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1

Magnetism and spin transport studies on indium tin oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAGNETISM AND SPIN TRANSPORT STUDIES ON INDIUM TIN OXIDE Ali Moraad Hakimi Darwin College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Cambridge February 2011 In loving memory of my... Grandfathers, Cyrus and Peter Abstract This dissertation reports on a detailed systematic study of the investigation into using Indium Oxide based materials in next generation spin-transport electronic ap- plications. Initial studies focused on the optimisation...

Hakimi, Ali Moraad Heydar

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

P-64: A Comparative Study of Metal Oxide Coated Indium-tin Oxide Anodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indium-tin oxide anodes capped with certain oxides of metals enhance while other oxides degrade the hole-injection and quantum efficiencies of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The oxides of tin, zinc, praseodymium, yttrium, gallium, terbium and titanium have been investigated. The power efficiency of an OLED with a 1nm thick praseodymium oxide cap is improved by 2.5 times over that of a conventional OLED without an oxide capped anode.

For Organic Light-Emitting; Chengfeng Qiu; Haiying Chen; Zhilang Xie; Man Wong; Hoi Sing Kwok

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Investigation of post-annealing indium tin oxide for future electro-optical device application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanostructure transformation associated with electro-optical properties via post-annealing of indium tin oxide film (ITO) is investigated by increasing post-annealing temperature in ambient oxygen. Although oxygen vacancy and activation Sn ions contribute ... Keywords: Burstein-Moss effect, indium tin oxide film (ITO), oxygen vacancy, photoluminescence, post-annealing

Ching-Yuan Ho; Tse-Yi Tu; Chun-Chieh Wang; Yuan Kang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Controlled VLS Growth of Indium, Gallium and Tin Oxide Nanowires via Chemical Vapor Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technique to synthesize indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tinmaterial systems such as indium oxide, gallium oxide and tinand Characterization A. Indium Oxide Nanowires Indium oxide

Johnson, M.C.; Aloni, S.; McCready, D.E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Gated Conductance of Thin Indium Tin Oxide - The Simplest Transistor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transistors are the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices. So far, all transistors are based on various types of semiconductor junctions. The most common bipolar-junction transistors and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors contain p-n junctions to control the current, depending on applied biases across the junctions. Thin-film transistors need metal-semiconductor junctions for injecting and extracting electrons from their channels. Here, by coating a heavily-doped thin indium-tin-oxide (ITO) film through a shadow mask onto a biopolymer chitosan/ITO/glass substrate, we can have a high-performance junctionless transparent organic-inorganic hybrid thin film transistor. This could be the simplest transistor in the world, to our knowledge, not only in its structure, but also its fabrication process. In addition, the device performance is found to be greatly enhanced using a reinforced chitosan/SiO2 hybrid bilayer dielectric stack. Our results clearly show that this architecture can...

Jiang, Jie; Sun, Jia; Dou, Wei; Zhang, Qing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Pulsed-magnetron-sputtered low-temperature indium tin oxide films for flat-panel display applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were prepared by unipolar and bipolar direct current (DC)-pulsed magnetron sputtering in a mixture of argon and oxygen onto unheated glass substrates. The target of ITO with 10 wt.% tin is used. The influences ... Keywords: DC-pulsed magnetron sputtering, Indium tin oxide, electrical and optical properties

William J. Lee; Yean-Kuen Fang; Jyh-Jier Ho; Chin-Ying Chen; Rung-Ywan Tsai; Daoyang Huang; Fang C. Ho; H. W. Chou; C. C. Chen

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effect of Ag thickness on electrical transport and optical properties of indium tin oxide-Ag-indium tin oxide multilayers  

SciTech Connect

We report the dependence of electronic and optical properties on the Ag thickness in transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO)-Ag-ITO (IMI) multilayer films deposited on polyethylene naphthalate flexible substrate by sputtering at room temperature. The electrical properties (such as carrier concentration, mobility, and resistivity) changed significantly with incorporation of Ag between the ITO layers. Comparison of sheet resistance of the IMI multilayers and the calculated sheet resistance of the Ag midlayer indicates that most of the conduction is through the Ag film. The critical thickness of Ag to form a continuous conducting layer is found to be 8 nm using electrical and optical analysis. A conduction mechanism is proposed to elucidate the mobility variation with increased Ag thickness. Carrier transport is limited by either interface scattering or grain-boundary scattering depending on the thickness of the Ag midlayer. Interface scattering is dominant for thinner (5.5-7 nm) Ag and grain-boundary scattering is dominant for thicker (8-10.5 nm) Ag midlayers. In addition, the effect of varying Ag midlayer thickness on transmittance behavior is also discussed. A figure of merit is used to compare performance of the IMI multilayer systems as a function of Ag thickness.

Indluru, A.; Alford, T. L. [School of Materials and Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Detection and classification of volatile organic compounds using Indium Tin Oxide sensor array and artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reveals the novel approach of fabricating Indium Tin Oxide thin films grown on glass substrate at 648 K temperatures using direct evaporation method for detection of small concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their ... Keywords: ANNs, ITO thin films, VOC mixtures, VOCs, artificial neural networks, direct evaporation, indium tin oxide, sensor arrays, thin film sensors, volatile organic compounds

H. J. Pandya

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reduction of the Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Mohideen, U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Klimchitskaya, G. L. [North-West Technical University, Millionnaya Street 5, St. Petersburg, 191065 (Russian Federation); Mostepanenko, V. M. [Noncommercial Partnership ''Scientific Instruments,'' Tverskaya Street 11, Moscow, 103905 (Russian Federation)

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reduction of the Casimir force from indium tin oxide film by UV treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide (ITO) sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory, and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

Chang, C C; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reduction of the Casimir force from indium tin oxide film by UV treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide (ITO) sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory, and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed.

C. C. Chang; A. A. Banishev; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; U. Mohideen

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Correlation between the Indium Tin Oxide morphology and the performances of polymer light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: This paper reports on performance enhancement of polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) based on poly(2,5-bis. Keywords : Polymer light emitting diode; Indium tin oxide; Atomic force microscopy; Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy 1. Introduction Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) have received worldwide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Energy level alignment at the interfaces between typical electrodes and nucleobases: Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide and Al/thymine/indium-tin-oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the interfacial electronic structures of Al/adenine/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and Al/thymine/ITO using in situ ultraviolet and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. Adenine shows both an interface dipole and level bending, whereas thymine shows only an interface dipole in contact with ITO. In addition, thymine possesses a larger ionization energy than adenine. These are understood with delocalized {pi} states confirmed with theoretical calculations. For the interface between nucleobases and Al, both nucleobases show a prominent reduction of the electron injection barrier from Al to each base in accordance with a downward level shift.

Lee, Younjoo; Lee, Hyunbok; Park, Soohyung; Yi, Yeonjin [Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

DC sputtered indium-tin oxide transparent cathode for organic light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—The performance of top-emitting organic light-emitting diodes depends not just on the choice of the transparent cathodes but also on their techniques of formation. Compared to the damage induced by radio frequency sputtering of indium-tin oxide cathode, that induced by dc sputtering was verified to be less severe and relatively independent of the sputtering power. Consequently, a high dc sputtering power of 120 W could be employed to achieve a high deposition rate of 0.1 nm/s. Adequate emission efficiency was maintained, even with a relatively thin 7-nm copper (II) phthalocyanine buffer layer. Index Terms—Indium-tin oxide, organic light-emitting diodes, sputtering, top-emission, transparent cathode. I.

Haiying Chen; Chengfeng Qiu; Man Wong; Hoi Sing Kwok

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Formation and evolution of self-organized Au nanorings on indium-tin-oxide surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work reports on the formation of Au nanoclusters and on their evolution in nanoring structures on indium-tin-oxide surface by sputtering deposition and annealing processes. The quantification of the characteristics of the nanorings (surface density, depth, height, and width) is performed by atomic force microscopy. The possibility to control these characteristics by tuning annealing temperature and time is demonstrated establishing relations which allow to set the process parameters to obtain nanostructures of desired morphological properties for various technological applications.

Ruffino, F.; Simone, F.; Grimaldi, M. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Crupi, I. [MATIS CNR-IMM, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Defect structure of indium tin oxide and its relationship to conductivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Doping In{sub 2}O{sub 3} with tin results in an improved transparent conducting oxide (TCO). Although indium tin oxide (ITO) is the most frequently used commercial TCO, its defect structure is still uncertain. Previously, its defect chemistry has been inferred based on the conductivity of the material. To directly study the defect structure of ITO, the authors prepared powders under different processing environments and performed neutron powder diffraction. Structural information was obtained by performing Rietveld analysis. The results include positions of the atoms, their thermal displacements, the fractional occupancy of the defect oxygen site, and the fractional occupancies of Sn on each of the two nonequivalent cation sites, showing a strong preference for the b site. These structural results are correlated with the measured electrical properties of the same samples.

Gonzalez, G. B.; Cohen, J. B.; Hwang, J.-H.; Mason, T. O.; Hodges, J. P.; Jorgensen, J. D.

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

The electronic structure of co-sputtered zinc indium tin oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect

Zinc indium tin oxide (ZITO) transparent conductive oxide layers were deposited via radio frequency (RF) magnetron co-sputtering at room temperature. A series of samples with gradually varying zinc content was investigated. The samples were characterized with x-ray and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (XPS, UPS) to determine the electronic structure of the surface. Valence and conduction bands maxima (VBM, CBM), and work function were determined. The experiments indicate that increasing Zn content results in films with a higher defect rate at the surface leading to the formation of a degenerately doped surface layer if the Zn content surpasses {approx}50%. Furthermore, the experiments demonstrate that ZITO is susceptible to ultraviolet light induced work function reduction, similar to what was earlier observed on ITO and TiO{sub 2} films.

Carreras, Paz; Antony, Aldrin; Bertomeu, Joan [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gutmann, Sebastian [Department of Chemistry, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Schlaf, Rudy [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Modifying the Casimir force between indium tin oxide film and Au sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present complete results of the experiment on measuring the Casimir force between an Au-coated sphere and an untreated or, alternatively, UV-treated indium tin oxide film deposited on a quartz substrate. Measurements were performed using an atomic force microscope in a high vacuum chamber. The measurement system was calibrated electrostatically. Special analysis of the systematic deviations is performed, and respective corrections in the calibration parameters are introduced. The corrected parameters are free from anomalies discussed in the literature. The experimental data for the Casimir force from two measurement sets for both untreated and UV-treated samples are presented. The experimental errors are determined at a 95% confidence level. It is demonstrated that the UV treatment of an I TO plate results in a significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35% depending on separation). However, ellipsometry measurements of the imaginary parts of dielectric permittivities of the un...

Banishev, A A; Castillo-Garza, R; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U; 10.1103/PhysRevB.85.045436

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Indium-Tin-Oxide-Based Transparent Conducting Layers for Highly Efficient Photovoltaic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional hydrogen (H{sub 2}) annealing and subsequent electrochemical treatment are found to make tin-doped indium oxide (ITO)-based photoelectrodes suitable for highly efficient dye sensitized solar cells. The additional H{sub 2} annealing process recovered the electrical conductivity of the ITO film the same as its initial high conductivity, which enhanced the charge collecting property. Moreover, the employment of electrochemical oxidation of TiO{sub 2}/ITO photoelectrode improved the energy conversion efficiency of the ITO-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), higher than that of a conventional FTO-based DSSC. Electrochemical impedance analysis showed that the H2 annealing process reduced the internal resistance of the cell, i.e., the resistance of the ITO and the Schottky barrier at the TiO{sub 2}/ITO interface were reduced, and that the electrochemical treatment recovered the diodelike characteristics of the DSSC by retarding back electron transfer from the photoelectrode to the electrolyte. The present work demonstrates that thermally and electrochemically modified ITO-based photoelectrode is another alternative to the conventionally used FTO-based photoelectrode.

Lee, S.; Noh, J. H.; Bae, S. T.; Cho, I. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Shin, H.; Lee, J. K.; Jung, H. S.; Hong, K. S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Interfacial reactions between indium tin oxide and triphenylamine tetramer layers induced by photoirradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of photoirradiation on the interfacial chemical reactions between indium tin oxide (ITO) films and layers of triphenylamine tetramer (TPTE) were investigated by using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thin TPTE layers deposited onto sputter-deposited ITO films were irradiated with violet light-emitting diodes (peak wavelength: 380 nm). Shifts in the peak positions of spectral components that originated in the organic layer toward the higher binding-energy side were observed in the XPS profiles during the early stages of irradiation. No further peak shifts were observed after additional irradiation. An increase in the ratio of the organic component in the O 1s spectra was also observed during the photoirradiation. The ratio of the organic component increased in proportion to the cube root of the irradiation time. These results suggest that photoirradiation induces an increase in the height of the carrier injection barrier at the interface between TPTE and ITO in the early stages of the irradiation, possibly due to the rapid diffusion controlled formation and growth of an oxidized TPTE layer, which is considered to act as a high resistance layer.

Satoh, Toshikazu; Fujikawa, Hisayoshi [Toyota Central R and D Laboratories, Inc., 41-1 Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ichiro; Murasaki, Takanori; Kato, Yoshifumi [Toyota Industries Corporation, 8 Chaya, Kyowa, Obu, Aichi 474-8601 (Japan)

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Performance enhancement of organic light-emitting diodes by chlorine plasma treatment of indium tin oxide  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated on ITO/glass substrates pretreated with low-energy O{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} plasma were compared. At 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, the OLEDs with O{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} plasma-treated indium tin oxide (ITO) had voltages of 9.6 and 7.6 eV, and brightness of 9580 and 12380 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. At {approx}10{sup 4} cd/m{sup 2}, the latter had a 30% higher external quantum efficiency and a 74% higher power efficiency. Photoelectron spectroscopies revealed that Cl{sub 2} plasma treatment created stable In-Cl bonds and raised the work function of ITO by up to 0.9 eV. These results suggest that the better energy level alignment at the chlorinated ITO/organic interface enhances hole injection, leading to more efficient and more reliable operation of the OLEDs. The developed plasma chlorination process is very effective for surface modification of ITO and compatible with the fabrication of various organic electronics.

Cao, X. A.; Zhang, Y. Q. [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

The crystallinity and mechanical properties of indium tin oxide coatings on polymer substrates  

SciTech Connect

We present the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical strength of indium tin oxide (ITO) on flexible substrates. With varying thickness (h{sub f}), ITO is deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by dc magnetron sputtering. The microstructure of ITO is controlled by substrate surface conditions and sputtering parameters. The maximum substrate temperature during deposition is limited to 80 deg. C due to the low glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of PET. The crystallinity and surface roughness (R{sub rms}) are analyzed by high resolution x-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and AFM. The crack resistance of ITO is evaluated by uniaxial tension test. The experimental results reveal that, at a fixed h{sub f}, the degree and quality of crystallinity of ITO are highly improved by increasing sputtering power and the substrate temperature. As the crystallinity is improved, the ratio of preferred growth orientations of (222) to (400) is increased and the degree of peak shifts to lower 2{theta} is decreased. They indicate that the crystallinity is improved as the lattice damage is reduced and film density is increased. The tension test results confirm that, up to a certain h{sub f}, the strength of ITO can be significantly enhanced by improving the microstructures.

Kim, Eun-Hye; Yang, Chan-Woo; Park, Jin-Woo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modifying the Casimir force between indium tin oxide film and Au sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present complete results of the experiment on measuring the Casimir force between an Au-coated sphere and an untreated or, alternatively, UV-treated indium tin oxide film deposited on a quartz substrate. Measurements were performed using an atomic force microscope in a high vacuum chamber. The measurement system was calibrated electrostatically. Special analysis of the systematic deviations is performed, and respective corrections in the calibration parameters are introduced. The corrected parameters are free from anomalies discussed in the literature. The experimental data for the Casimir force from two measurement sets for both untreated and UV-treated samples are presented. The experimental errors are determined at a 95% confidence level. It is demonstrated that the UV treatment of an I TO plate results in a significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35% depending on separation). However, ellipsometry measurements of the imaginary parts of dielectric permittivities of the untreated and UV-treated samples did not reveal any significant differences. The experimental data are compared with computations in the framework of the Lifshitz theory. It is found that the data for the untreated sample are in a very good agreement with theoretical results taking into account the free charge carriers in an ITO film. For the UV-treated sample the data exclude the theoretical results obtained with account of free charge carriers. These data are in a very good agreement with computations disregarding the contribution of free carriers. According to the explanation provided, this is caused by the phase transition of the ITO film from metallic to dielectric state caused by the UV treatment. Possible applications of the discovered phenomenon in nanotechnology are discussed.

A. A. Banishev; C. -C. Chang; R. Castillo-Garza; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; U. Mohideen

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Electronic states at the interface between indium tin oxide and silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic properties and thermal stability of interfacial states between indium tin oxide (ITO) and monocrystalline silicon (Si) have been investigated. ITO films with thicknesses of about 300 nm were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering on n- and p-type (100) Si at room temperature. The samples were then annealed for 30 min at different temperatures in the range 100-600 deg. C, and the ITO-Si junction was found to exhibit rectifying behavior. Current-voltage (IV), capacitance-voltage (CV), and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements have been used to electrically characterize the ITO-Si interface. DLTS measurements on p-type Si samples reveal a dominant hole trap at around 0.37 eV above the valence band edge. In the n-type samples, a broad band of electron traps occur in the range 0.1-0.2 eV below the conduction band edge. These electron traps display wide DLTS peaks, indicating a band of electronic energy levels rather than well-defined states originating from isolated point defects. All the traps in both the p- and n-type samples are found to be located near the ITO-Si interface. Investigations of the thermal stability of the observed electronic states show that the dominant hole trap anneal out after 30 min at 250 deg. C, while the dominant electron traps can be stable up to 500 deg. C. IV and DLTS measurements demonstrate a clear correlation between the annealing of the dominant electronic states and increase in the junction rectification.

Malmbekk, H.; Vines, L.; Monakhov, E. V.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Physics Department/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048, Blindern, Oslo N-0316 (Norway)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Low Temperature, Self-nucleated Growth of Indium Tin Oxide Nanostructures by Pulsed Laser Deposition in Argon  

SciTech Connect

Indium tin oxide (ITO) nanostructures were successfully deposited on glass substrate by pulsed laser ablation in argon gas at 250 deg. C. Microstructural changes were observed in the argon gas pressure between 30 to 50 mTorr. The as-grown, nanostructured ITO exhibit In{sub 2}O{sub 3} bixbyite structure orientated at <111> direction. At the initial stage of growth, there was a large number of nucleation sites detected which eventually evolved into needle-like branches. The presence of spheres at the tip of these branches indicates that these nanostructured ITO were likely governed by vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism.

Tan, S. S.; Lee, W. K.; Kee, Y. Y.; Wong, H. Y.; Tou, T. Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Determination of the solubility of tin indium oxide using in situ and ex x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect

A novel approach to determine the thermodynamic solubility of tin in indium oxide via the exsolution from tin overdoped nano-ITO powders is presented. High-energy, in situ and ex situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was utilized to study the solubility limit at temperatures ranging from 900 C to 1375 C. The tin exsolution from overdoped nanopowders and the formation of In{sub 4}Sn{sub 3}O{sub 12} were observed in situ during the first 4-48 h of high-temperature treatment. Samples annealed between 900 C and 1175 C were also studied ex situ with heat treatments for up to 2060 h. Structural results obtained from Rietveld analysis include compositional phase analysis, atomic positions, and lattice parameters. The tin solubility in In{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined using the phase analysis compositions from X-ray diffraction and the elemental compositions obtained from X-ray fluorescence. Experimental complications that can lead to incorrect tin solubility values in the literature are discussed.

Gonzalez, G. B.; Mason, T. O.; Okasinski, J. S.; Buslaps, T.; Honkimaki, V. (X-Ray Science Division); (DePaul Univ.); (Northwestern Univ.); (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. The ultimate objective of this dissertation work is to produce CNT-based assemblies with sheet resistance below 100 Omega/sq and visible light transmission greater than 85 percent. The alternate deposition of positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) [PDDA] and CNTs stabilized with negatively charged deoxycholate (DOC) exhibit linear film growth and thin film properties can be precisely tuned. Ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance, and UV-vis were used to measure the growth of these films as a function of PDDA-CNT bilayers deposited, while TEM, SEM, and AFM were used to visualize the nanostructure of these films. Following a literature review describing potential ITO substitutes and LbL technology, the influence of CNT type on optoelectronic performance of LbL assemblies is described. Three different types of nanotubes were investigated: (1) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), (2) few-walled carbon nanotubes (FWNT), and (3) purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs produced the most transparent (>85 percent visible light transmittance) and electrically conductive (148 S/cm, 1.62 kOmega/sq) 20-bilayer films with a 41.6 nm thickness, while MWNT-based films are much thicker and more opaque. A 20-bilayer PDDA/(MWNT DOC) film is approximately 103 nm thick, with a conductivity of 36 S/cm and a transmittance of 30 percent. In an effort to improve both transparency and electrical conductivity, heat and acid treatments were studied. Heating films to 300 degree C reduced sheet resistance to 701 Omega/sq (618 S/cm conductivity, 38.4 nm thickness), with no change in transparency, owing to the removal of insulating component in the film. Despite improving conductivity, heating is not compatible with most plastic substrates, so acid doping was investigated as an alternate means to enhance properties. Exposing SWNT-based assemblies to HNO3 vapor reduced sheet resistance of a 10 BL film to 227 Omega/sq. Replacing SWNTs with double walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) provided further reduction in sheet resistance due to the greater metallic of DWNT. A 5 BL DWNT film exhibited the lowest 104 Omega/sq sheet resistance (4200 S/cm conductivity, 22.9 nm thickness) with 84 percent transmittance after nitric acid treatment. DWNT-based assemblies maintained their low sheet resistance after repeated bending and also showed electrochemical stability relative to ITO. This work demonstrates the excellent optoelectronic performance, mechanical flexibility, and electrochemical stability of CNT-based assemblies, which are potentially useful as flexible transparent electrodes for a variety of flexible electronics.

Park, Yong Tae

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reversible wettability of electron-beam deposited indium-tin-oxide driven by ns-UV irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) is one of the most widely used semiconductor oxides in the field of organic optoelectronics, especially for the realization of anode contacts. Here the authors report on the control of the wettability properties of ITO films deposited by reactive electron beam deposition and irradiated by means of nanosecond-pulsed UV irradiation. The enhancement of the surface water wettability, with a reduction of the water contact angle larger than 50 deg., is achieved by few tens of seconds of irradiation. The analyzed photo-induced wettability change is fully reversible in agreement with a surface-defect model, and it can be exploited to realize optically transparent, conductive surfaces with controllable wetting properties for sensors and microfluidic circuits.

Persano, Luana [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti, I-73010 Arnesano-LE (Italy); Del Carro, Pompilio [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Pisignano, Dario [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies UNILE, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Barsanti, I-73010 Arnesano-LE (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica ''Ennio De Giorgi'', Universita del Salento, via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Light output enhancement of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with contrasting indium tin-oxide nanopatterned structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various nanopatterns on the transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) layer are investigated to enhance the light extraction efficiency of the InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Triangular, square, and circular nanohole patterns with the square ...

Sang Hyun Jung, Keun Man Song, Young Su Choi, Hyeong-Ho Park, Hyun-Beom Shin, Ho Kwan Kang, Jaejin Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and structural properties of indium–tin–oxide thin films foris used to deposit indium tin oxide (ITO). ITO is commonlytransparent contact, indium tin oxide (ITO), forms ohmic

Tu, Bor-An Clayton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold of indium-tin oxide films at 1064 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-induced-damage characteristics of commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO) films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering deposition on K9 glass substrates as a function of the film thickness have been studied at 1064 nm with a 10 ns laser pulse in the 1-on-1 mode, and the various mechanisms for thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold (LIDT) of the film have been discussed in detail. It is observed that laser-damage-resistance of ITO film shows dramatic thickness effect with the LIDT of the 50-nm ITO film 7.6 times as large as the value of 300 nm film, and the effect of depressed carrier density by decreasing the film thickness is demonstrated to be the primary reason. Our experiment findings indicate that searching transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film with low carrier density and high carrier mobility is an efficient technique to improve the laser-damage-resistance of TCO films based on maintaining their well electric conductivity.

Wang Haifeng; Huang Zhimeng; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei; Huang Lixian; Li Yanglong; Luo Yongquan; Wang Weiping; Zhao Xiangjie [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Influence of defects and processing parameters on the properties of indium tin oxide films on polyethylene napthalate substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited on polyethylene napthalate (PEN) by rf sputtering using different rf powers (60 and 120 W) and at different substrate temperatures (room temperature and 100 deg. C). Selected PEN substrates were pretreated using an Ar plasma before ITO sputter deposition. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used to determine the oxygen content in the films. Hall effect measurements were used to evaluate the electrical properties. In this paper the influence of defect structure, sputtering conditions, and the effect of annealing on the electrical and optical properties of ITO on PEN have been investigated. Electrical properties such as carrier concentration, mobility, and resistivity of the ITO films varied with rf power and substrate temperature. The electrical and optical properties of the films changed after annealing in air. This study also describes how the as-deposited amorphous ITO changes from amorphous to crystalline as a result of heat treatment, and investigates the effects of Sn defect clustering on electrical and optical properties of the ITO films.

Han, H.; Zoo, Yeongseok; Bhagat, S. K.; Lewis, J. S.; Alford, T. L. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8706 (United States); Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, P.O. Box 12194, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709-2194 (United States); School of Materials and Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8706 (United States)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Indium-tin-oxide-free tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al organic light-emitting diodes with 80% enhanced power efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free small molecule organic light-emitting diodes (SMOLEDs) with multilayered highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as the anode are demonstrated. PEDOT:PSS/MoO{sub 3}/N,N'-diphenyl- N,N'-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq{sub 3})/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)/LiF/Al SMOLEDs exhibited a peak power efficiency of 3.82 lm/W, 81% higher than that of similar ITO-based SMOLEDs (2.11 lm/W). The improved performance is believed to be due to the higher work function, lower refractive index, and decreased surface roughness of PEDOT:PSS vs ITO, and to Ohmic hole injection from PEDOT:PSS to the NPD layer via the MoO{sub 3} interlayer. The results demonstrate that PEDOT:PSS can substitute ITO in SMOLEDs with strongly improved device performance.

Cai, Min; Xiao, Teng; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ying; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hydrogen Sensor Based on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Electrolyte and Tin-Doped Indium Oxide Sensing Electrode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid state electrochemical sensor has been developed for hydrogen leak detection in ambient air. The sensor uses an yttria-stabilized electrolyte with a tin-doped indium oxide sensing electrode and a Pt reference electrode. Excellent sensitivity, and response time of one second or less, are reported for hydrogen gas over the concentration range of 0.03 to 5.5% in air. Cross-sensitivity to relative humidity and to CO{sub 2} are shown to be low. The response to methane, a potentially significant source of interference for such a sensor, is significantly less than that for hydrogen. The sensor shows good reproducibility and was unaffected by thermal cycling over the course of this investigation. The effects of sensing electrode thickness and thermal aging are also reported, and the sensing mechanism is discussed. The sensor is intended for use in vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen internal combustion engines. Those vehicles will use and/or store significant quantities of hydrogen, and will require safety sensor for monitoring potential hydrogen leakage in order to ensure passenger safety.

Martin, L P; Glass, R S

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Engineering Escherichia coli for molecularly defined electron transfer to metal oxides and electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1-thiogalactopyranoside Indium tin oxide Microbial fuel cellone type of electrode: indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glasssurface, specifically indium tin oxide (ITO), with nanoscale

Jensen, Heather Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ti-Doped Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films for Transparent Field-Effect Transistors: Control of Charge-Carrier Density and Crystalline Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) films are representative transparent conducting oxide media for organic light-emitting diodes, liquid crystal displays, and solar cell applications. Extending the utility of ITO films from passive electrodes to active channel layers in transparent field-effect transistors (FETs), however, has been largely limited because of the materials' high carrier density (>1 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup 03}), wide band gap, and polycrystalline structure. Here, we demonstrate that control over the cation composition in ITO-based oxide films via solid doping of titanium (Ti) can optimize the carrier concentration and suppress film crystallization. On 120 nm thick SiO{sub 2}/Mo (200 nm)/glass substrates, transparent n-type FETs prepared with 4 at % Ti-doped ITO films and fabricated via the cosputtering of ITO and TiO{sub 2} exhibited high electron mobilities of 13.4 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, a low subthreshold gate swing of 0.25 V decade{sup -1}, and a high I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio of >1 x 10{sup 8}.

