23

    A system, method and apparatus is provided for monitoring and adjusting the quality of indoor air. A sensor array senses an air sample from the indoor air and analyzes the air sample to obtain signatures representative of contaminants in the air sample. When the level or type of contaminant poses a threat or hazard to the occupants, the present invention takes corrective actions which may include introducing additional fresh air. The corrective actions taken are intended to promote overall health of personnel, prevent personnel from being overexposed to hazardous contaminants and minimize the cost of operating the HVAC system. The identification of the contaminants is performed by comparing the signatures provided by the sensor array with a database of known signatures. Upon identification, the system takes corrective actions based on the level of contaminant present. The present invention is capable of learning the identity of previously unknown contaminants, which increases its ability to identify contaminants in the future. Indoor air quality is assured by monitoring the contaminants not only in the indoor air, but also in the outdoor air and the air which is to be recirculated. The present invention is easily adaptable to new and existing HVAC systems. In sum, the present invention is able to monitor and adjust the quality of indoor air in real time by sensing the level and type of contaminants present in indoor air, outdoor and recirculated air, providing an intelligent decision about the quality of the air, and minimizing the cost of operating an HVAC system.

  17. Impact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    air pollution study (CITEPA), France * Corresponding email: Eva.Leoz@ineris.fr SUMMARY Data pollutants in ambient air. Consequently our study aims at describing both emission factors and inerisImpact of domestic woodburning appliances on indoor air quality Corinne Mandin1 , Jacques Ribéron2

  18. Indoor Air Quality and Health in FEMA Temporary Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    within the trailers make air quality concerns worse. Who Is Most At Risk Poor air quality causes problems with asthma · People who have allergies · People who have chronic lung disease such as bronchitis or of asthma may benefit from symptomatic treatment. Health Study CDC will work with parents to study children

  19. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  20. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  1. Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

  2. Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

  3. Improving Indoor Air Quality Improves the Performance of Office Work and School Work 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wargocki, P.

    2008-01-01

    strong incentive for providing indoor air of a quality that is better than the minimum levels required by present standards. IAQ can be improved by reducing the pollution load on the air by selecting low-polluting building and furnishing materials...

  4. Weatherization and Indoor Air Quality: Measured Impacts in Single Family Homes Under the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott; Cautley, Dan; Francisco, Paul; Hawkins, Beth A; Brennan, Terry M

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes findings from a national field study of indoor air quality parameters in homes treated under the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). The study involved testing and monitoring in 514 single-family homes (including mobile homes) located in 35 states and served by 88 local weatherization agencies.

  5. Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Englemann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  6. Study of building material emissions and indoor air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xudong, 1966-

    1999-01-01

    Building materials and furnishings emit a wide variety of indoor pollutants, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). At present, no accurate models are available to characterize material emissions and sorption under ...

  7. Advanced Technology for Economical Dehumidification to Improve Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckwith, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    High humidity can have a detrimental effect on many aspects of indoor environments. Building materials, books, and records deteriorate more rapidly in humidity levels above 60% due to biodegradation. High humidity increases electrical costs...

  8. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model developmen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is...

  9. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indoor Environment Department Energy Performance of Buildings Group Berkeley, CA 94720 January 2010 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the BuildingTechnologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy under ontract

  10. Integrating Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Apartments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Quality and Energy Education In addition toAPPENDIX A1: Tenant Indoor Environmental Quality and Energyimproving indoor air quality (IAQ), energy efficiency and

  11. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Quality Measurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Quality ~leasurements in Energy Efficient Buildings Craig D.Gregory W. Traynor Energy Efficient Buildings Program Energy

  12. Building Efficiency and Indoor Air Quality - You Can Have Both 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettler, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    , and run around loops. These methods can be used on some packaged equipment but is normally provided on makeup air units and central air supply systems. These built up units offer opportunities to combine heat recovery, special filtration, humidity control...

  13. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    ROOF PORT HOLES AIR REGISTERS E8 XBL 7712-11473B Figure 3 - Schematic of Exterior and Interior of Energy Efficient

  14. Monitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase of a pilot survey.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . KEYWORDS Air pollution, air stuffiness, formaldehyde, benzene. 1 INTRODUCTION Indoor air quality to determine an air stuffiness index as an indirect mean to assess pollutants accumulation in a closed spaceMonitoring indoor air quality in French schools and day-care centres. Results from the first phase

  15. IAQ in Hospitals - Better Health through Indoor Air Quality Awareness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Rajhi, S.; Ramaswamy, M.; Al-Jahwari, F.

    2010-01-01

    the operator and the work by recirculating some of the air through a HEPA filter to provide a down-flow over the working area. Class 3 safety cabinets are totally enclosed units designed to provide a high degree of user protection. As mentioned above... of filters is 6mm WG.Fine filters can filter down to 5-micron size with efficiency of 99.9%. Pressure drop is 15 mm of W.G. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters down to 0.3-micron size. Pressure drop is in these type of filters is 50 mm...

  16. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010for VOCs from post-1990 indoor air concentration studies inUnion project on indoor air pollutants. Allergy, 2008. 63(

  17. Improve Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Building Performance: Leveraging Technology to Improve All Three 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, D.

    2011-01-01

    suburban-- locations, outdoor air is actually far more polluted than indoor air. Appropriate application of air cleaning technologies and monitoring can allow many buildings to achieve both improved IAQ and lower operating costs....

  18. A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P. Dick, Michael Hannigan, Qin Lv, Li Shang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Robert

    .shang}@colorado.edu Abstract--Indoor air quality is important. It influences human productivity and health. Personal pollution pollutant exposure is important. Currently, stationary and accurate air quality monitoring sen- sors [30A Hybrid Sensor System for Indoor Air Quality Monitoring Yun Xiang, Ricardo Piedrahita, Robert P

  19. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  20. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  1. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Combustion -Generated Indoor Air Pollution Craigcontrol of air pollution from indoor combustion sources. Ifocused on combustion-generated indoor air pollution, namely

  2. Indoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    will be placed in the basement. Carbon dioxide CO2 tank and monitors: A CO2 tank will be placed in a first floor closet, and programmed to release CO2 gas four times a day for 15 minutes each time. Two CO2 monitorsIndoor Air Quality of Weatherized Homes in the Northeast A Cornell University study, funded

  3. inAir: Measuring and Visualizing Indoor Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    , long-term exposure to such chemicals can cause significant chronic health problems like asthma to the development of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, heart disease, and lung cancer. Complicating quality and are often causes of Figure 1. inAir located in a living room. dizziness, nausea, allergic

  4. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  5. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  6. Mechanistic modeling of the interrelationships between indoor/outdoor air quality and human exposure in a GIS framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isukapalli, S.S.; Purushothaman, V.; Georgopoulos, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    Evaluation of human exposure to atmospheric contaminants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM) is often based on measured data from fixed ambient (outdoors) Air Monitoring Stations. This results in an artificial characterization of indoor exposures, as concentrations and physicochemical attributes of indoor pollutants vary significantly and are different from corresponding outdoor values. A mechanistically-based modeling approach is presented here that aims to improve estimates for the outdoor/indoor relationships of photochemical pollutants and of associated fine particles and, subsequently, of human exposure assessments. New approaches for refining the spatial, temporal, and indoor/outdoor patterns of gas phase photochemical contaminants and PM are currently being developed and tested. These approaches are combined with information from either ambient monitoring networks or from ambient air quality models that consider aerosol physics and chemistry coupled with gas phase photochemistry (e.g. UAM-AERO). This process utilizes Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Relational Database (RD) methods, to facilitate detailed exposure scenario construction (involving e.g. the geographic location of an individual considered in time) and to aid in the estimation of population exposure over selected geographic areas. The combination of monitor data or air quality modeling with microenvironmental modeling in a GIS framework can potentially provide a useful platform for more accurate assessments of human exposure to co-occurring gas and particulate phase air pollutants.

  7. Gosselin, J.R. and Chen, Q. 2008. "A dual airflow window for indoor air quality improvement and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and energy conservation in buildings," HVAC&R Research, 14(3), 359-372. A Dual Airflow Window for Indoor Air with exhausted indoor air. The energy needed to condition outdoor air is reduced because of the counterflow heat, the dual airflow window has a great potential for conserving energy and improving indoor air quality

  8. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J.M.; Price, P.N.; Sherman, M.H.; Singer, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    Intake of chemical air pollutants in residences represents an important and substantial health hazard. Sealing homes to reduce air infiltration can save space conditioning energy, but can also increase indoor pollutant concentrations. Mechanical ventilation ensures a minimum amount of outdoor airflow that helps reduce concentrations of indoor emitted pollutants while requiring some energy for fan(s) and thermal conditioning of the added airflow. This work demonstrates a physics based, data driven modeling framework for comparing the costs and benefits of whole-house mechanical ventilation and applied the framework to new California homes. The results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits from reduced exposure to indoor pollutants in New California homes are worth the energy costs of adding mechanical ventilation as specified by ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This study determines the health burden for a subset of pollutants in indoor air and the costs and benefits of ASHRAE's mechanical ventilation standard (62.2) for new California homes. Results indicate that, on a population basis, the health benefits of new home mechanical ventilation justify the energy costs.

  9. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in the ZEBRAlliance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, D.; Jackson, M.; Shrestha, S.

    2013-09-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. In this project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in research houses located in Oak Ridge, TN, that were less than 2 years old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built, unoccupied, and unfurnished. The team identified air pollutants of concern in the test homes that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern from initial air sampling surveys. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74°F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused minimal to modest increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  10. Fresh air indoors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kull, K.

    1988-09-01

    This article describes and compares ventilation systems for the control of indoor air pollution in residential housing. These include: local exhaust fans, whole-house fans, central exhaust with wall ports, and heat-recovery central ventilation (HRV). HRV's have a higher initial cost than the other systems but they are the only ones that save energy. Homeowners are given guidelines for choosing the system best suited for their homes in terms of efficiency and payback period.

  11. Using a Ventilation Controller to Optimize Residential Passive Ventilation For Energy and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain

    2014-08-01

    One way to reduce the energy impact of providing residential ventilation is to use passive and hybrid systems. However, these passive and hybrid (sometimes called mixed-mode) systems must still meet chronic and acute health standards for ventilation. This study uses a computer simulation approach to examine the energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) implications of passive and hybrid ventilation systems, in 16 California climate zones. Both uncontrolled and flow controlled passive stacks are assessed. A new hybrid ventilation system is outlined that uses an intelligent ventilation controller to minimise energy use, while ensuring chronic and acute IAQ standards are met. ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 – the United States standard for residential ventilation - is used as the chronic standard, and exposure limits for PM2.5, formaldehyde and NO2 are used as the acute standards.The results show that controlled passive ventilation and hybrid ventilation can be used in homes to provide equivalent IAQ to continuous mechanical ventilation, for less use of energy.

  12. Optimization of Ventilation Energy Demands and Indoor Air Quality in High-Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hun, Diana E; Jackson, Mark C; Shrestha, Som S

    2014-01-01

    High-performance homes require that ventilation energy demands and indoor air quality (IAQ) be simultaneously optimized. We attempted to bridge these two areas by conducting tests in a research house located in Oak Ridge, TN, that was 20 months old, energy-efficient (i.e., expected to consume 50% less energy than a house built per the 2006 IRC), tightly-built (i.e., natural ventilation rate ~0.02 h-1), unoccupied, and unfurnished. We identified air pollutants of concern in the test home that could generally serve as indicators of IAQ, and conduced field experiments and computer simulations to determine the effectiveness and energy required by various techniques that lessened the concentration of these contaminants. Formaldehyde was selected as the main pollutant of concern among the contaminants that were sampled in the initial survey because it was the only compound that showed concentrations that were greater than the recommended exposure levels. Field data indicate that concentrations were higher during the summer primarily because emissions from sources rise with increases in temperature. Furthermore, supply ventilation and gas-phase filtration were effective means to reduce formaldehyde concentrations; however, exhaust ventilation had minimal influence on this pollutant. Results from simulations suggest that formaldehyde concentrations obtained while ventilating per ASHRAE 62.2-2010 could be decreased by about 20% from May through September through three strategies: 1) increasing ASHRAE supply ventilation by a factor of two, 2) reducing the thermostat setpoint from 76 to 74 F, or 3) running a gas-phase filtration system while decreasing supply ventilation per ASHRAE by half. In the mixed-humid climate of Oak Ridge, these strategies caused increases in electricity cost of ~$5 to ~$15/month depending on outdoor conditions.

  13. inAir: A Longitudinal study of Indoor Air Quality Measurements and Visualizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    pollutants are colorless and odorless, while many activities are inconspicuous and routine. We implemented inAir. Among those, air pollution and its effects on health have been researched extensively over past several decades [13]. In particular, the health effects of air pollution cover a wide variety of respiratory

  14. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    of indoor combustion-generated air pollution in residen-LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D.L,BL-5918 COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION C. D.

  15. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometNovakov, T. : Formation of Pollution Particulate NitrogenGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.

  16. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    of Medicine (2011) Climate change, the indoor environment,on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality andto work and learn and climate change may make existing IEQ

  17. Evaluating Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, H. H.; Al-Momani, H.

    2004-01-01

    Air Quality (IAQ) as Modifying Factor in Designing Public School Buildings in Jordan Hikmat H. Ali, Ph.D. Hind Al...-Momani Department of Architecture Jordan University of Science and Technology Irbid-Jordan Hikmat_ali@yahoo.com Hikmat@just.edu.jo Phone (962) 2-7201000 Fax (962...

  18. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976. GeometGENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION Dr. C. D. Hollowell, Dr. R.W. Traynor Introduction Air pollution research has focused

  19. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Union of Air Pollution Prevention Associations,The Status of Indoor Air Pollution Research 1976, GeometAnnual Meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association,

  20. DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes. A critical aspect of...

  1. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical VentilationQuality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

  2. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Air Plus Living Building Challenge Passive House EarthCraftof a passive perfluorocarbon tracer system for buildingof a green building, Energy Star or Passive House program.

  3. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Another three homes used point-source heating, relyingsource Heating Fuel Type Electric Location Natural Gas Homehomes in CA are moving away from forced air heating and cooling systems, towards hydronic and point-source

  4. Airborne Particulate Matter in HVAC Systems and its Influence on Indoor Air Quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Z.; Li, N.; Wang, H.

    2006-01-01

    , Brownian diffusion, is always present as a result of the random interactions between particles and air molecules. A net flux of particles generated by Brownian diffusion only exists in the presence of a nonzero particle concentration gradient. Brownian.... In the same way that fluctuating turbulent velocity components contribute to momentum transport in turbulent flows, turbulent fluctuations contribute to the diffusive flux of particles. The instantaneous particle concentration in a turbulent flow can...

  5. DRAFT 11/09/2010 PLEASE DO NOT CITE OR QUOTE Indoor Air Quality (IAQ)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , industry standard organizations, state and local programs, and the home energy retrofit industry to better new EPA regulatory standards. · Provide guidance for diagnosing occupant health problems or building; help improve the quality of the work performed in this expanding industry; promote occupant health

  6. A scoping study on the costs of indoor air quality illnesses:an insurance loss reduction perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Allan; Vine, Edward L.

    1998-08-31

    The incidence of commercial buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ), and the frequency of litigation over the effects of poor IAQ is increasing. If so, these increases have ramifications for insurance carriers, which pay for many of the costs of health care and general commercial liability. However, little is known about the actual costs to insurance companies from poor IAQ in buildings. This paper reports on the results of a literature search of buildings-related, business and legal databases, and interviews with insurance and risk management representatives aimed at finding information on the direct costs to the insurance industry of poor building IAQ, as well as the costs of litigation. The literature search and discussions with insurance and risk management professionals reported in this paper turned up little specific information about the costs of IAQ-related problems to insurance companies. However, those discussions and certain articles in the insurance industry press indicate that there is a strong awareness and growing concern over the "silent crisis" of IAQ and its potential to cause large industry losses, and that a few companies are taking steps to address this issue. The source of these losses include both direct costs to insurers from paying health insurance and professional liability claims, as weIl as the cost of litigation. In spite of the lack of data on how IAQ-related health problems affect their business, the insurance industry has taken the anecdotal evidence about their reality seriously enough to alter their policies in ways that have lessened their exposure. We conclude by briefly discussing four activities that need to be addressed in the near future: (1) quantifying IAQ-related insurance costs by sector, (2) educating the insurance industry about the importance of IAQ issues, (3) examining IAQ impacts on the insurance industry in the residential sector, and (4) evaluating the relationship between IAQ improvements and their impact on energy use.

  7. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  8. Building Air Quality Alliance Program fro Building Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kettler, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    IAQ increases. EPA studies rank indoor air pollution among the top five risks of environmental threats to public health. Guidance on achieving acceptable air quality and on preventing indoor air pollution is available. The 199 1 EPAMIOSH guide...

  9. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402K-13001, February 2013 iaprev1.pdf More Documents...

  10. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

  11. Attributes of Indoor Environmental Quality to Earth-sheltered Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheta, S.

    2010-01-01

    , while the second ranking was indoor radon (Huelman, 2004, pp. 10-21). Indoor environmental quality problems in earth sheltered buildings can take many forms but the main way to look at problems is to remember the three ?P?s? of indoor....), carbon monoxide and other combustion products, radon, pesticides, and household chemicals (Barcik, 2005, pp. 30-1). There are three basic aspects of indoor environmental quality that will be covered in this article?the sources of indoor air...

  12. Investigation and Analysis of the Indoor Air Environment of a Large-scale Art Exhibition Hall in Beijing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, X.; Cao, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Adopting the method of locale measurement and subjective appraisal, this paper presents a synthesized investigation and analysis of both the indoor thermal and humid indices and the air quality of a specific exhibition hall in Beijing. Indoor air...

  13. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01

    to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The resultsthe indoor air quality and energy use of passive stacks.of the improved air quality is energy consumption increases

  14. NIOSH testimony on indoor air quality: Selected references before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean and Water Protection, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by J. Donald Millar, May 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has compiled the document in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality (IAQ), including sick building syndrome. Included in the publication are: NIOSH Congressional testimony that describes the NIOSH IAQ investigations program and summarizes the results of NIOSH research and findings on IAQ problems, NIOSH guidance for conducting indoor air quality investigations, NIOSH journal article on evaluating building ventilation systems, and list of non-NIOSH publications on indoor air quality. As the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for occupational safety and health standards, NIOSH limits its IAQ activities to the occupational environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducts an IAQ program and can be contacted for information regarding both occupational and non-occupational settings.

  15. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2010-01-01

    x A Emission Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion. PaperInternational) on Combustion, Tokyo (August, 1974). Chang,fll , J I ___F J "J LBL-S9lS COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR

  16. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAP’s low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and “conventional” materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPA’s Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide “lessons learned” that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  17. Indoor-air-quality research. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Development and Applications and the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, August 2, 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Spokesmen for the environmental health sciences, consumer product safety, medical profession, and conservation discussed current research on whether indoor air quality suffers as a result of weatherization to reduce air leakage at a two-day hearing. Critical areas for research were the identification, measurement, characterization, control and health effects of indoor pollutants. Of particular concern to the committee was the administration's phasing out of some research programs despite DOE authorization and Congressional appropriations to continue. The witnesses discussed contaminants from building materials, household products, and other sources as well as the effects of reduced ventilation. Additional material submitted for the record follows their testimony.

  18. Participant Assisted Data Collection Methods in the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Singer, Brett C.

