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1

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

2

Scientific analysis is essential to assess biofuel policy effects: in response to the paper by Kim and Dale on "Indirect land use change for biofuels: Testing predictions and improving analytical methodologies"  

SciTech Connect

Vigorous debate on the effects of biofuels derives largely from the changes in land use estimated using economic models designed mainly for the analysis of agricultural trade and markets. The models referenced for land-use change (LUC) analysis in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Final Rule on the Renewable Fuel Standard include GTAP, FAPRI-CARD, and FASOM. To address bioenergy impacts, these models were expanded and modified to facilitate simulations of hypothesized LUC. However, even when models use similar basic assumptions and data, the range of LUC results can vary by ten-fold or more. While the market dynamics simulated in these models include processes that are important in estimating effects of biofuel policies, the models have not been validated for estimating land-use changes and employ crucial assumptions and simplifications that contradict empirical evidence.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL] [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling biofuel expansion effects on land use change dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing demand for crop-based biofuels, in addition to other human drivers of land use, induces direct and indirect land use changes (LUC). Our system dynamics tool is intended to complement existing LUC modeling approaches and to improve the understanding of global LUC drivers and dynamics by allowing examination of global LUC under diverse scenarios and varying model assumptions. We report on a small subset of such analyses. This model provides insights into the drivers and dynamic interactions of LUC (e.g., dietary choices and biofuel policy) and is not intended to assert improvement in numerical results relative to other works.Demand for food commodities are mostly met in high food and high crop-based biofuel demand scenarios, but cropland must expand substantially. Meeting roughly 25% of global transportation fuel demand by 2050 with biofuels requires >2 times the land used to meet food demands under a presumed 40% increase in per capita food demand. In comparison, the high food demand scenario requires greater pastureland for meat production, leading to larger overall expansion into forest and grassland. Our results indicate that, in all scenarios, there is a potential for supply shortfalls, and associated upward pressure on prices, of food commodities requiring higher land use intensity (e.g., beef) which biofuels could exacerbate.

Ethan Warner; Daniel Inman; Benjamin Kunstman; Brian Bush; Laura Vimmerstedt; Steve Peterson; Jordan Macknick; Yimin Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

SciTech Connect

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

7

The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on soil degradation on both physical and chemical property of soil as well as on soil carbon sequestration availability and soil carbon sequestration in Bezawit Sub- Watershed, near Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. More The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon

Walter, M.Todd

8

ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of region, soil, land use, and terrain type on fuelwood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(sandy, sandy/loam, or rocky), land use (parkland agroforest or woodland), and terrain (flat, temporarily for Z. mauritiana, and on rocky soils for all species. Fuel- wood production of P. reticulatum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on the Effectiveness of Land Use and Demand Strategies in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOT $12,000 Cal Trans Total Project Cost $42,533 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 StartProject Information Form Project Title White Paper on the Effectiveness of Land Use and Demand and End Dates June 30, 2014 to January 30, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Reducing vehicle

California at Davis, University of

10

A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect Shao, Hongfei Florida State University Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Category: Aerosols The aerosol first indirect effect is known to cool the Earth radiatively. However, its magnitude is very uncertain; large discrepancies exist among the observed values published in the literature. In this study, we first survey the published values of those parameters used for describing the first indirect effect. By analyzing the discrepancies among these values, we show that the first indirect effect has been overestimated by many investigators due to an improper parameter being used. Therefore, we introduce a more meaningful parameter to measure this effect. We estimated the first indirect effect using the new parameter based on observational

11

Applying consequential LCA to support energy policy: Land use change effects of bioenergy production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Luxembourg aims at complying with the EU objective of attaining a 14% use of bioenergy in the national grid by 2020. The increase of biomethane production from energy crops could be a valuable option in achieving this objective. However, the overall environmental benefit of such option is yet to be proven. Consequential Life Cycle Assessment (CLCA) has shown to be a useful tool to evaluate the environmental suitability of future energy scenarios and policies. The objective of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the environmental consequences of modifying the Luxembourgish agricultural system to increase maize production for biomethane generation. A total of 10 different scenarios were modelled using a partial equilibrium (PE) model to identify changes in land cultivation based on farmers' revenue maximisation, which were then compared to the baseline scenario, i.e. the state of the agricultural sector in 2009. The results were divided into three different consequential decision contexts, presenting differing patterns in terms of land use changes (LUCs) but with minor shifts in environmental impacts. Nevertheless, energy from maize production would imply substantially higher environmental impacts when compared with the current use of natural gas, mainly due to increases in climate change and agricultural land occupation impacts. The results are discussed based on the consequences they may generate on the bioenergy policy, the management of arable land, the changes in importexport flows in Luxembourg and \\{LUCs\\} in the domestic agricultural system. In addition, the specific PE+LCA method presented intends to be of use for other regional studies in which a high level of site-specific data is available.