J Kim; K Ji; M Jang; H Yang; R Choi; J Jeong

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Melanin as a target for melanoma chemotherapy: Pro-oxidant effect of oxygen and metals on melanoma viability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

La Jolla, CA, USA). Indium tin oxide plates were purchasedand hydrophilic indium tin oxide (ITO). While the magnitude

Farmer, Patrick J; Gidanian, S; Shahandeh, B; Di Bilio, A J; Tohidian, N; Meyskens, F L

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

High quality ZnO:Al transparent conducting oxide films synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO). In thismore established indium tin oxide (ITO). While ITO remains

Anders, Andre

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Structure, optical, and electrical properties of indium tin oxide thin films prepared by sputtering at room temperature and annealed in air or nitrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been grown onto soda-lime glass substrates by sputtering at room temperature with various oxygen to argon partial pressure ratios. After deposition, the samples have been annealed at temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 degree sign C in nitrogen or in air. The structure, optical, and electrical characteristics of the ITO coatings have been analyzed as a function of the deposition and the annealing parameters by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and Hall effect measurements. It has been found that the as-grown amorphous layers crystallize in the cubic structure by heating above 200 degree sign C. Simultaneously, the visible optical transmittance increases and the electrical resistance decreases, in proportions that depend mainly on the sputtering conditions. The lowest resistivity values have been obtained by annealing at 400 degree sign C in nitrogen, where the highest carrier concentrations are achieved, related to oxygen vacancy creation. Some relationships between the analyzed properties have been established, showing the dependence of the cubic lattice distortion and the infrared optical characteristics on the carrier concentration.

Guillen, C.; Herrero, J. [Departamento de Energia, CIEMAT, Avda Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Self-Assembled Bilayers on Indium–Tin Oxide (SAB-ITO) Electrodes: A Design for Chromophore–Catalyst Photoanodes  

SciTech Connect

A novel approach for creating assemblies on metal oxide surfaces via the addition of a catalyst overlayer on a chomophore monolayer derivatized surface is described. It is based on the sequential self-assembly of a chromophore, [Ru(bpy)(4,4?-(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}bpy){sub 2})]{sup 2+}, and oxidation catalyst, [Ru(bpy)(P{sub 2}Mebim{sub 2}py)OH{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, pair, resulting in a spatially separated chromophore–catalyst assembly.

Glasson, Christopher R. K.; Song, Wenjing; Ashford, Dennis L.; Vannucci, Aaron K.; Chen, Zuofeng; Concepcion, Javier J.; Holland, Patrick L.; Meyer, Thomas J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu{sub 2}O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu{sub 2}O and Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu{sub 2}O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset {Delta}E{sub VB} 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu{sub 2}O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Juergen; Broetz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachbereich Material- und Geowissenschaften, Petersenstrasse 32, D-64287 (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Chemically Modified Metal Oxide Nanostructure for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanoparticle seeded indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate usingarrays were grown on an indium-tin oxide substrate followedof a double-sided indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate

Wang, Gongming

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Properties of double-layered Ga-doped Al-zinc-oxide/titanium-doped indium-tin-oxide thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering applied for Si-based thin film solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, Ga-doped Al-zinc-oxide (GAZO)/titanium-doped indium-tin-oxide (ITIO) bi-layer films were deposited onto glass substrates by direct current (dc) magnetron sputtering. The bottom ITIO film, with a thickness of 200 nm, was sputtered onto the glass substrate. The ITIO film was post-annealed at 350 deg. C for 10-120 min as a seed layer. The effect of post-annealing conditions on the morphologies, electrical, and optical properties of ITIO films was investigated. A GAZO layer with a thickness of 1200 nm was continuously sputtered onto the ITIO bottom layer. The results show that the properties of the GAZO/ITIO films were strongly dependent on the post-annealed conditions. The spectral haze (T{sub diffuse}/T{sub total}) of the GAZO/ITIO bi-layer films increases upon increasing the post-annealing time. The haze and resistivity of the GAZO/ITIO bi-layer films were improved with the post-annealed process. After optimizing the deposition and annealing parameters, the GAZO/ITIO bi-layer film has an average transmittance of 83.20% at the 400-800 nm wavelengths, a maximum haze of 16%, and the lowest resistivity of 1.04 x 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm. Finally, the GAZO/ITIO bi-layer films, as a front electrode for silicon-based thin film solar cells, obtained a maximum efficiency of 7.10%. These encouraging experimental results have potential applications in GAZO/ITIO bi-layer film deposition by in-line sputtering without the wet-etching process and enable the production of highly efficient, low-cost thin film solar cells.

Wang, Chao-Chun; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Lin, Yang-Shih; Lien, Shui-Yang; Huang, Yung-Chuan; Liu, Chueh-Yang; Chen, Chia-Fu; Nautiyal, Asheesh; Lee, Shuo-Jen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MingDao University, Changhua 52345, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Atomic Layer Deposition of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films Using Nonhalogenated Jeffrey W. Elam,*, David A. Baker, Alex B. F. Martinson,, Michael J. Pellin, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precise coatings to be applied on all exposed surfaces of nanoporous substrates such as aerogels10 using ALD techniques to apply metal oxide coatings onto porous supports such as anodic aluminum oxide

45

Highly Conductive Textured Molybdenum Doped Indium Oxide Thin Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of Mo-doped indium oxide (IMO) films with mobilities of up to 125 cm2/Vsec. Films have been grown from targets with 1-4 wt.% molybdenum. The optimum electrical and optical properties were obtained with the 2% target and yielded a maximum conductivity of 3717 S/cm with mobilities of 99 cm2/V-sec on (100) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single crystal substrates. Films also exhibit greater than 90% transparency in the visible range. Compared to commercial indium tin oxide (ITO) films, these PLD-grown IMO films have similar conductivity but since they have substantially higher mobility they have a correspondingly lower carrier concentration. The lower carrier concentration should extend the infrared window of the transparency for films of the same conductivity. This may lead to improved performance in a number of applications requiring improved performance TCOs.

Warmsingh, C.; Yoshida, Y.; Readey, D.; Perkins, J.; Parilla, P.; Teplin, C.; Kaydanova, T.; Alleman, J.; Gedvilas, L.; Keyes, B.; Gessert, T.; Coutts, T.; Ginley, D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire ... Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy.

47

Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Available Technologies: Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide Nanoink  

Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; Remediation; ... indium tin oxide while offering comparable optical and electronic properties.

49

Indium oxide 'rods in dots' nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

The authors have demonstrated a special indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) 'rods in dots' nanostructure with high nanorod sheet density of over 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. The approach has been realized through depositing controllable individual In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods in both number and shape within a single porous alumina membrane (PAM) nanochannel under radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The authors further discussed in detail effects of the PAM configurations (pore diameter and thickness) and sputtering conditions (substrate temperature and argon pressure) on the formation of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructure.

Ding, G. Q.; Shen, W. Z.; Zheng, M. J.; Zhou, Z. B. [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Spectroscopy and Opto-Electronic Physics, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1954 Hua Shan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Charge carrier transport in indium oxide nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline indium oxide samples with various sizes of nanocrystals are synthesized by the sol-gel method. The minimal and maximal average sizes of nanocrystals are 7-8 and 18-20 nm, respectively. An analysis of conductivity measured at dc and ac signals in a wide temperature range (T = 50-300 K) shows that the transport of charge carriers at high temperatures takes place over the conduction band, while in the low-temperature range, the hopping mechanism with a varying jump length over localized states is observed.

Forsh, E. A.; Marikutsa, A. V.; Martyshov, M. N.; Forsh, P. A., E-mail: forsh@vega.phys.msu.ru; Rumyantseva, M. N.; Gas'kov, A. M.; Kashkarov, P. K. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide semiconductor thin film transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported on the performance and electrical properties of co-sputtering-processed amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc oxide (?-HfIZO) thin film transistors (TFTs). Co-sputtering-processed ?-HfIZO thin films have shown an amorphous phase in nature. ...

Sheng-Po Chang; San-Syong Shih

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

p-type conduction in sputtered indium oxide films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report p-type conductivity in intrinsic indium oxide (IO) films deposited by magnetron sputtering on fused quartz substrates under oxygen-rich ambient. Highly oriented (111) films were studied by x-ray diffraction, optical absorption, and Hall effect measurements. We fabricated p-n homojunctions on these films.

Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Alcala, Rafael [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon and Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Villuendas, Francisco [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

Seager, Carleton H. (1304 Onava Ct., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112); Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate (13609 Verbena Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fabrication of nano-hole array patterns on transparent conducting oxide layer using thermally curable nanoimprint lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, periodic array of nano-sized holes was fabricated in an indium tin oxide (ITO) layer, deposited onto a glass substrate with nanoimprint lithography. As a result of a thermally curing imprint process, hole array patterns with a diameter ... Keywords: Indium tin oxide (ITO), Nanoimprint lithography (NIL), Patterned transparent electrode, Photonic crystals, Transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer

Kyeong-Jae Byeon; Seon-Yong Hwang; Heon Lee

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Towards an understanding of light activation processes in titanium oxide based inverted organic solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 233903 (2012) Thin-film encapsulation of inverted indium-tin-oxide-free polymer solar cells by atomic structures.2­5 In an inverted PSC, electrons are collected by the indium tin oxide (ITO) bottom electrode of increasing attention around the world for the last 20 years as a potential source of renewable energy. PSC

59

Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles and infrared emissivity study thereon  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles was carried out in water-acetone solution at volumetric ratio of 1:1 with pH value varying from 3.2 to 9.3. As indicated by TGA, maximum collagen adsorption to indium oxide nanoparticles occurred at pH of 3.2. It was proposed that noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions made main contributions to collagen adsorption. The IR emissivity values (8-14 {mu}m) of collagen-adsorbed indium oxide nanoparticles decreased significantly compared to either pure collagen or indium oxide nanoparticles possibly due to the interfacial interactions between collagen and indium oxide nanoparticles. And the lowest infrared emissivity value of 0.587 was obtained at collagen adsorption of 1.94 g/100 g In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the chance of improved compatibility with organic adhesives, the chemical activity of adsorbed collagen was further confirmed by grafting copolymerization with methyl methacrylate by formation of polymer shell outside, as evidenced by IR spectrum and transmission electron microscopy.

Zhou Yuming [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)], E-mail: fchem@seu.edu.cn; Shan Yun; Sun Yanqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Ju Huangxian [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

Near room temperature lithographically processed metal-oxide transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fully lithographic process at near-room-temperature was developed for the purpose of fabricating transistors based on metal-oxide channel materials. The combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) as the source/drain electrodes, ...

Tang, Hui, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optical investigations on indium oxide nano-particles prepared through precipitation method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible light emitting indium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation method. Sodium hydroxide dissolved in ethanol was used as a precipitating agent to obtain indium hydroxide precipitates. Precipitates, thus formed were calcined at 600 deg. C for 1 h to obtain indium oxide nanoparticles. The structure of the particles as determined from the X-Ray diffraction pattern was found to be body centered cubic. The phase transformation of the prepared nanoparticles was analyzed using thermogravimetry. Surface morphology of the prepared nanoparticles was analyzed using high resolution-scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the analysis show cube-like aggregates of size around 50 nm. It was found that the nanoparticles have a strong emission at 427 nm and a weak emission at 530 nm. These emissions were due to the presence of singly ionized oxygen vacancies and the nature of the defect was confirmed through Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis.

Seetha, M.; Bharathi, S.; Dhayal Raj, A. [Thin film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); DRDO-BU center for life sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, 641 046 (India); DRDO-BU center for life sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); Nataraj, D. [Thin film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India); DRDO-BU center for life sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings ...  

... (Indium Tin Oxide) ... Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC January 2013 tdc_IN06076_0113_mn

64

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Point defects and transport mechanisms in transparent conducting oxides of intermediate conductivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and indium-tin oxide (ITO), would enable all-oxide and all-transparent electronics and optoelectronics [3-type TCO with properties (especially mobility) comparable to the best n-type TCOs, such as tin oxide Renewable Energy Laboratory. References [1] H. Kawazoe, M. Yasukawa, H. Hyodo, M. Kurita, H. Yanagi, H

Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

66

Highly conductive indium zinc oxide prepared by reactive magnetron cosputtering technique using indium and zinc metallic targets  

SciTech Connect

Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is frequently deposited from an oxide target; but the use of metallic target is increasingly expected as preparing the film with comparable properties. This work aimed to prepare a highly conductive and transparent Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film on Corning Eagle{sup 2000} glass substrate by magnetron cosputtering method using indium and zinc targets. Structural characterization was performed using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The film had an amorphous structure when the film was prepared on an unheated substrate, but had an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystalline structure when the film was deposited on 150 and 300 deg. C substrates. The electrical properties of the film were greatly affected by annealing; the Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film had a low resistivity of 6.1x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and an average transmittance of 81.7% when the film was deposited without substrate heating and followed a 600 deg. C annealing.

Tsai, T. K.; Chen, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Huang, Y. Y.; Fang, J. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); LinCo Technology, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Formosa University, Huwei, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Graphene and its Hybrid Nanostructures for Nanoelectronics and Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanowire arrays on an indium tin oxide substrate. Journal ofmetal oxides such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or fluorine tinoptoelectronics are indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine tin

LIN, JIAN

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of oxidation on the Mechanical Properties of Liquid Gallium and Eutectic Gallium-Indium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid metals exhibit remarkable mechanical properties, in particular large surface tension and low viscosity. However, these properties are greatly affected by oxidation when exposed to air. We measure the viscosity, surface tension, and contact angle of gallium (Ga) and a eutectic gallium-indium alloy (eGaIn) while controlling such oxidation by surrounding the metal with an acid bath of variable concentration. Rheometry measurements reveal a yield stress directly attributable to an oxide skin that obscures the intrinsic behavior of the liquid metals. We demonstrate how the intrinsic viscosity can be obtained with precision through a scaling technique that collapses low- and high-Reynolds number data. Measuring surface tension with a pendant drop method, we show that the oxide skin generates a surface stress that mimics surface tension and develop a simple model to relate this to the yield stress obtained from rheometry. We find that yield stress, surface tension, and contact angle all transition from solid-...

Xu, Qin; Guo, Qiti; Jaeger, Heinrich; Brown, Eric

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electrical effect of titanium diffusion on amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, thermal diffusion phenomenon of Ti into amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ({alpha}-IGZO) was carefully investigated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, I-V, and R{sub s} measurement systems and HSC chemistry simulation tool. According to the experimental and simulated results, the diffused Ti atoms were easily oxidized due to its lowest oxidation free energy. Since oxygen atoms were decomposed from the {alpha}-IGZO during the oxidation of Ti, the number of oxygen vacancies working as electron-donating sites in {alpha}-IGZO was dramatically increased, contributing to the decrease of resistivity ({rho}) from 1.96 {Omega} cm (as-deposited {alpha}-IGZO) to 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}{Omega} cm (350 Degree-Sign C annealed {alpha}-IGZO).

Choi, Seung-Ha [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Development Group of Oxide Semiconductor, Samsung Display, Yongin 446-711 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Woo-Shik [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Park, Jin-Hong [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

70

Manganese-doped indium oxide and its application in organic light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of manganese-doped indium oxide (IMO) deposited by electron beam evaporation have been investigated as anodes in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The IMO films have a high work function of 5.35 eV, a desirable surface morphology with an average roughness of 1.1 nm, a high average optical transmittance of 87.2% in the visible region, and a maximum optical transmittance of 92% at 460 nm. It is demonstrated that an IMO anode can effectively improve hole injection at the anode/organic interface, resulting in OLEDs with an increased electroluminescent efficiency.

Liao Yaqin [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Lu Qipeng; Fan Yi; Liu Xingyuan [Key Laboratory of Excited State Processes, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Origin of ferromagnetism enhancement in bi-layer chromium-doped indium zinc oxides  

SciTech Connect

This work demonstrates that by controlling the rapid thermal annealing temperature, amorphous chromium-doped indium zinc oxide films develop an amorphous-crystalline bi-layer structure and show magnetization up to {approx}30 emu/cm{sup 3}. The crystalline layer arises from significant out-diffusion of Zn from surfaces, leading to a large difference in the Zn:In ratio in amorphous and crystalline layers. Doped Cr ions in amorphous and crystalline layers form different valence configurations, creating a charge reservoir which transfers electrons through amorphous-crystalline interfaces and in turn enhances ferromagnetism.

Hsu, C. Y. [Physics Department, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China)

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Disordered surface structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100)  

SciTech Connect

The composition and structure of an ultra-thin tin oxide film on Rh(100), prepared by the deposition of a submonolayer of tin followed by annealing in an O{sub 2} atmosphere, were examined by a combination of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). Although the LEED pattern exhibited c(2 x 8) spots clearly, a uniform periodicity of the c(2 x 8) unit cell was not observed in the STM images. The bright dots that were observed periodically in the STM image were similar to those of the ultra-thin Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} film on Rh(111) and formed a zigzag arrangement with the numerous point and line defects. The XPS study revealed that the Sn 3d{sub 5/2} peak of the tin oxide film on Rh(100) showed a metallic state as well as an oxide state that was between the SnO{sub 2} and SnO states. The structural models, which were based on the Sn{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure on Rh(111), were determined using DFT total energy calculations. The simulated STM images of the two slightly different honeycomb-chain models well reproduced the zigzag arrangement in the STM image. The STM image and XPS spectrum were interpreted using a combination of the two models.

Zenkyu, R.; Tajima, D.; Yuhara, J. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Indium oxide atomic layer deposition facilitated by the synergy between oxygen and water.  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films using cyclopentadienyl indium (InCp) and combinations of both molecular oxygen and water as the co-reactants. When either O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O were used individually as the oxygen source the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth was negligible over the temperature range 100-250 C. However, when oxygen and water were used in combination either as a simultaneous exposure or supplied sequentially, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were deposited at growth rates of 1.0-1.6 {angstrom}/cycle over the full range of deposition temperatures. In situ quadrupole mass spectrometry and quartz crystal microbalance measurements revealed that water serves the function of releasing ligands from the surface while oxygen performs the role of oxidizing the indium. Since both processes are necessary for sustained growth, both O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O are required for the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD. The electrical resistivity, mobility, and carrier concentration of the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films varied dramatically with both the deposition temperature and co-reactant sequence and correlated to a crystallization occurring at {approx}140 C observed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Using this new process we successfully deposited ALD In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films over large area substrates (12 in. x 18 in.) with very high uniformity in thickness and resistivity.

Libera, J. A.; Hryn, J. N.; Elam, J. W. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

74

A disposable capillary electrophoresis microchip with an indium tin oxide decoupler/amperometric detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have fabricated a capillary electrophoresis (CE) chip-based electrochemical detection (ECD) system for measurements of the dopamine, catechol, DNA ladder, and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The microfabricated CE-ECD systems are adequate for a disposable ... Keywords: Capillary electrophoresis, Electrochemical detection, ITO, Microchip, PDMS

Ju-Ho Kim; C. J. Kang; D. Jeon; Yong-Sang Kim

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Extremely Efficient Indium-Tin-Oxide-Free Green Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes  

SciTech Connect

This paper demonstrates extremely efficient (?P,max = 118 lm W?1) ITO-free green phosphorescent OLEDs (PHOLEDs) with multilayered, highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films as the anode. The efficiency is obtained without any outcoupling-enhancing structures and is 44% higher than the 82 lm W?1 of similar optimized ITO-anode PHOLEDs. Detailed simulations show that this improvement is due largely to the intrinsically enhanced outcoupling that results from a weak microcavity effect.

Cai, Min; Ye, Zhuo; Xiao, Teng; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ying; Mayer, Robert W.; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method of forming electrical pathways in indium-tin-oxide coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical device includes a substrate having an ITO coating thereon, a portion of which is conductive and defines at least one electrical pathway, the balance of the ITO being insulative. The device is made by the following general steps: (a) providing a substrate having a conductive ITO coating on at least one surface thereof; (b) rendering a preselected portion of the coating of conductive ITO insulative, leaving the remaining portion of conductive ITO as at least one electrical pathway. 8 figs.

Haynes, T.E.

1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

Elemental distribution and oxygen deficiency of magnetron sputtered indium tin oxide films  

SciTech Connect

The atomic structure and composition of noninterfacial ITO and ITO-Si interfaces were studied with transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering on monocrystalline p-type (100) Si wafers. Both as deposited and heat treated films consisted of crystalline ITO. The ITO/Si interface showed a more complicated composition. A thin layer of SiO{sub x} was found at the ITO/Si interface together with In and Sn nanoclusters, as well as highly oxygen deficient regions, as observed by XPS. High energy electron exposure of this area crystallized the In nanoclusters and at the same time increased the SiO{sub x} interface layer thickness.

Thoegersen, Annett; Rein, Margrethe; Monakhov, Edouard; Mayandi, Jeyanthinath [Institute for Energy Technology, Department of Solar Energy, Instituttveien 18, 2008 Kjeller (Norway); Diplas, Spyros [SINTEF Materials and Chemistry, P.B 124 Blindern, N-0314 Oslo, Norway, and Centre for Material Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo (Norway)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Method of forming electrical pathways in indium-tin-oxide coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical device includes a substrate having an ITO coating thereon, a portion of which is conductive and defines at least one electrical pathway, and the balance of the ITO being insulative. The device is made by the following general steps: a. providing a substrate having a conductive ITO coating on at least one surface thereof; b. rendering a preselected portion of the coating of conductive ITO insulative, leaving the remaining portion of conductive ITO as at least one electrical pathway.

Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Method of forming electrical pathways in indium-tin-oxide coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical device includes a substrate having an ITO coating thereon, a portion of which is conductive and defines at least one electrical pathway, and the balance of the ITO being insulative. The device is made by the following general steps: a. providing a substrate having a conductive ITO coating on at least one surface thereof; b. rendering a preselected portion of the coating of conductive ITO insulative, leaving the remaining portion of conductive ITO as at least one electrical pathway.

Haynes, Tony E. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method of forming electrical pathways in indium-tin-oxide coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical device includes a substrate having an ITO coating thereon, a portion of which is conductive and defines at least one electrical pathway, and the balance of the ITO being insulative. The device is made by the following general steps: a. providing a substrate having a conductive ITO coating on at least one surface thereof; b. rendering a preselected portion of the coating of conductive ITO insulative, leaving the remaining portion of conductive ITO as at least one electrical pathway. 8 figs.

Haynes, T.E.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Growth and morphology of 0.80 eV photoemitting indium nitride nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

221 , and ammonolysis of indium oxide 22 . There are alsoand the absence of any indium oxide peaks indicate that the

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Flexible indium zinc oxide/Ag/indium zinc oxide multilayer electrode grown on polyethersulfone substrate by cost-efficient roll-to-roll sputtering for flexible organic photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe the preparation and characteristics of flexible indium zinc oxide (IZO)-Ag-IZO multilayer electrodes grown on flexible polyethersulfone (PES) substrates using a roll-to-roll sputtering system for use in flexible organic photovoltaics. By the continuous roll-to-roll sputtering of the bottom IZO, Ag, and top IZO layers at room temperature, they were able to fabricate a high quality IZO-Ag-IZO multilayer electrode with a sheet resistance of 6.15 {epsilon}/square, optical transmittance of 87.4%, and figure of merit value of 42.03x10{sup -3} {Omega}{sup -1} on the PES substrate. In addition, the IZO-Ag-IZO multilayer electrode exhibited superior flexibility to the roll-to-roll sputter grown single ITO electrode due to the existence of a ductile Ag layer between the IZO layers and stable amorphous structure of the IZO film. Furthermore, the flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) fabricated on the roll-to-roll sputter grown IZO-Ag-IZO electrode showed higher power efficiency (3.51%) than the OSCs fabricated on the roll-to-roll sputter grown single ITO electrode (2.67%).

Park, Yong-Seok; Kim, Han-Ki [Department of Display Materials Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochoen-dong, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effect of oxidation on the Mechanical Properties of Liquid Gallium and Eutectic Gallium-Indium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid metals exhibit remarkable mechanical properties, in particular large surface tension and low viscosity. However, these properties are greatly affected by oxidation when exposed to air. We measure the viscosity, surface tension, and contact angle of gallium (Ga) and a eutectic gallium-indium alloy (eGaIn) while controlling such oxidation by surrounding the metal with an acid bath of variable concentration. Rheometry measurements reveal a yield stress directly attributable to an oxide skin that obscures the intrinsic behavior of the liquid metals. We demonstrate how the intrinsic viscosity can be obtained with precision through a scaling technique that collapses low- and high-Reynolds number data. Measuring surface tension with a pendant drop method, we show that the oxide skin generates a surface stress that mimics surface tension and develop a simple model to relate this to the yield stress obtained from rheometry. We find that yield stress, surface tension, and contact angle all transition from solid-like to liquid behavior at the same critical acid concentration, thereby quantitatively confirming that the wettability of these liquid metals is due to the oxide skin.

Qin Xu; Nikolai Qudalov; Qiti Guo; Heinrich Jaeger; Eric Brown

2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of indium zinc oxide thin films by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have performed spectroscopic analysis of the plasma generated by Nd:YAG ({lambda} = 266 nm) laser irradiation of thin indium zinc oxide films with variable In content deposited by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition on glass substrates. The samples were irradiated in 5 x 10{sup 4} Pa argon using laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 10 mJ energy. The plasma emission spectra were recorded with an Echelle spectrometer coupled to a gated detector with different delays with respect to the laser pulse. The relative concentrations of indium and zinc were evaluated by comparing the measured spectra to the spectral radiance computed for a plasma in local thermal equilibrium. Plasma temperature and electron density were deduced from the relative intensities and Stark broadening of spectral lines of atomic zinc. Analyses at different locations on the deposited thin films revealed that the In/(In + Zn) concentration ratio significantly varies over the sample surface, from 0.4 at the borders to about 0.5 in the center of the film. The results demonstrate that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy allows for precise and fast characterization of thin films with variable composition.

Popescu, A. C. [LP3, CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, 163 Ave. de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Ilfov 077125 (Romania); Beldjilali, S. [LP3, CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, 163 Ave. de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France); LPPMCA, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie d'Oran, BP 1505 El Mnaouer, Oran (Algeria); Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Ilfov 077125 (Romania); Craciun, V. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Ilfov 077125 (Romania); MAIC, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Hermann, J. [LP3, CNRS - Universite Aix-Marseille, 163 Ave. de Luminy, Marseille 13288 (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Transparent conductive indium zinc oxide films prepared by pulsed plasma deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent conductive indium zinc oxide films were prepared by pulsed plasma deposition from a ceramic target (90 wt. % In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 10 wt. % ZnO). The dependences of film properties upon the substrate temperature was investigated using characterization methods including x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, Hall measurement, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The films grown at room temperature had a rather smooth surface due to the amorphous structure, with a root mean square roughness of less than 1 nm. The atomic ratio of Zn/(Zn + In) in these films is 15.3 at. %, which is close to that in the target, and the chemical states of indium and zinc atoms were In{sup 3+} and Zn{sup 2+}, respectively. The films deposited on a substrate with a temperature of 200 Degree-Sign C exhibited polycrystalline structure and a preferred growth orientation along the (222) plane. Here the electrical properties were improved due to the better crystallinity, with the films exhibiting a minimum resistivity value of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}{Omega} cm, a maximum carrier mobility of 45 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and an optical transmittance over 80% in the visible region.

Wan Runlai; Yang Ming; Zhou Qianfei; Zhang Qun [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been constructed with indium oxide (In2O3)nanowires [18].and Cho [20], the native indium oxide thickness is 5nm atin nature. The native indium oxide represents 40% of the

Lee, Gyuhyon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Dual Gate Thin Film Transistors Based on Indium Oxide Active Layers  

SciTech Connect

Polycrystalline Indium Oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were employed as an active channel layer for the fabrication of bottom and top gate thin film transistors. While conventional SiO{sub 2} served as a bottom gate dielectric, cross-linked poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP) was used a top gate dielectric. These nano-crystalline TFTs exhibited n-channel behavior with their transport behavior highly dependent on the thickness of the channel. The correlation between the thickness of the active layer and TFT parameters such as on/off ratio, field-effect mobility, threshold voltage were carried out. The optical spectra revealed a high transmittance in the entire visible region, thus making them promising candidates for the display technology.

Kekuda, Dhananjaya; Rao, K. Mohan; Tolpadi, Amita [Department of Physics, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Chu, C. W. [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

In-Sn (Indium - Tin)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Sn crystallographic data...In-Sn crystallographic data Phase Composition, wt% Sn Pearson symbol Space group (In) 0 to 12.4 tI 2 I 4/ mmm β 12.4 to 44.8 tI 2 I 4/ mmm γ 73 to ? hP 5 P 6/ mmm (βSn) ? to 100 tI 4 I 4 1 / amd (αSn) 100 cF 8 Fd m...