    2013-08-01

    From November 2011 to March 2013, air quality was measured over 6-day periods in 324 residences across California using a mail-out strategy. All interactions with study participants, from recruitment, to data collection, to communication of results, were conducted with remote communication methods including conventional mail, electronic mail, telephone and text messaging. Potential participants were reached primarily by sharing study information with community groups and organizations that directed interested individuals to complete an online screening survey. Pollutant concentrations were measured with sampling equipment that was mailed to participants' homes with deployment instructions. Residence and household characteristics and activity data were collected via two phone surveys and an activity log. A comparison of responses to survey questions completed online versus over the phone indicated that a substantial fraction of participants (roughly 20%) required a researcher's assistance to respond to basic questions about appliance characteristics. Using the printed instructions and telephone assistance from researchers, roughly 90% of participants successfully deployed and returned sampling materials accurately and on schedule. The mail-out strategy employed in this study was found to be a cost-effective means for collecting residential air quality data.

  19. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  20. Ris-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-M-2476 RELATIONSHIPS IN INDOOR/OUTDOOR AIR POLLUTION Jørn Roed Abstract. Beryllium-7 the pollution episode and airing shortly after is also investigated. Earlier relevant literature is reviewed descriptors; AEROSOLS; AIR FILTERS; AIR POLLUTION; AIR QUALITY; BUILDINGS; CONTAMINATION; DEPOSITION

  1. Improving Indoor Environmental Quality And Energy Performance Of Modular Classroom HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Spears, Michael; Lai, Chi-Ming; Shendell, Derek G.

    2005-01-01

    INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFINDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND ENERGY PERFORMANCE OFEnergy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are

  2. Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores and other commercial buildings in California. Issues related to the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Apte, Mike G.

    2010-10-31

    This report considers the question of whether the California Energy Commission should incorporate the ASHRAE 62.1 ventilation standard into the Title 24 ventilation rate (VR) standards, thus allowing buildings to follow the Indoor Air Quality Procedure. This, in contrast to the current prescriptive standard, allows the option of using ventilation rate as one of several strategies, which might include source reduction and air cleaning, to meet specified targets of indoor air concentrations and occupant acceptability. The research findings reviewed in this report suggest that a revised approach to a ventilation standard for commercial buildings is necessary, because the current prescriptive ASHRAE 62.1 Ventilation Rate Procedure (VRP) apparently does not provide occupants with either sufficiently acceptable or sufficiently healthprotective air quality. One possible solution would be a dramatic increase in the minimum ventilation rates (VRs) prescribed by a VRP. This solution, however, is not feasible for at least three reasons: the current need to reduce energy use rather than increase it further, the problem of polluted outdoor air in many cities, and the apparent limited ability of increasing VRs to reduce all indoor airborne contaminants of concern (per Hodgson (2003)). Any feasible solution is thus likely to include methods of pollutant reduction other than increased outdoor air ventilation; e.g., source reduction or air cleaning. The alternative 62.1 Indoor Air Quality Procedure (IAQP) offers multiple possible benefits in this direction over the VRP, but seems too limited by insufficient specifications and inadequate available data to provide adequate protection for occupants. Ventilation system designers rarely choose to use it, finding it too arbitrary and requiring use of much non-engineering judgment and information that is not readily available. This report suggests strategies to revise the current ASHRAE IAQP to reduce its current limitations. These strategies, however, would make it more complex and more prescriptive, and would require substantial research. One practical intermediate strategy to save energy would be an alternate VRP, allowing VRs lower than currently prescribed, as long as indoor VOC concentrations were no higher than with VRs prescribed under the current VRP. This kind of hybrid, with source reduction and use of air cleaning optional but permitted, could eventually evolve, as data, materials, and air-cleaning technology allowed gradual lowering of allowable concentrations, into a fully developed IAQP. Ultimately, it seems that VR standards must evolve to resemble the IAQP, especially in California, where buildings must achieve zero net energy use within 20 years.

  3. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Version of Infiltration Calculation Training Course Study A-Quality Study, the effects of house tightening infiltrationfield studies begin to demonstrate the low infiltration

  4. Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

    2006-07-31

    This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

  5. Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoteau, Dennis R.

    Effectiveness of Houseplants in Reducing the Indoor Air Pollutant Ozone Heather L. Papinchak1 , E for their species effectiveness in reducing ozone concentrations in a simulated indoor environment. Continuously supply system were used to simulate an indoor environment in which ozone concentrations could be measured

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA The indoor microbiome is a complex system that is thought to depend on dispersal from the outdoor biome and the occupants' microbiome

  7. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional KnowledgeAgenda Agenda NERSC UserAgustin Mihi andAir Leaks inAir

  8. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N AManaged bynuevo sistemaAir

  9. Predicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    attributable to air pollution, 1.5 million of these from indoor air pollution. Worldwide there are more deathsPredicting air quality in smart environments Seun Deleawea , Jim Kusznirb , Brian Lambb and Diane J that is often overlooked in maintaining a healthy lifestyle is the air quality of the environment. In this paper

  10. Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health Hazards in Indoor Air J.M. Logue, M. H. Sherman, B.C. Singer5250E #12;Logue et al, Health Hazards in Indoor air LBNL5250E Health Hazards in Indoor Air J, Singer BC, 2010 Health Hazards in Indoor Air. In Proceedings of the 2010 31st AIVC Conference, Low Energy

  11. Indoor Environmental Quality Benefits of Apartment Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Delp, William W.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion; Singer, Brett C.; Spears, Michael; Vermeer, Kimberly; Fisk, William J.

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen apartments serving low-income populations in three buildings were retrofit with the goal of simultaneously reducing energy consumption and improving indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Retrofit measures varied among apartments and included, among others, envelope sealing, installation of continuous mechanical ventilation systems, upgrading bathroom fans and range hoods, attic insulation, replacement of heating and cooling systems, and adding wall-mounted particle air cleaners. IEQ parameters were measured, generally for two one-week periods before and after the retrofits. The measurements indicate an overall improvement in IEQ conditions after the retrofits. Comfort conditions, bathroom humidity, and concentrations of carbon dioxide, acetaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and particles generally improved. Formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide levels decreased in the building with the highest concentrations, were unchanged in a second building, and increased in a third building. IEQ parameters other than particles improved more in apartments with continuous mechanical ventilation systems installed. In general, but not consistently, larger percent increases in air exchange rates were associated with larger percent decreases in indoor levels of the pollutants that primarily come from indoor sources.

  12. Indoor airPLUS Version 1 (Rev. 01) Verification Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rev. 01 checklist has been modified to reflect only the additional Indoor airPLUS requirements and their corresponding section numbers that must be met after completing the ENERGY STAR checklists.

  13. Clean-up of Contaminated Indoor Air Using Photocatalytic Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hingorani, S.; Greist, H.; Goswami, T.; Goswami, Y.

    2000-01-01

    to be completely effective. Dark control experiments were performed for each condition to confirm the validity of each experiment. The photocatalytic technology tested in these experiments was demonstrated to completely oxidize acetone at normal indoor air...

  14. COMBUSTION-GENERATED INDOOR AIR POLLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    Pollutants from Indoor Combustion Sources: I. Field Measure-Characteristics in Two Stage Combustion, paper presented atInternational) on Combustion, August, 1974, Tokyo, Japan. 8

  15. Optimal Indoor Air Temperature Considering Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort in the Shanghai Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y.; Lian, Z.; Hou, Z.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air temperature is the most important control parameter in air conditioning systems. It not only impacts the thermal comfort of occupants, but also also greatly affects the energy consumption in air conditioning systems. The lower the indoor...

  16. Air movement preferences observed in office buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Movement – Good or Bad? Indoor Air 14: 40-45. Toftum, J (Quality Survey. Indoor Air 14 (8): 65–74. Internationalon the Perception of Indoor Air Quality during Immediate and

  17. Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    Model Reduction for Indoor-Air Behavior in Control Design for Energy-Efficient Buildings Jeff models for the indoor-air environment in control design for energy efficient buildings. In one method by a desire to incorporate models of the indoor-air environment in the design of energy efficient buildings

  18. The Center for Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    review of indoor air pollution in schools requested by the Environment Committee of the Connecticut and evaluating the students' and staff health symptoms, · assessing the building for causes of poor indoor air agencies. Programs have included guidance on the Environmental Protection Agency Indoor Air Quality Tools

  19. Room air stratification in combined chilled ceiling and displacement ventilation systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Tully, Brad; Rimmer, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Environments. Proceedings of Indoor Air 2005: 10 thInternational Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate,displacement ventilation hybrid air conditioning system-

  20. Exposure to formaldehyde in indoor air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gammage, R.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Trends in formaldehyde concentrations to which residents are exposed are reviewed, as are the means for assessing these exposures. Concentrations as high as a few ppm encountered in manufactured housing during the 1970s were eliminated after the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 1984 ruling came into effect. The pressed-wood product industry, and its trade organizations, have made concerted efforts to comply with the ruling. Moreover, they have imposed additional voluntary product standards upon themselves intended to be applicable to a range of pressed-wood products wider than that defined in the HUD standard. Quarterly product testing on arbitrarily selected products shows a general lowering of emission rates with only a few percent of products now being above the HUD level. Measurement of ambient indoor levels of formaldehyde has been largely replaced by testing to assure conformance to product standards. The lower-emitting products on the market, if used in mobile home construction and furnishing, will expectantly produce formaldehyde levels not exceeding 0.1 ppm, except under conditions of unusually high temperature and humidity. Recent studies implicate household dust as a significant carrier of bound formaldehyde. In a few instances, old urea-formaldehyde cavity wall insulation has become friable and particles have blown into living areas. Future health assessments might need to consider this additional pathway of potential exposure.

  1. Renewables and air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooley, D.R.

    2000-08-01

    The US heavy reliance on fossil fuels is a central obstacle to improving air quality and preventing catastrophic climate change. To solve this problem will require a combination of financial incentives and market rules that strongly encourage development of renewable energy resources to meet electric power demand. One promising policy option is to allow renewable energy resources to directly participate in air pollution emission trading mechanisms. Currently, the clean air benefits of renewable energy generally go unrecognized by regulators, under-appreciated by consumers and uncompensated by markets. Renewable energy is a key clean air alternative to conventional electricity generation, and the development of renewables could be stimulated by changes to the Clean Air Act's emissions trading programs. As Congress revisits clean air issues over the next several years, renewable energy representatives could push for statutory changes that reward the renewable energy industry for the air quality benefits it provides. By also becoming involved in key US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state rule-making cases, the renewables industry could influence the structure of emissions trading programs and strengthen one of the most persuasive arguments for wind, solar and biomass energy development.

  2. Optimal Airflow Control for Laboratory Air Handling Unit (LAHU) Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Y.; Liu, M.; Conger, K.

    2002-01-01

    the indoor air quality, This paper presents modeling, optimization procedures and optimal airflow control sequences....

  3. Energy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental measurements and collect energy consumption data. Based on analyses of the data collected fromEnergy and Indoor Environmental Quality Retrofits in Low-Income Apartments ENVIRONMENTAL ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/environmental August 2011 The Issue

  4. Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air Purifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Quantification of Ozone Levels in Indoor Environments Generated by Ionization and Ozonolysis Air ozone (O3) during operation, either in- tentionally or as a byproduct of air ionization standards. Sev- eral types of air purifiers were tested for their ability to produce ozone in various indoor

  5. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-05-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  6. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  7. Nebraska Air Quality Regulations (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to ambient air quality standards, pollution source operating permits, emissions reporting,...

  8. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  9. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass combustion and acutekerosene fuel combustion Indoor air pollution from biomasscombustion emits naphthalene [44, 46, 83, 84] and formaldehyde [42, 45, 85]. In the indoor air pollution

  10. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    review for each building based on their design approach to LEED,reviews of project and site documentation. The air-quality LEED

  11. Chapter 21 Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are in the PortlandVancouver metro area where there are more industrial sources of air pollution and higher levels of traffic congestion that create more air emissions....

  12. Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Efficient Probabilistic Localization for Autonomous Indoor Airships using Sonar, Air Flow, and IMU, {muellerj, burgard}@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Abstract In recent years, autonomous miniature airships have navigation, sonar, IMU 1 Introduction Miniature airships as autonomous mobile systems for indoor navigation

  13. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  14. Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stenner, Robert D.; Hadley, Donald L.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Buck, John W.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Janus, Michael C.

    2001-03-01

    Indoor air quality effects on human health are of increasing concern to public health agencies and building owners. The prevention and treatment of 'sick building' syndrome and the spread of air-borne diseases in hospitals, for example, are well known priorities. However, increasing attention is being directed to the vulnerability of our public buildings/places, public security and national defense facilities to terrorist attack or the accidental release of air-borne biological pathogens, harmful chemicals, or radioactive contaminants. The Indoor Air Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Health Modeling and Assessment System (IA-NBC-HMAS) was developed to serve as a health impact analysis tool for use in addressing these concerns. The overall goal was to develop a user-friendly fully functional prototype Health Modeling and Assessment system, which will operate under the PNNL FRAMES system for ease of use and to maximize its integration with other modeling and assessment capabilities accessible within the FRAMES system (e.g., ambient air fate and transport models, water borne fate and transport models, Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic models, etc.). The prototype IA-NBC-HMAS is designed to serve as a functional Health Modeling and Assessment system that can be easily tailored to meet specific building analysis needs of a customer. The prototype system was developed and tested using an actual building (i.e., the Churchville Building located at the Aberdeen Proving Ground) and release scenario (i.e., the release and measurement of tracer materials within the building) to ensure realism and practicality in the design and development of the prototype system. A user-friendly "demo" accompanies this report to allow the reader the opportunity for a "hands on" review of the prototype system's capability.

  15. A Marked Point Process Model for the Source Proximity E ect in the Indoor Environment 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    indoor air quality monitors arise because of the source proximity e#11;ect, in which pollutant sources. McBride Abstract In indoor air quality studies, discrepancies between personal and station- ary Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship as well as the Center for Indoor Air Research. The author thanks

  16. Development of a modeling framework to predict indoor air concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Loy, M.D.; Nazaroff, W.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Daisey, J.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental and Energy Technologies Div.

    1998-12-31

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are an important but largely unstudied class of indoor air pollutants. SVOCs have been well-studied as outdoor air pollutants, but much less effort has been focused on understanding the factors affecting their concentrations in indoor air. Because of these compounds` low (10-6 to 10 Pa at room temperature) vapor pressures, they readily partition into condensed phases from the gas phase. In outdoor air, this phenomenon is important as a source of secondary organic aerosol and as a mechanism for long range transport and persistence of SVOCs in the atmosphere as particle-phase species. Indoor environments include another potential condensed phase besides the airborne particle phase: surface materials such as carpet, wallboard, upholstery, ceiling tiles, linoleum, and many others. Adsorption to these materials has a markedly different effect on indoor contaminant concentrations because the condensed phase is stationary. Unlike the airborne particle phase, for which ventilation is a significant removal mechanism, the only significant pathway for removal of reversibly sorbed pollutants from the indoor environment is desorption into the gas phase followed by ventilation. Because buildings generally have a large surface area to gas-phase volume ratio, the net removal of SVOCs from the indoor environment via this mechanism is likely to be very slow. Compounds re-emitted from one surface are likely to quickly re-absorb to another. This paper presents an analysis of the factors affecting indoor concentrations of SVOCs including ventilation, gas-particle partitioning, gas phase sorption on indoor surfaces, particle deposition, and oxidative radical chemistry and estimates their relative importance to facilitate simplification of numerical simulations of indoor pollutant concentrations.

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Indoor Air and Environmental Tobacco Smoke Measured with a New Integrated Organic Vapor-Particle Sampler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundel, L.A.; Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Lee, C.C.; Stevens, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental tobaccoof polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Indoor Air 1991;1:497-NK. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives

  18. Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Air Pollutants, SLAC Emissions Sources, and Regulatory Reference Department: Chemical permit regulations are designed to track, record, and control air pollutants belonging to several on chemical classifications. This reference outlines major categories of air pollutants found at SLAC

  19. JV Task 86 - Identifying the Source of Benzene in Indoor Air Using Different Compound Classes from TO-15 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven B. Hawthorne

    2007-04-15

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) data that had already been collected using EPA method TO-15 at four different sites under regulatory scrutiny (a school, strip mall, apartment complex, and business/residential neighborhood) were evaluated to determine whether the source of indoor air benzene was outdoor air or vapor intrusion from contaminated soil. Both the use of tracer organics characteristic of different sources and principal component statistical analysis demonstrated that the source of indoor air at virtually all indoor sampling locations was a result of outdoor air, and not contaminated soil in and near the indoor air-sampling locations. These results show that proposed remediation activities to remove benzene-contaminated soil are highly unlikely to reduce indoor air benzene concentrations. A manuscript describing these results is presently being prepared for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.

  20. Social Media: Air Quality #SummerSafety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    than adults to the health effects caused by air pollution. http://cdc.gov/air/air_health.htm #SummerSafety Twitter: Children and teens may be more sensitive than adults to air pollution. http://cdc.gov/air/air Social Media: Air Quality #SummerSafety Please help the NWS spread these important safety

  1. Air temperature thresholds for indoor comfort and perceived air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Edward, Arens; Pasut, Wilmer

    2012-01-01

    on ambient temperature, Ergonomics, 2007, Vol. 50, No. 4,on Environmental Ergonomics 2009, August. Humphreys, M.A. (

  2. Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

  3. Maintaining System Air Quality | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maintaining System Air Quality (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency Stabilizing System...

  4. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 109 | NUMBER 5 | May 2001 481 Quantifying the Effects of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Combustion on Acute Respiratory Infections in Developing to indoor air pollution, especially to particulate matter, from the combustion of biofuels (wood, charcoal to indoor air pollution high on the agenda of international development and public health organizations (10

  5. The Effects of Indoor Air Velocity on Occupant Thermal Comfort in Winter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01

    In China the thermal comfort standard that regulates the indoor air velocity cannot exceed 0.15m/s in winter. But many scholars doubt this regulation. This paper presents the results of an experimental research project on thermal comfort...

  6. Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing and Modeling Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution among Rural Women in Guatemala Lisa pollution in rural areas of developing countries. It is estimated that about half (53%) of all households in the poor countries of Latin American use biofuels (wood, dung and/or crop residues) to cook. Combustion by

  7. Georgia Air Quality Control Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Air Quality Control Act (AQCA) is a set of environmental regulations, permitting requirements, and air quality standards that control the amount of pollutants emitted and who emits them...

  8. Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

  9. Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Department...

  10. Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System - Compressed Air Tip Sheet #5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing how to determine the right air quality for compressed air systems.

  11. Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Christopher P.; Ducati, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    and Photobiology A.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Investigating the photo-oxidation of model indoor air pollutants using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry Christopher P. Ireland* and Caterina Ducati Department of Materials... such as deodorizers or floor cleaners, removal of these is a key priority, particularly as many VOCs are known to be mutagenic or carcinogenic [11]. Whilst air purification techniques such as filtration via activated carbon [12] or thermal advanced oxidation processes...