Ian Vzquez-Rowe; Antonino Marvuglia; Sameer Rege; Enrico Benetto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

SYMPOSIUM ON EFFECTS OF FOREST LAND USE ON EROSION AND SLOPE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TO EVALUATING OFF-SITE EFFECTS OF 1 T I MBER HARVEST ACTIVITIES ON CHANNEL ~lORPHOLOGY Gordon E. Grant, Michael effects. A study was undertaken to determine whether off-site effects of timber harvest activities were Range of Oregon. In this paper, we suggest a theoretical framework for predicting how different off-site

13

Land-use Leakage  

SciTech Connect

Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International offsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of Anthropogenic Land-Use and Land-Cover Changes on Climate and Land Carbon Storage in CMIP5 Projections for the Twenty-First Century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the representative concentration pathway 2.6 (RCP2.6) and RCP8.5 scenarios performed for phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudr; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and third generation feedstocks 14 Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Gasoline and Alternatives Fuel Pathway Direct emissions (g CO2eMJ) Land use and other effects (g CO2eMJ) Total...

16

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli  

SciTech Connect

Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

19

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

20

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models G. Feingold National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Lane Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction The effect of aerosols on cloud microphysical and radiative properties (the "indirect effect") has the greatest uncertainty of all known climate-forcing mechanisms. Increases in aerosol concentrations result in higher concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increased cloud droplet concentrations, and smaller droplet sizes (Twomey 1974). A possible secondary effect is the suppression of rainfall.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Conceptualizing and testing random indirect effects and moderated mediation in multilevel models: New procedures and recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean ...

Bauer, D. J.; Preacher, K. J.; Gil, Karen M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

An integrated simulation method for flash-flood risk assessment :2. Effect of historical changes in land use Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 285294 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated simulation method for flash-flood risk assessment :2. Effect of historical changes. Flood frequency analyses of the annual flood series, retrieved from the simulations, were used into quantitative methods for risk assessment. Keywords: flood, simulation, distributed model, land-use changes

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

SPSS and SAS procedures for estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Researchers often conduct mediation analysis in order to indirectly assess the effect of a proposed cause on some outcome through a proposed mediator. The utility of mediation analysis stems from its ability to go beyond ...

Preacher, K. J.; Hayes, A. F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

SciTech Connect

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

Koch, D

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

25

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

26

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

27

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Bartholomew, Mary Jane Brookhaven National Laboratory Daum, Peter Brookhaven National Laboratory Dunn, Maureen Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Liu, Yangang Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Andrews, Betsy NOAA/CMDL Ogren, John NOAA/CMDL Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Field Campaigns Impacts of aerosol indirect effects are considered too uncertain for inclusion in reports issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A major reason for this uncertainty is an insufficient physical

28

Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

Hollister, Emily Brooke

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

30

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

31

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflectivities. #12;3 In recent years, simulations of the aerosol indirect effect in general circulation models in satellite imagery data. Images at 3.7 µm are used in a semi-automated procedure for identifying polluted concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and more cloud droplets. Because droplet formation is rapid

32

Airports and land use planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The EPA has developed an Airport Noise Regulatory concept including an impact analysis methodology and a readily understandable format for the presentation of results. The regulatory process provides a means of reducing and/or preventing aviation noise impacts via a balanced mix of aviation actions and lead use controls. The analysis methodology which EPA has developed is based upon a comparison of aviation noise and the background levels which are due to all sources other than aviation. Hence the noise impacts of multi modal systems can be evaluated. Noise criteria have been developed for the classification of airports by severity of impact and for goals necessary to protect the public health and welfare. The regulatory process was designed to insure participation of the airport proprietor local governments and the general public. Each airport noise abatement plan will be subjected to public scrutiny in an open hearing as well as to review by the Federal Aviation Administration with consulation by the EPA. The process results in an airport operating pier for noise abatement which is basic to land use planning.

S. E. Starley

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

34

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

35

Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains G. Feingold and W. L. Eberhard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Vernon and M. Previdi Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract We have demonstrated first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The response of non-precipitating, ice-free clouds to changes in aerosol loading is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud-drop effective radius (r e ) for a relative change in aerosol extinction under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path (LWP). This is done in a single column of air at a temporal resolution of 20 s (spatial resolution of ~100 m).