90

The Development of Semiconducting Materials for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typically composed of indium-tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glasswere fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass

Douglas, Jessica D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Multistability, ionic doping, and charge dynamics in electrosynthesized polypyrrole, polymer-nanoparticle blend nonvolatile memory, and fixed p-i-n junction polymer light-emitting electrochemical cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modification of indium tin oxide films by alkanethiol andwork function of indium tin oxide: Differentiating dipolarparent low-work-function indium tin oxide electrode obtained

Simon, Daniel Theodore

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells: Hafnium-Praseodymium-Indium Oxide System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The HfO/sub 2/-PrO/sub 1.83/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ system has been studied at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop alternative, highly electrically conducting oxides as electrode and interconnection materials for solid oxide fuel cells. A coprecipitation process was developed for synthesizing single-phase, mixed oxide powders necessary to fabricate powders and dense oxides. A ternary phase diagram was developed, and the phases and structures were related to electrical transport properties. Two new phases, an orthorhombic PrInO/sub 3/ and a rhombohedral Hf/sub 2/In/sub 2/O/sub 7/ phase, were identified. The highest electronic conductivity is related to the presence of a bcc, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ solid solution (ss) containing HfO/sub 2/ and PrO/sub 1.83/. Compositions containing more than 35 mol % of the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ss have electrical conductivities greater than 10/sup /minus/1/ (ohm-cm)/sup /minus/1/, and the two or three phase structures that contain this phase appear to exhibit mixed electronic-ionic conduction. The high electrical conductivities and structures similar to the Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/(HfO/sub 2/) electrolyte give these oxides potential for use as cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells. 21 refs.

Bates, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.; Weber, W.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Oscillator-based Touch Sensor for Mobile Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sputter-Coated Indium Tin Oxide Polyester Substrates formetal oxide of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) [13]. The ITO cover

Huang, Liting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

It's Elemental - The Element Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cadmium Cadmium Previous Element (Cadmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tin) Tin The Element Indium [Click for Isotope Data] 49 In Indium 114.818 Atomic Number: 49 Atomic Weight: 114.818 Melting Point: 429.75 K (156.60°C or 313.88°F) Boiling Point: 2345 K (2072°C or 3762°F) Density: 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. Say what? Indium is pronounced as IN-dee-em. History and Uses: Indium was discovered by the German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter in 1863. Reich and Richter had been looking for traces of the element thallium in samples of zinc ores. A brilliant indigo line in

95

V1, Alkanethiol Island Formation on Single Crystal Zinc Oxide ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... through the Renewable Energy Materials Research Science and Engineering Center is ... A2, Observation and Elimination of Indium Surface Segregation ... B5, The Universal Optimal Seebeck Coefficient for Maximum Power Factor ..... X9, Solution-Processed Zirconium Oxide and Integration with Zinc-Tin Oxide Thin-

96

Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relatively expensive indium tin oxide layers, in addition toH on patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass substrates

Schriver, Maria Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Rational Design and Preparation of Organic Semiconductors for use in Field Effect Transistors and Photovoltaic Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fabrication, patterned indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glassis usually transparent indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(3,4-

Mauldin, Clayton Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Creating CZTS Thin Films Via Stacked Metallic CVD and Sulfurization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) would be used.Indium tin oxide is an electrically conductive and

Bielecki, Anthony

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of tin doped indium oxide films by picosecondare usually made from indium tin oxide (ITO), because of its

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fully-depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices fabricated on high-resistivity silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer capped by indium tin oxide and silicon dioxide. Thisand ? 600 ? of indium tin oxide (ITO) A is deposited [27].

Holland, Stephen E.; Groom, Donald E.; Palaio, Nick P.; Stover, Richard J.; Wei, Mingzhi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Nanowire-Based All-Oxide Solar Cells Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong Yang*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this solution were placed onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate (Thin Film Devices, 40 energy production is fast becoming a vital source of renewable energy being developed as an alternativeNanowire-Based All-Oxide Solar Cells Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong Yang* Department of Chemistry

Yang, Peidong

102

A DISCUSSION OF HEAT MIRROR FILM: PERFORMANCE, PRODUCTION PROCESS, AND COST ESTIMATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metallic indium to an indium oxide which is both transparentoxides of the indium and tin oxide types on polymeric films.

Levin, B. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Characteristics of indium oxide plasma filters deposited by atmospheric pressure CVD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of undoped and tin-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are being investigated for use as plasma filters in spectral control applications for thermal photovoltaic cells. These films are required to exhibit high reflectance at wavelengths longer than the plasma wavelength {lambda}{sub p}, high transmittance at wavelengths shorter than {lambda}{sub p} and low absorption throughout the spectrum. Both types of films were grown via atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) on Si (100) and fused silica substrates using trimethylindium (TMI), tetraethyltin (TET), and oxygen as the precursors. Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to measure the filter transmittance and reflectance between 1.8--20 {micro}m. Nominal conditions used during the growth of undoped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} were a substrate temperature of 450 C and partial pressures of 1.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} atm. and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} atm. for TMI and O{sub 2} respectively. The O{sub 2}/TMI partial pressure ratio and substrate temperature were systematically varied to control the filter characteristics. The plasma wavelength {lambda}{sub p} was found to be a sensitive function of these parameters. Post-growth annealing of the films was done in inert as well as air ambient at elevated temperatures, but was found to have no beneficial effect. Tin-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} was grown under similar conditions as above, with a typical TET partial pressure of 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} atm. Here also, the material properties and consequently the optical response were found to be strongly dependent on growth conditions such as O{sub 2} and TET partial pressures. Both undoped and tin-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} grown on fused silica exhibited enhanced transmittance due to the close matching of refractive indices of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} and silica. X-ray diffractometer measurements indicated that all these films were polycrystalline and highly textured towards the (111) direction. The best undoped and tin-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films had a {lambda}{sub p} around 2.7 {micro}m, peak reflectance greater than 75% and residual absorption below 20%. These results indicate the promise of undoped and tin-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a material for plasma filters.

Langlois, E.; Murthy, S.D.; Bhat, I.; Gutmann, R. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Brown, E.; Dziendziel, R.; Freeman, M.; Choudhury, N. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Roll Printed Electronics: Development and Scaling of Gravure Printing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gravure printing of indium tin oxide nanoparticle patternsfor the deposition of indium tin oxide nanoparticles forwith and without Indium Zinc Oxide (IZO) conductive layers

de la Fuente Vornbrock, Alejandro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and less abundant indium tin oxide. Hot target sputteringAccomplishments While indium tin oxide (ITO) is today’scost (indium-free) high quality transparent conducting oxide

ed, Todd Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Silicon nanowire phototransistor : designing, fabricating and characterizing a high responsibility, broadband photodetector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of Indium Oxide Nanowires," Applied Physics a-region using indium tin oxide (ITO). The windows for topgallium, tin, indium, cadmium, and vanadium oxides. Group IV

Zhang, Arthur Yasheng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Electrical Characterization of Semiconductor Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

influence of the native indium oxide formed at . . . ,” Nanoin conducting transparent indium-tin oxide thin films,” Solal. [69] reported changes in indium tin oxide (ITO) surface

Khanal, Devesh Raj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Tin (Sn)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Tin phase Interatomic distance, nm Number of neighbors α tin 0.279 4 0.456 8 β tin 0.302 4 0.318 2 0.376 4 Liquid tin (250 °C) 0.338 10 Source: Ref 433...

109

NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide ITO – Indium-Doped Tin Oxide DI –used in DSSCs: indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine-

Phuyal, Dibya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Aluminum doped zinc oxide for organic photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum doped zinc oxide (AZO) was grown via magnetron sputtering as a low-cost alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Postdeposition ozone treatment resulted in devices with lower series resistance, increased open-circuit voltage, and power conversion efficiency double that of devices fabricated on untreated AZO. Furthermore, cells fabricated using ozone treated AZO and standard ITO displayed comparable performance.

Murdoch, G. B.; Hinds, S.; Sargent, E. H.; Tsang, S. W.; Mordoukhovski, L.; Lu, Z. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E4 (Canada)

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Conducting and Optical Properties of Transparent Conducting Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films by Sol-Gel Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent conducting oxides were successfully prepared from mixed zinc nitrate hexahydrate and indium nitrate hydrate solutions in ethylene glycol using sol-gel technique. The In content in the film was varied (0, 2, 10, 20, 40, 75 and 100 atom %). Films were prepared by spin coating of the liquid precursors followed by thermal decomposition at 400° C after each layer. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, the pure ZnO and pure InO films (0 and at 100 % In) were crystalline as-deposited. The crystallinity was suppressed in mixed compositions such that the films with compositions between 10 and 75 at % were amorphous. All the films were transparent with the transmission cut-off frequency near 400 nm, which is characteristic of TCO materials. All as-deposited films were conductive with 0 and 100 atom % In having the lowest resistivities. The resistivity of all compositions were improved by post-deposition reducing anneal in pure Ar at 300° C. The lowest resistivity of 0.2 ?cm was obtained for the pure ZnO after Ar anneal. It was two-orders of magnitude higher than reported in the literature for the In-doped ZnO, which was attributed to the low processing temperature. The resistivities of as-deposited and annealed in Ar films were increased by consequent air anneal at 300° C.

Huang, S.; Kaydanova, T.; Miedaner, A.; Ginley, D.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Influence of the film properties on the plasma etching dynamics of rf-sputtered indium zinc oxide layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The etching characteristics of indium zinc oxide (IZO) films were investigated using a high-density plasma in Ar, Ar/Cl{sub 2}, and Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} chemistries. The IZO layers were deposited by means of rf magnetron sputtering, in which the target composition and growth temperature were varied to selectively tune the film properties. X-ray diffraction, elastic recoil detection, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were used to determine the crystallization quality, atomic density, and composition of the as-deposited IZO films. As the In/(In+Zn) composition ratio in the IZO layer increases, the etch yield in Ar and Ar/Cl{sub 2} plasmas remains fairly constant, indicating that the etching dynamic is essentially independent of the film properties. In sharp contrast, a strong increase of the IZO etch yield with the In/(In+Zn) fraction is observed in Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma due to the preferential desorption of the group-III etch products. By comparing these experimental data to the predictions of a simple rate model accounting for preferential desorption effects, it is concluded that the balance between etching and polymer deposition in the Ar/CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma plays an important role in the evolution of the IZO etch rate with the In concentration fraction.

Stafford, L.; Lim, W. T.; Pearton, S. J.; Chicoine, M.; Gujrathi, S.; Schiettekatte, F.; Park, Jae-Soung; Song, Ju-Il; Heo, Young-Woo; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Joo; Kravchenko, I. I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Department of Inorganic Materials Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Temperature-Dependent Electron Transport in Quantum Dot Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a 150 nm layer of 10 mol. % tin oxide in indium oxide (indium tin oxide, or ITO). The pattern allows for six 1 mmof transparent conducting oxides: indium tin oxide (ITO) and

Padilla, Derek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of InSb Semiconductor Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITO), indium oxide (In 2 O 3 ), and zinc oxide (ZnO) havenanotube (CNT), tin oxide (SnO 2 ), indium tin oxide (

Paul, Rajat Kanti

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Physicochemical characterization of point defects in fluorine doped tin oxide films  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical properties of spray deposited FTO films are studied using FESEM, x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrical and optical measurements. The results of XRD measurements showed that the films are polycrystalline (grain size 20-50 nm) with Rutile structure and mixed preferred orientation along the (200) and (110) planes. An angular shift of the XRD peaks after F-doping is observed and interpreted as being due to the formation of substitutional fluorine defects (F{sub O}) in presence of high concentration of oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}) that are electrically neutral. The electrical neutrality of oxygen vacancies is supported by the observation that the electron concentration n is two orders of magnitude lower than the V{sub O} concentration calculated from chemical analyses using XPS measurements. It is shown that an agreement between XPS, XRD, and Hall effect results is possible provided that the degree of deviation from stoichiometry is calculated with the assumption that the major part of the bulk carbon content is involved in O-C bonds. High temperature thermal annealing is found to cause an increase in the F{sub O} concentration and a decrease in both n and V{sub O} concentrations with the increase of the annealing temperature. These results could be interpreted in terms of a high temperature chemical exchange reaction between the SnO{sub 2} matrix and a precipitated fluoride phase. In this reaction, fluorine is released to the matrix and Sn is trapped by the fluoride phase, thus creating substitutional fluorine F{sub O} and tin vacancy V{sub Sn} defects. The enthalpy of this reaction is determined to be approximately 2.4 eV while the energy of formation of a V{sub Sn} through the migration of Sn{sub Sn} host atom to the fluoride phase is approximately 0.45 eV.

El Akkad, Fikry; Joseph, Sudeep [Physics Department, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microbial and Colloidal Deposition to Solid Surfaces: Effect of Heterogeneity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

substrates of glass, indium tin oxide (ITO), and ITO-glassincluded bulk glass, indium tin oxide (ITO), and ITO-oxidize and corrode indium tin oxide. 51 4.3 R ESULTS AND D

Chen, Gexin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Palladium and Tin Alloyed Catalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction in an Alkaline Medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a study of a series of carbon-supported Pd-Sn binary alloyed catalysts prepared through a modified Polyol method as anode electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cell reactions in an alkaline medium. Transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to characterize the Pd-Sn/C catalysts, where homogeneous Pd-Sn alloys were determined to be present with the surface Sn being partially oxidized. Among various Pd-Sn catalysts, Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C catalysts showed much enhanced current densities in cyclic voltammetric and chronoamperometric measurements, compared to commercial Pd/C (Johnson Matthey). The overall rate law of ethanol oxidation reaction for both Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C and commercial Pd/C were also determined, which clearly showed that Pd{sub 86}Sn{sub 14}/C was more favorable in high ethanol concentration and/or high pH environment. Density functional theory calculations also confirmed Pd-Sn alloy structures would result in lower reaction energies for the dehydrogenation of ethanol, compared to the pure Pd crystal.

Su D.; Du W.; Mackenzie K.E.; Milano D.F.; Deskins N.A.; Teng X.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standard tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) or other alternatives.cost (indium-free) high quality transparent conducting oxide

Hansen, Todd

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which is basically indium oxide, I istance vs. temperatureis assembled from 2 indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting device using indium-free transparent anode Ga:ZnO with scalability for large area coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of economically-produced and environmentally-stable transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coatings is critical for the development of a variety of electronic devices requiring transparent electrodes. Such devices include liquid crystal display pixels and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs),[1, 2] solar cell applications,[3, 4] and electrically heated windows.[5, 6] The materials fulfilling these requirements are usually wide band gap inorganic transparent conductive oxides (TCOs). Tin-doped indium oxide, or ITO, has traditionally been used for electronic TCO applications because of its low resistivity, high work function and transparency. Due to the increasing cost and limited supply of indium and its tendency to migrate in to the device, there has been increasing research interest to substitute ITO with an indium-free material. A number of alternative metal oxides and doped oxides have been evaluated as TCO materials with varying degrees of success.[7, 8] Among these alternatives to ITO, gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) [2, 9] and aluminium-doped zinc oxide (AZO) [10, 11] have drawn particular attention. These materials have been demonstrated to have resistivities and transparencies approaching those of the best ITO, low toxicity, and much lower materials cost. Although AZO is attractive as a TCO electrode material, GZO features a greater resistance to oxidation as a result of gallium’s greater electronegativity compared to Submitted to 2 aluminum.[12, 13

Wang, Liang (Frank); Matson, Dean W.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optoelectronic Manipulation, Assembly, and Patterning of Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

300-nm thick transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glasspreviously by actuating an indium-tin oxide (ITO) layer as alayer of sputtered indium tin oxide (ITO), with 10 ?/? sheet

Jamshidi, Arash

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Light-induced Electrokinetics: A path to a versatile micro total analysis system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silicon (a-Si:H) on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glassthe transparent conductor indium tin oxide (ITO). The bottoma top, Teflon-coated indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode and a

Valley, Justin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

SOLUTION-PROCESSED INORGANIC ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetron sputtered indium-tin-oxide on plastic substrate,”and A. K. -Y. Jen, “Indium tin oxide-free semi-transparentelectrodes, usually indium tin oxide (ITO). Application of

Bakhishev, Teymur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanowire networks embedded in indium tin oxide nanoparticleoxide (i-ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO) by radio frequencyNetworks Embedded in Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticle Matrices

Chung, Choong-Heui

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Probing Nanostructures for Photovoltaics: Using atomic force microscopy and other tools to characterize nanoscale materials for harvesting solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a PEDOT:PSS coated indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and LiF/Althe e?ciency. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a transparentIn the control device, indium tin oxide(ITO) is used as the

Zaniewski, Anna Monro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

film TiO 2 on conductive Indium- Tin-Oxide (ITO) glass, by2 on conductive Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) glass, by conformablysubstrates such as indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass and doped

Chen, Zheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Synthetic Control of Organic Semiconductor Excited States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Al architecture. Indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) coated glassTiO 2 /Polymer/Al. Indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) coated glassAl architecture. Indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) coated glass

Clem, Tabitha Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

usually with the form indium tin oxide anode (ITO)/poly(3,4-Donor/Acceptor/Cathode. Indium tin oxide is a transparentAl architecture. Indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) coated glass

Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Applications of non-imaging micro-optic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focal Length F-number Indium Tin Oxide Luminescent SolarFigure IV-14: Patterned indium tin oxide electrodes (a) areto create patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes on a

Baker, Katherine Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Functional Polymer Architectures for Solution Processed Organic Light Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OLED emitter and indium tin oxide (ITO) as the transparentanode (typically indium tin oxide, ITO) and the cathode (solution on pre-treated indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass

Poulsen, Daniel Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Solution Phase Routes to Functional Nanostructured Materials for Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MnFe 2 O 4 ), and tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). 12 We use anfoil or tin- doped indium oxide (ITO) coated glass. Films2 O 4 , and tin- doped indium oxide (ITO). 25 We used an

Rauda, Iris Ester

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Methods and devices for comprehensive molecular analysis of single cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anodic corrosion of indium tin oxide films induced by theconsisted of an indium-tin oxide (ITO) film on a glassnot an option. While indium-tin oxide (ITO) could possibly

Hsiao, Alexander Philip; Hsiao, Alexander Philip

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Oxygen Concentration Microgradients for Cell Culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical Properties of Indium Tin Oxide Thin Films,” J. Am.peroxidase ITO : Indium tin oxide LB : Luria-Betani MHC :gradient. Patterning Indium tin oxide (ITO) is widely used

Park, Jaehyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Improved structural and electrical properties of thin ZnO:Al films by dc filtered cathodic arc deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the properties of indium tin oxide thin films. J. Appl.optical properties in indium-tin-oxide thin film on glassthe replacement of indium tin oxide (ITO) for applications

Zhu, Yuankun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Augmentation of alignment and differentiation in C2C12 skeletal myoblasts through use of nano-to-microscale biochemical patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glycol) films on indium tin oxide substrates." Langmuir500 nm gaps created on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glassInc. (Morrisville, PA). Indium-Tin-Oxide coated microscope

Chung, Kevin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling DNA and protein arrays for high-throughput analyses [electronic resource] /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Anodic corrosion of indium tin oxide films induced by thecoverslip coated with indium-tin oxide, which serves as thecoverslip coated with indium-tin oxide (ITO), which serves

Barbee, Kristopher David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High optical quality polycrystalline indium phosphide grown on ...  

High optical quality polycrystalline indium phosphide ... III–V semiconductor solar cells have demonstrated the highest power ... (thermal oxide, 50nm ...

138

Highest transmittance and high-mobility amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide films on flexible substrate by room-temperature deposition and post-deposition anneals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin films of the highest transmittance reported in literature were initially deposited onto flexible polymer substrates at room temperature. The films were annealed in vacuum, air, and oxygen to enhance their electrical and optical performances. Electrical and optical characterizations were done before and after anneals. A partial reversal of the degradation in electrical properties upon annealing in oxygen was achieved by subjecting the films to subsequent vacuum anneals. A model was developed based on film texture and structural defects which showed close agreement between the measured and calculated carrier mobility values at low carrier concentrations (2-6 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}).

Gadre, Mandar J. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Alford, T. L. [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Flexible Display Center at Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mechanical Property Measurements of Membranes and Viruses by Using Fluorescence Interference Contrast Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.Casimir Force from Indium Tin Oxide Film by UV Treatment.

Gui, Dong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ultrahigh Efficiency Multiband Solar Cells Final Report for Director's Innovation Initiative Project DII-2005-1221  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examined n-ZnO and indium tin oxide (ITO) and as potentialusing sputtered indium tin oxide (ITO) with an electron

Ager III, Joel W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, Kin Man

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Liquid phase epitaxial growth and characterization of germanium far infrared blocked impurity band detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be a thin layer of indium tin oxide sputtered onto theis Sn-doped In 2 0 3 (Indium Tin Oxide or ITO) which is an

Bandaru, Jordana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oscillator-Based Touch Sensor with Adaptive Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory TSMC ITO Indium Tin Oxide USART vi TaiwanGenerally they are Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) or some other kind

Du, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linked to Au, Ag, and indium tin oxide (ITO) by this method.band spectrum of ITO (indium tin oxide). The valence band is

Hamad, Kimberly S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high transmittance of indium tin oxide (ITO) [32]. 5. Largethe deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO), SiO 2 , and copper

Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the anode side is Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) which is aBH) OPDs is the indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(ethylene-

Guvenc, Ali Bilge

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Controlling Magnetism at the Nanoscale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was done using an Indium tin oxide (ITO)/PMMA/Au device. Thethe I-V curve for Indium tin oxide (ITO)/PMMA/Au device for

Wong, Jared

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the depletion layer of indium tin oxide as measured by in-The electrodes were indium-tin-oxide (ITO), a n-type

Parra, Erika Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Pure Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion of tin exposed in different environments for 10 and 20 years...� � Marine (Florida) 0.0023 0.09 � � Marine (California) � � 0.0029 0.11 Semiarid � � 0.00044 0.017 Rural 0.00049 0.019 � � (a) Converted from weight

149

Indium Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Indium Corporation Place New York Product String representation "Indium Corporat ... rope, and Asia." is too long. References Indium...

150

Atomic scale studies of interface formation between oxides and III-V semiconductor surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatile [151], but indium oxides are not [156]; therefore,with them having an indium oxide composition. Bulk In 2 O 3temperatures and the indium oxides remain in the form of

Clemens, Jonathon Boyd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fabrication and Characterization of Organic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment  of  indium  tin  oxide  for  organic solar JR.  Criteria for ITO (indium?tin?oxide) an organic  light expansive material, indium thin oxide (ITO) thin films, with

Yengel, Emre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A study of InP nanowires : growth, material properties, and application in optoelectronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Sapphire, so growth on indium oxide should not be muchthe NWs onto an electrode (indium tin oxide), the problem ofis deposited onto an indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass

Novotny, Clint Joseph

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nanocrystal Photovoltaics: The Case of Cu2S-CdS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solid was gallium- or indium- oxide because the EGaIn wasCdS Microarrays on Indium Tin Oxide Substrates Appliedpole figure ITO - indium tin oxide RMS – root mean square

Rivest, Jessica Louis Baker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Flexible, Transparent, Conducting Nanotubes Advance ...  

conducting material, indium tin oxide (ITO). All of the indium component of ITO is exported from abroad. The continuously increasing cost of indium and its limited

155

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials such as indium, since conventional pillar fabrication by focused ion-beam milling techniques ultimately leads to melting or structural degradation. All indium...

156

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high conductivity) for this application include tin oxide, indium tin oxide, and zinc oxide. Contact: Bryan Pivovar 303-275-3809 Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research...

157

It's Elemental - The Element Tin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon. Tin makes up only about 0.001% of the earth's crust and is chiefly mined in Malaysia. Two allotropes of tin occur near room temperature. The first form of tin is called...

158

Oxides and nitrides as alternative plasmonic materials in the optical range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As alternatives to conventional metals, new plasmonic materials offer many advantages in the rapidly growing fields of plasmonics and metamaterials. These advantages include low intrinsic loss, semiconductor-based design, compatibility with standard nanofabrication processes, tunability, and others. Transparent conducting oxides such as Al:ZnO, Ga:ZnO and indium-tin-oxide (ITO) enable many high-performance metamaterial devices operating in the near-IR. Transition-metal nitrides such as TiN or ZrN can be substitutes for conventional metals in the visible frequencies. In this paper we provide the details of fabrication and characterization of these new materials and discuss their suitability for a number of metamaterial and plasmonic applications.

Naik, Gururaj V; Boltasseva, Alexandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Kinds of Scrap Tin Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...tin that is usually fairly high in tin content. Prices for this type are quoted in American Metal Market. The specific scrap grades within this typeâ??block tin, and high-tin babbitt and pewterâ??are consistent enough to identify and define....

160

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Indium is a key material in lead-free solder applications for microelectronics due to its excellent wetting properties, extended ductility, and high electrical conductivity. With the size of electronic devices continuing to shrink and the promise of indium-based nanotechnologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of this material's small-scale mechanical properties and reliability. Researchers from the University of Waterloo, California Institute of Technology, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have collaborated with a team at ALS Beamline 12.3.2 to investigate the small-scale mechanics of indium nanostructures. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction (μSXRD) studies revealed that the indium microstructure is typical of a well-annealed metal, containing very few initial dislocations and showing close-to-theoretical strength.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Indium is a key material in lead-free solder applications for microelectronics due to its excellent wetting properties, extended ductility, and high electrical conductivity. With the size of electronic devices continuing to shrink and the promise of indium-based nanotechnologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of this material's small-scale mechanical properties and reliability. Researchers from the University of Waterloo, California Institute of Technology, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have collaborated with a team at ALS Beamline 12.3.2 to investigate the small-scale mechanics of indium nanostructures. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction (μSXRD) studies revealed that the indium microstructure is typical of a well-annealed metal, containing very few initial dislocations and showing close-to-theoretical strength.

162

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Mechanical Behavior of Indium Nanostructures Print Indium is a key material in lead-free solder applications for microelectronics due to its excellent wetting properties, extended ductility, and high electrical conductivity. With the size of electronic devices continuing to shrink and the promise of indium-based nanotechnologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of this material's small-scale mechanical properties and reliability. Researchers from the University of Waterloo, California Institute of Technology, and Los Alamos National Laboratory have collaborated with a team at ALS Beamline 12.3.2 to investigate the small-scale mechanics of indium nanostructures. Scanning x-ray microdiffraction (μSXRD) studies revealed that the indium microstructure is typical of a well-annealed metal, containing very few initial dislocations and showing close-to-theoretical strength.

163

CoSb3-InSb Isoplethal Section of Co-Sb-In Ternary Phase Diagram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been reported that introduction of indium into this compound can enhance its ... Metallization on Indium Tin Oxide Plastic Substrate by Potential–sweeping ...

164

Solderability perservative coatings: Electroless tin vs. organic azoles  

SciTech Connect

This paper compares the solderability performance and corrosions ion protection effectiveness of electroless tin coatings versus organic azole films after exposure to a series of humidity and thermal (lead-free solders) cycling conditions. The solderability of immersion tin is directly related to the tin oxide growth on the surface and is not affected by the formation of Sn-Cu intermetallic phases as long as the intermetallic phase is protected by a Sn layer. For a nominal tin thickness of 60{mu}inches, the typical thermal excursions associated with assembly are not sufficient to cause the intermetallic phase to consume the entire tin layer. Exposure to humidity at moderate to elevated temperatures promotes heavy tin oxide formation which leads to solderability loss. In contrast, thin azole films are more robust to humidity exposure; however upon heating in the presence of oxygen, they decompose and lead to severe solderability degradation. Evaluations of lead-free solder pastes for surface mount assembly applications indicate that immersion tin significantly improves the spreading of Sn:Ag and Sn:Bi alloys as compared to azole surface finishes.

Artaki, I.; Ray, U.; Jackson, A.M.; Gordon, H.M. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Platinum-, rhenium-, indium-containing catalysts for conversion of hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for the catalytic reforming of naphtha-boiling range charge stock at reforming conditions with a catalytic composite comprising: (a) a refractory inorganic oxide; (b) a first uniform dispersion of a platinum component and a rhenium component; (c) a second dispersion of an indium component thereover; (d) a halogen component; and (e) a sulfur component.

Antos, G.J.; Wang, L.

1986-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

166

Transparent Conductive Nano-Composites  

Indium Tin Oxide, the most widely used commercial transparent conducting coating, has severe limitations such inflexibility, high processing ...