  12. Air cleaners for indoor-air-pollution control (Chapter 10). Book chapter, Feb 89-Jul 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, A.S.; Ramanathan, K.; Hanley, J.T.; Smith, D.D.; Ensor, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    The chapter describes an experimental study to evaluate performance characteristics of currently available controls for indoor air pollutants, including both particles and gases. The study evaluated the particle-size-dependent collection efficiency of seven commercially available devices for particulate control: a common furnace filter, four industrial filters, and two electronic air cleaners (EACs). The furnance filter had negligible effect on particles with diameters between 0.1 and 1 micrometer. The industrial filters, with ASHRAE ratings of 95, 85, 65, and 40% showed minimum efficiency at about 0.1 micrometer, which was substantially less than the ASHRAE efficiency. One EAC, essentially a furnance filter with a high-voltage electrode, reached a maximum efficiency of 30% at low flowrates (7 cu m/min); however, it had a negligible effect at higher flowrates. The other EAC, similar to an industrial ESP, showed efficiencies of 80-90% over the entire size range at low to moderate flowrates. At the highest flowrate, a minimum efficiency was detected at 0.35 micrometer. The study also evaluated the suitability of commerically available carbon-based sorbents (wood, coal, and coconut) for removing low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (benzene, acetaldehyde, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane).

  13. Monitoring Viable Fungal and Bacterial Bioaerosol Concentrations to Identify Acceptable Levels for Common Indoor Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, L. D.

    1998-01-01

    Bioaerosol concentrations between 200 - 450 CFU/m3 have remained largely uncharacterized with respect to potential indoor air quality concerns. This research provides for further description of indoor bioaerosol concentrations and concludes that 3 0...

  14. Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy ResourcesAir Quality Jump to: navigation, search

  15. Pre-clinical Measures of Eye Damage (Lens Opacity), Case-control Study of Tuberculosis, and Indicators of Indoor Air Pollution from Biomass Smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokhrel, Amod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Indoor air pollution from biomass fuels and respiratoryTuberculosis and Indoor Biomass and Kerosene Use in Nepal: AR.D. Retherford, and K.R. Smith, Biomass cooking fuels and

  16. Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational requirements for facilities that may contribute to air emissions. General air quality standards and standards for...

  17. Application of receptor modeling to indoor air emissions from electroplating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadden, R.A.; Liao, S.L.; Scheff, P.A.; Franke, J.E.; Conroy, L.M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). School of Public Health

    1998-12-01

    In work areas containing multiple sources of the same air pollutant, it is useful for control purposes to be able to separate out the contribution from each individual source. In this study, the chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model was used to allocate the contributions from multiple sources to area concentration measurements in three electroplating shops. Shop 1 was a room with a single copper electroplating line; shop 2 was a large bay containing a chromium conversion coating line, a continuous chromium electroplating line, and several manual electroplating operations; shop 3 contained a piston chrome plating line, a decorative chrome plating line, and manual and barrel zinc coating lines. The receptor modeling approach uses the elemental composition of one or more source categories to determine what fraction of an area sample is contributed by each source. In most cases the CMB model predicted over 90% of the measured concentrations. The allocation procedure explained 100% of the copper measured at three locations in shop 1, with contributions of 95 to 98% from the plating line and the rest from air outside the room. For shop 2, a two-source model explained 100% of the chromium measured at five sampling locations. For shop 3, the percent contributions of chromium from the piston plating line and the decorative plating line were consistent with distance from each of the sources.

  18. Air quality evaluation of London Paddington train station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Uven; Swanson, Jacob J.; Boies, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    concentrations in residential houses. Atmospheric Environment 2004, 38 (21), 3405-3415. 9. Long, C. M.; Suh, H. H.; Koutrakis, P., Characterization of indoor particle sources using continuous mass and size monitors. Journal of the Air & Waste Management...

  19. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. A separate measure guideline addresses combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage that use outdoor air for combustion. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  20. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    group felt that the building automation or management systemhad issues with the building automation systems, a lack ofbe provided from the building automation systems and no air

  1. Analysis of a Dedicated Outdoor Air System and Low Temperature Supply Air Conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang, L.; Li, R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the principles and the characteristics of a dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) and low temperature supply air system. DOAS is offered based on the demands of indoor air quality and the low temperature supply air system...

  2. Technology Solutions Case Study: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-05-01

    This case study describes how to assess and carry out the combustion safety procedures for appliances and heating equipment that uses indoor air for combustion in low-rise residential buildings. Only appliances installed in the living space, or in an area freely communicating with the living space, vented alone or in tandem with another appliance are considered here. This document is for inspectors, auditors, and technicians working in homes where energy upgrades are being conducted whether or not air infiltration control is included in the package of measures being applied. In the indoor combustion air case, guidelines summarized here are based on language provided in several of the codes to establish minimum requirements for the space using simplified prescriptive measures. In addition, building performance testing procedures are provided by testing agencies. The codes in combination with the test procedures offer comprehensive combustion safety coverage to address safety concerns, allowing inexperienced residential energy retrofit inspectors to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits to proceed.

  3. Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Qiguo

    2011-01-01

    of the near source air quality impact of distributedDabdub, D. , 2003. Urban Air quality impacts of distributedDabdub, D. , 2004. Urban Air quality impacts of distributed

  4. Indoor environment quality in LEED buildings: Understanding conditions affecting performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Quality - Interviews Credits Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 5 Designer Occupant (7 interviews) Operations/Managementquality standpoint by not always from a thermal comfort standpoint. Operations interviews: All three buildings management

  5. Commercial Building Indoor Environmental Quality Evaluation: Methods and Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzerling, David

    2012-01-01

    quality (IEQ) acceptance in residential buildings.Energy and Buildings, 41(9), 930–936. doi:10.1016/j.more tolerant of “green” buildings? Building Research &

  6. 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This forum on improving air quality will take place May 22-24, 2012, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It is co-sponsored by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and the National Tribal...

  7. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characterstics* T to: discover new interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess future; and improve methods to model, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts

  8. Air Quality Rules (North Carolina) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    air quality rule for North Carolina that includes ambient air quality standards, emission control standards, monitoring and reporting requirements, and permitting procedures....

  9. Opening Remarks, Achieving Air Quality and Climate Change Goals...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Air Quality and Climate Change Goals through Energy and Transportation Transformation Analisa Bevan CARB May 14, 2014 Sacramento California Healthy Air Quality for All...

  10. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 110 | NUMBER 11 | November 2002 1057 The Health Impacts of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution from Solid Fuels in Developing Countries: Knowledge, Gaps, and Data Needs and coal smoke contain a large number of pollutants and known health haz- ards, including particulate- cyclic organic matter, including carcinogens such as benzo[a]pyrene (5­9). Exposure to indoor air

  11. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Norman, Bourassa; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshfumi; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Wang, Duo

    2008-04-04

    An improved HVAC system for portable classrooms was specified to address key problems in existing units. These included low energy efficiency, poor control of and provision for adequate ventilation, and excessive acoustic noise. Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one-year measurement-intensive field-test of ten of these IHPAC systems was conducted in occupied classrooms in two distinct California climates. These measurements are compared to those made in parallel in side by side portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units were found to work as designed, providing predicted annual energy efficiency improvements of about 36 percent to 42 percent across California's climate zones, relative to 10 SEER units. Classroom ventilation was vastly improved as evidenced by far lower indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations. TheIHPAC units were found to provide ventilation that meets both California State energy and occupational codes and the ASHRAE minimum ventilation requirements; the classrooms equipped with the 10 SEER equipment universally did not meet these targets. The IHPAC system provided a major improvement in indoor acoustic conditions. HVAC system generated background noise was reduced in fan-only and fan and compressor modes, reducing the nose levels to better than the design objective of 45 dB(A), and acceptable for additional design points by the Collaborative on High Performance Schools. The IHPAC provided superior ventilation, with indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations that showed that the Title 24 minimum ventilation requirement of 15 CFM per occupant was nearly always being met. The opposite was found in the classrooms utilizing the 10 SEER system, where the indoor minus outdoor CO2 concentrations frequently exceeded levels that reflect inadequate ventilation. Improved ventilation conditions in the IHPAC lead to effective removal of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes, on average lowering the concentrations by 57 percent relative to the levels in the 10 SEER classrooms. The average IHPAC to 10 SEER formaldehyde ratio was about 67 percent, indicating only a 33 percent reduction of this compound in indoor air. The IHPAC thermal control system provided less variability in occupied classroom temperature than the 10 SEER thermostats. The average room temperatures in all seasons tended to be slightly lower in the IHPAC classrooms, often below the lower limit of the ASHRAE 55 thermal comfort band. State-wide and national energy modeling provided conservative estimates of potential energy savings by use of the IHPAC system that would provide payback a the range of time far lower than the lifetime of the equipment. Assuming electricity costs of $0.15/kWh, the perclassroom range of savings is from about $85 to $195 per year in California, and about $89 to $250 per year in the U.S., depending upon the city. These modelsdid not include the non-energy benefits to the classrooms including better air quality and acoustic conditions that could lead to improved health and learning in school. Market connection efforts that were part of the study give all indication that this has been a very successful project. The successes include the specification of the IHPAC equipment in the CHPS portable classroom standards, the release of a commercial product based on the standards that is now being installed in schools around the U.S., and the fact that a public utility company is currently considering the addition of the technology to its customer incentive program. These successes indicate that the IHPAC may reach its potential to improve ventilation and save energy in classrooms.

  12. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

    2011-01-01

    Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

  13. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Emissions 7.3 Impacts of LNG on Air Quality 8. References 9.El Paso at Blythe. Chapter 3: Air Quality Impact AssessmentRespect to the South Coast Air Quality Management District

  14. On-Road Air Quality and the Effect of Partial Recirculation on In-Cabin Air Quality for Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grady, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The proposed fractional air recirculation system canThe suggested fractional air recirculation method is away of improving cabin air quality. References [1] U.S. DOT.

  15. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to...

  16. Maintaining Indoor Air Quality During Construction and Renovation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianyu

    / Hazards Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compounds that are readily Flooring Caulks Fuels, Cleaners Wall Coverings Sealants Adhesives Composite Wood Products Paints Carpeting be implemented. Hazardous Particulates which are subject to special regulation include lead paint dust which

  17. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory Energy Efficient Buildings Mobile Laboratory.of 1,150 f t . LBL's Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) MobileLaboratory. Energy Efficient Buildings Program Energy and

  18. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    microbial burden The Energy Efficient Buildings (EEB) Mobilein a number of energy efficient buildings, wherein pollutantenergy~efficient ventilation , institutional and commercial buildings.

  19. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside....

  20. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2009-01-01

    Energy Research Program Prepared By: Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryNational Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 October 2008 The research reported here was supported by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchNational Laboratory.  The information from this project contributes to PIER’s  Energy?Related Environmental Research 

  1. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (United States) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) Country of...

  2. INDOOR AIR QUALITY MEASUREMENTS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Modem RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 18.95HEATING COMMERCIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 10.3data on various active and pas- sive methods of reducing energy consumption

  3. INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) PROGGRAM GUIDELINE HUMAN RESOURCES SERVICE GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    congestion, itching, coughing, and runny nose. Throat symptoms include feelings of dryness and irritation

  4. Indoor Air Quality Assessment of the San Francisco Federal Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael

    2010-01-01

    References ASHRAE. 1999. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 129-199,Atlanta GA. ASHRAE. 2004. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55, ThermalAtlanta GA. ASHRAE. 2007. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1,

  5. Indoor Air Quality Survey of Boston Nail Salons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    of salon activities, and a short questionnaire #12;Study Methods Carbon Dioxide (CO2) can be used's (ppb) 9,519 45 1,409 5,475 16,225 35,711 37,767 CO2 (ppm) 1,085 641 809 1,055 1,257 1,544 2,057 PM2.5 (g/m3) 21 6 14 16 20 49 62 #12;Average Measured CO2 (ppm) Concentrations · CO2 levels in 15 of 21

  6. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1 - 67006++,

  7. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom theHighI _ _1 - 67006++,(Journal

  8. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBar (Thesis/Dissertation) |

  9. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBar (Thesis/Dissertation) |(Technical Report) |

  10. ENERGY STAR Webinar: Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartment ofGraphics »DepartmentEERE

  11. Effect of residential air-to-air heat and moisture exchangers on indoor humidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barringer, C.G.; McGugan, C.A. )

    1989-01-01

    A project was undertaken to develop guidelines for the selection of residential heat and moisture recovery ventilation systems (HRVs) in order to maintain an acceptable indoor humidity for various climatic conditions. These guidelines were developed from reviews on ventilation requirements, HRV performance specifications, and from computer modeling. Space conditions within three house/occupancy models for several types of HRV were simulated for three climatic conditions (Lake Charles, LA; Seattle, WA; and Winnipeg, MB) in order to determine the impact of the HRVs on indoor relative humidity and space-conditioning loads. Results show that when reduction of cooling cost is the main consideration, exchangers with moisture recovery are preferable to sensible HRVs. For reduction of heating costs, moisture recovery should be done for ventilation rates greater than about 15 L/s and average winter temperatures less than about (minus) 10{degrees}C if internal moisture generation rates are low. For houses with higher ventilation rates and colder average winter temperatures, exchangers with moisture recovery should be used.

  12. Energy Saving and Good Quality Lighting for Indoor Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, H.

    2008-01-01

    but at the same time also in quality of lighting took place. This increase of efficiency can be realized in different ways. In e.g. offices, new fluorescent lamps TL5 with extremely high lamp efficacies, silver-coated aluminium lamellae optics for high... installations Recessed mounted office luminaire SmartForm with TL5 lamps and highly efficient silver-coated aluminium lamellae louvre with a light output ratio up to 94%. Very popular among architects are closed luminaires with optical acrylic micro lense...

  13. Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    9/14/12 1 Air pollution kills. So what? Air quality engineering to improve public health;9/14/12 2 Air Quality Engineering H Air Quality Engineering H #12;9/14/12 3 Really? Air pollution running out of coffins and florists were running out of flowers. -- BBC #12;9/14/12 4 Air pollution

  14. Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office of Radiation & Indoor Air EPA 402-R-05-009 Radiation Protection Division (6608J) August 2006) Radiation Protection Division works to address hazards posed by technologically enhanced naturally occurring #12;1 URANIUM LOCATION DATABASE COMPILATION Abstract The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA

  15. Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder Wolkoff , Gunnar D. Nielsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Review Non-cancer effects of formaldehyde and relevance for setting an indoor air guideline Peder 2010 Accepted 25 May 2010 Available online 16 June 2010 Keywords: Airways Asthma Children Formaldehyde Sensory irritation Susceptible subgroups There is considerable recent focus and concern about formaldehyde

  16. Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk, William J.

    2007-01-01

    of semiconductor photocatalysis. Chem. Rev. 1995, 95, 69-96.M.A. Evaluation of photocatalysis for gas-phase air

  17. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality.natural gas extraction and pipeline transport on air qualitynatural gas-based hydrogen pathways in terms of the resulting changes in urban air quality.

  18. Emerging Latin American air quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosmer, A.W.; Vitale, E.M.; Guerrero, C.R.; Solorzano-Vincent, L.

    1998-12-31

    Latin America is the most urbanized region in the developing world. In recent years, significant economic growth has resulted in population migration from rural areas to urban centers, as well as in a substantial rise in the standard of living within the Region. These changes have impacted the air quality of Latin American countries as increased numbers of industrial facilities and motor vehicles release pollutants into the air. With the advent of new free trade agreements such as MERCOSUR and NAFTA, economic activity and associated pollutant levels can only be expected to continue to expand in the future. In order to address growing air pollution problems, many Latin America countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, and Mexico have passed, or will soon pass, new legislation to develop and strengthen their environmental frameworks with respect to air quality. As a first step toward understanding the impacts that this increased environmental regulation will have, this paper will examine the regulatory systems in six Latin American countries with respect to ambient air quality and for each of these countries: review a short history of the air quality problems within the country; outline the legal and institutional framework including key laws and implementing institutions; summarize in brief the current status of the country in terms of program development and implementation; and identify projected future trends. In addition, the paper will briefly review the international treaties that have bearing on Latin American air quality. Finally, the paper will conclude by identifying and exploring emerging trends in individual countries and the region as a whole.

  19. Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order...

  20. Attic Air Sealing Guide - Building America Top Innovation | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to achieving effective energy savings while avoiding pitfalls that can lead to combustion safety and indoor air quality issues. The widely disseminated, DOE-sponsored Guide...

  1. Protocol for Maximizing Energy Savings and Indoor Environmental Quality Improvements when Retrofitting Apartments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noris, Federico; Delp, William W.; Vermeer, Kimberly; Adamkiewicz, Gary; Singer, Brett C.; Fisk, William J.

    2012-06-18

    The current focus on building energy retrofit provides an opportunity to simultaneously improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ). Toward this end, we developed a protocol for selecting packages of retrofits that both save energy and improve IEQ in apartments. The protocol specifies the methodology for selecting retrofits from a candidate list while addressing expected energy savings, IEQ impacts, and costs in an integrated manner. Interviews, inspections and measurements are specified to collect the needed input information. The protocol was applied to 17 apartments in three buildings in two different climates within California. Diagnostic measurements and surveys conducted before and after retrofit implementation indicate enhanced apartment performance.

  2. Determining the Right Air Quality for Your Compressed Air System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Plant Air Air tools, general plant air Instrument Air Laboratories, paint spraying, powder coating, climate control Process Air Food and pharmaceutical process...

  3. WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide and lead are common air

  4. 2013 R&D 100 Award: DNATrax could revolutionize air quality detection and tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farquar, George

    2014-04-03

    A team of LLNL scientists and engineers has developed a safe and versatile material, known as DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol Experiments (DNATrax), that can be used to reliably and rapidly diagnose airflow patterns and problems in both indoor and outdoor venues. Until DNATrax particles were developed, no rapid or safe way existed to validate air transport models with realistic particles in the range of 1-10 microns. Successful DNATrax testing was conducted at the Pentagon in November 2012 in conjunction with the Pentagon Force Protection Agency. This study enhanced the team's understanding of indoor ventilation environments created by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. DNATrax are particles comprised of sugar and synthetic DNA that serve as a bar code for the particle. The potential for creating unique bar-coded particles is virtually unlimited, thus allowing for simultaneous and repeated releases, which dramatically reduces the costs associated with conducting tests for contaminants. Among the applications for the new material are indoor air quality detection, for homes, offices, ships and airplanes; urban particulate tracking, for subway stations, train stations, and convention centers; environmental release tracking; and oil and gas uses, including fracking, to better track fluid flow.

  5. 2013 R&D 100 Award: DNATrax could revolutionize air quality detection and tracking

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Farquar, George

    2014-07-22

    A team of LLNL scientists and engineers has developed a safe and versatile material, known as DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol Experiments (DNATrax), that can be used to reliably and rapidly diagnose airflow patterns and problems in both indoor and outdoor venues. Until DNATrax particles were developed, no rapid or safe way existed to validate air transport models with realistic particles in the range of 1-10 microns. Successful DNATrax testing was conducted at the Pentagon in November 2012 in conjunction with the Pentagon Force Protection Agency. This study enhanced the team's understanding of indoor ventilation environments created by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. DNATrax are particles comprised of sugar and synthetic DNA that serve as a bar code for the particle. The potential for creating unique bar-coded particles is virtually unlimited, thus allowing for simultaneous and repeated releases, which dramatically reduces the costs associated with conducting tests for contaminants. Among the applications for the new material are indoor air quality detection, for homes, offices, ships and airplanes; urban particulate tracking, for subway stations, train stations, and convention centers; environmental release tracking; and oil and gas uses, including fracking, to better track fluid flow.

  6. WearAir: Expressive T-shirts for Air Quality Sensing Sunyoung Kim and Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    and health from people who are less proactively concerned with air quality. AIR POLLUTANT: VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS Different types of air pollutants contribute to air quality in different locations: Ozone, CO, NOx and VOCs are major contributors to outdoor air pollution; and particulate matters, VOCs, carbon monoxide

  7. Indoor Chemical Exposures: Humans' Non-respiratory Interactions with Room Air

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Weschler

    2010-09-01

    March 18, 2010 Berkeley Lab Environmental Energy Technology Division distinguished lecture: The marked difference in pollutant concentrations between an occupied and un-occupied room are only partially explained by human bio-effluents. Humans alter levels of ozone and related oxidants such as nitrate and hydroxyl radicals in the rooms they inhabit; in effect, they change the oxidative capacity of room air. Ozone-initiated reactions on exposed skin, hair and clothing generate products, including potentially irritating chemicals whose concentrations are much higher in the occupant's breathing zone than in the core of the room. Charles J. Weschler is a Professor at the School of Public Health, the Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine and the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI) at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School & Rutgers University (New Jersey). He is also a Visiting Professor at the International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU, Lyngby, Denmark).

  8. Methodological Issues in the Estimation of the Travel, Energy, and Air Quality Impacts of Telecommuting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokhtarian, Patricia; Handy, Susan; Salomon, Ilan

    1995-01-01

    have analyzed the air quality and energy impacts, but mostits travel, air quality, and energy impacts, and illustrateTHE TRAVEL, ENERGY, AND AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF TELECOMMUTING

  9. Air quality VI details environmental progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-12-31

    A report is given of the International Conference on Air Quality VI where key topics discussed were control of mercury, trace elements, sulphur trioxide and particulates. This year a separate track was added on greenhouse gas reduction, with panels on greenhouse gas policy and markets, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration, and monitoring, mitigation and verification. In keynote remarks, NETL Director Carl Bauer noted that emissions have gone down since 1990 even though coal consumption has increased. The conference provided an overview of the state-of-the-science regarding key pollutants and CO{sub 2}, the corresponding regulatory environment, and the technology readiness of mitigation techniques. 1 photo.

  10. PREV'AIR, a modeling platform for the air quality predictability study , C. Honor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    PREV'AIR, a modeling platform for the air quality predictability study Menut L.1 , C. Honoré2 , L Ministère de l'écologie et du développement durable, Paris, France This platform is proposed by the PREV'AIR about PREV'AIR ? please send an e-mail to cecile.honore@ineris.fr 1. Introduction Since 2002, the PREV'AIR

  11. Indoor air pollution from portable kerosene-fired space heaters. [Effects of wick height and fuel consumption rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Dillworth, J.F.; Grimsrud, D.T.

    1983-02-01

    Indoor use of unvented combustion appliances is known to cause an increase in indoor air pollutant levels. Laboratory tests were conducted on radiant and convective portable kerosene-fired space heaters to identify the pollutants they emit and to determine their emission rates. Laboratory-derived CO and NO/sub 2/ emission rates from unvented portable kerosense-fired space heaters are summarized and the effect of wick height and fuel consumption rate on CO and NO/sub 2/ emissions is given. Pollutant concentration profiles resulting from the use of kerosene heaters in a 27m/sup 3/ environmental chamber and a 240m/sup 3/ house are presented. When such heaters are operated for one hour in a 27m/sup 3/ chamber with 0.4 air changes per hour, the resultant CO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above the U.S. occupational standard, and NO/sub 2/ concentrations are well above California's short-term outdoor standard. Further data on parameters such as heater usage patterns and air exchange rates are needed to determine the actual pollutant exposure that kerosene heater users experience.

  12. Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

    The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

  13. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Bittencourt, L. S. (2010) Air movement acceptability limitsthermal acceptability and air movement assessments in a hot-e úmidos. (Applicability of air velocity limits for thermal

  14. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Windsor Conference - Air Conditioning and the Low CarbonA. , Thomas, PC (2010). Air conditioning, comfort and energyAmerica's Romance with Air- Conditioning. Washington, D.C.

  15. New Mexico Guidelines for Public Notification for Air Quality...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico Guidelines for Public Notification for Air Quality Permit Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: New Mexico Guidelines...

  16. Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosar, D.

    1998-01-01

    for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality", that has cascaded into building codes over the early to mid 1990's. There has been a twofold to fourfold increase in outside air requirements for many commercial building applications, compared to the 1981 version...

  17. Improving the Air We Breathe: Prepared by the University of Utah Air Quality Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in levels of short-term (24-hour) particle pollution in the American Lung Association's State of the Air 2014 report. 2 Unhealthy, or "Red" air quality days occur when pollution levels (specifically PM 2 for air quality because of inversions that trap pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter (PM

  18. Indoor airborne bacterial communities are influenced by ventilation, occupancy, and outdoor air source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohannan, Brendan

    , is an energy-efficient way to simultaneously cool building mass and avoid overnight and weekend microbial an intensive temporal study of indoor airborne bacterial communities in a high-traffic university building associated with differing ventilation strategies relevant to modern building design. Our results indicate

  19. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drescher, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  20. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  1. Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation by Erica Bickford A dissertation rights reserved. #12;Abstract Emissions and Air Quality Impacts of Freight Transportation Erica Bickford.S. transportation is the largest source of national nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and the third largest source

  2. AIR FLOW DISTRIBUTION IN A HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL Helmut E. Feustel and Richard C. Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    To provide good indoor air quality or to calculate space conditioning loads for energy consumption for providing sufficient indoor air quality has an impact on the energy consumption of the building. The effect consumption per floor for a 12 story apartment building in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Consumption data have

  3. Performance and Portability of an Air Quality Model Donald Dabdub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Rajit

    and planning for the control of air pollution episodes. The California Institute of Technology (CIT) photochemical model is one such air quality model. It is used to predict the pollution dynamics in the South Coast Air Basin of California. It has also been modified to model pollution in South Korea, Mexico

  4. Listening to Air Quality Sunyoung Kim & Eric Paulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    cities of the developing world, urban air pollution has worsened, which has been detrimental quality with bare human perception as air pollutants are mostly invisible and odorless. We believe in surroundings. INTRODUCTION Urban air pollution is higher in developing countries because they often depend more

  5. Air Pollution - Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ontario Ministry of the Environment The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces...

  6. Proposal for a consulting commission Climate and Air Quality of the Austrian Academy of Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drmota, Michael

    and climate strategies and their relation to air pollution issues · Co-benefit consideration of different issues relating to the atmosphere (air pollution, climate change) and aerosol ­ climate interaction · Exposures to ambient and indoor air pollutants (fine and ultrafine particles) · Epidemiology of disease

  7. United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (6608J) EPA 402-F-12-001 | September 2013 www.epa.gov/radiation/laws/190 "Environmental Radiation Protection Standards discussion about whether to revise the Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power

  8. Integrating affordability, energy and environmental efficiency, air quality and disaster resistance into residential design and construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, G.D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Much has been researched and written about the individual qualities of good home design and construction in terms of: energy efficiency; affordability; indoor air quality; sustainability; and wind, fire, and flood resistance. The real challenge is to integrate all these characteristics into the ideal house. The purpose of this paper is to review the characteristics of each of the above features and explore the integration of them into the ideal residential structure. The house would take the shape of a compact two story structure. A geometrically compact structure uses less construction materials per floor area, presents less area for improved thermal efficiency, and less profile for wind and flood resistance. The first floor would be constructed using insulated strong high thermal mass masonry system resistant to flood, wind, fire, and termite damage. The second story would be constructed using a lighter reinforced wood frame system with between stud insulation coupled with exterior insulated sheathing to minimize thermal bridging across studs. Optimizing floor plan such as separating living and sleeping areas present opportunities for efficient split HVAC zoning, natural ventilation, and solar passive adaptation. The design would emphasize the 4, 8, and 12 foot dimensioning for waste reduction; selection of environmentally friendly building materials, such as cellulose insulation; and efficient lighting and appliances. Features providing improved indoor air quality such as prudent duct selection, design and location, use of radon barriers, omission of carpeting, and control of moisture would be addressed. The design philosophy, concepts and rationale for the integration of these and many other features of the ideal residence will be addressed and illustrated.

  9. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Gas Technology Institute—Des Plaines, IL Partners: -- University of Illinois, Urbana IL -- Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, Chicago IL

  10. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Air conditioning, comfort and energy in India’s CommertialAir conditioning, comfort and energy in India’s Commertialand energy consumption across commercial, office and public buildings in India [

  11. Air Quality Regulations (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as pollution control devices, boilers, fuels and paints at 3,650 facilities that produce air pollution in Pennsylvania. The program administers the rules and regulations of the...

  12. PREV'AIR, a platform for air quality monitoring and fore-, Menut, L.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    with trends in emission levels. Forecasts and observation maps of air pollutants - ozone, nitrogen dioxide on the pollutant. The air quality maps published every day are the result of numerical simula- tions performed using chemistry-transport models that allow the calculation of the evolution of air pollutant

  13. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    ITS-RR-08-28 Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts ofEngineering Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts ofa regional lifecycle analysis of air quality impacts is

  14. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2002-01-01

    resolved before air quality and energy officials can begin3 2. Air Quality Regulation and Energyinitiate. 2. Air Quality Regulation and Energy Efficiency

  15. Evaluation of control strategies for volatile organic compounds in indoor air (journal article)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramanathan, K.; Debler, V.L.

    1988-01-01

    The paper discusses research which evaluates the application of adsorption techniques to the control of indoor organic vapors. The adsorption on activated carbon of three compounds representing three classes of organic species was studied at 30 C in the concentration range zero to 200 ppb using a microbalance. The three were benzene (aromatic), acetaldehyde (oxygenated aliphatic), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (halogenated aliphatic). Three sorbents (a wood base carbon, a coal base carbon, and a coconut shell base carbon) were examined. Uptakes for all the compounds on all the carbons were low (on the order of 10 to the minus 7th power gmol/g carbon). Simulation of a packed bed of carbon indicated that carbon adsorption may not be practical for continuous removal, but may be applicable to sudden releases (e.g., spills). Potential alternatives to activated carbon adsorption are discussed. Potentially toxic organic vapors are emitted from a wide variety of building materials, consumer products, and human activities. Control of indoor organic vapors generally involves removing the source and/or increasing the ventilation rate. The ubiquitous nature of sources of organic vapors generally makes source removal impractical. Increased ventilation causes increased energy usage with its resultant economic penalties. Therefore, practical removal methods are needed.

  16. ECOLOGIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND THE STUDY OF THE INFLUENCE OF AIR QUALITY ON MORTALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selvin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Orcutt, An empirical analysis of air pollution dose-responseIf ecologic regression analysis of air quality and mortality

  17. Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev

    2009-01-01

    E. , (2000). Spectral analysis of air pollutants. Part 1:time series and analyses of air quality model outputs will

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Air Quality Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardizi, Leslee P.; Smith, Richard

    2009-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Air Quality Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Air Quality Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. Regulatory compliance and air quality permitting: Why do firms overcomply?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHart-Davis, Leisha; Bozeman, Barry

    2001-10-01

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Regulatory compliance and air quality permitting: Why do firms overcomply? Leisha DeHart-Davis; Barry Bozeman Journal of Public Administration...Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Regulatory compliance and air quality permitting: Why do firms overcomply? Leisha DeHart-Davis; Barry Bozeman Journal of Public Administration...

  20. Transport Science and the Law Air Quality Applied Sciences Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Contribution" Test 1. Upwind reductions must be "proportional" across all upwind states ­ Cost only used air agencies · Formed in 1967 · Technical and policy support for air quality & climate initiatives #12 satellites detect? 2. Does tighter or different ozone standard mean new strategies? i. Winter VOCs or NOx? ii

  1. Natural Influences of Forestson Local and Regional Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Influences of Forestson Local and Regional Air Quality Emissions and Air Resource smoke from w i l d f i r e and pre- scribed f i r e , emissions associated with concentrated rec- r e s e n t e d a t t h e Symposium on E f f e c t s of Air Effects of smoke on fauna a r e documented

  2. Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candido, Christhina Maria

    2010-01-01

    energy efficiency with the majority of electricity consumption attributed to lighting and air-conditioningair-conditioning and lighting systems without any consideration for energy efficiency

  3. Human comfort and self-estimated performance in relation to indoor environmental parameters and building features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontczak, Monika

    2012-01-01

    caused by indoor air pollution, thermal load and noise.thermal load, low-frequency venti- lation noise and indoor air pollution.

  4. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Air Using Adsorbent Cartridge Followed by High Performancewheel and chemisorbent cartridge, transferring some heat todrawing air through silica gel cartridges coated with 2,4-

  5. CLEARING THE AIR? THE EFFECTS OF GASOLINE CONTENT REGULATION ON AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    gasoline markets and raise prices paid by consumers. We provide the first comprehensive empirical estimatesCLEARING THE AIR? THE EFFECTS OF GASOLINE CONTENT REGULATION ON AIR QUALITY Maximilian Auffhammer and Ryan Kellogg* January 2009 Abstract This paper examines the effects of U.S. gasoline content

  6. Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millstein, Dev

    2009-01-01

    3 Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model aerosoland its role in regional air quality. Science, 311, 67-70.aerosol in Fresno, CA. J. Air Waste Manage. Assoc. , 56,

  7. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    of natural gas-to-hydrogen pathways on urban air quality ofnatural gas extraction and pipeline transport on air qualityas natural gas extraction and oil refining) on air quality

  8. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  9. Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  10. Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kav, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  11. Air Quality 4 4-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    at the Central Steam Facility. 4.1 RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS Federal air quality laws and DOE regulations monitoring is conducted. Figure 4-1 indicates the locations of the monitored facilities for radiological emis radioactive and nonradioactive emissions at several facilities on site to ensure compliance

  12. Studies of urban air quality using electrochemical based sensor instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popoola, Olalekan Abdul Muiz

    2012-07-03

    .............................................................................................. 21 1.6.1. Financial implication of poor air quality in the UK ............................................................ 21 1.6.2. Trends in emission and measurements of CO, NO, O3 and NOX in the UK ....................... 22 1.7. Road transport... emissions of CO and NOX. ................................................................................ 24 1.8. Outline of the thesis .................................................................................................................. 25...

  13. Saving energy and improving IAQ through application of advanced air cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J; Destaillats, H.; Sidheswaran, M.A.

    2011-03-01

    In the future, we may be able use air cleaning systems and reduce rates of ventilation (i.e., reduce rates of outdoor air supply) to save energy, with indoor air quality (IAQ) remaining constant or even improved. The opportunity is greatest for commercial buildings because they usually have a narrower range of indoor pollutant sources than homes. This article describes the types of air cleaning systems that will be needed in commercial buildings.

  14. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, T. M.

    We evaluate how regional characteristics of population and background pollution might impact the selection of optimal air quality model resolution when calculating the human health impacts of changes to air quality. Using ...

  15. Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

  16. Demo Abstract: Common Sense: Participatory Urban Sensing Using a Network of Handheld Air Quality Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Paul M.

    people die each year from the effects of air pollution [6]. Unfortunately, while variations in airDemo Abstract: Common Sense: Participatory Urban Sensing Using a Network of Handheld Air Quality Abstract Poor air quality is a global health issue, causing serious problems like asthma, cancer, and heart

  17. Project Title: Air Quality Monitoring in the Coastal Environment of Miami Professor's name: Xinrong Ren________________________________________ ______ _

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Project Title: Air Quality Monitoring in the Coastal Environment of Miami Professor's name: Xinrong@rsmas.miami.edu _____________________ _ Description of project: In this project, the air quality in Miami has been monitored continuously and characterized in the laboratory prior to the deployment to monitor the air quality. The student participating

  18. Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    Review Satellite remote sensing of surface air quality Randall V. Martin a,b,* a Department 2007 Received in revised form 26 June 2008 Accepted 2 July 2008 Keywords: Remote sensing Air quality Satellite Pollution Emissions a b s t r a c t Satellite remote sensing of air quality has evolved

  19. Risk Assessment Scheme of Infection Transmission Indoors Incorporating the Impact of Resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2015-01-01

    2002; 7. Goldmann DA. Transmission of viral respiratoryScheme of Infection Transmission Indoors 34. Krauter P,nosocomial tuberculosis transmission. Indoor Air, 1998; 8(

  20. Air Quality and Road Emission Results for Fort Stewart, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Randy R.; Driver, Crystal J.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Barfuss, Brad C.

    2004-02-02

    The Directorate of Public Works Environmental & Natural Resources Division (Fort Stewart /Hunter Army Airfield) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to monitor particulate matter (PM) concentrations on Fort Stewart, Georgia. The purpose of this investigation was to establish a PM sampling network using monitoring equipment typically used in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ''saturation sampling'', to determine air quality on the installation. In this initial study, the emphasis was on training-generated PM, not receptor PM loading. The majority of PM samples were 24-hr filter-based samples with sampling frequency ranging from every other day, to once every six days synchronized with the EPA 6th day national sampling schedule. Eight measurement sites were established and used to determine spatial variability in PM concentrations and evaluate whether fluctuations in PM appear to result from training activities and forest management practices on the installation. Data collected to date indicate the average installation PM2.5 concentration is lower than that of nearby urban Savannah, Georgia. At three sites near the installation perimeter, analyses to segregate PM concentrations by direction of air flow across the installation boundary indicate that air (below 80 ft) leaving the installation contains less PM2.5 than that entering the installation. This is reinforced by the observation that air near the ground is cleaner on average than the air at the top of the canopy.

  1. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tringe, Susannah

    2009-01-01

    independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air ofthat the indoor air microbes are not random transients fromhealth policies. Airborne microbes are often attached to

  2. Strategies and Technologies for Improving Air Quality Around Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammad Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    urbanair/ 2. Lewtas, J. Air pollution combustion emissions:Lewtas. Air pollution combustion emissions: Characterization

  3. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  4. Air Quality Modeling in the South Coast Air Basin of California: What Do the Numbers Really Mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    photochemical air quality models are used by regulatory agencies to design emission control strategies that lead models. For instance, it reported statistical errors in the prediction of O3 and NOx concentration and emission controls. Fine et al.2 identified different sources of uncertainty on air quality models

  5. Participatory Patterns in an International Air Quality Monitoring Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sîrbu, Alina; Caminiti, Saverio; De Baets, Bernard; Elen, Bart; Francis, Louise; Gravino, Pietro; Hotho, Andreas; Ingarra, Stefano; Loreto, Vittorio; Molino, Andrea; Mueller, Juergen; Peters, Jan; Ricchiuti, Ferdinando; Saracino, Fabio; Servedio, Vito D P; Stumme, Gerd; Theunis, Jan; Tria, Francesca; Bossche, Joris Van den

    2015-01-01

    The issue of sustainability is at the top of the political and societal agenda, being considered of extreme importance and urgency. Human individual action impacts the environment both locally (e.g., local air/water quality, noise disturbance) and globally (e.g., climate change, resource use). Urban environments represent a crucial example, with an increasing realization that the most effective way of producing a change is involving the citizens themselves in monitoring campaigns (a citizen science bottom-up approach). This is possible by developing novel technologies and IT infrastructures enabling large citizen participation. Here, in the wider framework of one of the first such projects, we show results from an international competition where citizens were involved in mobile air pollution monitoring using low cost sensing devices, combined with a web-based game to monitor perceived levels of pollution. Measures of shift in perceptions over the course of the campaign are provided, together with insights int...