167

CLEAN, CLEVER AND COMPETITIVE NORDIC ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-tail (coupling) ITO Indium Tin Oxide LED light emitting diode LUMO lowest unoccupied molecular orbital NBS N

168

AN ENERGY EFFICIENT WINDOW SYSTEM FINAL REPORT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas, For instance, indium oxide forms a dark film whenheat mirrors are typically indium-tin oxide (ITO) films fromoxide is for the thin film device anti-reflection coating of silica on indium

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Properties of In-Doped ZnO Films Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition on GaN(0001) Templates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TCO is amor- phous indium tin oxide (ITO), most commonlythe properties of indium-doped zinc oxide layers grown byoxide, doping, n-type, MOCVD, metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, ZnO: In, indium

Ben-Yaacov, Tammy; Ive, Tommy; Walle, Chris G.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Speck, James S.; Denbaars, Steven P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

171

Atomic and electronic structures of oxides on III-V semiconductors :  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STM imaging. Subsequently, indium oxide is deposited byIndium Monoxide (In 2 O) Once the surface structure of InAs(001)-(4×2) was characterized, the gate oxidesIndium I t Tunneling Current LDOS Local Density of States LEED Low Energy Electron Diffraction MBE Molecular Beam Epitaxy MOSFET Metal-Oxide

Shen, Jian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Local structure of indium oxynitride from x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron x-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) measurements of In L{sub 3} edge is used in conjunction with first principles calculations to characterize rf magnetron sputtered indium oxynitride at different O contents. Good agreement between the measured and the independently calculated spectra are obtained. Calculations show that the XANES spectra of this alloy are sensitive to the coordination numbers of the In atoms, i.e., fourfold for indium nitride-like structures and sixfold for indium oxide-like structures, but not to the substitution of nearest neighbor N by O or vice versa.

T-Thienprasert, J.; Onkaw, D.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology and National Synchrotron Research Center, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Nukeaw, J.; Sungthong, A. [Nanotechnology Research Center of KMITL and Department of Applied Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Porntheeraphat, S. [Thai Microelectronics Center, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Fast Neutron Research Facility, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

What is a TIN/EIN?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TIN/EIN Information. As ... number. Please see the following Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) for information. What is a TIN/EIN? ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

Vacuum Distillation Refining of Crude Tin - Thermodynamics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vacuum Distillation Refining of Crude Tin - Thermodynamics Analysis and Experiments on the Removal of Arsenic from the Crude Tin.

175

High quality ZnO:Al transparent conducting oxide films synthesized by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum-doped zinc oxide, ZnO:Al or AZO, is a well-known n-type transparent conducting oxide with great potential in a number of applications currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO). In this study, the optical and electrical properties of AZO thin films deposited on glass and silicon by pulsed filtered cathodic arc deposition are systematically studied. In contrast to magnetron sputtering, this technique does not produce energetic negative ions, and therefore ion damage can be minimized. The quality of the AZO films strongly depends on the growth temperature while only marginal improvements are obtained with post-deposition annealing. The best films, grown at a temperature of about 200?C, have resistivities in the low to mid 10-4 Omega cm range with a transmittance better than 85percent in the visible part of the spectrum. It is remarkable that relatively good films of small thickness (60 nm) can be fabricated using this method.

Anders, Andre; Lim, Sunnie H.N.; Yu, Kin Man; Andersson, Joakim; Rosen, Johanna; McFarland, Mike; Brown, Jeff

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Miedaner, Alexander (Boulder, CO); Van Hest, Maikel (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO); Nekuda, Jennifer A. (Lakewood, CO)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-supported metal catalysts are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. In this paper, we report a novel method to deposit metal catalysts and metal oxide nanoparticles on two-dimensional graphene sheets to improve the catalytic performance and stability of the catalyst materials. The new synthesis method allows indium tin oxide (ITO) nanocrystals to be directly grown on functionalized graphene sheets forming the ITO-graphene hybrids. Pt nanoparticles are then deposited to form a special triple-junction structure (Pt-ITO-graphene). Both experimental study and periodic density functional theory calculations show that the supported Pt nanoparticles are stable at Pt-ITO-graphene triple junction points. The new catalyst materials were tested for oxygen reduction for potential applications in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, and they exhibited greatly enhanced stability and activity. The reasons for the high stability and activity of Pt-ITO-graphene are analyzed.

Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Mei, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Chong M.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Park, Seh K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Cupronickel Nanowires for Transparent Conducting Nanowire Networks  

SciTech Connect

Nanowires of copper can be coated from liquids to create flexible, transparent conducting films that can potentially replace the dominant transparent conductor, indium tin oxide, in displays, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, and electrochromic windows. One issue with these nanowire films is that copper is prone to oxidation. It was hypothesized that the resistance to oxidation could be improved by coating copper nanowires with nickel. This work demonstrates a method for synthesizing copper nanowires with nickel shells as well as the properties of cupronickel nanowires in transparent conducting films. Time- and temperature-dependent sheet resistance measurements indicate that the sheet resistance of copper and silver nanowire films will double after 3 and 36 months at room temperature, respectively. In contrast, the sheet resistance of cupronickel nanowires containing 20 mol % nickel will double in about 400 years. Coating copper nanowires to a ratio of 2:1 Cu:Ni gave them a neutral gray color, making them more suitable for use in displays and electrochromic windows. These properties, and the fact that copper and nickel are 1000 times more abundant than indium or silver, make cupronickel nanowires a promising alternative for the sustainable, efficient production of transparent conductors.

Rathmall, Aaron [Duke University; Nguyen, Minh [Duke University; Wiley, Benjamin J [Duke University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Indium Fluor Sauerstoff Kulturleistung Chemie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In F O 49 9 8 Indium Fluor Sauerstoff Kulturleistung Chemie Tag der Chemie Samstag, 18. Juni 2011;Liebe Besucherin, lieber Besucher Hiermit möchten wir Sie herzlich zu unserem «Tag der Chemie» auf dem Experimental- vorführung spannender und verblüffender Phänomene aus der Chemie. Für die Kinder, die gern einmal

Zürich, Universität

180

Tunable Infrared Absorption and Visible Transparency of ...  

parent conducting oxide (TCO), indium tin oxide (ITO).1 At ... and dye-sensitized solar cells, ... energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Available Technologies: Universal Electrochromic Smart Window ...  

Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; ... nanocrystals of either tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) or aluminum-doped zinc oxide ...

182

Session N: Next Generation Solar Cell Materials and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2011 ... Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide (AZO)2 and Indium-doped Tin Oxide (ITO) .... David Young1; Howard Branz1; 1National Renewable Energy Lab; ...

183

SSRL HEADLINES October 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Barcelona (ICMAB, Spain) have altered niobium oxide glass by inserting tin-doped indium oxide nanocrystals into its structure. Read more... image Structure of Chinese...

184

M A T E R I A L S R E S E A R C H I N S T I T U T E B U L L E T I N S U M M E R 2 0 0 9 for the 21st Century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it ends up. A large industry is based on indium for use in indium tin oxide, a transparent thin film industry. At the same time, the process by which indium tin oxide is applied to a substrate is incredibly and a half times all current U.S. consumption. By current technology, we mean energy efficient and renewable

Yener, Aylin

185

The influence of temperature and humidity on the wettability of immersion tin coated printed wiring boards  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the merits and drawbacks of immersion tin coatings as potential printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes. Immersion tin films applied in various thicknesses (0.2 to 2 {mu}m) to different copper substrates were characterized relative to thermal stability and shelflife. Thermal excursions included those typical in mixed technology assembly processes. Exposure to temperature/humidity was varied from near ambient (35{degree}C/85%RH) to harsh (steam aging). A minimum thickness of {approximately}60{mu}in (1.5{mu}m) was determined to be critical for assembly operations involving multiple thermal excursions. Even though formation of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMC) is facile, at the copper-tin interface, these compounds do not adversely affect the soldering performance, as long as the IMC phase is protected by a tin surface layer. Immersion tin finishes are relatively stable to thermal exposure, but are readily oxidized in the presence of humidity. This oxide growth is directly responsible for solderability degradation. The underlying copper substrate was also found to have a significant impact on the thermal stability of tin films. An electroless copper substrate caused significantly more intermetallic formation, that resulted in poor solderability even under moderate temperature, humidity conditions.

Ray, U.; Artaki, I. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Copper-tin anodes for rechargeable lithium batteries : an example of the matrix effect in an intermetallic system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium batteries are typically constructed from a lithium cobalt oxide cathode and a carbon anode. We have investigated intermetallic anode materials based on tin, which can provide a high capacity at a slightly higher voltage (400 mV) than metallic lithium and thus reduce the safety concerns associated with the carbon anode. In particular, we have investigated the copper-tin system at around the composition Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and have determined the effect on cycling and capacity of electrodes with various ratios of copper to tin. Anode compositions that are slightly copper rich (Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 4}) were found to exhibit greater utilization of the tin than those with the stoichiometric bronze ratio (Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}) or those having a slight excess of tin (Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 6}). The differences in electrochemical behavior are explained in terms of an inert matrix model.

Kepler, K. D.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fabrication of Solid Electrolyte Dendrites for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of Solid Electrolyte Dendrites for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Miniaturizations · Fabrication of TiN Nanoparticle Dispersed Si3N4 Ceramics by Wet Jet ...

188

Adv. Sci. Technol. (Faenza, Italy) 33, 1037-1050 (2003) TECHNOLOGICAL CHALLENGES FOR TRANSPARENT CONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these limiting properties are also discussed. 1. INTRODUCTION A few materials, mostly oxides of tin, indium and to etch TCs. Zinc oxide is the easiest material to etch, tin oxide is the most difficult, and indium oxide in part by the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory. #12;2 2. OPTICAL AND ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES 2

Gordon, Roy

189

Fully depleted, back-illuminated charge-coupled devices ...  

silicon layer capped by indium tin oxide and silicon dioxide. ... supported by the Department of Energy under Contract DE ... silicon for solar cell applications ...

190

High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent ...  

Metallic structures that can be used as transparent electrodes or to enhance the performance of solar ... more energy efficient ... indium tin oxide ...

191

Session P: One-Dimensional Photovoltaics - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 24, 2010 ... Transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) was sputtered onto the surface of ... to Produce Hydrogen: Sudhakar Shet1; 1National Renewable Energy ...

192

JOM: The Member Journal of TMS - JOM Monthly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 12, 2009... transparent conductive film designed to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) films used in touch panels, organic light-emitting diode (OLED) panels, ...

193

Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting  

SciTech Connect

Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of

Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology.

Gary Silverman; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu,Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve Philips Lighting GmbH Goldman, Claudia; Hartmann, Sören; Jessen, Frank; Krogmann, Bianca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred, Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a clear focus on economics and the work plan focused both on doped ZnO process and OLED device structure that would be consistent with the new TCO. The team successfully made 6 inch OLEDs with a serial construction. More process development is required to optimize commercial OLED structures. Feasibility was demonstrated on two different light extraction technologies: 1/4 lambda refractive index matching and high-low-high band pass filter. Process development was also completed on the key precursors for the TCO, which are ready for pilot-plant scale-up. Subsequently, Arkema has developed a cost of ownership model that is consistent with DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing targets as outlined in the DOE SSL R&D Manufacturing 2010 report. The overall outcome of this project was the demonstration that doped zinc oxide can be used for OLED devices without a drop-off in performance while gaining the economic and sustainable benefits of a more readily available TCO. The broad impact of this project, is the facilitation of OLED lighting market penetration into general illumination, resulting in significant energy savings, decreased greenhouse emissions, with no environmental impact issues such as mercury found in Fluorescent technology. The primary objective of this project was to develop a commercially viable process for 'Substrates' (Substrate/ undercoat/ TCO topcoat) to be used in production of OLED devices (lamps/luminaries/modules). This project focused on using Arkema's recently developed doped ZnO technology for the Fenestration industry and applying the technology to the OLED lighting industry. The secondary objective was the use of undercoat technology to improve light extraction from the OLED device. In optical fields and window applications, technology has been developed to mitigate reflection losses by selecting appropriate thicknesses and refractive indices of coatings applied either below or above the functional layer of interest. This technology has been proven and implemented in the fenestration industry for more than 15 years. Successful completion of

Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

2011-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers  

SciTech Connect

The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

Surface Composition, Work Function, and Electrochemical Characteristics of Gallium-Doped Zinc Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) possesses the electric conductivity, thermal stability, and earth abundance to be a promising transparent conductive oxide replacement for indium tin oxide electrodes in a number of molecular electronic devices, including organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes. The surface chemistry of GZO is complex and dominated by the hydrolysis chemistry of ZnO, which influences the work function via charge transfer and band bending caused by adsorbates. A comprehensive characterization of the surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of GZO electrodes is presented, using both solution and surface adsorbed redox probe molecules. The GZO surface is characterized using monochromatic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy after the following pretreatments: (i) hydriodic acid etch, (ii) potassium hydroxide etch, (iii) RF oxygen plasma etching, and (iv) high-vacuum argon-ion sputtering. The O 1s spectra for the GZO electrodes have contributions from the stoichiometric oxide lattice, defects within the lattice, hydroxylated species, and carbonaceous impurities, with relative near-surface compositions varying with pretreatment. Solution etching procedures result in an increase of the work function and ionization potential of the GZO electrode, but yield different near surface Zn:Ga atomic ratios, which significantly influence charge transfer rates for a chemisorbed probe molecule. The near surface chemical composition is shown to be the dominant factor in controlling surface work function and significantly influences the rate of electron transfer to both solution and tethered probe molecules.

Ratcliff, E. L.; Sigdel, A. K.; Macech, M. R.; Nebesny, K.; Lee, P. A.; Ginley, D. S.; Armstrong, N. R.; Berry, J. J.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Role of indium in highly crystalline ZnO thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc oxide and indium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) transparent conducting thin films were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering using separate Zn and In targets. The independent control of the In content in ZnO has helped us to explore the role of indium in influencing the oriented (002) growth, crystallinity, conductivity and mobility of the doped films. The lowest resistivity of ZnO:In thin film is 2.73 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} ohm-cm. At the optimal condition of high (002) orientation, ZnO:In films with electrical resistivity of 7.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} ohm.cm and mobility of 126.4 cm{sup 2}/V.s are achieved.

Singh, Anil; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K. [Thin Film Laboratory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

199

Los Alamos National Laboratory Est. 1943 MPA Materials Matter--Newsletter of the Materials Physics and Applications Division I N S I D E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of solid-state lighting. Indium tin oxide is the most popular transparent conducting oxide for organic. The LANL team identified new compositions that could be alternatives to indium tin oxide for use in organic in poor performance over time (see figure). The DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (Karl

200

RF-SPUTTERED ITO AND ITO:Zr STUDIED BY IN SITU SPECTROSCOPIC ELLIPSOMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(PV) [1]. Oxides of cadmium, indium, and tin with simultaneous visible transparency and relatively) as a result. Indium oxide alloyed with up to ~10 wt.% tin oxide (and called ITO) has been one of the more. Weiss 4 , Bridget R. Rogers 5 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Center for Photovoltaics

Weiss, Sharon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Introduction Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a transparent conducting oxide to create a series connection. ITO is indium tin oxide; CIGS is copper indium photovoltaic modules are entering the renewable energy marketplace in in- creasing volume, with more than cells. A number of such buffer layers have been used, the most common of which are undoped tin oxide (Sn

Beach, Joe

202

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

120122013 General Bulletin US TIN S TATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12012­2013 General Bulletin S TEPHENF.A US TIN S TATE UNIVERSITY 1 9 2 3 General Bulletin FOr 2012­2013 ..............................................................................................................................8 University Calendar for 2012-2013................................................................................................................. 10 May-mester, 2013

Long, Nicholas

204

Yittria and Alumina Nano-scale Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening on Spark Plasma Sintering Kinetics of 13Cr-2Mo ... Synthesis of TiN Nanorods by Thermal Decomposition of Solid/Gas

205

A Low Temperature Fully Lithographic Process For Metal–Oxide Field-Effect Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a low temperature ( ~ 100à °C) lithographic method for fabricating hybrid metal oxide/organic field-effect transistors (FETs) that combine a zinc-indium-oxide (ZIO) semiconductor channel and organic, parylene, ...

Sodini, Charles G.

206

REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO AN IMMOBILE REDUCED TECHNETIUM SPECIES USING TIN(II) APATITE  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic tin(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 to a non-mobile oxidation state and sequesters the technetium, preventing re-oxidization to mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions. Previous work indicated technetium reacted Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index of 12.8 in Cast Stone. An effect by pH is observed on the distribution coefficient, the highest distribution coefficient being l70,900 observed at pH levels of 2.5 to 10.2. The tin apatite was resistant to releasing technetium under test conditions.

Duncan JB

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Introduction to organic solar cells As the need for renewable energy sources becomes more urgent, photovoltaic en-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between two electrodes, one transparent and one reflecting. The glass substrate is coated with indium-tin-oxide indium tin oxide JD current density in dark JL current density under illumination Jn(p) electron (holeCHAPTER ONE Introduction to organic solar cells Summary As the need for renewable energy sources

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

208

Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 83 (2004) 263271 Improving power efficiencies in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blend device, made with indium-tin oxide and Ca electrodes, gives a power conversion efficiency Zp=1 indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold electrodes in a sandwich structure. The TiO2 solgel precursor, prepared.orholdc a National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA b Physics Department, University of California

Carter, Sue

209

Introduction As the evidence of global warming continues to build-up, it is becoming clear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a transparent bottom electrode, nor- mally indium-tin-oxide (ITO), which forms the anode. To enhance the repro molecular orbital ITO Indium-tin-oxide JD Current density in the dark JL Current density under illumination on the natural balance on our planet, underscore the urgency of developing renewable energy sources. Today

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

210

Introduction As discussed in other articles in this issue,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Figure 3a).4,10 Fluorine- doped tin oxide is preferred for the trans- parent electrode over indium tin oxide because indium diffuses into the titania when it is heated to 400 C. We have found that open Renewable Energy Laboratory.) #12;adjusting the time used for the melt infil- tration.9 A 30-nm

McGehee, Michael

211

VOLUME 26 NO 1 JANUARY 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

films composed of donor­acceptor and donor­insulator networks on indium-tin-oxide electrodes Katsuhiko on indium tin oxide electrodes. Garozzo et al. report on a route for production of large-scale substrates Faupel, Universita¨et Kiel, Germany David S. Ginley, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Amit Goyal, UT

Gao, Yanfei

212

CHINA PARTICUOLOGY Vol. 3, No. 6, 321-328, 2005 MICROMECHANICS OF MACROELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) are used as electrodes, and amorphous silicon is used in thin resistance of tin-doped indium oxide on polymer substrates. Appl. Phys. Lett., 76, 1425-1427. Cairns, D. R societal needs for easily accessible information, renewable energy, and sustainable environment

213

Materials availability for thin film (TF) PV technologies development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) manufacturing, which accounts for more than 50 is used to produce Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive layer used in LCD screens, and also in the area. #12;21 6 Conclusions Ambitious goals for renewable energy and generous support regimes in many

214

Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides: Experimental details  

SciTech Connect

This work is an extended version of a paper published previously [S. de Man et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 040402 (2009)], where we presented measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated sphere and a plate coated with either gold or an indium tin oxide (I TO) layer. The experiment, which was performed in air, showed that I TO conducts sufficiently to prevent charge accumulation but is still transparent enough to halve the Casimir attraction when compared to gold. Here we report all the experimental details that, owing to the limited space available, were omitted in the previous article. We discuss the performance of our setup in terms of stability of the calibration procedure and reproducibility of the Casimir force measurement. We also introduce and demonstrate a technique to obtain the spring constant of our force sensor. Furthermore, we present a thorough description of the experimental method, a comprehensive explanation of data elaboration and error analysis, and a complete characterization of the dielectric function and of the surface roughness of the samples used in the actual experiment.

Man, S. de; Heeck, K.; Iannuzzi, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and LaserLaB, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Halving the Casimir force with conductive oxides: experimental details  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is an extended version of a paper published last year in Physical Review Letters [S. de Man et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 040402 (2009)], where we presented measurements of the Casimir force between a gold coated sphere and a plate coated with either gold or an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) layer. The experiment, which was performed in air, showed that ITO is sufficiently conducting to prevent charge accumulation, but still transparent enough to halve the Casimir attraction when compared to gold. Here, we report all the experimental details that, due to the limited space available, were omitted in the previous article. We discuss the performance of our setup in terms of stability of the calibration procedure and reproducibility of the Casimir force measurement. We also introduce and demonstrate a new technique to obtain the spring constant of our force sensor. Furthermore, we present a thorough description of the experimental method, a comprehensive explanation of data elaboration and error analysis, and a...

de Man, Sven; Iannuzzi, Davide

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Copper Indium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Cluster Tool Capabilities The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) cluster tool in the Process Development and Integration Laboratory offers powerful capabilities with integrated chambers for depositing, processing, measuring, and characterizing photovoltaic materials and devices. You can read more on the rationale for developing this cluster tool and its capabilities, and check out the National Solar Technology Roadmap for CIGS Photovoltaics. Contact Miguel Contreras for more details on these capabilities. The Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide cluster tool, manufactured by DCA Instruments, will be operational in 2009. Techniques will include evaporation; radiofrequency, direct-current (DC), and pulsed DC sputtering;

217

Thermodynamics of Indium Dissolution Behavior in FeO-bearing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, the dissolution mechanism of indium into the metallurgical slag has not been ... Clean Production Process of Titanium Sponge and New Method of ...

218

99M-Technetium labeled tin colloid radiopharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved 99m-technetium labeled tin(II) colloid, size-stabilized for reticuloendothelial organ imaging without the use of macromolecular stabilizers and a packaged tin base reagent and an improved method for making it are disclosed.

Winchell, Harry S. (Lafayette, CA); Barak, Morton (Walnut Creek, CA); Van Fleet, III, Parmer (Walnut Creek, CA)

1976-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

219

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond, S.M. (Raymond A.) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Electron Microscopy Study of Tin Whisker Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of tin whiskers formed on sputtered tin layers deposited on brass was studied using electron microscopy. The occurrence of whiskers appeared to be largely independent of the macroscopic stress state in the film; rather it was microscopic compressive stresses arising from the formation of an intermetallic phase that appeared to be the necessary precursor. Whisker morphology was a result of whether nucleation had occurred on single grains or on multiple grains. In the latter case, the whiskers had a fluted or striated surface. The formation of whiskers on electron transparent samples was demonstrated. These samples showed the whiskers were monocrystalline and defect free, and that the growth direction could be determined.

Norton, Murray G. (Washington State University); Lebret, Joel (8392)

2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microwave plasma CVD of NANO structured tin/carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a graphitic tin-carbon composite at low temperatures is described. The method involves using microwave radiation to produce a neutral gas plasma in a reactor cell. At least one organo tin precursor material in the reactor cell forms a tin-carbon film on a supporting substrate disposed in the cell under influence of the plasma. The three dimensional carbon matrix material with embedded tin nanoparticles can be used as an electrode in lithium-ion batteries.

Marcinek, Marek (Warszawa, PL); Kostecki, Robert (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

222

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tin with the substrate. Our focused ion beam (FIB) milling has revealed this internal microstructure. We have also developed ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Designing interlayers to improve the mechanical reliability of transparent conductive oxide coatings on flexible substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we investigate the effect of interlayers on the mechanical properties of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) on flexible polymer substrates. Indium tin oxide (ITO), which is the most widely used TCO film, and Ti, which is the most widely used adhesive interlayer, are selected as the coating and the interlayer, respectively. These films are deposited on the polymer substrates using dc-magnetron sputtering to achieve varying thicknesses. The changes in the following critical factors for film cracking and delamination are analyzed: the internal stress ({sigma}{sup i}) induced in the coatings during deposition using a white light interferometer, the crystallinity using a transmission electron microscope, and the surface roughness of ITO caused by the interlayer using an atomic force microscope. The resistances to the cracking and delamination of ITO are evaluated using a fragmentation test. Our tests and analyses reveal the important role of the interlayers, which significantly reduce the compressive {sigma}{sup i} that is induced in the ITO and increase the resistance to the buckling delamination of the ITO. However, the relaxation of {sigma}{sup i} is not beneficial to cracking because there is less compensation for the external tension as {sigma}{sup i} further decreases. Based on these results, the microstructural control is revealed as a more influential factor than {sigma}{sup i} for improving crack resistance.

Kim, Eun-Hye; Yang, Chan-Woo; Park, Jin-Woo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low frequency pressure modulation of indium antimonide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lumped parameter resonator capable of generating megapascal pressures at low frequency (kilohertz) is described. Accelerometers are used to determine the applied pressure, and are calibrated with a piezoelectric sample. A laser diagnostic was also developed to measure the pressure in semiconductor samples through the band gap pressure dependence. In addition, the laser diagnostic has been used to measure the attenuation coefficient {alpha} of commercially available indium antimonide (InSb) wafers. The resonator and laser diagnostic have been used with InSb samples to verify the pressure response.

Hallock, Gary A. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0240 (United States); Meier, Mark A. [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77252-2189 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Highly efficient blue organic light emitting devices with indium-free transparent anode on flexible substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium-free transparent conducting oxides may provide a lower cost solution for the transparent anode in flexible displays and energy efficient solid state lighting. We report herein a near room temperature sputtering process for generating an indium-free transparent conductive oxide (TCO) coating on a flexible substrate. Specifically, we deposited gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) uniformly over a 12” diameter area at room temperature on polyethylene terephthalate (PET). During deposition, the system heats to about 60oC due to the energetic sputtering conditions, without any noticeable damage to the PET substrate. The GZO films exhibit excellent physical, optical and electrical properties: roughness ~7 nm, transmittance >85% and resistivity ~ 10-3 ohm• cm. Phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on these substrates with comparable performance (16% external quantum efficiency and 33 lm/W power efficiency at 1mA/cm2) to that of devices fabricated on GZO (or ITO) deposited on glass substrates, suggesting flexible GZO/PET substrates may be used instead of high-cost and rigid ITO and glass for flexible displays and solid state lighting.

Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Matson, Dean W.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

The natural and industrial cycling of indium in the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indium is an important metal whose production is increasing dramatically due to new uses in the rapidly growing electronics, photovoltaic, and LED industries. Little is known, however, about the natural or industrial cycling ...

White, Sarah Jane O'Connell

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An evaluation of indium antimonide quantum well transistor technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the super high electron mobility of Indium Antimonide (InSb), researchers have seen great potential to use this new material in high switching speed and low power transistors. In Dec, 2005, Intel and its ...

Liu, Jingwei, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mason-0124123 - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measured work function. Materials to be considered in the talk include pure and tin-doped indium oxide (In2O3, ITO), pure and Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO, AZO), pure and...

229

Microsoft Word - Nanocrystal-in-glass-composites bh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(ICMAB, Spain) have demonstrated the power of this approach by introducing tin-doped indium oxide nanocrystals (ITO NCs) into niobium oxide glass (NbO x ) and showing that a...

230

SSRL Science Highlights Archive | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recently, researchers have altered niobium oxide glass by inserting tin-doped indium oxide nanocrystals into its structure. PDF Version | X-ray diffraction BL11-3 Role...

231

Tunable Transmittance of Near-infrared and Visible Light in Reconstruc...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(ICMAB, Spain) have demonstrated the power of this approach by introducing tin-doped indium oxide nanocrystals (ITO NCs) into niobium oxide glass (NbOx) and showing that a new...

232

K9, Thin Film Encapsulation of Oxide Based Thin Film Transistors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In optimized TTFTs with a composition of [Zn]: [Sn] = 36:64 the relative change of the saturated ... DD4, Oxygen Plasma Exposure Effects on Indium Oxide Nanowire Transistors ... Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy.

233

Photocatalytic and electrochemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid on TiO2 films under UVA and UVB irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalysis is a possible alternative/complementary technology for water purification. Attempts to increase the overall efficiency of the process include using higher energy UV to gain better quantum efficiency and electrochemically assisting the process by the application of an external electrical potential. In this work, nanocrystalline TiO2 films, prepared on borosilicate glass and indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) borosilicate glass, were used to investigate the photocatalytic and electrochemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid under UVA and UVB irradiation. The experiments were carried out in a stirred tank reactor with high mass transfer characteristics. The rate of formic acid oxidation under UVB irradiation was 30 % greater as compared to UVA irradiation. A maximum Uapp of 9 % was obtained under UVA irradiation in 100 % O2 under open circuit or +1.0 V (SCE) applied potential. A maximum Uapp of 20.3 % was obtained under UVB irradiation with 100 % O2 using TiO2 on borosilicate glass. Uapp was 19 % for +1.0 V, 100 % O2, using TiO2 on ITO borosilicate glass under UVB irradiation. The increase in oxidation rates and Uapp with UVB irradiation are due to the higher extinction coefficient of TiO2 at shorter wavelengths and/or the promotion of conduction band electrons to higher more stable states, thus reducing the rate of recombination of charge carriers. The use of a UVB source as compared to a UVA source results in a significant increase in the rate of oxidation and increased apparent quantum yields, however, a cost analysis of the process would

T. A. Mcmurray; J. A. Byrne; P. S. M. Dunlop; E. T. Mcadams

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reliability of Copper Wire Bonding on Copper Substrate with Tin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suitable bonding conditions, Tin thickness, stage temperature, wire bonding power and bonding time are chosen through wire bonding tests. Peel strength of a ...

235

Nanocomposite Carbon/Tin Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries ...  

An approach developed by Robert Kostecki and Marek Marcinek of Berkeley Lab has given rise to a new generation of nanostructured carbon-tin films that ...

236

Silicon/Graphite –Tin Nano-structured Composites Synthesized by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Silicon/Graphite –Tin Nano-structured Composites Synthesized by High Energy Mechanical Milling for Lithium-ion Rechargeable Batteries ...