  6. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    and radon from the outgassing of building materials. Theproblems with the outgassing of formaldehyde from One methodbecause of formaldehyde outgassing from building materials

  7. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Energy Group Consol Net Zero Energy Certified The ThousandEnergy Institute, 2012) Net-Zero Energy Certified (Zero Netare: Passive House Net-zero energy home Green certified home

  8. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    in building energy research projects, and have beenof “energy efficient”. Later research projects in Rochester,Research and the Literature .. 117 Table 40 Project Summary Information . 140 Table 41 Energy and

  9. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    1de hyde Adhesives Organics Paint Mercury, Organics Buildingorganics emitted from common building materials such as adhesives, sealants, paints,of paint, var- nish. pesticides, and various organic

  10. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Baseboard heaters Portable space heater HRV supply duct # ofX HRV supply duct Portable space heater X X X Baseboard X Xwall heater – § I Portable space heater – § J Heat Pump

  11. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    of Improved Residential Furnace Filtration on Airbornefor next 15 minutes. Inspect furnace Inspect water heaterfor appliance monitoring: Furnace, water heater, range hood.

  12. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    as 0.5 ppm when one top burner was operated for less than 300.25 ach) when using two bUrners for 16 minutes. Similargas stove overs and top burners are shown in Tables 4 and 5,

  13. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    iii. Serial number: iv. Burner rating: Visual Inspection: c.doors present on the burner compartments? _____Yes _____Nocompartment, with no burners on. iv. Light the 4 burners on

  14. INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND ENERGY EFFICIENT VENTILATION RATES AT A NEW YORK CITY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    same. Carbon monoxide ~s produced from incomplete combustionmonoxide, carbon dioxide, and many organic compounds are products of combustion.

  15. IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollowell, Craig D.

    2011-01-01

    and Carbon Monoxide Several recent field and laboratory studies at various laboratories have focused on combustion-

  16. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels. Carbon monoxideCombustion Appliance Zone California Energy Commission Central Fan Integrated Supply Cubic Feet per Minute Carbon Monoxide

  17. Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    was assumed that a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) was usedand that the HRV was connected to the home’s central heating

  18. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    significantly less than expected. HRV+CFIS Airflows measuredthroughout the home were less than expected. HRVERV HRV Ductwork was connected to the unit backwards.

  19. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    and DiMattio, American Industrial Hygiene Association, "76:471. American Industrial Hygiene Association, "Community

  20. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    operating system and the INGRES data base management system,management system to support a single controlled vocabulary able to index any bibliographic citation maintained in the data base.

  1. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    used either natural gas or propane for cooktop fuel. Of the1302 Cooktop Fuel Type Gas Propane Electric - ResistanceFuel Type Gas Electric Propane Cooktop and Oven Together

  2. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    or another appliance? No propane All combustion appliancesuse propane Some combustion appliances use propane Don’t

  3. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    and optional sustainability and energy performance standardsSustainability Classification Deep Energy Retrofit Green Certified Passive House Net-Zero Energy “Very High Performance”sustainability improvements in existing housing is central to current models for green building and high performance

  4. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Occupant Behavior ..commissioning and occupant behavior caused other potentialas an option for tracking occupant behavior, but they were

  5. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01

    RESIDENTiAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL 18,95 Quadsregulations; COMMERCIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION DATA (1976) TOTAL

  6. Heat Pipe Impact on Dehumidification, Indoor Air Quality and Energy Savings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, J. T.

    1996-01-01

    for dehumidification, precooling, reheating and heat recovery. FIGURE 1. A SIMPLE HEAT BACKGROUND AND OVERVIEW The use of heat pipes dates back to the turn of the century. Heat pipes, also termed Perkins pipes, are heat transfer devices which work by means... stream_source_info ESL-HH-96-05-44.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 15385 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name ESL-HH-96-05-44.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 HEAT PIPE IMPACT...

  7. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    a 3,785 L (1,000 gal) solar storage tank to supply spacestorage tanks serve as solar storage, pre-heat, buffer andthe incorporation of solar energy demands storage MS Thesis,

  8. Indoor Air Quality in 24 California Residences Designed as High Performance Green Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Less, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    Cook top ventilation in passive House/LEED home. (2010).Berkeley National Lab. Passive House Institute U.S. (2011).What is a passive house? Retrieved 11/23, 2012, from http://

  9. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s sconveyance of9, 2013 ASER Web Addresses

  10. Texas Air Quality and the Role of Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edlund, C.

    2012-01-01

    old 4 Powerpoint Templates Page 5 SUMMER PEAK DAY LOAD SHAPE WITH FUEL MIX Natural Gas Wind Nuclear Hydro August 3, 2011 Other DC Imports Coal Energy Price 80,000 $3,500 $3001 70,000 $3,000 60,000 $2,500 Natural Gas... Page 1 Carl E. Edlund, P.E. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Dallas, Texas October 10, 2012 Powerpoint Templates Page 2 TEXAS AIR QUALITY UPDATE FOCUS: CRITERIA POLLUTANTS , GHG EMISSIONS AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY OTHER: MATS, CAIR...

  11. MCA 75-2 - Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:Lowell Point,Massachusetts:Kansas:M1Remains2 - Air Quality

  12. 5 CCR 1001 - Air Quality Control | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | Open Energy Information 55 et - Air Quality

  13. Parametric Evaluation of an Innovative Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) Air Cleaning Technology for Indoor Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-01-01

    obtained by TD-GC/MS analysis of air samples collectedobtained by TD-GC/MS analysis of air samples collected

  14. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Health Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution. University ofon-road motor vehicles to urban air pollution using travelurban air pollution, zero emission vehicle (ZEV) mandates

  15. Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    Particulate air quality model predictions using prognostic vs. diagnostic meteorology in central a , Michael J. Kleeman c,* a Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, 1 Prognostic meteorological fields Data assimilation UCD/CIT air quality model California Regional Particulate

  16. Pullman's Weather and Air Quality Station James O'Malley, Brian Lamb, Tom Jobson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Pullman's Weather and Air Quality Station James O'Malley, Brian Lamb, Tom Jobson Thanks, and to Dr. Shelley N. Pressley. To monitor air quality in Pullman, the Laboratory for Atmospheric Research at Washington State University has operated a combined air monitoring and weather station located on the roof

  17. The effects of wildfire atmospheric emissions on regional air quality using current and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    . These species either directly affect the air Figure 4. Percentages and the amounts of pollutants emittedThe effects of wildfire atmospheric emissions on regional air quality using current and future of wildfire emissions on air quality is modeled using the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling framework: Meteorological

  18. An Investigation of the Limitations in Plume Rise Models used in Air Quality Forecast Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    are important for predicting pollutants regulated by National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). NAAQS pollutants, include CO, NO2, PM2.5, PM10, O3, and SO2, are considered deleterious to public health and airAn Investigation of the Limitations in Plume Rise Models used in Air Quality Forecast Systems 1

  19. Impact of Hydrated Cement Paste Quality and Entrained Air-Void

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Hydrated Cement Paste Quality and Entrained Air-Void System on the Durability of Concrete the characteristics of the entrained air-void system #12;Objectives · Review the current accepted relationship between is affected by the quality of the hydrated cement paste (HCP) and the presence of a properly entrained air

  20. Simplified methodology for indoor environment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srebric, Jelena, 1970-

    2000-01-01

    Current design of the building indoor environment uses averaged single parameters such as air velocity, air temperature or contaminant concentration. This approach gives only general information about thermal comfort and ...

  1. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  2. Using the Air Void Analyzer for Real-Time Quality Control Adjustments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2006 Using the Air Void Analyzer for Real-Time Quality Control Adjustments in the Field Tech Brief by Jim Grove, P.E. Bob Steffes Mark Anderson-Wilk Overview of the Air Void Analyzer The air void analyzer (AVA) with its independent isolation base can be used to accurately evaluate the air void system

  3. A Self-Consistent Method to Assess Air Quality Co-Benefits from US Climate Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saari, R.

    Air quality co-benefits can potentially reduce the costs of greenhouse gas mitigation. However, while many studies of the cost of greenhouse gas mitigation model the full macroeconomic welfare impacts, most studies of air ...

  4. There's no justice in transit! : transit equity, land use, and air quality in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machala, Laura Beth

    2007-01-01

    As a result of air pollution created by the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), aka "the Big Dig," transit and other air quality mitigation projects were incorporated into the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The SIP is ...

  5. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air qualityas natural gas extraction and oil re?ning) on air quality inquality impacts for three different hydrogen production and delivery pathways, based on steam methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas,

  6. EPA Tribal Training and Outreach Support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications to provide training, and technical and outreach support for the American Indian Air Quality Training Program.

  7. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    as natural gas extraction and oil re?ning) on air quality inemission emission emission emission emission Oil extractionTanker delivery Oil refinery Pipeline Storage Truck

  8. Air Quality Impacts of Liquefied Natural Gas in the South Coast Air Basin of California Marc Carerras-Sospedra1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Air Quality Impacts of Liquefied Natural Gas in the South Coast Air Basin of California Marc. These volumes contribute to the total natural gas supply to the SoCalGas/SDG&E system of 76 million Nm3 /day for a typical summer demand in 2023, and 91 million Nm3 /day for the estimated maximum demand. b) Natural Gas

  9. The role of Health Impact Assessment in the setting of air quality standards: An Australian perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickett, Jeffery; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Katscherian, Dianne; Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia ; Harris, Patrick

    2013-11-15

    The approaches used for setting or reviewing air quality standards vary from country to country. The purpose of this research was to consider the potential to improve decision-making through integration of HIA into the processes to review and set air quality standards used in Australia. To assess the value of HIA in this policy process, its strengths and weaknesses were evaluated aligned with review of international processes for setting air quality standards. Air quality standard setting programmes elsewhere have either used HIA or have amalgamated and incorporated factors normally found within HIA frameworks. They clearly demonstrate the value of a formalised HIA process for setting air quality standards in Australia. The following elements should be taken into consideration when using HIA in standard setting. (a) The adequacy of a mainly technical approach in current standard setting procedures to consider social determinants of health. (b) The importance of risk assessment criteria and information within the HIA process. The assessment of risk should consider equity, the distribution of variations in air quality in different locations and the potential impacts on health. (c) The uncertainties in extrapolating evidence from one population to another or to subpopulations, especially the more vulnerable, due to differing environmental factors and population variables. (d) The significance of communication with all potential stakeholders on issues associated with the management of air quality. In Australia there is also an opportunity for HIA to be used in conjunction with the NEPM to develop local air quality standard measures. The outcomes of this research indicated that the use of HIA for air quality standard setting at the national and local levels would prove advantageous. -- Highlights: • Health Impact Assessment framework has been applied to a policy development process. • HIA process was evaluated for application in air quality standard setting. • Advantages of HIA in the air quality standard setting process are demonstrated.

  10. Analysis of a wet scrubber network in the air remediation of industrial workplaces: benefit for the city air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Curci, Gabriele; Monaco, Alessio; De Giovanni, Marina; Giammaria, Franco; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Industrial activities carried out in confined spaces are characterized by a very specific type of air pollution. The extended exposure to this kind of pollution is often highly harmful, resulting in dramatic effects both on health and safety aspects. The indoor industrial abatement systems, adopted to purify the air, are typically applied to the emission points. The processed air is subsequently emitted outside. In this study we present the experimental results of three-stage wet scrubber systems installed in the industrial workplace of a (i) fiberglass processing plant, where the highest exposure levels to volatile compounds are nowadays today monitored,and of a (ii) waste-to-energy plant, characterized by a very high particulate matter level. The adopted technology, to be used as complementing strategy,does not require special disposal procedures and the processed air is re-emitted in the same work environment for the benefit of the work operators. The operation of the scrubbers network during the working a...

  11. Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 513529 Air quality prediction in Milan: feed-forward neural networks,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corani, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 513­529 Air quality prediction in Milan: feed-forward neural December 2004; accepted 3 January 2005 Abstract Ozone and PM10 constitute the major concern for air quality of Milan. This paper addresses the problem of the prediction of such two pollutants, using to this end

  12. Emission factor estimation in regional air quality studies of residential natural gas fuel interchangeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Emission factor estimation in regional air quality studies of residential natural gas fuel applicable to investigations of modeling the effect of natural gas interchangeability on urban air quality for natural gas burner emissions data. The method is built to compensate for the typically small sample size

  13. Real-time Air Quality Monitoring Through Mobile Sensing in Metropolitan Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iftode, Liviu

    . General Terms Measurement, Design, Experimentation, Human Factors. Keywords Air Quality, Pollution, Urban levels in the urban and suburban settings. According to the US EPA [3], the six common air pollutants. These are called the criteria pollutants and thus are required to be measured to tell us how healthy the air

  14. New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    New Study Finds Strong Carbon Pollution Standards Improve Air Quality, Environment, and Health, Co- benefits of Carbon Standards: Air Pollution Changes under Different 111d Options for Existing-by-state changes in harmful air pollution, it is the first study to quantify and map the co-benefits of power plant

  15. On the Challenge of Creating and Communicating Air Quality Information: A Case for Environmental Engineers*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möbius, Bernd

    , development of air pollutant concentration assessment and interpretation techniques, which must be tailored, with a possible refer- ence to general background information on the nature of the individual air pollutantOn the Challenge of Creating and Communicating Air Quality Information: A Case for Environmental

  16. Ontologies for the Integration of Air Quality Models and 3D City Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    -city densification may limit air pollution, carbon emissions, and energy use through reduced transportation of the most important environmental problems is air pollution, mostly induced by vehicle traffic1 Ontologies for the Integration of Air Quality Models and 3D City Models Claudine Metral Institut

  17. Comparing air quality impacts of hydrogen and gasoline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    pathways Light duty ?eet Urban air pollution 1. Introductionof light duty gasoline ?eets to urban air pollution usingThe PM 10 pollution is the least accurate in the light duty

  18. The Center for Indoor Environments and Health's specific mission is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    pollutants and materials Outdoor air contaminants (including diesel particulates) and materials brought for Indoor Environments and Health #12;Why are building communities struggling with managing indoor air air problems? Design Structures built slab on grade, and/or with flat roofs with poor drainage

  19. Texas Air Quality Status and the Texas Emission Reduction Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, S.

    2012-01-01

    in eligible areas. With recent legislation, the TERP also supports programs to encourage the use of alternative fuels for transportation in Texas. Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ? Galveston, Texas ? October 10, 2012 Clean Air... Transportation Triangle (CTT) (new) ? Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Grant Program (TNGVGP) (new) ? Alternative Fueling Facilities Program (AFFP) (new) ? New Technology Implementation Grants (NTIG) Program ? Texas Clean School Bus Program Clean Air Through...

  20. Application of WRF/Chem-MADRID for real-time air quality forecasting over the Southeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang

    States Ming-Tung Chuang a , Yang Zhang a,*, Daiwen Kang b a Air Quality Forecasting Lab, North Carolina on a three-dimensional air quality model provides a powerful tool to forecast air quality and advise, inaccuracies in simulated meteorological variables such as 2-m temperature, 10-m wind speed, and precipitation

  1. Air Quality Impacts of Some Alternative Vehicle Options UC Irvine National Fuel Cell Research Center 1 March 28, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Air Quality Impacts of Some Alternative Vehicle Options UC Irvine National Fuel Cell Research of California, Irvine (UCI) #12;Air Quality Impacts of Some Alternative Vehicle Options UC Irvine National Fuel.......................................................................................................... 37 #12;Air Quality Impacts of Some Alternative Vehicle Options UC Irvine National Fuel Cell Research

  2. H.N. Knudsen, P. Wargocki and J. Vondruskova (2006) "Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    quality of air polluted by building materials ­ a summary of reported data", Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2006, Vol. 1, 57-62. #12;#12;Effect of ventilation on perceived quality of air polluted existing data on how varying ventilation rates affect the perceived quality of air polluted by building

  3. Atmospheric composition change - global and regional air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    in urban air. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2881–deep convective system. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 4,processes in atmospheric chemistry. Chemical Society Review

  4. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  5. A response surface model of the air quality impacts of aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma?ek, Tudor

    2008-01-01

    Aviation demand is expected to double in the coming decades, and there are growing concerns about its impacts on the environment. Governments seek to mitigate the impacts of aviation on climate, air quality, and noise by ...

  6. Quantification of the impact of climate uncertainty on regional air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, K.-J.

    Uncertainties in calculated impacts of climate forecasts on future regional air quality are investigated using downscaled MM5 meteorological fields from the NASA GISS and MIT IGSM global models and the CMAQ model in 2050 ...

  7. The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok, Akshay

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

  8. How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    · How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

  9. Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Clean Air and Environmental Quality Volume 40 No.2. May 2006 43 POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF AIR POLLUTION AEROSOLS ON PRECIPITATION IN AUSTRALIA Potential impacts of air pollution aerosols on precipitation that anthropogenic air pollution downwind of urban and industrial developments affects clouds microphysics

  10. A new method for evaluating regional air quality1 H. F. Dacre3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacre, Helen

    , to determine the suitability of new pollution10 source sites and to inform decisions on air pollution strategyA new method for evaluating regional air quality1 forecasts2 H. F. Dacre3 Department of Meteorology of the pollutant field. The SAL method is able to quantify errors in the predicted size and shape of the pol

  11. Linking Satellite Ammonia Retrievals with the AIRPACT Air Quality Modeling System.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Linking Satellite Ammonia Retrievals with the AIRPACT Air Quality Modeling System. 1 Ayrton Bryan program under grant number 0754990 Introduction Ammonia (NH3) is an important atmospheric pollutant to retrieve ammonia spectra and derive nadir profiles. AIRPACT (Air Indicator Report for Public Awareness

  12. Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    are calculated with R, a language for statistical computing. The routine STEP in R is used to remove variablesStatistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Annemiek Pijnappel De Bilt, 2011 | Stageverslag #12;#12;Statistical post processing of model output from the air

  13. Small Business Air Quality Compliance Assistance Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A small business stationary source that is owned or operated by a person that employs 100 or fewer individuals, is not a major stationary source (as defined by the federal Clean Air Act), does not...

  14. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Monitoring in Sixteen Relocatable Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael; Michael G. Apte, Bourassa Norman, David Faulkner, Alfred T. Hodgson,; Toshfumi Hotchi, Michael Spears, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Duo Wang

    2008-01-01

    Working with industry, a prototype improved heat pump airWorking with industry, a prototype improved heat pump airindustry has been incrementally addressing the classroom noise levels generated by the wall mount heat pump

  15. Analysis of Cold Air Distribution System in an Office Building by the Numerical Simulation Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian, Y.; Li, D.; Xu, H.; Ma, X.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out in this paper to calculate indoor air patterns, which include angles of inlet direction and induced ratios in a typical official room. According to the simulation results, the indoor air distribution and indoor...

  16. Building Pressure Control in VAV System with Relief Air Fan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, X.; Liu, M.; Zheng, B.

    2005-01-01

    Building Pressure Control in VAV Systems with Relief Air Fan Xiufeng Pang, Mingsheng Liu, PhD, P.E., Bin Zheng University of Nebraska, Lincoln—ESL 1110 So. 67 th St, Omaha, NE, 68182 Abstract Building pressure control is critical... to energy conservation and indoor air quality by preventing excessive infiltration or exfiltration. In the supply and the return/relief fan Air Handling Unit (AHU) system, better space pressurization can be achieved when return/relief fan operates...

  17. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Indoor Air 1993, Helsinki. IPMVP IEQ Committee. 1999. Indooruse can also improve IEQ (IPMVP 1998, Fisk and Rosenfeld

  18. The Impact of Climate Change on Air QualityRelated Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I: Present Time Simulation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Hua

    The Impact of Climate Change on Air Quality­Related Meteorological Conditions in California. Part I on meteorology and air quality conditions in Cal- ifornia by dynamically downscaling Parallel Climate Model (PCM: Present Time Simulation Analysis ZHAN ZHAO Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University

  19. Moving air for comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Turner, Stephen; Zhang, Hui; Paliaga, Gwelen

    2009-01-01

    Brager, L. Zagreus. 2007, “Air movement preferences observed709-731. 9. Toftum, J. 2004. “Air movement – good or bad? ”Indoor Air 14, pp 40-45. 10. Gong, N. , K. Tham, A. Melikov,

  20. Hamilton study: distribution of factors confounding the relationship between air quality and respiratory health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengelly, L.D.; Kerigan, A.T.; Goldsmith, C.H.; Inman, E.M.

    1984-10-01

    Hamilton, Ontario is an industrial city with a population of 300,000 which is situated at the western end of Lake Ontario. Canada's two largest iron and steel mills are located here; the city historically has had relatively poor air quality, which has improved markedly in the last 25 years. Concern about the health effects of current air quality recently led us to carry out an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution on the respiratory health of over 3500 school children. Respiratory health was measured by pulmonary function testing of each child, and by an assessment of each child's respiratory symptoms via a questionnaire administered to the parents. Previous studies had shown that other environmental factors (e.g. parental smoking, parental cough, socioeconomic level, housing, and gas cooking) might also affect respiratory health, and thus confound any potential relationships between health and air pollution. The questionnaire also collected information on many of these confounding factors. For the purposes of initial analysis, the city was divided into five areas in which differences in air quality were expected. In general, factors which have been associated with poor respiratory health were observed to be more prevalent in areas of poorer air quality.

  1. RAPID/Geothermal/Air Quality/Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsourceBulkTransmission/Environment/Nevada < RAPID‎RAPID/BulkTransmission/SiteWaterRAPID/Geothermal/Air

  2. Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

    2006-01-01

    non-uniform so that residents usually feel uncomfortable. The distribution of indoor airflow by cold air distribution is researched in this paper. We study indoor air distribution under different low temperature air supply conditions by numerical...

  3. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01

    4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

  4. Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by generating fewer emissions from electricity production. These benefits, however, are difficult quality planning process. If a model were available to accurately predict the decrease in temperature and detailed manner is important if heat island control strategies are to be viewed as "quantifiable

  5. Overview of ozone human exposure and health risk analyses used in the U.S. EPA's review of the ozone air quality standard.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitfield, R. G.

    1999-03-04

    This paper presents an overview of the ozone human exposure and health risk analyses developed under sponsorship of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These analyses are being used in the current review of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for ozone. The analyses consist of three principal steps: (1) estimating short-term ozone exposure for particular populations (exposure model); (2) estimating population response to exposures or concentrations (exposure-response or concentration-response models); and (3) integrating concentrations or exposure with concentration-response or exposure-response models to produce overall risk estimates (risk model). The exposure model, called the probabilistic NAAQS exposure model for ozone (pNEM/03), incorporates the following factors: hourly ambient ozone concentrations; spatial distribution of concentrations; ventilation state of individuals at time of exposure; and movement of people through various microenvironments (e.g., outdoors, indoors, inside a vehicle) of varying air quality. Exposure estimates are represented by probability distributions. Exposure-response relationships have been developed for several respiratory symptom and lung function health effects, based on the results of controlled human exposure studies. These relationships also are probabilistic and reflect uncertainties associated with sample size and variability of response among subjects. The analyses also provide estimates of excess hospital admissions in the New York City area based on results from an epidemiology study. Overall risk results for selected health endpoints and recently analyzed air quality scenarios associated with alternative 8-hour NAAQS and the current 1-hour standard for outdoor children are used to illustrate application of the methodology.

  6. Washington Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit Regulatory Handbook |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,VillageWarren Park, Indiana:Open Energy Information Air

  7. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Air Quality | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintasNEPA TimelinesBulkTransmission/Air

  8. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  9. Air Quality Scoping Study for Sarcobatus Flat, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  10. A model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linden, Paul F.

    ; improved thermal comfort; improved ventilation efficiency and indoor air quality; reduced energy useA model for an under floor air distribution system Y.J.P. Lina,*, P.F. Lindenb a Energy gains that occur above the occupied zone are isolated from the calculation of the required space supply

  11. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2002-01-01

    LBNL-49750 Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air QualityStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings (www.aceee.org), and

  12. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vine, Edward

    2002-01-01

    reductions from energy-efficiency building technologies andreductions from energy-efficiency building technologies andLBNL-49750 Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality

  13. New Mexico Air Quality Universal Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio: EnergyHavenInformationMarket,Meadows,Quality

  14. WDEQ-Air Quality Division | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho)Vossloh Kiepe Jump to: navigation,Quality Division

  15. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore »measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO? concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10? data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.

  17. Mold: An Indoor Air Pollutant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Janie

    2002-07-08

    the right conditions they begin to grow. The food source can be any organic material such as dust, books, papers, animal dander, soap scum, wood, particle board, paint, wallpaper, carpet and upholstery. When such materials stay damp (especially in dark... mold that grows on wet materials containing cellulose. Stachybotrys is one of several molds that produce potent mycotoxins (toxic sub- stances). How does mold affect health? Most people have few difficulties when exposed to mold spores...

  18. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    acrolein, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,4- dichlorobenzene,1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzene, and 1,3-butadiene are specificacetaldehyde *butadiene, 1,3- *dichlorobenzene, 1,4- benzyl

  19. Health Hazards in Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    acrolein, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,4- dichlorobenzene,benzene, and 1,3-butadiene are specific products.acetaldehyde *butadiene, 1,3- *dichlorobenzene, 1,4- benzyl

  20. Integrated Technology Air Cleaners (ITAC): Design and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Cohn, Sebastian; Destaillats, Hugo; Henzel, Victor; Sidheswaran, Meera; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2013-09-13

    The primary objective of this project was to design, build, and test an air cleaner for residential use with the potential to substantially improve indoor air quality, or maintain indoor air quality unchanged, when outdoor air ventilation rates are reduced to save energy. Two air cleaners were designed and fabricated. The design targets for airflow rate, fan power, and projected cost were met. In short term laboratory studies, both units performed as expected; however, during field studies in homes, the formaldehyde removal performance of the air cleaners was much lower than expected. In subsequent laboratory studies, incomplete decomposition of some indoor air volatile organic compounds, with formaldehyde as a product of partial decomposition of volatile organic compounds, was confirmed as the explanation for the poor formaldehyde removal performance in the field studies. The amount of formaldehyde produced per unit of decomposition of other volatile organic compounds was substantially diminished by increasing the amount of catalyst on the filter and also by decreasing the air velocity. Together, these two measures reduced formaldehyde production, per unit destruction of other volatile organic compounds, by a factor of four, while increasing the removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds by a factor of 1.4. A company with a southern California office is conducting studies in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with the goal of incorporating the ITAC catalytic air cleaning technology in their future commercial products.

  1. Subtask 2.12 - Air Quality Assessment and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Raymond

    2007-07-30

    Past particulate matter (PM) research projects conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center included data on PM size, morphology, and chemistry. The objective of this project was to improve automated analysis capabilities of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer. The SEM is now able to perform particle-by-particle analysis on the desired number of particles and provide size, morphology, and chemistry information for each particle. A new x-ray and image analysis system was purchased and implemented for improvements to data acquisition and analysis. This new analysis system is equipped with a digital-pulse processor, allowing for the determination of pixel-by-pixel chemistry, which significantly enhances our ability to characterize PM and other materials. In addition, this system is personal computer-based, which allows programming of the SEM to perform the automated image analysis along with detailed chemical information. This permits the incorporation of particle classification algorithms within the same computer system as the analysis is conducted. Additionally, the new Spirit software can now integrate full SEM control with imaging, elemental identification, and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) operation. The EBSD system has also allowed for phase identification within the SEM. Reexamination of previous samples collected on a polycarbonate filter for ambient-air PM2.5 analysis has shown that crystalline identification of individual particles can be done without further sample preparation or modification of the sample and/or sampling substrate.

  2. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01

    In Review J. Indoor Air) 2007 LBNL-63193 Tarantola, Albert,Gas Measurement to Determine Air Movements in a House,Measurement Techniques”, Air Infiltration and Ventilation

  3. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 56185635 Air quality impacts of distributed power generation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    2007-01-01

    analysis; Spatial sensitivity 1. Introduction Distributed energy resources (DER) have the potential is expected. The use of these distributed generation (DG) resources results in multiple stationary powerAtmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 5618­5635 Air quality impacts of distributed power generation

  4. IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 IMPACT OF LOW-EMISSION DIESEL ENGINES ON UNDERGROUND MINE AIR QUALITY Susan T. Bagley1, Winthrop-1295 2 Department of Mechanical Engineering, Center for Diesel Research, University of Minnesota, 111, however, is providing the report on its Website because it is important for parties interested in diesel

  5. Airborne cloud condensation nuclei measurements during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    Administration WP3D platform during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition indirectly influence climate through their impact on cloud radiative properties and the hydro- logical cycle and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of EngineeringCenter for Environmental Research and Techno

  6. A Portable Low-Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Sophie

    species: CO, NO, O3, SO2, NO2 (electrochemical (EC) at 2 s) CO2 and total VOCs (optical at 10 s). · Size stations outside LHR (all CO2, sizeA Portable Low-Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport Olalekan

  7. Air Quality Impacts of Distributed Energy Resources Implemented in the Northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations reach 3 g/m3 and are located off the coast of New JerseyAir Quality Impacts of Distributed Energy Resources Implemented in the Northeastern United States and Energy Program, National Fuel Cell Research Center, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, University

  8. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle

  9. Intercontinental influence of NOx and CO emissions on particulate matter air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickley, Loretta J.

    Intercontinental influence of NOx and CO emissions on particulate matter air quality Eric M emissions and hence already high levels of PM. US NOx and CO emissions increase annual mean PM in northern in China it is mostly as nitrate. East Asian NOx and CO emissions have a weaker intercontinental influence

  10. Ensemble-based air quality forecasts: A multimodel approach applied to ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    Ensemble-based air quality forecasts: A multimodel approach applied to ozone Vivien Mallet1 21 September 2006. [1] The potential of ensemble techniques to improve ozone forecasts ozone-monitoring networks. We found that several linear combinations of models have the potential

  11. Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts* Tammy M interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

  12. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, David T.

    2009-01-01

    to mount the passive samplers in a house. designed describedhouses screened for study List of Figures A.l A.2 A.3 A.4 PassivePassive Sampler Sampler Girman/Allen Girman/Allen Wednesday 16 November Test house (

  13. A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon monoxide originates from incomplete combustion ofcarbon monoxide poisoning caused by faulty combustion

  14. A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    Range: NR* Average: Range: Week 1. No HRV operating Week 2.With HRV operating in Test Room Black and Worthan, 1995.classroom in School A before the HRV was operated. The C 0

  15. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, David T.

    2009-01-01

    sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration under ContractReport prepared for Bonneville Power Administration, #85544.Report to Bonneville Power Administration D.T. Grimsrud,

  16. A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    in Maine. C 0 levels measured using passive dosimeter tubes.1250 dosimeters mailed;473 dosimeters returned. 2300 ppm Percentage greater than:

  17. A Survey and Critical Review of the Literature on Indoor Air Quality, Ventilation and Health Symptoms in Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisey, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    ALA believes that asthma causes children to experience 16potential causes of SBS symptoms as well as asthma. Amongthe causes of SBS and other health effects, such as asthma,

  18. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, David T.

    2009-01-01

    by Bonneville Power Administration under Contract No. DE-for Bonneville Power Administration, #85544. Jardinier, P. (to Bonneville Power Administration D.T. Grimsrud, September

  19. Measured Cooling Season Results Relating the Impact of Mechanical Ventilation on Energy, Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality in Humid Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Eric; Amos, Bryan; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Widder, Sarah H.; Fonorow, Ken

    2014-08-22

    Conference Paper for ACEEE Summer Study in Buildings discussing results to date of a project evaluating the impact of ventialtion on energy use, comfort, durability, and cost in the hot humid climate.

  20. Advanced chemistry-transport modeling and observing systems allow daily air quality observations, short-term forecasts, and real-time analyses of air quality at the global and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , French legislation has been adapted in such a way that the local authorities in charge of air pollution can now inform the public and take emergency decisions re- lated to air pollution control not onlyOLOGICAL SOCIETy | #12;air quality monitoring system. In case of a pollution episode, when concentrations exceed

  1. The CitiSense Air Quality Monitoring Mobile Sensor Node Piero Zappi, Elizabeth Bales, Jing Hong Park, William Griswold and Tajana Simuni Rosing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    conditions than the national ambient air quality standard [1]. Current air pollutant measurement networks. For example, The San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD) maintains only five air pollutant samplingThe CitiSense Air Quality Monitoring Mobile Sensor Node Piero Zappi, Elizabeth Bales, Jing Hong

  2. Central Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Air supply and return ducts come from indoors through the home's exterior wall or roof to connect with the packaged air conditioner, which is usually located outdoors....

  3. Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 the effect on China's ozone air quality from 2000-2050 global15 changes in climate and anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean

  4. Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a,*, Daniel J. Jacob a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Ozone air quality measurement requirements for a geostationary satellite mission Peter Zoogman a Accepted 23 May 2011 Keywords: Air quality Ozone Kalman filter Assimilation Remote sensing a b s t r a c satellite measurements of ozone in different spectral regions to constrain surface ozone concentrations

  5. Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong SAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 ­ 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong Composition of MSW at the beginning of the 21st century in China #12;Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 ­ 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong SAR PS-18- 2 Composition of MSW Composition

  6. Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and major cities2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    1 Sensitivity of air quality to potential future climate change and emissions in the United1 States and future air quality is compared for the years 2006-2010 and17 2048-2052 over the contiguous United States affected by changes in climate, land use and pollutant38 emissions [Weaver et al., 2009]. Predictions

  7. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) for Indoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at Low Part-per-Billion Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-01-01

    obtained by TD-GC/MS analysis of air samples collectedobtained by TD-GC/MS analysis of air samples collected

  8. Design methods for displacement ventilation: Critical review.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption in1988, Indoor Airflow, Air quality and Energy Consumption inhigh indoor air quality in energy efficient way may be a

  9. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draper, Robert (Churchill, PA); Lackey, Robert S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fagan, Jr., Thomas J. (Penn HIlls, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Humphrey, Joseph R. (Grand Rapids, MI)

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  10. Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Flying over the Reality Gap: From Simulated to Real Indoor Airships Jean-Christophe Zufferey-Christophe.Zufferey@epfl.ch Abstract Because of their ability to naturally float in the air, indoor airships (often called blimps) con physics-based dynamic modelling of indoor airships including a pragmatic methodology for parameter

  11. IMPACT OF THE URBAN POLLUTION ON THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT -EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON A MECHANICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bâtiment (CSTB), Nantes, France ABSTRACT This study aims to assess the transfer of outdoor air pollution and the relationships between outdoor and indoor urban air pollutant concentrations are more and more a subject indoor pollutant sources. At the initial state, the dwelling was naturally ventilated. Air renewal

  12. Salt Repository Project site study plan for meteorology/air quality: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    The Site Study Plan for Meteorology/Air Quality describes a field program consisting of continuous measurements of wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, dew point, and pressure neede for later modeling and dose calculations. These measurements will include upper level winds, vertical temperature structure, and vertical wind speed. All measurements will be made at a site located within the 9-m/sup 2/ site area but remote from the ESF. The SSP describes the need for each study; its design and design rationale; analysis, management, and use of data; schedule of field activities, organization of field personnel and sample management and quality assurance requirements. These studies will provide data needed to satisfy requirements contained in, or derived from, the Salt Repository Project Requirements Document. Although titled Meteorology/Air Quality, this SSP addresses only meteorology, as there are no air quality data needs in the SCP. A correction to the title will be made in a later revision. 27 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Air-Quality Data from NARSTO (North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NARSTO is a public/private partnership dedicated to improving management of air quality in North America. It was established on February 13, 1995 when representatives of Canada, the United States, and Mexico signed the NARSTO Charter in a ceremony at the White House. The Department of Energy is one of the charter members providing funding. The central programmatic goal of NARSTO is to provide data and information for use in the determination of workable, efficient, and effective strategies for local and regional ozone and fine particle management. Since its founding, NARSTO has completed three major scientific Assessments of critical air quality management issues. NARSTO maintains the Quality Systems Science Center and the NARSTO Data Archive for storing data from NARSTO Affiliated Research Activities and making these data available to the scientific community. NARSTO also facilitates activities, such as the Reactivity Research Working Group, which provide critical reviews of the state of the science in areas of interest to air quality policy makers. In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Sciences Division announced their sponsorship of the NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center (QSSC). The QSSC is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory within the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). Quality Assurance and Data Management assistance and guidelines are provided by the QSCC, along with access to data files. The permanent data archive is maintained by the NASA EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Center at the Langley Research Center. The archived data can be reached by a link from the QSSC.(Specialized Interface) See also the NARSTO web site at http://www.narsto.org/

  14. Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    require that manufac- turers derive cooling ratings for unitary systems by testing a sample of sufficient size to meet certain specified statistical confidence levels. For split unitary systems comprising an outdoor unit and an indoor coil assembly...(95), SEER, and recommended indoor volumetric flow rate of air, are publicly available. The procedure also assumee that the matched indoor section is available for inspection and evaluation of the indoor coil capacity and the indoor fan power...

  15. Assessment methodology for the air quality impact of residential wood burning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipfert, F.W.

    1981-01-01

    Data from surveys of 1977-1979 indicate that firewood usage tends to vary inversely with population density, resulting in an implied limit to the density of usage. Tests of wood stoves indicate that emissions of particulates vary inversely with heat demand, such that nighttime emissions at low combustion rates may be worse than those during maximum heat demand conditions. Finally, atmospheric dispersion rates are coupled to the driving forces of space heating so that nighttime emissions tend to have a disproportionately large impact on ambient air quality. All of these factors must be considered jointly in order to perform a meaningful assessment of the air quality impacts of increased residential wood fuel use; the results indicate that in flat terrain primary ambient standards are not threatened by residential wood combustion.

  16. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

    2010-05-25

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. Radiological emissions at the PNNL Site result from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site would meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor and estimate offsite air emissions of radioactive materials. The result is a program that monitors the impact to the public from the PNNL Site.

  17. Air Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a hazard to human health when the particle size becomes small enough to enter the lungs, e.g., smoke. At LANL, particulate matter concentrations are measured continuously and...

  18. Autonomous flight in unstructured and unknown indoor environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Abraham Galton

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, implementation, and validation of a system that enables a micro air vehicle to autonomously explore and map unstructured and unknown indoor environments. Such a vehicle would be of considerable ...

  19. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on air quality and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chun, K.C.; Chang, Y.S.; Rabchuk, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration, which is responsible for marketing electricity produced at the hydroelectric power-generating facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation on the Upper Colorado River, has proposed changes in the levels of its commitment (sales) of long-term firm capacity and energy to its customers. This report describes (1) the existing conditions of air resources (climate and meteorology, ambient air quality, and acoustic environment) of the region potentially affected by the proposed action and (2) the methodology used and the results of analyses conducted to assess the potential impacts on air resources of the proposed action and the commitment-level alternatives. Analyses were performed for the potential impacts of both commitment-level alternatives and supply options, which include combinations of electric power purchases and different operational scenarios of the hydroelectric power-generating facilities.