237

LCD, low-temperature soldering and compound semiconductor : the sources, market, applications and future prospects of indium in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indium is a minor but very valuable metal. Decreasing supplies of indium from refining and increasing demands from LCD, low-temperature soldering and compound semiconductors have stimulated the indium price increase ...

Yong, Foo Nun

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support the liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

Heckman, Richard A. (Castro Valley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

SnO2 functionalized AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor for hydrogen sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Nanocrystalline indium oxide-doped tin oxide thin film as low temperature hydrogen sensor. Sensors and Actuators B Available online 1 May 2012 Keywords: Hydrogen sensor High electron mobility transistors (HEMT) Tin oxide rights reserved. 1. Introduction Hydrogen is a clean, renewable, and sustainable energy carrier

Florida, University of

240

Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Properties of dc magnetron reactively sputtered TiN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titanium nitride is of interest for IC fabrication because of its excellent performance as a metallic diffusion barrier. TiN films have been deposited in a batch sputtering system equipped with dc magnetron cathodes

Jim Stimmell

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Kinetics of the wetting of tin on air-passivated copper in the absence of a fluxing agent  

SciTech Connect

A specially designed ultrahigh vacuum in situ surface analysis and wetting system has been constructed to study the spreading of liquid metal solders on carefully prepared and well-characterized solid substrates. Initial studies have been completed for the spreading of pure tin solder on copper substrates in the absence of any fluxing agent. Surface chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the air-exposed surface to consisted of about 3 nm of Cu{sub 2}O, while the as-received surface consisted of about 8 nm of Cu{sub 2}O. The sputter-cleaned surface contained less than one monolayer (0.3 nm) of Cu{sub 2}O. Sample surfaces were prepared and spreading experiments performed without intermediate exposure of the surfaces to contaminating atmospheres. Solder spreading was performed under 50 torr of highly purified helium gas to allow for adequate thermal coupling between the solder and the substrate. Spreading experiments utilizing a linear temperature ramp show that pure tin solder spreads readily on oxidized copper surfaces at elevated temperatures. The initiation temperature for rapid tin spreading on the as-received copper surface was 325{degrees}C, similar to the temperature where isothermal spreading changes activation energy or rate. Decreasing the thickness of the oxide on the surface lowered the observed temperature for the initiation of spreading and increased the rate of spreading. On the sputter-cleaned copper surface, rapid solder spreading was observed immediately upon melting of the solder.

Peebles, D.E.; Peebles, H.C.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Yost, F.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Investigation of short-range surface forces to develop self-organizing devices by Steven M. Tobias.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Force spectra from atomic force microscopy were used to verify surface energy components of indium tin oxide and mesocarbon microbeads. These materials were selected based on spectroscopic and thermodynamic parameters to ...

Tobias, Steven M., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Interfaces - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Many oxygen ion conductors exhibit similar distortions, opening a new direction .... 1Northwestern University; 2National Renewable Energy Laboratory; ... e.g., in solar cells), alternatives to indium-tin oxide (ITO) as transparent ...

245

P4, Wafer Scale Si Nanowire Arrays for Photovoltaic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) was sputtered onto the surface of the ... The devices showed an energy conversion efficiency of 3.0% and fill factor of 0.25.

246

Enabling Low–Cost Large–Area OPV Solar Power - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plextronics, Inc. is helping seed the renewable energy OPV market by .... Stress Relaxation in GaN Epilayers Grown by MOCVD with Indium Surfactant ... Tight Binding and LCAO Methods for Tin Oxide Deposited by Chemical Vapour ...

247

A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering - Lawrence Berkeley ...  

the more costly indium–tin–oxide widely used in displays, solar ... high-energy (> 100 eV) negative ... Basics and Applications in Thin Film Solar Cells.NewYork ...

248

Organic light-emitting diodes with carbon nanotube cathode ...  

parent indium-tin-oxide !IT O " anode in combination with ... OfÞce of Ener gy EfÞciency and Renewable Ener gy , under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1 1231. 1C. W .

249

A disposable biosensor with Prussian blue deposited electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel electrochemical detector (ECD) to catalyze redox efficiently by electrodepositing Prussian blue (PB, ferric hexacyanoferrate) on the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and amperometric methods were used. ... Keywords: Amperometric, Biosensor, Catecchol, Dopamine, ITO

In-Je Yi; Ju-Ho Kim; Y. J. Choi; C. J. Kang; Yong-Sang Kim

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

PII: S0368-2048(98)00286-2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LC is filled into the gap, a few microns wide, between two polyimide films coated onto indium- tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes which in turn are deposited onto two glass-plate cross...

251

Performance of rearrangeable nonblocking 4×4 switch matrices on LiNbO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, fabrication, and characterization of rearrangeable nonblocking 4×4 switch matrices and the development of a novel ITO (indium-tin-oxide)/Au multilayer electrode that leads to low switching voltages and low DC drift is reported. ...

D. Hoffman; H. Heidrich; H. Ahlers; M. K. Fluge

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

PAD: Polymer-Assisted Deposition of Metal-Oxide and Metal ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent ... for the successful production of both simple and complex metal-oxide films such as TiO2, ITO, SrTiO3, TiN, AlN, and ...

253

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report II.D Electrolytic Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" (in press: International Journal of Hydrogen Energy). 3. "Evaluation of RF-Sputtered Indium-Tin Oxide-Si:Ge), copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), iron oxide (Fe2O3), etc.] that match energy requirements (Primary Contact) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 (303) 275-4270, fax

254

Precipitation in a lead calcium tin anode  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a hot rolled sheet of a tin and calcium bearing lead alloy were solution heat treated at 300 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to room temperature at different rates; these samples were left at room temperature to study natural precipitation of CaSn{sub 3} particles. The samples were aged for 45 days before analysing their microstructure, which was carried out in a scanning electron microscope using secondary and backscattered electron detectors. Selected X-ray spectra analyses were conducted to verify the nature of the precipitates. Images were taken at different magnifications in both modes of observation to locate the precipitates and record their position within the images and calculate the distance between them. Differential scanning calorimeter analyses were conducted on selected samples. It was found that the mechanical properties of the material correlate with the minimum average distance between precipitates, which is related to the average cooling rate from solution heat treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distance between precipitates in a lead alloy is recorded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between the distance and the cooling rate is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the strengthening of the alloy depends on the distance between precipitates.

Perez-Gonzalez, Francisco A., E-mail: fco.aurelio@inbox.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Camurri, Carlos G., E-mail: ccamurri@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Carrasco, Claudia A., E-mail: ccarrascoc@udec.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria de Materiales, Universidad de Concepcion (Chile); Colas, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.colas@uanl.edu.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Centro de Innovacion, Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of annealing on the structural, optical and electrical properties of ITO films by RF sputtering under low vacuum level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were prepared by RF sputtering of ceramic ITO target in pure argon atmosphere at a high base pressure of 3x10^-^4mbar without substrate heating and oxygen admittance. The use of pure argon during deposition resulted ... Keywords: 68.55.J, 73.61.Le, 78.66.Li, 81.15.Cd, Annealing, Electrical properties, Indium tin oxide (ITO), Optical properties, Sputtering, X-ray diffraction

T. S. Sathiaraj

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Session II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2009 ... Advances in Energy: Navin Manjooran1; 1Siemens AG ... generation, renewable energy, energy service, power transmission and power distribution. ... All the films were deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass. ... the impact of germanium (Ge) within an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) conductive matrix.

257

Coordination Chemistry Reviews 256 (2012) 25032520 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orbital; IPCE, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency; ITO, tin-doped indium oxide; LUMO, lowest, fluorine-doped tin oxide; GC­MS, gas chromatography­mass spectrometry; HOMO, highest occupied molecular.V. 1. Introduction The quest for abundant, renewable energy is currently one of society's greatest

258

c o l e P o l y t e c h n i q u e Benedict O'Donnell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silicon c-Si Crystalline Silicon CVD Chemical Vapor Deposition FF Fill factor % ITO Indium-Tin-Oxide JSC .......................................................................................... 35 4. Thin layers of tin and ITO over stable zinc oxide of energy imports led to increased funding in renewable energy. Whereas research had previously focused

259

ISSN:1369 7021 Elsevier Ltd 2007NOVEMBER 2007 | VOLUME 10 | NUMBER 1128 Polymer-based solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 2b) sandwiched between a transparent conductor such as indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulfanate) (PEDOT:PSS) or fluorinated tin oxide (FTO), and a reflecting metal by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), but some have been corroborated by several groups. The key

McGehee, Michael

260

Please cite this article in press as: K.J. Young, et al., Coord. Chem. Rev. (2012), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2012.03.031 ARTICLE IN PRESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orbital; IPCE, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency; ITO, tin-doped indium oxide; LUMO, lowest, fluorine-doped tin oxide; GC­MS, gas chromatography­mass spectrometry; HOMO, highest occupied molecular for abundant, renewable energy is currently one of society's greatest technological challenges. Light energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DISSERTATION IMPACT OF LIFETIME VARIATIONS AND SECONDARY BARRIERS ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer is made up of tin oxide (SnO2) or indium tin oxide (ITO). For low-temperature CdS and Cd. Of all of these energy sources, solar energy is considered the most consistent and abundant renewable. Besides, it is renewable and non-polluting. Therefore, it has huge potential to meet the energy demand

Sites, James R.

262

S. Guha, J. Yang, A. Banerjee, K. Hoffman, S. Sugiyama, and J. Call United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, Michigan 48084 USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Si and a-SiGe alloy layers, and iv) depositing indium tin oxide ([TO) which serves as an antireflection-junction cell. lndium Tin Oxide Deposition Machine The final step in the deposition process is reactive panels were shipped to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for both indoor and outdoor light

Deng, Xunming

263

Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO), Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO)

1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Method for enhancing the solubility of boron and indium in silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

Sadigh, Babak (Oakland, CA); Lenosky, Thomas J. (Pleasanton, CA); Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas (Danville, CA); Giles, Martin (Hillsborough, OR); Caturla, Maria-Jose (Livermore, CA); Ozolins, Vidvuds (Pleasanton, CA); Asta, Mark (Evanston, IL); Theiss, Silva (St. Paul, MN); Foad, Majeed (Santa Clara, CA); Quong, Andrew (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Photocapacitance spectroscopy of surface states on indium phosphide photoelectrodes  

SciTech Connect

Indium phosphide photoelectrodes have been studied in situ using electrochemical photocapacitance spectroscopy. The observed photocapacitance spectra were a strong function of electrode surface conditions. The photoionization energies of the chemically induced surface states correlated well with previously reported values determined by surface photovoltage spectroscopy. The chemical treatment of the InP electrode surface with Co and Pt reduced the concentration of deep level interface states near the valence band and introduced a new state at E/sub v/+1.2 eV.

Goodman, C.E.; Wessels, B.W.; Ang, P.G.P.

1984-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Substituents Dependent Capability of bis(ruthenium-dioxolene-terpyridine)Complexes Toward Water Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bridging ligand, 1,8-bis(2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene (btpyan) was synthesized by the Miyaura-Suzuki cross coupling reaction of anthracenyl-1,8-diboronic acid and 4'-triflyl-2,2':6'-2{double_prime}-terpyridine in the presence of Pd(PPh{sub 3}){sub 4} (5 mol%) with 68% in yield. Three ruthenium-dioxolene dimers, [Ru{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(dioxolene){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (dioxolene = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([1]{sup 0}), 3,5-dichloro-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([2]{sup 0}) and 4-nitro-1,2-benzosemiquinone ([3]{sup 0})) were prepared by the reaction of [Ru{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}(btpyan)]{sup 0} with the corresponding catechol. The electronic structure of [1]{sup 0} is approximated by [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (sq = semiquinonato). On the other hand, the electronic states of [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} are close to [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2} (cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} (cat = catecholato), indicating that a dioxolene having electron-withdrawing groups stabilizes [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2}(cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} rather than [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} as resonance isomers. No sign was found of deprotonation of the hydroxo groups of [1]{sup 0}, whereas [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} showed an acid-base equilibrium in treatments with t-BuOLi followed by HClO{sub 4}. Furthermore, controlled potential electrolysis of [1]{sup 0} deposited on an ITO (indium-tin oxide) electrode catalyzed the four-electron oxidation of H{sub 2}O to evolve O{sub 2} at potentials more positive than +1.6 V (vs. SCE) at pH 4.0. On the other hand, the electrolysis of [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} deposited on ITO electrodes did not show catalytic activity for water oxidation under similar conditions. Such a difference in the reactivity among [1]{sup 0}, [2]{sup 0} and [3]{sup 0} is ascribed to the shift of the resonance equilibrium between [Ru{sub 2}{sup II}(OH){sub 2}(sq){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0} and [Ru{sub 2}{sup III}(OH){sub 2}(cat){sub 2}(btpyan)]{sup 0}.

Wada, T.; Muckerman, J.; Fujita, E.; Tanaka, K.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

267

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Title Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Liu Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 160 Start Page A849 Issue 6 Pagination A849 - A855 Date Published 01/2013 ISSN 0013-4651 Abstract Pure tin (Sn) nanoparticles can be cycled in stable and high gravimetric capacity (>500 mAh/g) with a polyfluorene-type conductive polymer binder in composite electrodes. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles (<150 nanometers, nm) were used as anode materials in this study. The average diameter of Sn secondary particles is 270 nm, calculated based on BET surface area. The composite electrodes contain a conductive polymer binder that constitutes 2% to 10% of the material, without any conductive additives (e.g., acetylene black). The electrode containing the 5% conductive binder showed the best cycling performance, with a reversible capacity of 510 mAh/g. Crystallinity of Sn particles gradually degrades during cycling, and pulverization of particles was observed after long-term cycling, leading to the capacity fade. The conductive polymer binder shows advantages over other conventional binders, such as Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) binders, because it can provide electrical conductivity and strong adhesion during Sn volume change.

268

Direct spark plasma erosion synthesis of tin and silicon alloy nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, silicon and tin must be reduced to the nano-level to mitigate pulverization from drastic volume changes during lithium insertion/extraction. Current ...

269

Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

Not Available

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Silicon-tin oxynitride glassy composition and use as anode for lithium-ion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions which are especially useful in the construction of anode material for thin-film electrochemical devices including rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, electrochromic mirrors, electrochromic windows, and actuators. Additional applications of silicon-tin oxynitride glassy compositions include optical fibers and optical waveguides.

Neudecker, Bernd J. (Knoxville, TN); Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impact of TiN post-treatment on metal insulator metal capacitor performances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), TiN layers must be post-treated with N"2/H"2 plasma. Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitors using CVD-TiN as electrodes and Al"2O"3 as insulator are studied from both electrical and physico-chemical ... Keywords: EELS analysis, Electrical characteristics, MIM capacitors, TiN post-treatment

A. Bajolet; J-P. Manceau; S. Bruyère; R. Clerc; M. Proust; N. Gaillard; J-C. Giraudin; P. Delpech; L. Montès; G. Ghibaudo

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Molten tin reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements. [Patent application; continuous process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel is described. Within a containment vessel, a solid plug of tin and nitride precipitates supports a circulating bath of liquid tin therein. Spent nuclear fuel is immersed in the liquid tin under an atmosphere of nitrogen, resulting in the formation of nitride precipitates. The layer of liquid tin and nitride precipitates which interfaces the plug is solidified and integrated with the plug. Part of the plug is melted, removing nitride precipitates from the containment vessel, while a portion of the plug remains solidified to support te liquid tin and nitride precipitates remaining in the containment vessel. The process is practiced numerous times until substantially all of the precipitated nitrides are removed from the containment vessel.

Heckman, R.A.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Terminator III: Design of Tin-Based Biomimetic Self-Healing Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was first found that adding Indium allowed for a larger range of melting temperature, giving a melting range of 456-483 K. The compositions of 85.5%Sn,

275

Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

(Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Amorphous Indium-Zinc-Oxide Transparent Conductors for Thin Film PV: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous InZnO's (a-IZO) basic PV applicability has now been demonstrated in prototype CIGS, Si Heterojunction (SiHJ) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). However, to move beyond initial demonstration devices, improved TCO properties and processibility of the a-IZO films are needed. Here, RF-superimposed DC sputtering was used to improve the reliable deposition of a-IZO with conductivity > 3000 S/cm.

Perkins, J.; Gennett, T.; Galante, M.; Gillaspie, D.; Ginley, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Amorphous Indium-Zinc-Oxide Transparent Conductors for Thin Film PV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous InZnO's (a-IZO) basic PV applicability has now been demonstrated in prototype CIGS, Si Heterojunction (SiHJ) and organic photovoltaics (OPV). However, to move beyond initial demonstration devices, improved TCO properties and processibility of the a-IZO films are needed. Here, RF-superimposed DC sputtering was used to improve the reliable deposition of a-IZO with conductivity {sigma} >; 3000 S/cm.

Perkins, J.; Gennett, T.; Galante, M.; Gillaspie, D.; Ginley, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Analysis of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistor contact metal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 157-159 (2008). 22 W.L. Bragg, Philosophical Magazine Series 6, 40:236, 169-189 (1920). 23 N.E. Holden, Pure & Appl. Chem. 52, 2349-2384 (1979). 24 J.F. Shackelford and W. Alexander, Materials science and engineering handbook, ed. 3. (CRC...

Kiani, Ahmed; Hasko, David G.; Milne, William I.; Flewitt, Andrew J.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nanocrystals Embedded Zirconium-doped Hafnium Oxide High-k Gate Dielectric Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanocrystals embedded zirconium-doped hafnium oxide (ZrHfO) high-k gate dielectric films have been studied for the applications of the future metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and nonvolatile memory. ZrHfO has excellent gate dielectric properties and can be prepared into MOS structure with a low equivalent oxide thickness (EOT). Ruthenium (Ru) modification effects on the ZrHfO high-k MOS capacitor have been investigated. The bulk and interfacial properties changed with the inclusion of Ru nanoparticles. The permittivity of the ZrHfO film was increased while the energy depth of traps involved in the current transport was lowered. However, the barrier height of titanium nitride (TiN)/ZrHfO was not affected by the Ru nanoparticles. These results can be important to the novel metal gate/high-k/Si MOS structure. The Ru-modified ZrHfO gate dielectric film showed a large breakdown voltage and a long lifetime. The conventional polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) charge trapping layer can be replaced by the novel floating gate structure composed of discrete nanodots embedded in the high-k film. By replacing the SiO2 layer with the ZrHfO film, promising memory functions, e.g., low programming voltage and long charge retention time, can be expected. In this study, the ZrHfO high-k MOS capacitors that separately contain nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide (nc-RuO), indium tin oxide (nc-ITO), and zinc oxide (nc-ZnO) have been successfully fabricated by the sputtering deposition method followed with the rapid thermal annealing process. Material and electrical properties of these kinds of memory devices have been investigated using analysis tools such as XPS, XRD, and HRTEM; electrical characterizations such as C-V, J-V, CVS, and frequency-dependent measurements. All capacitors showed an obvious memory window contributed by the charge trapping effect. The formation of the interface at the nc-RuO/ZrHfO and nc-ITO/ZrHfO contact regions was confirmed by the XPS spectra. Charges were deeply trapped to the bulk nanocrystal sites. However, a portion of holes were loosely trapped at the nanocrystal/ZrHfO interface. Charges trapped to the different sites lead to different detrapping characteristics. For further improving the memory functions, the dual-layer nc-ITO and -ZnO embedded ZrHfO gate dielectric stacks have been fabricated. The dual-layer embedded structure contains two vertically-separated nanocrystal layers with a higher density than the single-layer embedded structure. The critical memory functions, e.g., memory window, programming efficiency, and charge retention can be improved by using the dual-layer nanocrystals embedded floating gate structure. This kind of gate dielectric stack is vital for the next-generation nonvolatile memory applications.

Lin, Chen-Han

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

Wouters, J.M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Imaging experimental coronary artery thrombosis with indium-111 platelets. [Dogs  

SciTech Connect

The ability of cardiac scintigraphy with indium-111 (/sup 111/In)-labeled platelets to detect coronary artery thrombosis (CAT) was assessed in a canine model. Cardiac imaging and tissue distribution studies were performed shortly after administering /sup 111/In-labeled platelets to 12 dogs (group 1) with acute CAT. Four dogs (group 2) with acute CAT were studied 2 and 22 hours after administering /sup 111/In platelets. In addition, four dogs (group 3) with 24-hour-old CAT were similarly evaluated. In all group 1 animals, in vivo imaging 1 to 2 hours after /sup 111/In platelet administration revealed intense uptake in the region of thrombus-containing left anterior descending arteries that was readily discernible from background blood pool activity. Sequential imaging of the four group 2 animals over a 22-hour period revealed no change in the scintigraphic pattern of the thrombosed arteries. In contrast, /sup 111/In platelet imaging in the four group 3 animals with 24-hour-old CAT failed to reveal enhanced activity within the region of the thrombus-containing coronary artery. In the 12 group 1 animals, the CAT accumulated 69 +- 10 (mean +- SEM) times greater activity than present in blood and 651 +- 135 times greater activity than normal left ventricular myocardium. There was 24 +- 7 times greater /sup 111/In activity in the damaged left anterior descending arteries compared with normal circumflex arteries. Similar uptake ratios were seen in group 2 animals. The 24-hour old thrombi from group 3 animals showed no enhanced /sup 111/In uptake. This study demonstrates that experimental acute CAT can be detected readily with /sup 111/In platelet cardiac scintigraphy.

Riba, A.L. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT); Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Zaret, B.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pulmonary uptake in Indium-111 leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with suspected occult infections  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency and significance of pulmonary activity noted on 306 indium-111 leukocyte studies involving 232 patients with suspected occult infections. Forty-eight studies showed pulmonary activity in one of two patterns of uptake, focal or diffuse. Fourteen of 27 studies (52%) with focal uptake and two of 21 studies (10%) with diffuse uptake were associated with infectious processes. Lung uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes was a poor predictor of pulmonary infection in patients studied for occult infection, although the focal pattern was more likely than the diffuse pattern to be associated with infection.

Cook, P.S.; Datz, F.L.; Disbro, M.A.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A.T.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Tin oxide nanosensors for highly sensitive toxic gas detection and their 3D system integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present nanosensors based on ultrathin SnO"2 films, which are very sensitive to the highly toxic gases SO"2 and H"2S. The SnO"2-sensing films are fabricated by a spray pyrolysis process on Si substrates with a thickness of 50nm. The sensor resistance ... Keywords: 3D-system integration, Gas sensors, Nanosensors, Toxic gases

C. Griessler; E. Brunet; T. Maier; S. Steinhauer; A. Köck; T. Jordi; F. Schrank; M. Schrems

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electromechanical properties of freestanding graphene functionalized with tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Freestanding graphene membranes were functionalized with SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. A detailed procedure providing uniform coverage and chemical synthesis is presented. Elemental composition was determined using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A technique called electrostatic-manipulation scanning tunneling microscopy was used to probe the electromechanical properties of functionalized freestanding graphene samples. We found ten times larger movement perpendicular to the plane compared to pristine freestanding graphene and propose a nanoparticle encapsulation model.

Dong, L. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Hansen, J. [Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Xu, P.; Ackerman, M. L.; Barber, S. D.; Schoelz, J. K.; Qi, D.; Thibado, P. M. [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

DFT Study of Initial Oxidation State on TiN Step Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ab Initio Temperature-Dependent Lattice Dynamics for BCC Uranium · Ab Initio ... Accelerated Self-Diffusion in FCC Metals Due to H Induced Superabundant Vacancies .... Solute Diffusion in Ordered Bulk Ni3Al: A First Principles Investigation.

288

Three novel indium MOFs derived from dicarboxylate ligands: Syntheses, structures and photoluminescent properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The self-assembly of InCl{sub 3} with 1,4-phenylenediacetic acid (1,4-H{sub 2}pda), 1,3-benzendicarboxylic acid (1,3-H{sub 2}bdc) and 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (1,4- H{sub 2}chdc) generates three new In(III) MOFs, (Me{sub 2}NH{sub 2})[In(cis-1,4-pda){sub 2}] (1), HIn(1,3-bdc){sub 2}{center_dot}2DMF (2) and In(OH)(trans-1,4-chdc) (3) (Me{sub 2}NH=dimethylamine, DMF=N, N'-dimethylformamide). Compound 1 displays a novel 1D no-planar double chain. Although a mixture of cis- and trans-1,4-H{sub 2}pda was used, the product of compound 1 is a single phase with only cis-pda{sup 2-} ligands. Compound 2 possesses a 2D square lattice with sql topology. Interestingly, in compound 2, the 4-connected building unit containing InO{sub 6} octahedron is firstly occurred in In-MOFs. Compound 3 is built up from the infinite metal-oxide chains cross-linked by trans-1,4-chdc{sup 2-} to form 3D framework with rhombus-shaped channels. Furthermore, compounds 1-3 present intense solid-state fluorescent emissions at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new In-MOFs based on different dicaboxylate acids display 1D chain, 2D layer and 3D open-framework, respectively and show strong luminescence emissions at room temperature. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new indium metal-organic frameworks have been solvothermal synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural variation is attributed to the diverse coordination modes of ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 exhibit 1D double chain, 2D layer and 3D open-framework, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds exhibit strong solid-state luminescence emission at room temperature.

Wang Liping; Song Tianyou; Li Chao; Xia Jing; Wang Shengyan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Li, E-mail: lwang99@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Xu Jianing [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Basic properties of a liquidt in anode solid oxide fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unconventional high temperature fuel cell system, the liquidt in anode solid oxide fuel cell(LTA-SOFC), is discussed. A thermodynamic analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell with a liquid metal anode is developed. Pertinent thermo chemical and thermo physical properties of liquid tin in particular are detailed. An experimental setup for analysis of LTA-SOFC anode kinetics is described, and data for a planar cell under hydrogen indicated an effective oxygen diffusion coefficient of 5.3×10?5 cm2 s?1 at 800 ?C and 8.9×10?5 cm2 s?1 at 900 ?C. This value is similar to previously reported literature values for liquid tin. The oxygen conductivity through the tin, calculated from measured diffusion coefficients and theoretical oxygen solubility limits, is found to be on the same order of thatofyttria-stabilizedzirconia(YSZ), a traditional SOFC electrolyte material. As such,the ohmicloss due to oxygen transport through the tin layer must be considered in practical system cell design since the tin layer will usually be at least as thick as the electrolyte.

Harry Abernathy; RandallGemmen; KirkGerdes; Mark Koslowske; ThomasTao

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Facility Tin City Long Range Radar Station Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tin City Long Range Radar Station Developer Tanadgusix Corp. Energy Purchaser Tin City Long Range Radar Station Location Nome AK Coordinates 65.559372°, -167.949686° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.559372,"lon":-167.949686,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Tin, Antimony, Bismuth, and Tellurium Lewis Acids in sigma-Accepting Ligands for Transition Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interactions between ligands and transition metals have been an essential subject in inorganic chemistry. Other than the commonly known L-type (two-electron donors) and X-type ligands (one-electron donors), Z-type ligands (two-electron acceptors) have begun to surface in the past decade. Capable of drawing a pair of d-electrons away from a metal, Z-ligands affect the electronic structures of transition metals leading to fascinating properties as well as reactivity. In particular, recent advance in Z-ligand chemistry have resulted in the discovery of transition metal borane complexes featuring metal ? boron interactions. Owing to the presence of a metal ? boron interaction which stabilizes the low valent state, these complexes have been shown to activate small molecules such as H2, CO2, and CHCl3. Further, the concept of Z-ligand has been extended to s- and d-block Lewis acids. In spite of these achievements, Z-ligands that contain Group 14-16 elements as Lewis acids remain scarce and relatively unexplored. For this reason, we have launched a series of investigations targeting complexes with transition metal ? Group 14-16 interactions. These investigations have allowed us to synthesize a series of novel complexes with palladium, platinum, or gold as metallobasic late transition metals and tin, antimony, bismuth, and tellurium as Lewis acids. The transition metal ? Lewis acid interactions of these complexes, which are supported by o-phosphinophenylene, 1,8-naphthalenediyl or 8-quinolinyl buttresses, have been established experimentally and theoretically. Further, the reactivity of these complexes toward anions and oxidants has also been explored. These experiments have led to the discovery of tellurium-platinum complexes that sustain reversible two-electron redox processes including the photo-reductive elimination of chlorine. Other noteworthy outcomes of this research include the isolation of the first telluroxanyl-metal complex as well as the discovery of complexes with HgII ? SbV interactions.