  20. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    in residential indoor air in Prince Edward Island, Canada."Boston, Massachusetts UK Prince Edward Island, Canada SW and

  1. Hazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured in Residences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    indoor air in Prince Edward Island, Canada." EnvironmentalMassachusetts UK Prince Edward Island, Canada SW and central

  2. Asthma in the vicinity of power stations: II. Outdoor air quality and symptoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, R.L.; Bridgman, H.A.; Wlodarczyk, J.; Abramson, R.; Adler, J.A.; Hensley, M.J. )

    1991-01-01

    To assess longitudinally the effect of living in the vicinity of coal-fired power stations on children with asthma, 99 schoolchildren with a history of wheezing in the previous 12 months were studied for 1 year, using daily diaries and measurements of air quality. The children had been identified in a cross-sectional survey of two coastal areas: Lake Munmorah (LM), within 5 km of two power stations, and Nelson Bay (NB), free from major industry. Daily air quality (sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx)), respiratory symptoms, and treatment for asthma were recorded throughout the year. Measurements of SO2 and NOx at LM were well within recommended guidelines although they were several times higher than at NB: maximum daily levels in SO2 (micrograms/m3) were 26 at LM, 11 at NB (standard, 365); yearly average SO2 was 2 at LM, 0.3 at NB (standard, 60); yearly average NOx (micrograms/m3) was 2 at LM, 0.4 at NB (standard, 94). Marked weekly fluctuations occurred in the prevalence of cough, wheezing, and breathlessness, without any substantial differences between LM and NB. Overall, the prevalence of symptoms was low (10% for wheezing, 20% for any symptom). Whether the daily SO2 and NOx levels affected the occurrence of respiratory symptoms was investigated in children at LM using a logistic regression (Korn and Whittemore technique). For these children as a group, air quality measurements were not associated with the occurrence of symptoms.

  3. With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air quality implications of a changing climate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    With harmful ozone concentrations tied to meteorological conditions, EPA investigates the U.S. air?" noting that ". . . changing climatic conditions could significantly affect the air quality in some quality implications of a changing climate. D iscussion of the potential sensitivity of air quality

  4. Impacts of Future Climate and Emission Changes on U.S. Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penrod, Ashley; Zhang, Yang; Wang, K.; Wu, Shiang Yuh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-06-01

    Changes in climate and emissions will affect future air quality. In this work, simulations of present (2001-2005) and future (2026-2030) regional air quality are conducted with the newly released CMAQ version 5.0 to examine the individual and combined impacts of simulated future climate and anthropogenic emission projections on air quality over the U.S. Current (2001-2005) meteorological and chemical predictions are evaluated against observational data to assess the model’s capability in reproducing the seasonal differences. Overall, WRF and CMAQ perform reasonably well. Increased temperatures (up to 3.18 °C) and decreased ventilation (up to 157 m in planetary boundary layer height) are found in both future winter and summer, with more prominent changes in winter. Increases in future temperatures result in increased isoprene and terpene emissions in winter and summer, driving the increase in maximum 8-h average O3 (up to 5.0 ppb) over the eastern U.S. in winter while decreases in NOx emissions drive the decrease in O3 over most of the U.S. in summer. Future concentrations of PM2.5 in winter and summer and many of its components including organic matter in winter, ammonium and nitrate in summer, and sulfate in winter and summer, decrease due to decreases in primary anthropogenic emissions and the concentrations of secondary anthropogenic pollutants and increased precipitation in winter. Future winter and summer dry and wet deposition fluxes are spatially variable and increase with increasing surface resistance and precipitation (e.g., NH4+ and NO3- dry and wet deposition fluxes increase in winter over much of the U.S.), respectively, and decrease with a decrease in ambient particulate concentrations (e.g., SO42- dry and wet deposition fluxes decrease over the eastern U.S. in summer and winter). Sensitivity simulations show that anthropogenic emission projections dominate over changes in climate in their impacts on the U.S. air quality in the near future. Changes in some regions/species, however, are dominated by climate and/or both climate and anthropogenic emissions, especially in future years that are marked by meteorological conditions conducive to poor air quality.

  5. Energy Efficiency in Buildings as an Air Quality Compliance Approach: Opportunities for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, Edward

    2002-05-01

    Increasing the energy efficiency of end-use equipment in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors can reduce air pollution emissions and greenhouse gases significantly. Because energy efficiency is an effective means of reducing multi-pollutant emissions, it is important to ensure that energy efficiency is a fully engaged component of emission-reduction programs. However, while energy-efficiency measures are perceived by many stakeholders to be important options for improving air quality, some members in the air quality community are concerned about the ability of these measures to fit in a regulatory framework-in particular, the ability of emissions reductions from energy-efficiency measures to be real, quantifiable, certifiable, and enforceable. Hence, there are few air quality programs that include energy efficiency as a tool for complying with air quality regulations. This paper describes the connection between energy consumption and air quality, the potential role of energy-efficiency measures to meet air quality regulations, the barriers and challenges to the use of these measures in the air quality regulatory environment, and the potential role that the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Building Technology, State and Community Programs (EERE-Buildings) could play in this area. EERE-Buildings can play a very important role in promoting energy efficiency in the air quality community, in ways that are fully consistent with its overall mission. EERE-Buildings will need to work with other stakeholders to aggressively promote energy efficiency via multiple means: publications, analytical tools, pilot programs, demonstrations, and program and policy analysis and evaluation. EERE-Buildings and state energy officials have considerable experience in implementing and monitoring energy-savings projects, as well as in designing documentation and verification requirements of energy-efficiency improvements. The following lists suggest potential EERE-Buildings activities, grouped by whether EERE-Buildings would play a lead or supporting role.

  6. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  7. Association between Local Traffic-Generated Air Pollution and Preeclampsia and Preterm Delivery in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jun; Ren, Cizao; Delfino, Ralph J; Chung, Judith; Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

    2009-01-01

    been associated with air pollution in only two recent U.S.indoor, and community air pollution research. Environ Healthvariation of outdoor air pollution. Atmos Environ 42( 33):

  8. A crossover design study to evaluate the effectiveness of appliance inspection and servicing for lowering indoor nitrogen dioxide concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colome, S.D. ); Billick, I.H. ); Baker, P.E.; Beals, S.A.; Rubio, S.A.; Cunningham, S.J. ); Wilson, A.L. )

    1988-01-01

    Some researchers have suggested that natural gas appliances are significant contributors to indoor air pollution. Indoor unvented combustion appliances, such as gas-fired ranges, unvented space heaters, and portable kerosene space heaters, have been associated with a wide variety of pollutants, including carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), formaldehyde (HCHO), and respirable particles. Previous indoor air quality studies have demonstrated that indoor NO{sub 2} concentrations often exceed outdoor ambient levels when gas- burning appliances are used. Cooking with gas has been the focus of many of these studies, although other unvented appliances, such as space-heaters, have also been associated with elevated NO{sub 2} concentrations. Some epidemiologic studies of exposure to NO{sub 2} in homes with gas ranges have indicated a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and illness. However, other studies contradicted these findings and failed to show any significant effects associated with gas cooking.

  9. Street-level air quality : exploring the feasibility of a cyclist-led, crowdsourced map in Singapore and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holub, Amalia R. (Amalia Rae)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the feasibility of creating a street-level air quality map, whereby cyclists gather data through a participatory sensing process as they ride around the city. I explore two primary areas required for ...

  10. Defensive Investments and the Demand for Air Quality: Evidence from the NOx Budget Program and Ozone Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschênes, Olivier

    Willingness to pay for air quality is a function of health and the costly defensive investments that contribute to health, but there is little research assessing the empirical importance of defensive investments. The setting ...

  11. Preliminary assessment of the impact of commercial aircraft on local air quality in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratliff, Gayle L. (Gayle Lois)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis examines the impact of aircraft emissions on local air quality by performing two analyses: an assessment of U.S. commercial aircraft contribution to county budgets of primary pollutants in nonattainment areas, ...

  12. 66 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-155. 1996. Quality Assurance, Training, and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Certification in Ozone Air Pollution Studies Schilling, Miller, and Takemoto Air Resources Board. 1990 data: summary of 1990 air quality data-- gaseous and particulate pollutants. Annual summary. Technical guidance for new air pollution sources. Natural Resources Report NPS/NRAQD/NPR­93/09. Denver, CO: Air

  13. The Effects of Air Permeability, Background Ventilation and Lifestyle on Energy Performance, Indoor Air Quality and Risk of Condensation in Domestic Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashemi, Arman; Khatami, Narguess

    2015-04-08

    on the energy performance as well as the risk of condensation and CO2 concentration in domestic buildings. Dynamic computer simulations were conducted in EnergyPlus. Results indicated direct relations between the ventilation rates, energy performance and IAQ...

  14. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume 2, Problem definition, background, and summary of prior research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Air pollution in Mexico City has increased along with the growth of the city, the movement of its population, and the growth of employment created by industry. The main cause of pollution in the city is energy consumption. Therefore, it is necessary to take into account the city`s economic development and its prospects when considering the technological relationships between well-being and energy consumption. Air pollution in the city from dust and other particles suspended in the air is an old problem. However, pollution as we know it today began about 50 years ago with the growth of industry, transportation, and population. The level of well-being attained in Mexico City implies a high energy use that necessarily affects the valley`s natural air quality. However, the pollution has grown so fast that the City must act urgently on three fronts: first, following a comprehensive strategy, transform the economic foundation of the city with nonpolluting activities to replace the old industries, second, halt pollution growth through the development of better technologies; and third, use better fuels, emission controls, and protection of wooded areas.

  15. Personal and Ambient Air Pollution is Associated with Increased Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Children with Asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    indoor, and community air pollution research. Environ Healthin pediatric asthmatics and air pollution: differences inwith peak particulate air pollution and effect modification

  16. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Ling; Brown, Nancy J.; Harley, Robert A.; Bao, Jian-Wen; Michelson, Sara A; Wilczak, James M

    2010-04-16

    This study presents detailed evaluation of the seasonal and episodic performance of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system applied to simulate air quality at a fine grid spacing (4 km horizontal resolution) in central California, where ozone air pollution problems are severe. A rich aerometric database collected during the summer 2000 Central California Ozone Study (CCOS) is used to prepare model inputs and to evaluate meteorological simulations and chemical outputs. We examine both temporal and spatial behaviors of ozone predictions. We highlight synoptically driven high-ozone events (exemplified by the four intensive operating periods (IOPs)) for evaluating both meteorological inputs and chemical outputs (ozone and its precursors) and compare them to the summer average. For most of the summer days, cross-domain normalized gross errors are less than 25% for modeled hourly ozone, and normalized biases are between {+-}15% for both hourly and peak (1 h and 8 h) ozone. The domain-wide aggregated metrics indicate similar performance between the IOPs and the whole summer with respect to predicted ozone and its precursors. Episode-to-episode differences in ozone predictions are more pronounced at a subregional level. The model performs consistently better in the San Joaquin Valley than other air basins, and episodic ozone predictions there are similar to the summer average. Poorer model performance (normalized peak ozone biases <-15% or >15%) is found in the Sacramento Valley and the Bay Area and is most noticeable in episodes that are subject to the largest uncertainties in meteorological fields (wind directions in the Sacramento Valley and timing and strength of onshore flow in the Bay Area) within the boundary layer.

  17. The ends of uncertainty: Air quality science and planning in Central California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fine, James

    2003-09-01

    Air quality planning in Central California is complicated and controversial despite millions of dollars invested to improve scientific understanding. This research describes and critiques the use of photochemical air quality simulation modeling studies in planning to attain standards for ground-level ozone in the San Francisco Bay Area and the San Joaquin Valley during the 1990's. Data are gathered through documents and interviews with planners, modelers, and policy-makers at public agencies and with representatives from the regulated and environmental communities. Interactions amongst organizations are diagramed to identify significant nodes of interaction. Dominant policy coalitions are described through narratives distinguished by their uses of and responses to uncertainty, their exposures to risks, and their responses to the principles of conservatism, civil duty, and caution. Policy narratives are delineated using aggregated respondent statements to describe and understand advocacy coalitions. I found that models impacted the planning process significantly, but were used not purely for their scientific capabilities. Modeling results provided justification for decisions based on other constraints and political considerations. Uncertainties were utilized opportunistically by stakeholders instead of managed explicitly. Ultimately, the process supported the partisan views of those in control of the modeling. Based on these findings, as well as a review of model uncertainty analysis capabilities, I recommend modifying the planning process to allow for the development and incorporation of uncertainty information, while addressing the need for inclusive and meaningful public participation. By documenting an actual air quality planning process these findings provide insights about the potential for using new scientific information and understanding to achieve environmental goals, most notably the analysis of uncertainties in modeling applications. Concurrently, needed uncertainty information is identified and capabilities to produce it are assessed. Practices to facilitate incorporation of uncertainty information are suggested based on research findings, as well as theory from the literatures of the policy sciences, decision sciences, science and technology studies, consensus-based and communicative planning, and modeling.

  18. Social Engineering Approach to Air Quality Challenge: The Case of Kathmandu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arya, Ramesh C.

    2000-01-01

    come up WIth programmes that have directly or indirectly suppol1ed the activities aimed at promoting better air q.uality in the kingdom. The USAI~ sponsored Global Resources Institute (GRI) for three-wheeler eleclnc vehicle program. The Danish Agency... to the pollution. The number of vehicles surged significantly in the later years. Mr. Ramcsh C. Arya is an Engineer working at Waler and Energy Secretariat (WECS) R. C AlJ'" 113 Unregulated import of old and new vehicles including the camet of the tourists...

  19. NMAC 20.2.72 Air Quality Construction Permits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI| Open Energy2 Air Quality

  20. Opening Remarks, Achieving Air Quality and Climate Change Goals through Energy and Transportation Transformation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovemberDOE'sManagementOpenEI and Linked OpenAir Quality and

  1. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

    2012-12-27

    This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

  2. Measure Guideline: Guide to Attic Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lstiburek, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information and recommendations for the preparation work necessary prior to adding attic insulation. Even though the purpose of this guide is to save energy, health, safety, and durability should not be compromised by energy efficiency. Accordingly, combustion safety and ventilation for indoor air quality are addressed first. Durability and attic ventilation then follow. Finally, to maximize energy savings, air sealing is completed prior to insulating. The guide is intended for home remodelers, builders, insulation contractors, mechanical contractors, general contractors who have previously done remodeling and homeowners as a guide to the work that needs to be done.

  3. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    by Ozone Air Pollution from Motor Vehicles. University ofHealth Effects of Motor-Vehicle Air Pollution. University ofby ozone air pollution from motor vehicles. Journal of

  4. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  5. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  6. JV Task 94 - Air Quality V: Mercury, Trace Elements, SO3, and Particulate Matter Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas A. Erickson

    2007-01-31

    This final report summarizes the planning, preparation, facilitation and production, and summary of the conference entitled 'Air Quality V: Mercury, Trace Elements, SO{sub 3}, and Particulate Matter,' held September 18-21, 2005, in Arlington, Virginia. The goal of the conference was to build on the discussions of the first four Air Quality Conferences, providing further opportunity for leading representatives of industry, government, research institutions, academia, and environmental organizations to discuss the key interrelationships between policy and science shaping near-term regulations and controls and to assist in moving forward on emerging issues that will lead to acceptable programs and policies to protect human health, the environment, and economic growth. The conference was extremely timely, as it was the last large conference prior to publication of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's final regulations for mercury control from coal-fired utilities, and provided a forum to realistically assess the status of mercury controls in relation to the new regulations.

  7. Predictability of European air quality: Assessment of 3 years of operational forecasts and analyses by the PREV'AIR system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , is proved to improve ozone forecasts, especially when photochemical pollution episodes occur. The PREV'AIR and laws regarding the pollutants of utmost importance in relation to human health, air pollution is still- ments are still needed to manage and control the impacts of air pollution on health. [3] Facing

  8. Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications for Policy Design for Integrating Air-quality Co-benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications for Policy Design for Integrating, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 Impacts of Climate Policy on Urban Air Pollution: Implications climate change and urban air pollution and imply that opportunities exist to simultaneously deal

  9. Aircraft measurements of SO2 and aerosols over northeastern China: Vertical pro les and the in uence of weather on air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    (e.g., Li et al., 2010a), and should be accounted for in remote sensing of air pollution from space and the in uence of weather on air quality Can Li a , Jeffrey W. Stehr a , Lackson T. Marufu a , Zhanqing Li a t s air quality caused by shift in weather pattern.

  10. Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, Dr. Richard; Morandi, Dr. Maria; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey; Hun, Diana E

    2011-01-01

    Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

  11. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Air Tightness of US Homes: Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2006-05-01

    Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses that database to develop a model for estimating air leakage as a function of climate, building age, floor area, building height, floor type, energy-efficiency and low-income designations. The model developed can be used to estimate the leakage distribution of populations of houses.

  13. Low frequency indoor radiolocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Matthew S. (Matthew Stephen), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of electromagnetic wave propagation to the problem of indoor radiolocation. Determining the location of people and objects relative to their environment is crucial for asset tracking, ...

  14. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  15. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  16. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  17. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  18. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  19. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  20. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

  1. Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streit, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

  2. Development of an air quality model for fugitive dust from mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winges, K.D.

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes a new air quality model, the EMAQ model, and compares it with the standard ISC model. The performance of the EMAQ model is discussed and its accuracy is commented upon. It is not yet determined if the EMAQ model can accurately simulate fugitive dust and a thorough evaluation is yet to be made which would determine if it has the ability to simulate changing wind directions and wind speeds with downwind distance, the ability to simulate pit-retention, the effect of meteorology and other factors on the deposition parameters. The hope is that the tools presented here are a step in the right direction which will eventually lead to reliable fugitive dust impact prediction.

  3. Mexico City air quality research initiative: An overview and some statistical aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waller, R.A.; Streit, G.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Guzman, F. (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican Petroleum Institute (Institute Mexicano del Petroleo, IMP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are in the first year of a three-year jointly funded project to examine the air quality in Mexico City and to provide techniques to evaluate the impact of proposed mitigation options. The technical tasks include modeling and simulation; monitoring and characterization; and strategic evaluation. Extensive measurements of the atmosphere, climate, and meteorology are being made as part of the study. This presentation provides an overview of the total project plan, reports on the current status of the technical tasks, describes the data collection methods, presents examples of the data analysis and graphics, and suggest roles for statistical analysis in this and similar environmental studies. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. ); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. ); Cropp, J.W. )

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

  5. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2012-11-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

  6. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    of light duty vehicles to urban air pollution are estimatedof on-road light duty vehicles to urban air pollution. Theof light duty fleets to urban air pollution using travel

  7. Air quality impacts and benefits under U.S. policy for air pollution, climate change, and clean energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saari, R. K. (Rebecca Kaarina)

    2015-01-01

    Policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions can also reduce outdoor levels of air pollutants that harm human health by targeting the same emissions sources. However, the design and scale of these policies can affect the ...

  8. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  9. Influence of the public transportation system on the air quality of a major urban center. A case study: Milan, Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    , such as power plant combustion, vehicular emis- sions, and industrial usage. Air quality has been studied. Sherwood Rowland a , Donald R. Blake a a Department of Chemistry, University of California, 531 Rowland, Irvine, CA 92697-2025, USA b Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California

  10. Effects of Siberian forest fires on air quality in East Asia during May 2003 and its climate implication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Rokjin

    Effects of Siberian forest fires on air quality in East Asia during May 2003 and its climate model Biomass burning Forest fire aerosols Radiative forcing Tropospheric ozone a b s t r a c t In May 2003, intense forest fires occurred over Siberia, which were the largest fires in the past decade

  11. Environmental assessment of air quality, noise and cooling tower drift from the Jersey City Total Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.T.; Kolb, J.O.