Lin, Tzu-Pin

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Materials 2012, 5, 2521-2536; doi:10.3390/ma5122521 ISSN 1996-1944  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures [3­6]. In an inverted OSC, electrons are collected by the indium tin oxide (ITO) bottom electrode of increasing attention around the world for the last 20 years as a potential source of renewable energy. OSC of inverted polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells based on titanium oxide as an electron selective layer

294

Nitrogen-Doped ZnO Nanowire Arrays for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. First, we grow ZnO nanowires on a ZnO nanoparticle seeded indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate using to the success of hydrogen technology is the efficient generation of hydrogen from a renewable energy source, most of the metal oxides have large bandgap energies, leading to limited light absorption

Li, Yat

295

FEATURE ARTICLE T.S. Zhao, Y.S. Li, S.Y. Shen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shifting negatively by about 150 mV. Jou et al. [87] electrodeposited PdCu alloy on indium tin oxide (ITO oxidation reaction, oxygen reduction reaction, cell performance 1 Introduction The growing global energy planet. Hence, developing renewable energy sources at a global scale is urgent for the sustainable

Zhao, Tianshou

296

Improved performance of amorphous silicon solar cells via scattering from surface plasmon polaritons in nearby metallic nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s to remove the surface oxide. A 20 nm indium tin oxide ITO contact layer was then depos- ited by rf.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory for providing a-Si:H thin films for this work. 1 A. Luque and S An engineered enhancement in short-circuit current density and energy conversion efficiency in amorphous silicon

Yu, Edward T.

297

Characterizing organometallic-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown indium gallium nitride islands on gallium nitride for light emitting diode applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The indium-gallium-nitride on gallium-nitride (InGaN/GaN) materials system is a promising candidate for providing a high intensity, high efficiency solution to the yet unsolved problem of… (more)

Anderson, Kathy Perkins Jenkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Paraoccupational exposures to lead and tin carried by electric-cable splicers  

SciTech Connect

To test the hypothesis that electric-cable splicers contaminate their homes with lead and tin, nine splicers were matched with nine of their neighbors. House dust samples were collected in two areas within each home: a laundry room/dirty clothes area, and a composite sample from other areas in the house. Samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence for lead and tin (tin is a tracer to the occupational source of lead). The difference in the geometric mean lead concentrations in the laundry areas between the splicers' and neighbors' homes (1021 ppm and 390 ppm) was statistically significant (p < 0.025). The difference in concentrations from the other areas of the house (585 ppm and 329 ppm) was also significant (p < 0.05). Tin concentrations in house dust were very different between the two groups (p < 0.0005), suggesting that electric-cable splicers were contaminating their homes with lead and tin from work. Recommendations are included to prevent paraoccupational lead exposures by eliminating the pathways into the home. Another recommendation suggests that blood-lead levels be screened in children under the age of seven who live with electric-cable splicers.

Rinehart, R.D.; Yanagisawa, Y. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solar fuels : integration of molecular catalysts with p-type semiconductor photocathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrical homogeneity of indium zinc oxide films”, Appliedand P. Wu, “Transparent Indium Zinc Oxide Ohmic Contact toundoped amorphous indium zinc oxide thin films with low

Kumar, Bhupendra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A layered surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on a polyaniline/In2O3 nanofibre composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

respectively [2]. Indium oxide is an n-type semiconductor,sensors incorporating indium oxide require an elevatedto a gradual change of the indium oxide crystal structure.

Sadek, A Z; Wlodarski, W; Shin, K; Kaner, Richard B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Amorphous Gallium Indium Zinc Oxide NonvolatileAmorphous gallium indium zinc oxide thin film transistors:Effects in Amorphous Gallium–Indium Zinc- xv Oxide Thin Film

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Growth, Characterization, Modeling and Device Applications of Semiconductor Nanowire Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from aluminum oxide coated indium phos- phide nanowirespectroscopy of aluminum oxide coated indium phos- phidealuminum oxide coated (top) and uncoated (bottom) indium

Lohn, Andrew John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID AND LIQUID GROUP III-V ALLOYS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing and indium oxides formed by electrochemicalvalent and trivalent indium oxides show nearly equal Gibbsand the most stable oxide, indium sesquioxide. In the first

Anderson, T.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A study of thermal cycling and radiation effects on indium and solder bump bonding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BTeV hybrid pixel detector is constructed of readout chips and sensor arrays which are developed separately. The detector is assembled by flip-chip mating of the two parts. This method requires the availability of highly reliable, reasonably low cost fine-pitch flip-chip attachment technology. We have tested the quality of two bump-bonding technologies; indium bumps (by Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong) and fluxless solder bumps (by MCNC in North Carolina, USA). The results have been presented elsewhere[1]. In this paper we describe tests we performed to further evaluate these technologies. We subjected 15 indium bump-bonded and 15 fluxless solder bump-bonded dummy detectors through a thermal cycle and then a dose of radiation to observe the effects of cooling, heating and radiation on bump-bonds.

Selcuk Cihangir et al.

2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Optical properties of TiN thin films close to the superconductor-insulator transition.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the intrinsic optical properties over a broad spectral range of TiN thin films deposited on an Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate. We analyze the measured reflectivity spectra of the film-substrate multilayer structure within a well-establish procedure based on the Fresnel equation and extract the real part of the optical conductivity of TiN. We identify the metallic contribution as well as the finite energy excitations and disentangle the spectral weight distribution among them. The absorption spectrum of TiN bears some similarities with the electrodynamic response observed in the normal state of the high-temperature superconductors. Particularly, a mid-infrared feature in the optical conductivity is quite reminiscent of a pseudogap-like excitation.

Pfuner, F.; Degiorgi, L.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Materials Science Division; ETH Zurich; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; IMEC Kapeldreef

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

lntersubbancl transitions in high indium content InGaAs/AIGaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lntersubbancl transitions in high indium content InGaAs/AIGaAs quantum wells H. C. Chui, S. M. Lord report the first observation of intersubband transitions in In,Ga, -#s(y=O.3,0.5)/ AlGaAs quantum wells. These quantum wells were grown on a GaAs substrate with a linearly graded InGaAs buffer to achieve strain

Fejer, Martin M.

309

Defect Levels of Indium-doped CdMnTe Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using photoluminescence (PL) and current deep-level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), we investigated the electronic defects of indium-doped detector-grade CdMnTe:In (CMT:In) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman method. We similarly analyzed CdZnTe:In (CZT:In) and undoped CdMnTe (CMT) crystals grown under the amount of same level of excess Te and/or indium doping level to detail the fundamental properties of the electronic defect structure more readily. Extended defects, existing in all the samples, were revealed by synchrotron white beam x-ray diffraction topography and scanning electron microscopy. The electronic structure of CMT is very similar to that of CZT, with shallow traps, A-centers, Cd vacancies, deep levels, and Te antisites. The 1.1-eV deep level, revealed by PL in earlier studies of CZT and CdTe, were attributed to dislocation-induced defects. In our I-DLTS measurements, the 1.1-eV traps showed different activation energies with applied bias voltage and an exponential dependence on the trap-filling time, which are typical characteristics of dislocation-induced defects. We propose a new defect-trap model for indium-doped CMT crystals.

K Kim; A Bolotinikov; G Camarda; R Gul; A Hossain; G Yang; Y Cui; R James

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Enhancing the efficiency of SnS solar cells via band-offset engineering with a zinc oxysulfide buffer layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S absorber layers without breaking vacuum. Indium tin oxide (ITO) (200 nm) was deposited at room temperature at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), exhibiting an improved cell performance of Jsc ¼ 19.4mA/cm2 by vapor deposition of p-type tin(II) sulfide, SnS, and n-type zinc oxysulfide, Zn(O,S), using a device

Gordon, Roy

311

Impact Dynamics of Oxidized Liquid Metal Drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during the impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number $We^{\\star}$ is employed that uses an effective surface...

Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Microstructure development in Nb3Sn(Ti) internal tin superconducting wire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the inner and outer rings of the 26-bundle wire (left) and in the 85-bundle wire (right). The voids observed to identify the phases present and X-ray microtomography (XMT) to investigate the void volume and distribution tin [1], powder-in-tube (PIT) [2] and bronze processes [3]. In this study, two commercially produced

Elliott, James

313

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

(Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Infrared Emissivity of Tin upon Release of a 25 GPa Shock into a LiF Window  

SciTech Connect

We measured the emissivity of a tin sample at its interface with a lithium-fluoride window upon release of a 25 GPa shock wave from the tin into the window. Measurements were made over four wavelength bands between 1.2 and 5.4 ?m. Thermal emission backgrounds from the tin, glue, and lithium fluoride were successfully removed from the reflectance signals. Emissivity changes for the sample, which was initially nearly specular, were small except for the longest wavelength band, where uncertainties were high because of poor signal-to-noise ratio at that wavelength. A thin glue layer, which bonds the sample to the window, was found to heat from reverberations of the shock wave between the tin and the lithium fluoride. At approximately 3.4 ?m the thermal emission from the glue was large compared to the tin, allowing a good estimate of the glue temperature from the thermal radiance. The glue appears to remain slightly colder than the tin, thereby minimizing heat conduction into or out of the tin immediately after the shock passage.

Turley, W. D., Holtkamp, D. B., Marshall, B. R., Stevens, G. D., Veeser, L. R.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Influence of ITO-silver wire electrode structure on the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to explore the effect of various electrode forms on single-crystal silicon solar cells by changing their front and back electrode structures. The high light penetration depth of the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and the high conductivity of ...

Wern-Dare Jheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hole drift mobility measurements in polycrystalline CuIn1-xGaxSe2 S. A. Dinca and E. A. Schiff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Mo/CuIn1-xGaxSe2/CdS/ZnO/indium tin oxide ITO / Ni/Al grid . The CIGS thin films were grown using elemen. Young National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA W. N. Shafarman Institute the National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL and from the Institute of Energy Conversion IEC . The hole drift

Schiff, Eric A.

318

Polymer solar cells with enhanced open-circuit voltage and efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was then added to the solutions and stirred before use. The solutions were spin-coated on indium tin oxide (ITO.77%, as certified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted much measured PCE being 7.73%. Devices were then encapsulated and sent to the National Renewable Energy

Ismagilov, Rustem F.

319

NUMERICAL MODELING OF CIGS AND CdTe SOLAR CELLS: SETTING THE BASELINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be no experimental evidence of a detrimental band offset there. For other TCOs, such as indium tin oxide, EC may have by the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. REFERENCES [1] S.M. Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices two or more energy levels is not contained in the SRH formalism. We assign the attractive cross

Sites, James R.

320

Introduction Recommendations Environment Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obtain. Parts of solar sells like indium tin oxide, lead, cadmium, chromium (VI), brominated fire:ThenWhat? - Recycling Solar PV Panels." Renewable Energy Focus. 3Aug. 2009.Web. Muller,A.;Wambach, K.;Alsema,A. Mater considering energy input for the processes It is also more energy efficient, and cells with recycled Si shows

Iglesia, Enrique

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole BouleVard., Golden, Colorado 80401 Received, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NANO LETTERS 2009 Vol. 9, No. 1 279-282 10

Fan, Shanhui

322

Introduction 1.1 Solar energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. A transparent, high work function indium-tin oxide (ITO) bottom contact is used as hole collec- tor (anode of climate change stress out the need for renewable energy production. Burning fossil fuels is today's main energy source. However, the ongoing depletion of these non- renewable resources, combined with the impact

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

323

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Figure 1a) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated of Chemistry, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617, Stanford University. | Department of Chemistry, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Cui, Yi

324

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2003 Progress Report Acronyms and Abbreviations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy EIHP European Integrated Hydrogen Project ELAT® Registered Trademark of De Nora North Storage System ISURF Iowa State University Research Foundation ITM Ion Transport Membrane ITO Indium Tin Gases NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NOx Nitric Oxides NPW Net Present Worth NREL National Renewable

325

To whom correspondence should be addressed. Journal of Solid State Chemistry 163, 259}266 (2002)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, electrochromic devices, and transparent semiconducting devices (1). One common TCO is tin-doped indium oxide (ITO. Coutts National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 Received June 13, 2001; in revised the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under subcontract number AAD-9-18668-05. The central facilities

Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

326

Electrochimica Acta 59 (2012) 3238 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the global energy crisis. Seeking clean, cost-competitive, renewable energy resources is an unavoid- able also been used to enhance the electrical and mechanical properties of indium tin 0013-4686/$ ­ see Keywords: Dye-sensitized solar cell Silica modification Titanium oxide a b s t r a c t Nanocomposites

Cao, Guozhong

327

ISSN 1754-5692 Environmental Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, non-conducting, thermoplastic polymer). Indium tin oxide (ITO) (120­150 nm thick, r z 7 � 10�4 U cm by the restructuring of Germany's Renewable Energy Sources Act in 2000, the photovoltaics industry has grown tremenISSN 1754-5692 Energy& Environmental Science COVER ARTICLE Atwater and Lewis etal. Si microwire

Heaton, Thomas H.

328

Fabrication and characterization of CdTe nano pattern on flexible substrates by nano imprinting and electrodeposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nano imprinting technology and the electrodeposition method were applied to make CdTe nano patterns on flexible substrates. An ammonia based aqueous solution was prepared at pH 10.7 and indium tin oxide (ITO)/polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) film with ... Keywords: CdTe nano pattern, Electrodeposition, Flexible substrate, Nano imprinting

Seungju Chun; Kang-Soo Han; Ju-Hyeon Shin; Heon Lee; Donghwan Kim

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

COMMENTARY nature photonics | VOL 1 | JANUARY 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephotonics 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ITO is indium tin oxide, PEDOT is poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), NPB is (N,N'-bis(naphthalene-1-yl organic or inorganic materials. Furthermore, natural biomaterials are a renewable resourceV (­)(+) 1 2 LUMO HOMO Figure 1 BioLEDs, which use DNA to help boost light emission15 . Shown are the energy

Cincinnati, University of

330

Conducting polymer and hydrogenated amorphous silicon hybrid solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-methylpyrrolidone, and isopropanol.14 The modified PEDOT:PSS was spin cast at 800 rpm onto a 25 mm 25 mm indium-tin-oxide ITO coated State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 Qi Wang,b Sean E. Shaheen, and David S. Ginley National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 Eric A. Schiff Department of Physics, Syracuse

Schiff, Eric A.

331

Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 609 2000 Materials Research Society Comparison of Structural Properties and Solar Cell Performance of a-Si:H Films Prepared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fabrication of the nip structure, the devices were completed by evaporative deposition of indium tin oxide. Capangpangan, D. Tsu and A. Chan of ECD, R. Reedy, L. Gedvillas and J. Webb of the National Renewable Energy 13.56 and 70 MHz PECVD Methods S.J. Jones*, D.L. Williamson**, T. Liu*, X. Deng*, and M. Izu* *Energy

Deng, Xunming

332

Fundedprojects Materials Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incorporating transparent indium tin oxide contacts. He has integrated that process with the incorporation by 2020. Yu will collaborate with investigators at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrated photodetector capable of detecting 2.5 Gigabits per second. Enabling highly efficient heat-energy

Zhou, Yuanyuan

333

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014754 Joshua M. Pearce, "Industrial Symbiosis for Very Large Scale Photovoltaic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, or indium tin oxide to be used as the substrates. The production stages in the glass factory that utilize Symbiosis for Very Large Scale Photovoltaic Manufacturing", Renewable Energy 33, pp. 11011108, 2008. http methods of curbing GHG emissions is a world transition from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

Science Highlight January 2011 Figure 1: Architecture of an organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The negative electrode is aluminum, indium tin oxide (ITO) is a common transparent electrode, and the substrate for Organic Solar Cells As worldwide energy consumption continues to increase, there is a pressing need to reduce our dependence on non-renewable and environmentally harmful fossil fuels. Achieving this goal

Wechsler, Risa H.

335

Effects of ultra-violet laser irradiation on graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphene can be applied for transparent electrodes instead of indium tin oxide (ITO). For patterning of ITO, the maskless laser process was reported as a simple and fast process. Raman spectra and electrical resistances of graphene were measured before ... Keywords: Graphene, Maskless laser process, Ultra-violet laser

Fujio Wakaya; Tsuyoshi Teraoka; Toshiya Kisa; Tomoya Manabe; Satoshi Abo; Mikio Takai

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Observation of reduction in Casimir force without change of dielectric permittivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additional information is provided on the effect of the significant (up to 35%) reduction in the magnitude of the Casimir force between an Au-coated sphere and an indium tin oxide film which was observed after UV treatment of the latter. A striking feature of this effect is that the reduction is not accompanied with a corresponding variation of the dielectric permittivity, as confirmed by direct ellipsometry measurements. The measurement data are compared with computations using the Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the data for the untreated sample are in a very good agreement with theory taking into account the free charge carriers in the indium tin oxide. The data for the UV-treated sample exclude the theoretical results obtained with account of free charge carriers. These data are found to be in a very good agreement with theory disregarding the free charge carriers in an indium tin oxide film. A possible theoretical explanation of our observations as a result of phase transition of indium tin oxide from metallic to dielectric state is discussed in comparison with other related experiments.

A. A. Banishev; C. -C. Chang; R. Castillo-Garza; G. L. Klimchitskaya; V. M. Mostepanenko; U. Mohideen

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Improved field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes by an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient way to improve field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer is presented. In this way, the intermediation layer is deposited on an indium tin oxide glass substrate by electrochemical ... Keywords: Ag micro-particle intermediation layer, Carbon nanotubes, Field emission

Wenhui Lu; Hang Song; Yixin Jin; Haifeng Zhao; Zhiming Li; Hong Jiang; Guoqing Miao

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Observation of reduction in Casimir force without change of dielectric permittivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Additional information is provided on the effect of the significant (up to 35%) reduction in the magnitude of the Casimir force between an Au-coated sphere and an indium tin oxide film which was observed after UV treatment of the latter. A striking feature of this effect is that the reduction is not accompanied with a corresponding variation of the dielectric permittivity, as confirmed by direct ellipsometry measurements. The measurement data are compared with computations using the Lifshitz theory. It is shown that the data for the untreated sample are in a very good agreement with theory taking into account the free charge carriers in the indium tin oxide. The data for the UV-treated sample exclude the theoretical results obtained with account of free charge carriers. These data are found to be in a very good agreement with theory disregarding the free charge carriers in an indium tin oxide film. A possible theoretical explanation of our observations as a result of phase transition of indium tin oxide from ...

Banishev, A A; Castillo-Garza, R; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Monitoring of endocrine disruptors by capillary electrophoresis amperometric detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capillary electrophoresis amperometric detector was fabricated using Prussian blue (PB) modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and twisted microchannel configuration. These devices were used for detection of endocrine disruptors, such as bisphenol ... Keywords: Amperometry, Bisphenol A (BPA), Capillary electrophoresis, Endocrine disruptor, Prussian blue (PB), Styrofoam

Kon Ha; Gi-sung Joo; Sandeep Kumar Jha; Yong-Sang Kim

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improvement of short-circuit current density in dye-sensitized solar cells using sputtered nanocolumnar TiO2compact layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a nanocolumnar TiO2 compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) was examined. Such a compact layer was sputtered on a glass substrate with an indium tin oxide (ITO) film using TiO2 powder as the raw material, ...

Lung-Chien Chen; Cheng-Chiang Chen; Bo-Shiang Tseng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ITO Thin Films by RF Sputtering for Ethanol Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensor for detection of ethanol vapours using RF sputter deposited ITO thin film on glass and Si substrates is reported. The principle of operation is the change of resistance of ITO film on exposure to ethanol vapours. The films were annealed at ... Keywords: Indium Tin Oxide, RF sputtering, ethanol sensor

Sudhir Chandra; H. J. Pandya; A. L. Vyas

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Air stable all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells processed from solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

films of CdTe followed by CdSe on indium tin oxide (ITO)features from both the CdSe and CdTe absorption spectra,4). In fact, three-dimensional CdSe colloid arrays have been

Gur, Ilan; Fromer, Neil A.; Geier, Michael L.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

phys. stat. sol. (c) 0, No. 6, 17951815 (2003) / DOI 10.1002/pssc.200303125 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Indium Tin Oxide LCV: Laboratoire des Composants pour la Visualisation LED : Light Emitting Diode tel : Acide Oléique oDCB : Orthodichlorobenzène OLA: Oleylamine OLED: Organic Light Emitting Diode OPD Light Emitting Diode poly-TPD: poly- N,N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl) 1, 1'-biphenyl-4, 4

Nabben, Reinhard

344

Ultra-violet laser processing of graphene on SiO2/Si  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A graphene transparent electrode might be used in industry in the near future instead of indium tin oxide (ITO). For patterning of ITO, the maskless laser process was reported as a simple and fast process. In this paper, effects of ultra-violet laser ... Keywords: Graphene, Maskless laser process, Ultra-violet laser

Fujio Wakaya, Tadashi Kurihara, Satoshi Abo, Mikio Takai

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P{sub 450} reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates. 1 fig. 2 tab.

Shelnutt, J.A.

1989-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Multifunctional Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3) Electric, ferroelectric, magnetic and photonic properties of oxides 4) Theoretical modeling of epitaxial growth, interfaces and microstructures 5) Composition ...

348

Alternating layers of plutonium and lead or indium as surrogate for plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elemental plutonium (Pu) assumes more crystal structures than other elements, plausibly due to bonding f electrons becoming non-bonding. Complex geometries hamper understanding of the transition in Pu, but calculations predict this transition in a system with simpler geometry: alternating layers either of plutonium and lead or of plutonium and indium. Here the transition occurs via a pairing-up of atoms within Pu layers. Calculations stepping through this pairing-up reveal valuable details of the transition, for example that the transition from bonding to non-bonding proceeds smoothly.

Rudin, Sven Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Waste reduction options for manufacturers of copper indium diselenide photovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper identifies general waste reduction concepts and specific waste reduction options to be used in the production of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic cells. A general discussion of manufacturing processes used for the production of photovoltaic cells is followed by a description of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for waste reduction (i.e., waste minimization through pollution prevention). A more specific discussion of manufacturing CIS cells is accompanied by detailed suggestions regarding waste minimization options for both inputs and outputs for ten stages of this process. Waste reduction from inputs focuses on source reduction and process changes, and reduction from outputs focuses on material reuse and recycling.

DePhillips, M.P.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

It's Elemental - The Periodic Table of Elements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selenium Bromine Krypton Rubidium Strontium Yttrium Zirconium Niobium Molybdenum Technetium Ruthenium Rhodium Palladium Silver Cadmium Indium Tin Antimony Tellurium Iodine...

351

Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Attacking the Kad Network Peng Wang, James Tyra, Eric Chan-Tin, Tyson Malchow, Denis Foo Kune,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attacking the Kad Network Peng Wang, James Tyra, Eric Chan-Tin, Tyson Malchow, Denis Foo Kune 55455 {pwang,tyra,dchantin,malchow,foo,hopper,kyd}@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT The Kad network

Kim, Dae-Shik

353

Methods for chemical recovery of non-carrier-added radioactive tin from irradiated intermetallic Ti-Sb targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method of chemical recovery of no-carrier-added radioactive tin (NCA radiotin) from intermetallide TiSb irradiated with accelerated charged particles. An irradiated sample of TiSb can be dissolved in acidic solutions. Antimony can be removed from the solution by extraction with dibutyl ether. Titanium in the form of peroxide can be separated from tin using chromatography on strong anion-exchange resin. In another embodiment NCA radiotin can be separated from iodide solution containing titanium by extraction with benzene, toluene or chloroform. NCA radiotin can be finally purified from the remaining antimony and other impurities using chromatography on silica gel. NCA tin-117m can be obtained from this process. NCA tin-117m can be used for labeling organic compounds and biological objects to be applied in medicine for imaging and therapy of various diseases.

Lapshina, Elena V. (Troitsk, RU); Zhuikov, Boris L. (Troitsk, RU); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Ermolaev, Stanislav V. (Obninsk, RU); Togaeva, Natalia R. (Obninsk, RU)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Atomic layer deposition of tin oxide with nitric oxide as an oxidant gas Jaeyeong Heo, Sang Bok Kim and Roy G. Gordon*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to applications of SnO2 such as energy- conserving windows for buildings,3 gas sensors,4,5 and transparent efficiency of the cells.6­11 The authors recently reported a successful growth of SnO2 by atomic layer process is expected to be widely useful for coating nanostructures with high surface areas and extremely

Gordon, Roy

355

A study of thermal cycling and radiation effects on indium and solder bump bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BTeV hybrid pixel detector is constructed of readout chips and sensor arrays which are developed separately. The detector is assembled by flip-chip mating of the two parts. This method requires the availability of highly reliable, reasonably low cost fine-pitch flip-chip attachment technology. We have tested the quality of two bump-bonding technologies; indium bumps (by Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong) and fluxless solder bumps (by MCNC in North Carolina, USA). The results have been presented elsewhere [1]. In this paper we describe tests we performed to further evaluate these technologies. We subjected 15 indium bump-bonded and 15 fluxless solder bump-bonded dummy detectors through a thermal cycle and then a dose of radiation to observe the effects of cooling, heating and radiation on bump-bonds. We also exercised the processes of HDI mounting and wire bonding to some of the dummy detectors to see the effect of these processes on bump bonds.

Simon Kwan et al.

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

356

Characterization of SAES St198 zirconium-iron-tin alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A waste minimization program to develop a non-oxidative stripper system based on metallic getters is being conducted. Initial development is being performed using a Zr-Fe-Sn intermetallic alloy getter procured as Stl98 from SAES Gefters/USA., Inc. This memorandum describes characterizations of physical and compositional properties of SAES Stl98. SAES Stl98 getter was supplied as very durable, cylindrical pellets made by compaction of. granules of Zr-Fe-Sn alloy up to 150 {mu}m in size. Pellet density was 5.2 g/mL corresponding to 24.8% open porosity and very little closed porosity. Bulk composition of Stl98 was 73.6 weight percent (w/o) Zr, 23.3 w/o Fe and 1.2 w/o Sn. Stl98 consists of Zr{sub 2}Fe primary phase along with four secondary phases (ZrFe{sub 2}, Zr{sub 5}FeSn, {alpha}-zirconium, and {eta}-Zr{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 0.6}). Hydriding characteristics of Stl98 are expected to differ slightly from those of Zr{sub 2}Fe because {alpha}-zirconium and, possibly, Zr{sub 5}FeSn also react with hydrogen.

Mosley, W.C.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of SAES St198 zirconium-iron-tin alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A waste minimization program to develop a non-oxidative stripper system based on metallic getters is being conducted. Initial development is being performed using a Zr-Fe-Sn intermetallic alloy getter procured as Stl98 from SAES Gefters/USA., Inc. This memorandum describes characterizations of physical and compositional properties of SAES Stl98. SAES Stl98 getter was supplied as very durable, cylindrical pellets made by compaction of. granules of Zr-Fe-Sn alloy up to 150 [mu]m in size. Pellet density was 5.2 g/mL corresponding to 24.8% open porosity and very little closed porosity. Bulk composition of Stl98 was 73.6 weight percent (w/o) Zr, 23.3 w/o Fe and 1.2 w/o Sn. Stl98 consists of Zr[sub 2]Fe primary phase along with four secondary phases (ZrFe[sub 2], Zr[sub 5]FeSn, [alpha]-zirconium, and [eta]-Zr[sub 4]Fe[sub 2]O[sub 0.6]). Hydriding characteristics of Stl98 are expected to differ slightly from those of Zr[sub 2]Fe because [alpha]-zirconium and, possibly, Zr[sub 5]FeSn also react with hydrogen.

Mosley, W.C.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nanopattern-stimulated superconductor-insulator transition in thin TiN films.  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of the comparative study of transport properties of continuous and nanoperforated TiN films, enabling us to separate the disorder and the geometry effects. Nanopatterning transforms a thin TiN film into an array of superconducting weak links and eo ipso stimulates the disorder- and magnetic-field-driven superconductor-to-insulator transitions, shifting both transitions to a lower degree of microscopic disorder. We observe magnetoresistance oscillations reflecting collective phase-frustration behaviour of the multiconnected superconducting weak link network in a wide range of temperatures. We find that nanopatterning enhances the role of the two-dimensional Coulomb interaction and changes the characteristic energies of the film on length scales significantly larger than the mean free path or the superconducting coherence length.

Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Mironov, A. Yu.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Nasimov, D. A.; Latyshev, A. V. (Materials Science Division); (A. V. Rzhanov Inst. Semoconductor Physics); (Russian Academy of Sciences)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Experimental Characterization of a Direct Carbon Solid Oxide Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To more rationally guide the design of liquid tin anode SOFCs, research at NETL has focused on measuring the kinetic parameters of the liquid tin anode under ...

360

Leaching of indium from obsolete liquid crystal displays: Comparing grinding with electrical disintegration in context of LCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two pre-treatment methods, prior to leaching of indium from obsolete LCD modules, were described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional grinding and electrical disintegration have been evaluated and compared in the context of LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental data on the leaching capacity for indium and the electricity consumption of equipment were inputted into the LCA model in order to compare the environmental performance of each method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An estimate for the environmental performance was calculated as the sum of six impact categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical disintegration method outperforms conventional grinding in all impact categories. - Abstract: In order to develop an effective recycling system for obsolete Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs), which would enable both the leaching of indium (In) and the recovery of a pure glass fraction for recycling, an effective liberation or size-reduction method would be an important pre-treatment step. Therefore, in this study, two different types of liberation methods: (1) conventional grinding, and (2) electrical disintegration have been tested and evaluated in the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). In other words, the above-mentioned methods were compared in order to find out the one that ensures the highest leaching capacity for indium, as well as the lowest environmental burden. One of the main findings of this study was that the electrical disintegration was the most effective liberation method, since it fully liberated the indium containing-layer, ensuring a leaching capacity of 968.5 mg-In/kg-LCD. In turn, the estimate for the environmental burden was approximately five times smaller when compared with the conventional grinding.

Dodbiba, Gjergj, E-mail: dodbiba@sys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan); Nagai, Hiroki; Wang Lipang; Okaya, Katsunori; Fujita, Toyohisa [Department of System Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of silver addition on the ethanol-sensing properties of indium oxide nanoparticle layers: optical absorption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In2O3 and In2O3:Ag nanoparticle layers have been deposited using a two-step method consisting of chemical capping and dip coating techniques. The result of optical absorption analysis of In2O3:Ag ...

Vidya Nand Singh; Bodh Raj Mehta; Rakesh Kumar Joshi; Frank Einar Kruis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Oxidation of Palladium Surfaces Submitted by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cutoff for the plane wave representation in the interstitial region between the muffin-tin spheres is Ewf

363

No difference in sensitivity for occult infection between tropolone- and oxine-labeled indium-111 leukocytes  

SciTech Connect

There is considerable disagreement as to whether oxine or tropolone is the best labeling agent for indium leukocytes. The authors have previously looked at the sensitivity of oxine-labeled /sup 111/In leukocyte scans for occult infections and now present a similar group of patients imaged with tropolone-labeled /sup 111/In leukocytes. Thirty-four patients (38 studies) with possible occult infection were prospectively studied. Patients were imaged 1-4 hr after injection and again at 24 hr postinjection. The differences in sensitivity between oxine and tropolone when imaged early and at 24 hr were not statistically significant. They conclude that there is not significant difference in the ability to detect infection between oxine- and tropolone-labeled leukocytes, both early at 1-4 hr, and on delayed imaging 24 hr after injection.

Datz, F.L.; Bedont, R.A.; Baker, W.J.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum  

SciTech Connect

A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic K? lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K? line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

2008-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

Microstructure evolution in TiN films reactively sputter deposited on multiphase substrates  

SciTech Connect

Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM) has been used to investigate the microstructure of TiN films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering onto ASP 30 high speed steel (HSS) substrates. ASP 30 is a multiphase material consisting of a martensitic matrix with MC and M/sub 6/C transition--metal particles embedded in it. The TiN films were approx.4 ..mu..m thick and were grown at substrate temperatures T/sub s/ between 200 and 550/sup 0/C. The X-TEM results showed that the film microstructure was very nonhomogeneous. A dense columnar morphology was observed above both the martensitic and M/sub 6/C substrate phases. The average column diameter ranged from 15 nm (T/sub s/ = 200/sup 0/C) to 50 nm (T/sub s/ = 550/sup 0/C) near the film/substrate interface over the martensitic phase and was in a factor of 2 less in the film regions adjacent to the M/sub 6/C phase. increased in both regions to 100 nm (T/sub s/ = 200/sup 0/C) to 150 nm (T/sub s/ = 550/sup 0/C) near the surface of the films. TiN grew epitaxially on MC particles but contained a high dislocation density which (except at 550/sup 0/C where some of the epitaxial grains extended throughout the entire film thickness) eventually coalesced to form low-angle grain boundaries and, finally, high-angle boundaries.

Helmersson, U.; Sundgren, J.; Greene, J.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Indium and impurity incorporation in InGaN films on polar, nonpolar, and semipolar GaN orientations grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

The effects of NH{sub 3} flow, group III flux, and substrate growth temperature on indium incorporation and surface morphology have been investigated for bulk InGaN films grown by ammonia molecular beam epitaxy. The incorporation of unintentional impurity elements (H, C, O) in InGaN films was studied as a function of growth temperature for growth on polar (0001) GaN on sapphire templates, nonpolar (1010) bulk GaN, and semipolar (1122), (2021) bulk GaN substrates. Enhanced indium incorporation was observed on both (1010) and (2021) surfaces relative to c-plane, while reduced indium incorporation was observed on (1122) for co-loaded conditions. Indium incorporation was observed to increase with decreasing growth temperature for all planes, while being relatively unaffected by the group III flux rates for a 1:1 Ga:In ratio. Indium incorporation was found to increase at the expense of a decreased growth rate for higher ammonia flows; however, smooth surface morphology was consistently observed for growth on semipolar orientations. Increased concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen were observed on semipolar and nonpolar orientations with a clear trend of increased hydrogen incorporation with indium content.

Browne, David A.; Young, Erin C.; Lang, Jordan R.; Hurni, Christophe A.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preparation of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor films by electrodeposition for fabricating high efficiency solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of 13.6% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide precursor thin film. The film is fabricated by first simultaneously electrodepositing copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a glass/molybdenum substrate (12/14). The electrodeposition voltage is a high frequency AC voltage superimposed upon a DC voltage to improve the morphology and growth rate of the film. The electrodeposition is followed by physical vapor deposition to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In.sub.1-n Ga.sub.x)Se.sub.2, with the ratio of Ga/(In+Ga) being approximately 0.39.

Bhattacharya, Raghu N. (Littleton, CO); Hasoon, Falah S. (Arvada, CO); Wiesner, Holm (Golden, CO); Keane, James (Lakewood, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Ramanathan, Kannan (Golden, CO)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Viscoelastic properties of oxide-coated liquid metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many liquid metals exposed to air develop an oxide film on their outer surface. This film is sufficiently solid-like to provide mechanical stability to small liquid metal droplets, yet weak enough to allow the droplets to be malleable. These properties are useful in both micro-electronics and microfluidics; however, little is known about how to characterize them. Here we probe the elastic, yielding, and relaxation properties of oxide-coated gallium and eutectic gallium indium using a rheometer equipped with a parallel-plate geometry. By using parallel plates of different size, we show that surface stresses dominate bulk stresses. These experiments also demonstrate that the apparent elastic properties of the oxide film are highly sensitive to its strain history. Moreover, the apparent elasticity is sensitive to the stresses stored in the oxide skin. We probe these stresses and their time-dependence, with both torque and normal force measurements. We also characterize the time-dependence of the elasticity by observing free vibrations of the rheometer. We rationalize the strain history and time-dependence in terms of oxidation and show that despite this dependence, reproducible elasticity measurements can be obtained due to the ability of shear to produce a state that is independent of the strain history. © 2009 The Society of Rheology. ?DOI: 10.1122/1.3236517? I.

Ryan J. Larsen A; Michael D. Dickey B; George M. Whitesides; David A. Weitz C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Spin-polarized relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method: Volume-dependent electronic structure and magnetic moment of plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear-muffin-tin-orbital method is generalized to the case of relativistic and spin-polarized self-consistent band calculations. Our formalism is analogous to the standard orthogonal--linear-muffin-tin-orbital formalism, except that the potential functions and the potential parameters are now matrices. The method is used to perform density-functional calculations for fcc plutonium with different atomic volumes. The formation of spin and orbital magnetic moments, as well as the changes in the energy bands for volume changes corresponding to the {alpha}-{delta} transition, are investigated. The calculated magnetic moments agree quite well with the experimental ones.

Solovyev, I.V. (Institute of Chemistry, Ural Branch of U.S.S.R. Academy of Science, Sverdlovsk GSP-145, U.S.S.R. (SU)); Liechtenstein, A.I. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-7000 Stuttgart 80, Federal Republic of Germany (DE)); Gubanov, V.A. (Institute of Chemistry, Ural Branch of U.S.S.R. Academy of Science, Sverdlovsk GSP-145, U.S.S.R. (SU)); Antropov, V.P. (Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of U.S.S.R. Academy of Science, Sverdlosk GSP-145, U.S.S.R. (SU)); Andersen, O.K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-7000 Stuttgart 80, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

1991-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reference Data for the Density and Viscosity of Liquid Cadmium, Cobalt, Gallium, Indium, Mercury, Silicon, Thallium, and Zinc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The available experimental data for the density and viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc have been critically examined with the intention of establishing both a density and a viscosity standard. All experimental data have been categorized into primary and secondary data according to the quality of measurement, the technique employed and the presentation of the data, as specified by a series of criteria. The proposed standard reference correlations for the density of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 0.6, 2.1, 0.4, 0.5, 2.2, 0.9, and 0.7, respectively. In the case of mercury, since density reference values already exist, no further work was carried out. The standard reference correlations for the viscosity of liquid cadmium, cobalt, gallium, indium, mercury, silicon, thallium, and zinc are characterized by percent deviations at the 95% confidence level of 9.4, 14.0, 13.5, 2.1, 7.3, 15.7, 5.1, and 9.3, respectively.

Assael, Marc J.; Armyra, Ivi J.; Brillo, Juergen; Stankus, Sergei V.; Wu Jiangtao; Wakeham, William A. [Chemical Engineering Department, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Institut fuer Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, 51170 Koeln (Germany); Kutateladze Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Brunch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev ave. 1, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Center of Thermal and Fluid Science, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Chemical Engineering Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2BY (United Kingdom)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Phase Structure and Cyclic Deformation in Eutectic Tin-Lead Alloy: A Numerical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is devoted to providing a mechanistic rationale of coarsening induced failure in solder alloys during thermomechanical fatigue. Micromechanical modeling of cyclic deformation of eutectic tin-lead alloy was undertaken using the finite element method. The models consist of regularly arranged tin-rich and lead-rich phases, simulating the lamellar array and colony structure in a typical eutectic system. A fine structure and a coarse structure, bearing the same phase fraction but different in the aspect ratio of each lead-rich layer and in the number of lead-rich layers in each colony, are utilized for representing the microstructure before and after coarsening, respectively. Both phases are treated as elastic-plastic solids with their respective properties. For simplicity the creep effect is ignored without compromising the main objective of this study. Cyclic loading under pure shear and uniaxial conditions is modeled. It is found that both the fine and coarse structures exhibit essentially the same macroscopic stress-strain response. The coarse structure, however, shows a greater maximum effective plastic strain on a local scale throughout the deformation. The numerical result implies that, in a solder joint, a locally coarsened region may not be mechanically weaker than its surrounding, but it is subject to early damage initiation due to accumulated plasticity. Other implications regarding solder alloy failure and micromechanical modeling of two-phase materials are discussed.

FANG,HUEI ELIOT; Li,W; SHEN,Y.-L

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Large-scale, nonsubtractive patterning of transparent conducting oxides by ion bombardment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While significant progress has been achieved in the fabrication and performance of transparent electronic devices, substantially less research effort has been devoted to transparent interconnects, despite their critical importance for transparent integrated circuitry. Here, we exploit the crystal disorder induced by Ar{sup +} ion bombardment to achieve efficient fabrication of electrically conductive patterns on indium oxide surfaces. The resulting ion-induced patterns are characterized by conductive atomic force microscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and four-point charge transport measurements. Massively parallel patterning is demonstrated over square centimeter areas with a patterned electrical conductivity of {approx}10{sup 4} S cm{sup -1}.

Sosa, Norma E.; Chen, Christopher; Liu Jun; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

375

Oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

Neutron scattering from elemental indium, the optical model, and the bound-state potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron differential elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental indium are measured from 4.5 to 10 MeV at incident-energy intervals of {approx}500 keV. Seventy or more differential values are obtained at each incident energy, distributed between {approx}18{degree} and 160{degree}. These experimental results are combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory, and with 11 and 14 MeV results in the literature, to form a comprehensive elastic-scattering database extending from {approx}1.5 to 14 MeV. These data are interpreted in terms of a conventional spherical optical model. The resulting potential is extrapolated to the bound-state regime. It is shown that in the middle of the 50--82 neutron shell, the potential derived from the scattering results adequately describes the binding energies of article states, but does not do well for hole states. The latter shortcoming is attributed to the holes states having occupational probabilities sufficiently different from unity, so that the exclusion principle become a factor, and to the rearrangement of the neutron core. 68 refs.

Chiba, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Guenther, P.T.; Lawson, R.D.; Smith, A.B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Environmental and health aspects of copper-indium-diselenide thin-film photovoltaic modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) is a semiconductor compound that can be used to produce thin-film photovoltaic modules. There is on-going research being conducted by various federal agencies and private industries to demonstrate the commercial viability of this material. Because this is a new technology, and because scant information about the health and environmental hazards associated with the use of this material is available, studies have been initiated to characterize the environmental mobility and environmental toxicology of this compound. The objective of these studies is to identify the environmental and health hazards associated with the production, use, and disposal of CIS thin-film photovoltaic modules. The program includes both experimental and theoretical components. Theoretical studies are being undertaken to estimate material flows through the environment for a range of production options as well as use and disposal scenarios. The experimental programs characterize the physical, chemical e.g. leachability and biological parameters e.g. EC{sub 50} in daphnia and algae, and feeding studies in rats.

Steinberger, H. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Solid State Technology, Munich (Germany); Thumm, W.; Freitag, R. [GSF-Inst. of Ecological Chemistry, Oberschleissheim (Germany); Moskowitz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chapin, R. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Formation of zinc oxide films using submicron zinc particle dispersions  

SciTech Connect

The thermal oxidation of submicron metallic Zn particles was studied as a method to form nanostructured ZnO films. The particles used for this work were characterized by electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and thermal analysis to evaluate the Zn-ZnO core shell structure, surface morphology, and oxidation characteristics. Significant nanostructural changes were observed for films annealed to 400 °C or higher, where nanoflakes, nanoribbons, nanoneedles and nanorods were formed as a result of stress induced fractures arising in the ZnO outer shell due to differential thermal expansion between the metallic Zn core and the ZnO shell. Mass transport occurs through these defects due to the high vapor pressure for metallic Zn at temperatures above 230 °C, whereupon the Zn vapor rapidly oxidizes in air to form the ZnO nanostructures. The Zn particles were also incorporated into zinc indium oxide precursor solutions to form thin film transistor test structures to evaluate the potential of forming nanostructured field effect sensors using simple solution processing.

Rajachidambaram, Meena Suhanya; Varga, Tamas; Kovarik, Libor; Sanghavi, Rahul P.; Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Han, Seungyeol; Chang, Chih-hung; Herman, Gregory S.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pressure-temperature phase diagram for a tin modified lead zirconate titanate ceramic.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural phase transformations between ferroelectric (FE), antiferroelectric (AFE), and paraelectric (FE) phases are frequently observed in the zirconia-rich phase region on the lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) phase diagram. Since the free energy difference among these phases is small, phase transformation can be easily induced by temperature, pressure and electric field. These induced transformation characteristics have been used for many practical applications. This study focuses on a hydrostatic pressure induced FE-to-AFE phase transformation in a tin modified PZT ceramic (PSZT). The relative phase stability between FE and AFE phases is determined by the dielectric permittivity measurement as a function of temperature from -60 C to 125 C. A pressure-temperature phase diagram for the PSZT system will be presented.

Grubbs, Robert K.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Roesler, Alexander William; Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Moore, Roger Howard

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Native Defects in CdO and CdCuO Alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxide or ITO.   ITO is indium  oxide alloyed with several primarily  of  indium  oxide  will  always  result  in candidate to replace indium oxide.    The next section will 

Speaks, Derrick Tyson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Growth and morphology of 0.80 eV photoemitting indium nitride nanowires  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

InN nanowires with high efficiency photoluminescence emission at 0.80 eV are reported for the first time. InN nanowires were synthesized via a vapor solid growth mechanism from high purity indium metal and ammonia. The products consist of only hexagonal wurtzite phase InN. Scanning electron microscopy showed wires with diameters of 50-100nm and having fairly smooth morphologies. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed high quality, single crystal InN nanowires which grew in the <0001> direction. The group-III nitrides have become an extremely important technological material over the past decade. They are commonly used in optoelectronic devices, such as high brightness light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and low wavelength laser diodes (LDs), as well as high power/high frequency electronic devices. Recently InN thin films grown by MOCVD and MBE were found to have a bandgap energy in the range of 0.7-0.9 eV, much lower than the value of {approx}1.9 eV found for InN films grown by sputtering. This large decrease in the direct bandgap transition energy and the ability to form ternary (InGaN) and quaternary (AlInGaN) alloys increases the versatility of group-III nitride optoelectronic devices, ranging from the near IR to the UV. Additionally, InN has some promising transport and electronic properties. It has the smallest effective electron mass of all the group-III nitrides which leads to high mobility and high saturation velocity10 and a large drift velocity at room temperature. As a result of these unique properties, there has been a large increase in interest in InN for potential use in optoelectronic devices, such as LDs and high efficiency solar cells, as well as high frequency/high power electronic devices.

Johnson, M.C.; Lee, C.J.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Konsek, S.L.; Aloni, S.; Han, W.Q.; Zettl, A.

2004-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

A New Portable Instrument for In Situ Measurement of Atmospheric Methane Mole Fraction by Applying an Improved Tin Dioxide–Based Gas Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new portable instrument based on a tin dioxide natural gas leak detector was developed to monitor the atmospheric methane mixing ratio in areas lacking sufficient infrastructure to sustain a conventional measurement system, such as a large ...

Hiroshi Suto; Gen Inoue

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

and electrical properties of zinc oxide films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Undoped and indium-doped ZnO films have been deposited onto glass substrates by the spray pyrolysis method. The effect of indium incorporation on structural and electrical properties of ZnO films has been investigated. Zinc acetate dihydrate, indium chloride were used as a starting material and a dopant source, respectively. X-ray diffraction pattern of the films showed hexagonal wurtzite type polycrystalline structure. The results show that indium incorporation leads to substantial changes in the structural characteristics of ZnO films. The grain size was found to be in the range 15-50 nm, depending on indium content. In addition, the surface morphology features of the films, as a function of the indium content, are shown. For all the films, a linear dependence typical of ohmic behavior was observed. The electrical conductivity of ZnO films was improved by indium incorporation. The most important changes were observed for 1 at. % In-doped ZnO film which exhibit a resistivity of 3.2x10-1 ?cm. At certain constant voltage, from Arrhenius plots of In-doped ZnO films, activation energy values have been calculated from 17 meV to 89 meV.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Synthesizing photovoltaic thin films of high quality copper-zinc-tin alloy with at least one chalcogen species  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing a thin film of copper, zinc, tin, and a chalcogen species ("CZTCh" or "CZTSS") with well-controlled properties. The method includes depositing a thin film of precursor materials, e.g., approximately stoichiometric amounts of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), tin (Sn), and a chalcogen species (Ch). The method then involves re-crystallizing and grain growth at higher temperatures, e.g., between about 725 and 925 degrees K, and annealing the precursor film at relatively lower temperatures, e.g., between 600 and 650 degrees K. The processing of the precursor film takes place in the presence of a quasi-equilibrium vapor, e.g., Sn and chalcogen species. The quasi-equilibrium vapor is used to maintain the precursor film in a quasi-equilibrium condition to reduce and even prevent decomposition of the CZTCh and is provided at a rate to balance desorption fluxes of Sn and chalcogens.

Teeter, Glenn; Du, Hui; Young, Matthew

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Distribution of aluminum and indium impurities in crystals of Ge-Si solid solutions grown from the melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem regarding the distribution of aluminum and indium impurities in bulk crystals of solid solutions with a variable composition Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.3) is solved in order to establish regularities of the changes in the segregation coefficients of impurities with variations in the composition of the host lattice in the germanium-silicon system. Aluminum-and indium-doped crystals of Ge{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.3) solid solutions with a silicon content decreasing along the crystallization axis are grown by a modified Bridgman method with the use of a silicon seed. The concentration distribution of impurities over the length of the crystals is determined from Hall measurements. It is demonstrated that the experimental data on the concentration distribution of impurities in the crystals are in good agreement with the results obtained from the theory according to which the equilibrium segregation coefficients of impurities vary linearly with a change in the composition of Ge-Si solid solution crystals.

Kyazimova, V. K. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: zangi@physics.ab.az; Zeynalov, Z. M. [Ganja State University (Azerbaijan); Zakhrabekova, Z. M.; Azhdarov, G. Kh. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Dielectric heating effects of dual-frequency liquid crystals Chien-Hui Wen and Shin-Tson Wua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat conduc- tivity of the substrates. C is primarily determined by the indium-tin-oxide glass can be achieved.4,5 Because of this attractive property, there is a renewed interest in using DFLCHz; fc: crossover frequency; and E: activation energy. Mixtures Tm °C Tc °C n 1 /K11 fc kHz E meV DF-1 48

Wu, Shin-Tson

388

Optically induced electrokinetic patterning and manipulation of particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fluid dynamics video will illustrate an optically induced electrokinetic technique for non-invasive particle manipulation on the surface of a parallel-plate gold/indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode that is illuminated with near-infrared (1064 nm) optical patterns and biased with an alternating current (AC) signal. This technique generates strong microfluidic vortices that is constructively used to dynamically and rapidly aggregate particle groups at low frequencies.

Williams, Stuart J; Wereley, Steven T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Secret Sharing Scheme: Vector Space Secret Sharing and F Function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let ${\\cal P}=\\{P_{1}, P_{2}, ..., P_{n}\\}$ be set of participants and $\\Gamma=\\{B_{i}| B_{i}\\subset {\\cal P}, 1\\leq i \\leq k \\}$ be access structure. Vector space secret sharing realizing access structure $\\Gamma$ requires existence of function $\\phi ... Keywords: Cryptography,Bismuth,Vectors,Computer science,Ignition,Nuclear weapons,Indium tin oxide,vector space sharing,Cryptography,secret sharing scheme,access structure

Mustafa Atici

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Disorder-free sputtering method on graphene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of various materials onto graphene without causing any disorder is highly desirable for graphene applications. Especially, sputtering is a versatile technique to deposit various metals and insulators for spintronics, and indium tin oxide to make transparent devices. However, the sputtering process causes damage to graphene because of high energy sputtered atoms. By flipping the substrate and using a high Ar pressure, we demonstrate that the level of damage to graphene can be reduced or eliminated in dc, rf, and reactive sputtering processes.

Qiu Xue Peng; Shin Young Jun; Niu Jing; Kulothungasagaran, Narayanapillai [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Kalon, Gopinadhan; Yang, Hyunsoo [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 117546 (Singapore); Qiu Caiyu [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Yu Ting [Graphene Research Centre, National University of Singapore, 117546 (Singapore); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Lipid Oxidation Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews state-of-the-art developments in the understanding of the oxidation of lipids and its connection with the oxidation of other biological molecules such as proteins and starch. Lipid Oxidation Pathways Hardback Books Health - Nutrition -

392

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to selectively oxidize methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons and to oxygenates, in particular formaldehyde and methanol, in high space time yields under relatively mild reaction conditions. Results in this document are reported under the headings: methane oxidation over silica, methane oxidation over Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, and oxidative coupling of methane over sulfate-doped Sr/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. 24 refs, 10 figs, 4 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an alloy of indium and gallium oxide. In the IGZO nanowireprecipitation of indium in zinc oxide. Journal of PhysicsO 3 (ZnO) n ), and indium iron zinc oxide (IFZO, In 2-x Fe x

Fardy, Melissa Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ErAs as a transparent contact at 1.55 mu m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have been doped indium oxides. The most intensively studiedto improve the electrical mobility of indium oxide. 3–5search has modi?ed the indium oxide matrix such as adding

Hanson, M P; Gossard, A C; Brown, E R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Atomic-level cotrol of the thermoelectric properties in polytypoid nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an alloy of indium and gallium oxide. In the IGZO nanowireof 500-900 K for bulk indium zinc oxide (IZO, In 2 O 3 (ZnO)nanowires IZO and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO, In 2-x Ga

C.Andrews, Sean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Photo-oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

398

Tech Beat July 28, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this cross-section of an organic photovoltaic cell, light passes through the upper layers (from top down, glass, indium tin dioxide, and ...

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Novel Catalyst Support Materials for PEM Fuel Cells: Current Status and Future Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalyst supports exhibit great influence on the cost, performance, and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. This review paper is to summarize several important kinds of novel support materials for PEM fuel cells (including direct methanol fuel cell, DMFC): nanostructured carbon materials (carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers, mesoporous carbon), conductive doped diamonds and nanodiamonds, conductive oxides (tin oxide/indium tin oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide) and carbides (tungsten carbides). The advantages and disadvantages, the acting mechanism to promote electrocatalysis, and the strategies to improve present catalyst support materials and to search for new ones are discussed. This is expected to throw light on future development of catalyst support for PEM fuel cells.

Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Multifunctional Oxides: Multifunctional Oxides: Synthesis and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy to Explore Magneoelectric Coupling in Multiferroic Oxide Heterostructures: Y-M Sheu1; S. Trugman1; L Yan1; C-P Chuu 1; ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most paved roads in the United States are surfaced with asphalt. These asphalt pavements suffer from fatigue cracking and thermal cracking, aggravated by the oxidation and hardening of asphalt. This negative impact of asphalt oxidation on pavement performance has not been considered adequately in pavement design. Part of the reason is that the process of asphalt oxidation in pavement is not well understood. This work focused on understanding the asphalt oxidation kinetics and on developing pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation and hardening in pavement under environmental conditions. A number of asphalts were studied in laboratory condition. Based on kinetics data, a fast-rate ? constant-rate asphalt oxidation kinetics model was developed to describe the early nonlinear fast-rate aging period and the later constant-rate period of asphalt oxidation. Furthermore, reaction kinetics parameters for the fast-rate and constant-rate reactions were empirically correlated, leading to a simplified model. And the experimental effort and time to obtain these kinetics parameters were significantly reduced. Furthermore, to investigate the mechanism of asphalt oxidation, two antioxidants were studied on their effectiveness. Asphalt oxidation was not significantly affected. It was found that evaluation of antioxidant effectiveness based on viscosity only is not reliable. The asphalt oxidation kinetics model was incorporated into the pavement oxidation model that predicts asphalt oxidation in pavement. The pavement oxidation model mimics the oxidation process of asphalt in real mixture at pavement temperatures. A new parameter, diffusion depth, defined the oxygen diffusion region in the mastic. A field calibration factor accounted for the factors not considered in the model such as the effect of small aggregate particles on oxygen diffusion. Carbonyl area and viscosity of binders recovered from field cores of three pavements in Texas were measured and were used for model calibration and validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed model estimates carbonyl growth over time in pavement, layer-by-layer, quite well. Finally, this work can be useful for incorporating asphalt oxidation into a pavement design method that can predict pavement performance with time and for making strategic decisions such as optimal time for maintenance treatments.

Jin, Xin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fuel Reliability Program: Post-Irradiation Examination and Testing of High-Fluence Control Rod Silver-Indium-Cadmium Absorber from t he Kernkraftwerk Obrigheim Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), one control rod absorber silver-indium-cadmium (AgInCd) specimen, KWO395, irradiated in Kernkraftwerk Obrigheim (KWO) and one control rod absorber specimen, R035/F9, irradiated in Ringhals 2 have been examined in the hot cell laboratory at Studsvik. The objective of the examinations was to characterize the absorber material and investigate its physical, chemical, and microstructural changes due to high neutron fluence/exposure us...

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Tubular Organization of SnO? Nanocrystallites for Improved Lithium Ion Battery Anode Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Porous tin oxide nanotubes were obtained by vacuum infiltration of tin oxide nanoparticles into porous aluminum oxide membranes, followed by calcination. The porous tin oxide nanotube arrays so prepared were characterized ...

Wang, Yong

404

Partial oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Bolingbrook, IL); Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Doshi, Rajiv (Downers Grove, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The analysis of cross-sections of proton and deuteron induced reactions on tin isotopes at the beam energy of 3.65 GeV/nucleon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the given paper the total inelastic cross-sections of the reactions of protons and deuterons on nuclear targets of enriched tin isotopes were compared. The factorization of cross-sections of reactions was discussed. Furthermore, the comparison of theoretical estimations on total inelastic cross-sections with corresponding experimental ones was made.

A. R. Balabekyan; N. A. Demekhina; V. M. Zhamkochyan; G. S. Karapetyan

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Growth and Properties of (001)-oriented Pb(Zr?.??Ti?.??)O?/LaNiO? Films on Si(001) Substrates with TiN Buffer Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow Pb(Zr?.??Ti?.??)O? (PZT)/LaNiO? (LNO) heterostructures with restricted crystallographic orientations on bare Si(001) and SiO?-coated Si(001) substrates, using TiN buffer layers. ...