    1980-06-01

    This assessment covers three specific effects from the operation of the Total Energy (TE) demonstration: (1) air quality from combustion emissions of 600 kW diesel engines and auxiliary boilers fueled with No. 2 distillate oil, (2) noise levels from TE equipment operation, (3) cooling tower drift from two, 2220 gpm, forced-draft cooling towers. For the air quality study, measurements were performed to determine both the combustion emission rates and ground-level air quality at the Demonstration site. Stack analysis of NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, CO, particulates, and total hydrocarbons characterized emission rates over a range of operating conditions. Ground-level air quality was monitored during two six-week periods during the summer and winter of 1977. The noise study was performed by measuring sound levels in db(A) in the area within approximately 60 m of the CEB. The noise survey investigated the effects on noise distribution of different wind conditions, time of day or night, and condition of doors - open or closed - near the diesel engines in the CEB. In the cooling tower study, drift emission characteristics were measured to quantify the drift emission before and after cleaning of the tower internals to reduce fallout of large drift droplets in the vicinity of the CEB.

  12. Regional air quality impacts of hydraulic fracturing and shale natural gas activity: Evidence from ambient VOC observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    Regional air quality impacts of hydraulic fracturing and shale natural gas activity: Evidence from/Washington area. Shale natural gas operation emissions appear to be transported downwind. a r t i c l e i n f o to free and extract natural gas trapped within shale layers (USGS, 2014). According to the U.S. Energy

  13. Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

  14. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition

  15. Changes in indoor pollutants since the 1950s Charles J. Weschler a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    University, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA b International Centre for Indoor Environment and Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark Keywords: Air conditioning Body burden Building materials products used indoors. Composite-wood, synthetic carpets, polymeric flooring, foam cushioning, plastic

  16. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  17. A Seasonal Perspective on Regional Air Quality in CentralCalifornia - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.; Tonse, Shaheen R.; Jin, Ling

    2006-12-01

    Central California spans a wide variety of urban, agricultural, and natural terrain, including the San Francisco Bay area, the Central Valley, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Population within this region is growing rapidly, and there are persistent, serious air pollution problems including fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and ozone. Summertime photochemical air pollution is the focus of the present study, which represents a first phase in the development and application of a modeling capability to assess formation and transport of ozone and its precursors within Central California over an entire summer season. This contrasts with past studies that have examined pollutant dynamics for a few selected high-ozone episodes each lasting 3-5 days. The Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) has been applied to predict air pollutant formation and transport in Central California for a 15-day period beginning on July 24, 2000. This period includes a 5-day intensive operating period (July 29 to August 2) from the Central California Ozone Study (CCOS). Day-specific meteorological conditions were modeled by research collaborators at NOAA using a mesoscale meteorological model (MM5). Pollutant emissions within the study domain were based on CARB emission inventory estimates, with additional efforts conducted as part of this research to capture relevant emissions variability including (1) temperature and sunlight-driven changes in biogenic VOC, (2) weekday/weekend and diurnal differences in light-duty (LD) and heavy-duty (HD) motor vehicle emissions, (3) effects of day-specific meteorological conditions on plume rise from point sources such as power plants. We also studied the effects of using cleaner pollutant inflow boundary conditions, lower than indicated during CCOS aircraft flights over the Pacific Ocean, but supported by other surface, ship-based, balloon and aircraft sampling studies along the west coast. Model predictions were compared with measured concentrations for O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, NO{sub y}, and CO at about 100 ground observation stations within the CCOS domain. Comparisons were made both for time series and for statistically aggregated metrics, to assess model performance over the whole modeling domain and for the individual air basins within the domain. The model tends to over-predict ozone levels along the coast where observed levels are generally low. Inland performance in the San Joaquin Valley is generally better. Model-measurement agreement for night-time ozone is improved by evaluating the sum of predicted O{sub 3} + NO{sub 2} against observations; this removes from the comparison the effect of any ozone titration that may occur. A variety of diagnostic simulations were conducted to investigate the causes for differences between predictions and observations. These included (1) enhanced deposition of O{sub 3} to the ocean, (2) reduced vertical mixing over the ocean, (3) attenuation of sunlight by coastal stratus, (4) the influence of surface albedo on photochemistry, and (5) the effects of observation nudging on wind fields. Use of advanced model probing tools such as process analysis and sensitivity analysis is demonstrated by diagnosing model sensitivity to boundary conditions and to weekday-weekend emission changes.

  18. Movement of outdoor particles to the indoor environment: An analysis of the Arnhem Lead Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layton, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thatcher, T.L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-03-01

    This paper analyzes the role of soil tracking as a source of indoor particles and quantifies key parameters influencing the transport of soil-derived particles (resuspension rates for particulate matter on floors, deposition velocities of suspended particles in indoor and outdoor air). The paper begins with a brief review of studies of particle transport processes and presents a simple model for studying the transport of particles in the indoor environment. The model is used to examine data on Pb distributions in the indoor and outdoor environments of community adjacent to a secondary lead smelter.

  19. Central power generation versus distributed generation e An air quality assessment in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    , central generation concentrates emissions in a small area, whereas DG spreads emissions throughout an urban air basin. In contrast, conventional, centralized power plants tend to be located in remote areas by the year 2020. The intermittent nature of renewable sources like wind and solar power may require

  20. Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE: Development and Corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciesielski, Paul; Yu, Hungjui; Johnson, Richard; Yoneyama, Kunio; Katsumata, Masaki; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Junhong; Loehrer, Scot; Young, Kate; Williams, S.; Brown, William; Braun, John; Van Hove, Terese

    2014-04-01

    The upper-air sounding network for DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation or MJO) has provided an unprecedented set of observations for studying the MJO over the Indian Ocean (IO) where coupling of this oscillation with deep convection first occurs. With 72 sounding sites and dropsonde data from 13 aircraft mission, the sonde network covers the tropics from Eastern African to the West Pacific. In total nearly 26,000 sondes were collected from this network during the experiment’s 6-month extended observing period (from October 2011 to March 2012). Slightly more than half of the sondes, collected from 33 sites, are at high vertical resolution. Rigorous post-field phase processing of the sonde data included several levels of quality checks and a variety of corrections which address a number of issues (e.g., daytime dry bias, baseline surface data errors, ship deck-heating effects, artificial dry spikes in slow ascent sondes). Because of the importance of an accurate description of the moisture field in meeting the scientific goals of the experiments, particular attention is given to humidity correction and its validation. The humidity corrections, though small relative to some previous field campaigns, produced high fidelity moisture analyses in which sonde precipitable water compared well with independent estimates. An assessment of model operational analyses moisture using corrected sonde data shows an overall good agreement with the exception at upper-levels where model moisture and clouds are more abundant than the sounding data would indicate.

  1. Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.

    2011-01-01

    where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot inof view of indoor air quality and energy savings can beindoor air quality and potentially save energy. Different

  2. Swimming Pool (Indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  3. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01

    of hydrogen, methanol and gasoline as fuels for fuel cellon Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Gasoline Vapor Recovery (Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel

  4. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    health effects of motor-vehicle air pollution. University ofof motor vehicle and other sources to ambient air pollution.pollution from adding large numbers of hydrogen vehicles to

  5. The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

    2009-01-01

    World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

  6. AIR QUALITY ENSEMBLE FORECAST COUPLING ARPEGE AND CHIMERE OVER WESTERN EUROPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    modellers' community to test the same methodology to foresee air pollutants concentrations threshold value will happen in order to implement mitigation measures concerning air pollutant emission the concept of air pollution ensemble forecast is not the same than the one for meteorology, we propose here

  7. CHAPTER 5: AIR QUALITY 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT5-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    facility operations and ensure compliance with the federal Clean Air Act, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performs continu- ous air emission sampling at several facilities. In addition to facility emis radiological and regulated, nonradiological air releases for 1998 are tabulated in this chapter. Ambient

  8. Air Quality Monitoring with SensorMap Pter Vlgyesi, Andrs Ndas, Xenofon Koutsoukos, kos Ldeczi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    of Davidson county [1]. The situation is not much different in others cities. Air pollution is highly location different pollutants in the air. The data points are tagged with location and time utilizing an on-board GPS in a large area will be obtained at a low cost. 1. Introduction Air pollution is one of the most important

  9. Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catalina, T.

    2011-01-01

    that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

  10. Seasonal versus Episodic Performance Evaluation for an Eulerian Photochemical Air Quality Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ling

    2010-01-01

    Quality Study Agency, California Energy Commission, the Assistant Secretary of Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas

  11. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  12. Reducing Building Energy Costs Using Optimized Operation Strategies for Constant Volume Air Handling Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; White, E.

    1994-01-01

    , they involve resetting the cooling deck or heating deck temperature according to the ambient temperature such that maximum energy efficiency can be achieved without compromising indoor air quality and comfort. Extended O&M Measures optimize system..., building energy consumption can be further reduced even after these traditional O&M measures are applied. This involves optimal adjusting of cold deck and hot deck settings according to the ambient temperature and organizing cold deck settings properly...

  13. Handover Performance of HVAC Duct Based Indoor Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancil, Daniel D.

    in indoor wireless net- works (IWN) that use heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ducts point to serve one floor and its staircase region achieves the best handover performance for IWN]. An alternative approach to transmitt/receive the RF signal is to use heating, ventilation, and airconditioning

  14. The Use of Conditioned Air for Maintaining Quality of Stored Sorghum Grain. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Person, Nat K. Jr.; Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; McCune, W. E.; Hobgood, Price

    1967-01-01

    the grain mass. This air must be supplied with properties which will provide a potential driving force, such as enthalpy and vapor pressure, in order for heat and moisture to be transferred. In actual practice, grain temperature is of primary concern... of the entering air since there is only one specific humidity at which the mpor pressures are equal. To maintain moisture equilibrium, the specific humidity must be considered a( one property of the air condition which is required. The other property...

  15. Impact of Mexico City emissions on regional air quality from MOZART-4 simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    the OH reactivity down- wind of Mexico City and therefore awinds from the west bring fairly clean air from the tropical Pacific over Mexico,

  16. Targeting Agriculture: Air Quality Policy in California’s San Joaquin Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    J. Bier. 2003. “Davis to Voice Air Bill Support: GovernorDavis, material from the governor’s chap- tered bill files (

  17. Underfloor air distribution systems: Benefits and when to use the system in building design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarry, B.T. [Keen Engineering Co., Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    Underfloor air distribution systems are a viable option for mechanical system building design. They are comprised of raised floor panels with a supply air plenum in the void between the raised floor and the concrete structure. Supply air grilles are flush mounted to the floor to create a flat floor and walking surface. The engineering challenge is to determine when to use underfloor air distribution systems and how to effectively apply them. The best places to use this system are in owner-occupied buildings with a high churn rate and/or frequent technology changes. The benefits of this system include fresh air at the level where building occupants are located, forgiveness for variations in internal cooling loads, easy relocation of the supply air grilles to suit revised layouts, a reduction in energy costs for the mechanical system, and an improvement in indoor air quality.

  18. Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste Management Association, Detroit,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Frey, H.C., and B. Hubbell, "A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework For Multipollutant Air Quality," Paper 2009-A-235-AWMA, Proceedings, 102nd Annual Conference and Exhibition, Air & Waste Management Association, Detroit, Michigan, June 16-19, 2009. A Risk-based Assessment And Management Framework

  19. QUANTIFYING THE POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF ATMS ON AIR QUALITY Bruce Hellinga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    pollution. Currently, in the United States, motor vehicles release up to 90% of the carbon monoxide (CO); and more than 50% of the hazardous air pollutants [1]. Many of the air pollutants emitted by motor vehicles spatially and temporally correlated pollutant emissions on the basis of a drive mode elemental emissions sub

  20. Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

    2007-11-26

    We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

  1. Changing the spatial location of electricity generation to increase water availability in areas with drought: a feasibility study and quantification of air quality impacts in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacsi, Adam P

    The feasibility, cost, and air quality impacts of using electrical grids to shift water use from drought-stricken regions to areas with more water availability were examined. Power plant cooling represents a large portion ...

  2. Best Practices in Determining the Impacts of Municipal Programs on Energy Use, Air Quality, and Other Ancillary Costs and Benefits (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, E.; Mosey, G.

    2006-10-03

    This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 held in Boulder, Colorado, discusses best practices for determining the impacts of municipal programs on energy use, air quality, and other costs and benefits.

  3. Erste Satzung zur nderung der Studien-und Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stutt-gart fr den auslandsorientierten Studiengang Master of Science in Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    auslandsorientierten Studiengang Master of Science in Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process and Waste Water Process Engineering vom 08. Juli 2008 (Amtliche Bekanntmachung Nr. 23/08) beschlossen. Der

  4. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  5. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat: Airtightness3. Effective

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovations profile describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2, a residential ventilation standard that is critical to transforming the U.S. housing industry to high-performance homes.

  7. Investigating the observed sensitivities of air-quality extremes to meteorological drivers via quantile regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, D.

    Air pollution variability is strongly dependent on meteorology. However, quantifying the impacts of changes in regional climatology on pollution extremes can be difficult due to the many non-linear and competing meteorological ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter defining the roles of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency gives specific detail on the regulation point-source air pollution for a variety of industries and pollutants.

  9. Lifecycle impacts of natural gas to hydrogen pathways on urban air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    California, which resulted in more air pollution than central power plants [Power-plant type Oil Biomass NG Coal Nuclear Solar Wind Hydro Total Generation mix (%) Central Plant Demand Centers California

  10. Air quality during the 2008 Beijing Olympics: secondary pollutants and regional impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    air pollutant emissions of coal-fired power plants in China:advanced NO x control in coal- fired power plants and to acontrol of emissions in coal- fired power plants, CO from

  11. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Quality Assurance Project Plan for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs), Subpart H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.; Biermann, A

    2000-06-27

    As a Department of Energy (DOE) Facility whose operations involve the use of radionuclides, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is subject to the requirements of 40 CFR 61, the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs). Subpart H of this Regulation establishes standards for exposure of the public to radionuclides (other than radon) released from DOE Facilities (Federal Register, 1989). These regulations limit the emission of radionuclides to ambient air from DOE facilities (see Section 2.0). Under the NESHAPs Subpart H Regulation (hereafter referred to as NESHAPs), DOE facilities are also required to establish a quality assurance program for radionuclide emission measurements; specific requirements for preparation of a Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) are given in Appendix B, Method 114 of 40 CFR 61. Throughout this QAPP, the specific Quality Assurance Method elements of 40 CFR 61 Subpart H addressed by a given section are identified. In addition, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) (US EPA, 1994a) published draft requirements for QAPP's prepared in support of programs that develop environmental data. We have incorporated many of the technical elements specified in that document into this QAPP, specifically those identified as relating to measurement and data acquisition; assessment and oversight; and data validation and usability. This QAPP will be evaluated on an annual basis, and updated as appropriate.

  12. Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban HeatIslandMitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2005-08-23

    Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

  13. Opportunities for Saving Energy and Improving Air Quality in Urban Heat Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem

    2007-07-01

    World energy use is the main contributor to atmospheric CO2. In 2002, about 7.0 giga metric tons of carbon (GtC) were emitted internationally by combustion of gas, liquid, and solid fuels (CDIAC, 2006), 2 to 5 times the amount contributed by deforestation (Brown et al., 1988). The share of atmospheric carbon emissions for the United States from fossil fuel combustion was 1.6 GtC. Increasing use of fossil fuel and deforestation together have raised atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration some 25% over the last 150 years. According to global climate models and preliminary measurements, these changes in the composition of the atmosphere have already begun raising the Earth's average temperature. If current energy trends continue, these changes could drastically alter the Earth's temperature, with unknown but potentially catastrophic physical and political consequences. During the last three decades, increased energy awareness has led to conservation efforts and leveling of energy consumption in the industrialized countries. An important byproduct of this reduced energy use is the lowering of CO{sub 2} emissions. Of all electricity generated in the United States, about one-sixth is used to air-condition buildings. The air-conditioning use is about 400 tera-watt-hours (TWh), equivalent to about 80 million metric tons of carbon (MtC) emissions, and translating to about $40 billion (B) per year. Of this $40 B/year, about half is used in cities that have pronounced 'heat islands'. The contribution of the urban heat island to the air-conditioning demand has increased over the last 40 years and it is currently at about 10%. Metropolitan areas in the United States (e.g., Los Angeles, Phoenix, Houston, Atlanta, and New York City) have typically pronounced heat islands that warrant special attention by anyone concerned with broad-scale energy efficiency (HIG, 2006). The ambient air is primarily heated through three processes: direct absorption of solar radiation, convection of heat from hot surfaces, and man-made heat (exhaust from cars, buildings, etc.). Air is fairly transparent to light--the direct absorption of solar radiation in atmospheric air only raises the air temperature by a small amount. Typically about 90% of solar radiation reaches the Earth's surface and then is either absorbed or reflected. The absorbed radiation on the surface increases the surface temperature. And in turn the hot surfaces heat the air. This convective heating is responsible for the majority of the diurnal temperature range. The contribution of man-made heat (e.g., air conditioning, cars) is very small, compared to the heating of air by hot surfaces, except for the downtown high-rise areas.

  14. Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application). The experiments and simulations focused on the air-cooled Ballard Nexa fuel cell. The experimental

  15. Studien-und Prfungsordnung der Universitt Stuttgart fr den auslandsorientierten Studiengang Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    Air Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering (WASTE) mit Abschluss Master Quality Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) beschlossen. Der Rektor hat Control, Solid Waste and Waste Water Process Engineering" (WASTE) überblickt werden, die Fähigkeit

  16. Experience on Commissioning of Heating/Cooling System and Thermal/Air Quality Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokoi, S.; Miura, H.; Huang, Y.; Nakahara, N.; Iwamae, A.

    2004-01-01

    -Insulated and Air-Tightened Residential House in Kansai District, Japan, Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2000, Espoo, Finland, Vol.2, PP.587-592, 2000.8. 4. T. Shimizu and N. Nakahara, Design and Measurements of an Aged-oriented House Aiming at Healthy...

  17. NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST) Daniel J. Jacob, Harvard University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    management issues, and determine how AQAST can help ­ to-do list! AQAST4 at California Air Resources Board: OMI observes NOx decrease from implementation of emissions control devices (ECDs) on power plants power plants for 2005-2011. We found that OMI clearly detects the implementation of ECDs, though

  18. Air quality implications associated with the selection of power plants in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, M.C.; Glantz, C.S.; Edelmen, P.C.

    1993-11-01

    This assessment models emission inventories and pollutant emission rates for fossil fuel power plants. Ground-level air concentration of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and TSP are predicted. Pollutant deposition, non-acidic deposition, acidic deposition, ozone impacts, and visibility attenuation are considered. Human health effects, wildlife effects, effects on plants and crops, and residual environmental impacts are estimated from predicted emissions.

  19. Impact of Trash Burning on Air Quality in Mexico City C. Wiedinmyer,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    . Air pollution causes serious health effects for Mexico City inhabitants.5 According to ref 6 Mexico less polluted cities. The 2006 MILAGRO field project (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations,7 ) provided detailed chemical characterization of the pollution and sources in Mexico City

  20. CHAPTER 4. Satellite Remote Sensing of Global Air Quality. Sundar A. Christopher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    with asthma and emphysema. In 1952 London experienced one of the worst smog disasters, which killed more than.5) can cause respiratory and lungs disease and even premature death. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 4.6 million people die each year from causes directly attributable to air pollution