Zhu, Tie-Jun

407

Populations of metastable and resonant argon atoms in radio frequency magnetron plasmas used for deposition of indium-zinc-oxide films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work reports optical absorption spectroscopy measurements of the number density of Ar atoms in resonant ({sup 3}P{sub 1}, {sup 1}P{sub 1}) and metastable ({sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}) states in rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} was fairly independent of pressure in the range of experimental conditions investigated, the density of Ar {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}P{sub 1} first sharply increased with pressure and then reached a plateau at values close to those of the {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels at pressures above about 50 mTorr. At such pressures, ultraviolet radiation from resonant states becomes trapped such that these levels behave as metastable states. For a self-bias voltage of -115 V and pressures in the 5-100 mTorr range, similar number densities of Ar resonant and metastable atoms were obtained for Zn, ZnO, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets, suggesting that, over the range of experimental conditions investigated, collisions between these excited species and sputtered Zn, In, and O atoms played only a minor role on the discharge kinetics. The metastable-to-ground state number density ratios were also fitted to the predictions of a global model using the average electron temperature, T{sub e}, as the only adjustable parameter. For all targets examined, the values of T{sub e} deduced from this method were in excellent agreement with those obtained from Langmuir probe measurements.

Maaloul, L.; Morel, S.; Stafford, L. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

1995-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electrical Bias as an Alternate Method for Reproducible Measurement of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS) Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light-to-dark metastable changes in thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can introduce uncertainty when measuring module performance on indoor flash testing equipment. This study describes a method to stabilize module performance through forward-bias current injection rather than light exposure. Measurements of five pairs of thin-film copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) PV modules indicate that forward-bias exposure maintained the PV modules at a stable condition (within 1%) while the unbiased modules degraded in performance by up to 12%. It was additionally found that modules exposed to forward bias exhibited stable performance within about 3% of their long-term outdoor exposed performance. This carrier-injection method provides a way to reduce uncertainty arising from fast transients in thin-film module performance between the time a module is removed from light exposure and when it is measured indoors, effectively simulating continuous light exposure by injecting minority carriers that behave much as photocarriers do. This investigation also provides insight into the initial light-induced transients of thin-film modules upon outdoor deployment.

Deline, C.; Stokes, A.; Silverman, T. J.; Rummel, S.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

EFFECT OF THERMAL PROCESSES ON COPPER-TIN ALLOYS FOR ZINC GETTERING  

SciTech Connect

A contamination mitigation plan was initiated to address the discovery of radioactive zinc‐65 in a glovebox. A near term solution was developed, installation of heated filters in the glovebox piping. This solution is effective at retaining the zinc in the currently contaminated area, but the gamma emitting contaminant is still present in a system designed for tritium beta. A project was initiated to develop a solution to contain the {sup 65}Zn in the furnace module. Copper and bronze (a Cu/Sn alloy) were found to be candidate materials to combine with zinc‐65 vapor, using thermodynamic calculations. A series of binary Cu/Sn alloys were developed (after determining that commercial alloys were unacceptable), that were found to be effective traps of zinc vapor. The task described in this report was undertaken to determine if the bronze substrates would retain their zinc gettering capability after being exposed to simulated extraction conditions with oxidizing and reducing gases. Pure copper and three bronze alloys were prepared, exposed to varying oxidation conditions from 250 to 450{degree}C, then exposed to varying reduction conditions in He-H{sub 2} from 250-450{degree}C, and finally exposed to zinc vapor at 350{degree}C for four hours. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, mass change, and visual observation. It was observed that the as fabricated samples and the reduced samples all retained their zinc gettering capacity while samples in the "as-oxidized" condition exhibited losses in zinc gettering capacity. Over the range of conditions tested, i.e., composition, oxidation temperature, and reduction temperature, no particular sample composition appeared better. Samples reduced at 350{degree}C exhibited the greatest zinc capacity, although there were some testing anomalies associated with these samples. This work clearly demonstrated that the zinc gettering was not adversely affected by exposure to simulated process conditions and a full scale lithium and zinc trap should be fabricated for testing in the Tritium Extraction Facility.

Korinko, P.; Golyski, M.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

(001) textured L1{sub 0}-FePt pseudo spin valve with TiN spacer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiN was investigated as a potential spacer material in L1{sub 0}-FePt based pseudo spin valves (PSV). PSVs with the structure MgO/L1{sub 0}-Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} (20 nm)/TiN (5 nm)/L1{sub 0}-Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} (x nm) were fabricated, where x was varied from 5 to 20 nm. The highest giant magnetoresistance (GMR) ratio of 0.61% was obtained for the PSV with a top L1{sub 0}-FePt thickness of 20 nm. Contributions to the GMR arose from both the spin dependent scattering at the FePt/TiN interfaces and domain wall resistivity. Magnon magnetoresistance was also observed in the fabricated PSVs.

Ho, P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore) and Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 117608 Singapore (Singapore); Han, G. C. [Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), 117608 Singapore (Singapore); He, K. H.; Chow, G. M.; Chen, J. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation is disclosed. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment. 1 fig.

Bunshah, R.; Nath, P.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment.

Bunshah, Rointan (Los Angeles, CA); Nath, Prem (Troy, MI)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

416

Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effect of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening on Spark Plasma Sintering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies on densification behavior revealed that steel powders with dispersed ceramic ... Synthesis of TiN Nanorods by Thermal Decomposition of Solid/Gas ...

418

Multifunctional Oxide Heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book is devoted to the rapidly developing field of oxide thin-films and heterostructures. Oxide materials combined with atomic-scale precision in a heterostructure exhibit an abundance of macroscopic physical properties involving the strong coupling between the electronic, spin, and structural degrees of freedom, and the interplay between magnetism, ferroelectricity, and conductivity. Recent advances in thin-film deposition and characterization techniques made possible the experimental realization of such oxide heterostructures, promising novel functionalities and device concepts.

Tsymbal, E Y [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL; Eom, Professor Chang-Beom [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [University of California, Berkeley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Defect Structure of Oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of electrical conductors: oxides, sulfides, and nitrides...2 O 4 , NiAl 2 O 4 , (Tl 2 O),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Oxidation of gallium arsenide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to gallium arsenide semiconductors and, more particularly, to the oxidation of surface layers of gallium arsenide semiconductors for semiconductor device fabrication.

Hoffbauer, M.A.; Cross, J.B.

1991-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

422

Oxidation/Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... International Symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Oxidation/ ... on combustor liners of a Solar Turbines' industrial gas turbine engine, ...

423

Influences of Mgo on Roasting Properties of Iron Ore Oxidized Pellets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc Plasma Smelting of Niobium Pentoxide towards Production of Nb Metal ... Phase Transformation of Andalusite-Mullite and Its Fiber Reinforcement to Refractory ... Preparation of Metallized Pellets and Recovery of Tin and Zinc from Tin, ...

424

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fluid characterisation and drop impact in inkjet printing for organic semiconductor devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elements provides a typical example. A hole-injection layer and a luminescent layer are formed between a cathode and a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) anode coated on to a glass substrate. The two layers are deposited by regions of less wettable... -suited for integration with metal oxide dielectric layers, which could enable improved optical and electrical performance. Figure 2-12. Photograph of a 10,000 cd m-2 OLED printed using Ir-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) macromolecules emitting at a...

Jung, Sungjune

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

Tench, D. Morgan (Camarillo, CA); Cunningham, Michael A. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Kobrin, Paul H. (Newbury Park, CA)

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Oxidative Degradation of Monoethanolamine Susan Chi Gary T. Rochelle* (gtr@che.utexas.edu, 512-471-7230) The University of Texas at Austin Department of Chemical Engineering Austin, Texas 78712 Prepared for presentation at the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Abstract Oxidative degradation of monoethanolamine (MEA) was studied under typical absorber condition of 55°C. The rate of evolution of NH 3 , which was indicative of the overall rate of degradation, was measured continuously in a batch system sparged with air. Dissolved iron from 0.0001 mM to 1 mM yields oxidation rates from 0.37 to 2 mM/hr in MEA solutions loaded with 0.4 mole CO 2 / mole MEA. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N,N-bis(2- hydroxyethyl)glycine effectively decrease the rate of oxidation in the presence of iron by 40 to

429

Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Women`s College, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Combined Rietveld Analysis of X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Data ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, indium-based oxides dominate the market for flat-panel displays. Indium is a toxic ... Oxygen Transport Investigation on Infiltrated SOFC Cathode.

431

P2.12 Internal Quantum Efficiency Measurement in InGaN/GaN UV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Indium Incorporation on Optical and Structural Properties of M-Plane .... P2.14 Photoluminescence Studies of Indium Nitride Films Grown on Oxide ...

432

About this Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of Indium Incorporation on Optical and Structural Properties of M-Plane .... P2.14 Photoluminescence Studies of Indium Nitride Films Grown on Oxide ...

433

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation is essential for further developments in analytical methodology and hyphenated techniques, with which more understanding of the reaction kinetics, mechanism, and implications will take place. ...

434

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS, provides a method and apparatus for reduction of tritium surface contamination on various items. The OTDS employs ozone gas as oxidizing agent to convert elemental tritium to tritium oxide. Tritium oxide vapor and excess ozone gas is purged from the OTDS, for discharge to atmosphere or transport to further process. An effluent stream is subjected to a catalytic process for the decomposition of excess ozone to diatomic oxygen. One of two configurations of the OTDS is employed: dynamic apparatus equipped with agitation mechanism and large volumetric capacity for decontamination of light items, or static apparatus equipped with pressurization and evacuation capability for decontamination of heavier, delicate, and/or valuable items.

Gentile, Charles A. (Plainsboro, NJ), Guttadora, Gregory L. (Highland Park, NJ), Parker, John J. (Medford, NJ)

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides  

SciTech Connect

The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

438

Metal atom oxidation laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

1975-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

440

REDUCTION AND SEQUESTRATION OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE AND PROTECTION FROM RE-OXIDATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-I0S simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period of time (6 weeks). Previous work indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table 1 shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit.

DUNCAN JB; JOHNSON JM; MOORE WP; HAGERTY KJ; RHODES RN; MOORE RC

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermally Oxidized Silicon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Anneli Munkholm (Lumileds Lighting) and Sean Brennan (SSRL) Illustration of the silicon positions near the Si-SiO2 interface for a 4° miscut projected onto the ( ) plane. The silicon atoms in the substrate are blue and those in the oxide are red. The small black spots represent the translated silicon positions in the absence of static disorder. The silicon atoms in the oxide have been randomly assigned a magnitude and direction based on the static disorder value at that position in the lattice. The outline of four silicon unit cells is shown in black, whereas the outline of four expanded lattice cells in the oxide is shown in blue One of the most studied devices of modern technology is the field-effect transistor, which is the basis for most integrated circuits. At its heart

442

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

443

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Molecular water oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

Gratzel, Michael (St. Sulpice, CH); Munavalli, Shekhar (Bel Air, MD); Pern, Fu-Jann (Lakewood, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Tetraalykylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H.sub.e-z ›(n-C.sub.4 H.sub.9).sub.4 N!.sub.z (XM.sub.11 M'O.sub.39).sup.-e The M' (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Myers, Jr., Harry K. (Cochranville, PA); Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tetraalklylammonium polyoxoanionic oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkanes are catalytically oxidized in air or oxygen using iron-substituted polyoxoanions (POAs) of the formula: H{sub e{minus}z}[(n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub z}(XM{sub 11}M{prime}O{sub 39}){sup {minus}e}. The M{prime} (e.g., iron(III)/iron(II)) reduction potential of the POAs is affected by selection of the central atom X and the framework metal M, and by the number of tetrabutyl-ammonium groups. Decreased Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential has been found to correlate to increased oxidation activity.

Ellis, P.E.; Lyons, J.E.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Shaikh, S.N.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Biological Properties of Zinc Oxide-Coated Anodized Aluminum Oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used agar diffusion assays to evaluate the activity of zinc oxide-coated ... Zirconia Stabilisation Nano-Confined by Using Electroless Nickel Cladding .... Metal Oxide Nanofibers Produced by a ForceSpinning Method for Battery Electrodes.

448

Hydrous oxide activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for preparing of an ion exchanger, comprising: treating an ionically inert activated charcoal porous support with an aqueous solution of metal oxychloride selected from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides so as to impregnate the pores of the support with the solution; separating the treated support from excess metal oxychloride solution; converting the metal oxychloride to a hydrous metal oxide precipitate in the pores of the support at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal support have opposite zeta potentials and sufficient to hydrolyze the metal oxychloride. It also describes a process for preparing an ion exchanger comprising: treating granulated activated charcoal with a concentrated solution of a metal oxychloride from the group consisting of zirconium and titanium oxychlorides, degassing the mixture; and treating the resultant mixture with a base selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide and alkali metal hydroxides so as to precipitate the oxychloride within the pores of the activated carbon granules as hydrous metal oxide at a pH above 8 and above the pH whereat the hydrous metal oxide and activated charcoal have opposite zeta potentials.

Weller, J.P.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

449

Doped zinc oxide microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design of new, high efficiency and cleaner burning engines is strongly coupled with the removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from fuels. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein these dibenzothiophene derivatives are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones is an approach that has gained significant attention. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) convert in a catalytic process dibenzothiophene and its derivatives to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones rapidly at moderate temperatures (60 C) and ambient pressure. The reaction can be performed in both an aqueous system containing an alcohol (methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol) to solubilize the DBT and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system where the alcohol is present in both phases and facilitates the oxidation. Under a consistent set of conditions using the FeBF{sub 2} TAML activator, the degree of conversion was found to be t-butanol > methanol > ethanol. In the cases of methanol and ethanol, both the sulfoxide and sulfone were observed while for t-butanol only the sulfone was detected. In the two-phase system, the alcohol may function as an inverse phase transfer agent. The oxidation was carried out using two different TAML activators. In homogeneous solution, approximately 90% oxidation of the DBT could be achieved using the prototype TAML activator, FeB*, by sonicating the solution at near room temperature. In bi-phasic systems conversions as high as 50% were achieved using the FeB* TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide at 100 C. The sonication method yielded only {approx}6% conversion but this may have been due to mixing.

Colin P. Horwitz; Terrence J. Collins

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book complements Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 1. Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods glycidol Health h

454

Oxygen sensitive, refractory oxide composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Oxide compositions containing niobium pentoxide and an oxide selected from the group consisting of hafnia, titania, and zirconia have electrical conductivity characteristics which vary greatly depending on the oxygen content.

Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book comprehensively reviews several aspects of cholesterol oxidation products: cholesterol oxidation mechanisms, analytical determination, origin and content of these compounds in foods and biological samples, and their biological effects, with an em

456

Low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films using disilane and nitrous oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: disilane, low temperature, nitrous oxide, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, silicon oxide

Juho Song; G. S. Lee; P. K. Ajmera

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles ( 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

Korinko, P.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

REVIEW OF PLUTONIUM OXIDATION LITERATURE  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles (<15 {micro}m), moderately sized particles (15 < x < 250 {micro}m) and large particles (> 250 {micro}m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

Korinko, P.

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

459

Multifunctional Oxide - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toshihiko Tani, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc. Scope, Multifunctional oxide ceramics and thin films exhibit fascinating ...

460

Merocyanine-dye photovoltaic cell on a plastic film  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flexible photovoltaic cell was produced by depositing a merocyanine-dye layer on a transparent electro-conducting film, which is a polyester film coated with ITO (indium-tin oxide). Two kinds of the layered structures on the films were examined; i.e., Al/merocyanine/ITO and Ag/merocyanine/ZnO/ITO structures. It was found that the latter structure was more promising for a solar cell because of a considerably better output stability and a higher conversion effiency.

Moriizumi, T.; Kudo, K.

1981-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Surface-Plasmon Enhanced Transparent Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Random silver nanohole films were created through colloidal lithography techniques and metal vapor deposition. The transparent electrodes were characterized by uv-visible spectroscopy and incorporated into an organic solar cell. The test cells were evaluated for solar power-conversion efficiency and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency spectra displayed evidence that a nanohole film with 92 nm diameter holes induces surface-plasmon-enhanced photoconversion. The nanohole silver films demonstrate a promising route to removing the indium tin oxide transparent electrode that is ubiquitous in organic optoelectronics.

Reilly III, T. H.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Tenent, R. C.; Morfa, A. J.; Rowlen, K. L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Transparent ion trap with integrated photodetector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence collection sets the efficiency of state detection and the rate of entanglement generation between remote trapped ion qubits. Despite efforts to improve light collection using various optical elements, solid angle capture is limited to ~10% for implementations that are scalable to many ions. We present an approach based on fluorescence detection through a transparent trap using an integrated photodetector, combining collection efficiency approaching 50% with scalability. We microfabricate transparent surface traps with indium tin oxide and verify stable trapping of single ions. The fluorescence from a cloud of ions is detected using a photodiode sandwiched with a transparent trap.

Amira M. Eltony; Shannon X. Wang; Gleb M. Akselrod; Peter F. Herskind; Isaac L. Chuang

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

Single-molecule interfacial electron transfer dynamics manipulated by external electric current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfacial electron transfer (IET) dynamics in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3, 3, 3', 3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine (DiD) dye molecules / indium tin oxide (ITO) film system have been probed at the ensemble and single-molecule level by recording the change of fluorescence emission intensity. By comparing the difference of the external electric current (EEC) dependence of lifetime and intensity for enambles and single molecules, it is shown that the single-molecule probe can effcienly demonstrate the IET dynamics. The backward electron transfer and electron transfer of ground state induce the single molecules fluorescence quenching when an EEC is applied to ITO film.

Zhang, Guofeng; Chen, Ruiyun; Gao, Yan; Wang, Xiaobo; Jia, Suotang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acetylene-containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA)-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

465

Pulsed laser deposition of ITO thin films and their characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films are grown on quartz glass substrates by the pulsed laser deposition method. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of ITO films are studied as a function of the substrate temperature, the oxygen pressure in the vacuum chamber, and the Sn concentration in the target. The transmittance of grown ITO films in the visible spectral region exceeds 85%. The minimum value of resistivity 1.79 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm has been achieved in the ITO films with content of Sn 5 at %.

Zuev, D. A., E-mail: zuewda@yandex.ru; Lotin, A. A.; Novodvorsky, O. A.; Lebedev, F. V.; Khramova, O. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (Russian Federation); Petuhov, I. A.; Putilin, Ph. N.; Shatohin, A. N.; Rumyanzeva, M. N.; Gaskov, A. M. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Nanopillar ITO electrodes via argon plasma etching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate the formation of vertically aligned indium tin oxide (ITO) nanopillars by exposing planar ITO films to Ar plasma, the conditions of which determine the size, spacing, and aspect ratio of the pillars. Annealing in air and forming gas is used to recover and optimize the optical transmittance and electrical conductivity of the nanopillar films. The final product is an ITO film whose superior optical transmittance and strong electrical conductivity combine with its robust columnar morphology and processing scalability to make it suitable for use in highly absorbing organic solar cells.

Van Dijken, Jaron G.; Brett, Michael J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada) and NRC-National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

Transparent ion trap with integrated photodetector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence collection sets the efficiency of state detection and the rate of entanglement generation between remote trapped ion qubits. Despite efforts to improve light collection using various optical elements, solid angle capture is limited to ~10% for implementations that are scalable to many ions. We present an approach based on fluorescence detection through a transparent trap using an integrated photodetector, combining collection efficiency approaching 50% with scalability. We microfabricate transparent surface traps with indium tin oxide and verify stable trapping of single ions. The fluorescence from a cloud of ions is detected using a photodiode sandwiched with a transparent trap.

Eltony, Amira M; Akselrod, Gleb M; Herskind, Peter F; Chuang, Isaac L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Broadband light absorption enhancement in polymer photovoltaics using metal nanowall gratings as transparent electrodes  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate light absorption in organic solar cells in which indium tin oxide (ITO) is replaced by a new metallic architecture (grating) as a transparent electrode. Different from typical metal nanowire gratings, our gratings consist of metal nanowalls with nanoscale footprint and (sub)microscale height [Adv. Mater. 23, 2469 (2011)], thus ensuring high optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. Simulations reveal that a broadband and polarization-insensitive light absorption enhancement is achieved via two mechanisms, when such silver nanowall gratings are employed in P3HT:PCBM based solar cells. Overall absorption enhanced by ~23% compared to a reference cell with ITO electrode.

Ye, Zhuo; Chaudhary, Sumit; Kuang, Ping; Ho, Kai-Ming

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Poly (p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes. 8 figs.

Shinar, J.; Swanson, L.S.; Lu, F.; Ding, Y.; Barton, T.J.; Vardeny, Z.V.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

470

Direct Patterning of CdSe Quantum Dots into Sub-100 nm Structures  

SciTech Connect

Ordered, two-dimensional cadmium selenide (CdSe) arrays have been fabricated on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes using the pattern replication in nonwetting templates (PRINT) process. CdSe quantum dots (QDs) with an average diameter of 2.7 nm and a pyridine surface ligand were used for patterning. The PRINT technique utilizes a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric mold that is tolerant of most organic solvents, thus allowing solutions of CdSe QDs in 4-picoline to be used for patterning without significant deformation of the mold. Nanometer-scale diffraction gratings have been successfully replicated with CdSe QDs.

Hampton, Meredith J.; Templeton, Joseph L.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Fabrication of poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as A1 or A1/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA); Swanson, Leland S. (Ames, IA); Lu, Feng (Ames, IA); Ding, Yiwei (Ames, IA)

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

472

Poly (p-phenyleneneacetylene) light-emitting diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Acetylene containing poly(p-phenyleneacetylene) (PPA) - based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are provided. The LEDs are fabricated by coating a hole-injecting electrode, preferably an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate, with a PPA polymer, such as a 2,5-dibutoxy or a 2,5-dihexoxy derivative of PPA, dissolved in an organic solvent. This is then followed by evaporating a layer of material capable of injecting electrons, such as Al or Al/Ca, onto the polymer to form a base electrode. This composition is then annealed to form efficient EL diodes.

Shinar, Joseph (Ames, IA); Swanson, Leland S. (Ames, IA); Lu, Feng (Ames, IA); Ding, Yiwei (Ames, IA); Barton, Thomas J. (Ames, IA); Vardeny, Zeev V. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

Enhanced stability against bias-stress of metal-oxide thin film transistors deposited at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Transparent zinc-tin-oxide (ZTO) thin film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. Compared to reference devices with a channel deposited at room temperature and subsequently annealing at 400 deg. C, a substantially enhanced stability against bias stress is evidenced for devices with in-situ substrate heating during deposition (400 deg. C). A reduced density of sub-gap defect states in TFT channels prepared with in-situ substrate heating is found. Concomitantly, a reduced sensitivity to the adsorption of ambient gases is evidenced for the in-situ heated devices. This finding is of particular importance for an application as driver electronics for organic light emitting diode displays.

Fakhri, M.; Goerrn, P.; Riedl, T. [Institute of Electronic Devices, University of Wuppertal, Rainer-Gruenter-St. 21, 42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Weimann, T.; Hinze, P. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

474

Selective methane oxidation over promoted oxide catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Principal accomplishments have been achieved in all three areas of selective catalytic oxidation of methane that have been pursued in this research project. These accomplishments are centered on the development of catalyst systems that produce high space time yields of C{sub 2} hydrocarbon products, formaldehyde, and methanol from methane/air mixtures at moderate temperatures and at ambient pressure. The accomplishments can be summarized as the following: the SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}/SrO/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst developed here has been further optimized to produce 2 kg of C{sub 2} hydrocarbons/kg catalyst/hr at 550C; V{sub 2}O{sub 5}SiO{sub 2} catalysts have been prepared that produce up to 1.5 kg formaldehyde/kg catalyst/hr at 630C with CO{sub 2} selectivities; and a novel dual bed catalyst system has been designed and tested that produces over 100 g methanol/kg catalyst/hr at 600C.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Controlled CO preferential oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

Meltser, Mark A. (Pittsford, NY); Hoch, Martin M. (Webster, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Chemical oxidizers treat wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Based on the inherent benefits of these original oxidation systems, a second generation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) has emerged. These processes combine key features of the first generation technologies with more sophisticated advances in UV technology, such as the new pulsed plasma xenon flash lamp that emits high-energy, high-intensity UV light. Second generation systems can be equipped with a transmittance controller to prevent lamp fouling or scaling. The coupling of the first generation's technology with the new UV sources provides the rapid destruction of chlorinated and nonchlorinated hydrocarbons and humic acids from contaminated water. It also is effective in the treatment of organic laden gases from soil vapor extraction systems. AOPs may promote the oxidation (and subsequent removal) of heavy metals in water, though few data are available to verify the claim. The success of AOPs, including ozonation with UV light, hydrogen peroxide with UV light and advanced photolysis, is linked with their creation of hydroxyl-free radicals (OH[center dot]) that are effective in eliminating contaminants such as formaldehyde, chlorinated hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. Hydroxyl free-radicals are consumed in microsecond reactions and exhibit little substrate selectivity with the exception of halogenated alkanes such as chloroform. They can act as chain carriers. Given their power, hydroxyl free-radicals react with virtually all organic solutes more quickly (especially in water) than any other oxidants, except fluorine. There are projects that have found the combination of some AOPs to be the most efficient organic destruction techniques for the job. For example, one project successfully remediated groundwater contaminated with gasoline and Number 2 diesel through successive treatments of ozone and hydrogen peroxide with ultraviolet light, followed by granular activated carbon. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

Stephenson, F.A. (Dames Moore, Phoenix, AZ (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Applications of Oxide Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discovery of the new family of copper-oxide superconductors has opened an area of exciting new materials science with enormous potential for practical developments in technology and engineering. Research was conducted to understand the basic physical properties and the materials characteristics of the high temperature superconductors that control their electrical and mechanical properties, and determine their potential usefulness. Material properties and current carrying capabilites of the new Bismut...

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

478

Oxides for Spintronics - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Multifunctional Oxides. Presentation Title, Oxides for Spintronics. Author(s) ...

479

MESOPOROUS METAL OXIDE MICROSPHERE ELECTRODE COMPOSITIONS AND ...  

Compositions and methods of making are provided for mesoporous metal oxide microspheres electrodes. The mesoporous metal oxide microsphere ...

480

Lead Zinc and Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"High Temperature Lead-free Solder for Microelectronics" (Overview), Frank R. Gayle, Gary Becka, Jerry Badgett, Gordon Whitten, Tsung-Yu Pan, Angela Grusd,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indium tin oxide" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Lead Zinc and Tin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title, Author, Publisher, Product Type, In Stock, Date Published. Add to Cart, Image, Click on Title to view details, Member (Student) Price, Non-member Price.

482

SSL Selections Descriptions v6.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zip Code Zip Code Project Description DOE Funding Total Project Value Cambrios Sunnyvale, CA 94085-4520 Solution-Processable Transparent Conductive Hole Injection Electrode for Organic Light-Emitting Diode (OLED) SSL. This project seeks to develop a cost-effective replacement for indium tin oxide for use as an electrode in OLED lighting devices. Indium is both rare and very expensive. $1,199,971 $1,846,110 University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627-0216 Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent OLEDs. This project seeks to produce white OLEDs with > 100 lm/W efficiency after light extraction enhancement and > 10,000 hour operating time, by making a new class of emissive materials. $1,239,071 $1,376,746 WhiteOptics, LLC

483

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, which offers many advantages over traditional energy conversion systems including low emission and high efficiency, has become increasingly attractive to the utility, automotive, and defense industries (as shown in Figure 1). As an all solid-state energy conversion device, the SOFC operates at high temperatures (700-1,000 C) and produces electricity by electrochemically combining the fuel and oxidant gases across an ionically conducting oxide membrane. To build up a useful voltage, a number of cells or PENs (Positive cathode-Electrolyte-Negative anode) are electrically connected in series in a stack through bi-polar plates, also known as interconnects. Shown in Figure 2 (a) is a schematic of the repeat unit for a planar stack, which is expected to be a mechanically robust, high power-density and cost-effective design. In the stack (refer to Figure 2 (b)), the interconnect is simultaneously exposed to both an oxidizing (air) environment on the cathode side and a reducing (fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas) environment on the anode side for thousands of hours at elevated temperatures (700-1,000 C). Other challenges include the fact that water vapor is likely to be present in both of these environments, and the fuel is likely to contain sulfide impurities. Also, the interconnect must be stable towards any sealing materials with which it is in contact, under numerous thermal cycles. Furthermore, the interconnect must also be stable towards electrical contact materials that are employed to minimize interfacial contact resistance, and/or the electrode materials. Considering these service environments, the interconnect materials should possess the following properties: (1) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation and corrosion) in both cathodic (oxidizing) and anodic (reducing) atmospheres. (2) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN and other adjacent components, all of which typically have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the range of 10.5-12.0 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}. (3) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales. (4) Satisfactory bulk and interfacial mechanical/thermomechanical reliability and durability at the SOFC operating temperatures. (5) Good compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials. Until recently, the leading candidate material for the interconnect was doped lanthanum chromite (LaCrO3), which is a ceramic material which can easily withstand the traditional 1000 C operating temperature. However, the high cost of raw materials and fabrication, difficulties in obtaining high-density chromite parts at reasonable sintering temp