36

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

37

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

38

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..........................................................................9 natUraL resoUrces Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 Extension is expanding its Land Use and Natural Resource Planning portfolio to include courses (with and Natural Resource Planning portfolio can help you be more effective in achieving your goals. Julia Lave

Ferrara, Katherine W.

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjusted indirect comparison Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Information Sciences 49 Summary of the August 2009 Forum Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) Summary: )? And how much would the indirect land-use...

40

A cost-effectiveness analysis of water security and water quality: impacts of climate and land-use change on the River Thames system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dustin Garrick, Simon Dadson and Rob Hope A cost-effectiveness analysis of water security...the river basin and used to assess the cost-effectiveness of a range of mitigation...measures can improve the situation. A cost-effectiveness study has been undertaken...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Conservation An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission's name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as

42

Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses  

SciTech Connect

We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses  

SciTech Connect

We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology; Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

45

Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps...

46

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated...

47

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report The Idaho National Laboratory announced recently that the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship...

48

RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeothermalLand UseFederal < RAPID | Geothermal | Land Use Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA RAPID Toolkit About...

49

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

50

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Transportation Land Use Connection Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Boarnet, Reid Ewing, and Richard E. Killingsworth. 2002. "How the Built Environment Affects Physical. "Smart Growth and the Transportation ­ Land Use Connection: What Does the Research Tell Us?" Prepared Button, eds., Handbook 4: Transport and the Environment. Forthcoming. Heilbrun, James. 1987. Urban

Handy, Susan L.

52

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

53

COATING AND MANDREL EFFECTS ON FABRICATION OF GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER NIF SCALE INDIRECT DRIVE CAPSULES  

SciTech Connect

OAK A271 COATING AND MANDREL EFFECTS ON FABRICATION OF GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER NIF SCALE INDIRECT DRIVE CAPSULES. Targets for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) need to be about 200 {micro}m thick and 2 mm in diameter. These dimensions are well beyond those currently fabricated on a routine basis. They have investigated fabrication of near NIF scale targets using the depolymerizable mandrel technique. Poly-alpha-methylstyrene (PAMS) mandrels, about 2 mm in diameter, of varying qualities were coated with as much as 125 {micro}m of glow discharge polymer (GDP). The surface finish of the final shells was examined using a variety of techniques. A clear dependence of the modal spectrum of final GDP shell on the quality of the initial PAMS mandrels was observed. isolated features were found to be the greatest cause for a shell not meeting the NIF standard.

NIKROO,A; PONTELANDOLFO,JM; CASTILLO,ER

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

55

Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options  

SciTech Connect

This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

58

Meeting Biofuels Targets: Implications for Land Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Nitrogen Use in Illinois  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article develops a dynamic micro-economic land use model to identify the cost-effective allocation of cropland for traditional row ... model and together with county level data on costs of production for Ill...

Madhu Khanna; Hayri nal; Xiaoguang Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

60

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES by Rebekah Edwards-Craig B of Research Project: British Columbia Land Use Planning: Backcountry Tourism Perspectives Supervisory, including the backcountry tourism and outdoor recreation sectors, at a disadvantage in such planning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and ...

Outka, Uma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Abstract The BLM's Resource Management Plans (Land Use...

63

Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Kurt R. Richter University of California Agricultural Issues Center October 2009 #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy II University of California Agricultural Issues Center #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy III Making

Ferrara, Katherine W.

64

Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Accommodating a Growing Biofuels Market Amelia French M.S. Candidate University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Turhollow, R.L.Graham, B.J. Stokes, and D.C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy/Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use #12

Gray, Matthew

66

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

67

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

68

The Relative Effects of Direct and Indirect Actions of Ionizing Radiations on Deoxyribonucleic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...determined over a range of concentrations...means that over this range of concentration...independent of the dose rate and of the hardness of the radiations within the ranges used and identical...indirect actions of ionizing radiations on deoxyribonucleic...

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

70

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

Bioenergy Production from Perennial Energy Crops: A Consequential LCA of 12 Bioenergy Scenarios including Land Use Changes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bioenergy Production from Perennial Energy Crops: A Consequential LCA of 12 Bioenergy Scenarios including Land Use Changes ... In the endeavor of optimizing the sustainability of bioenergy production in Denmark, this consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental impacts associated with the production of heat and electricity from one hectare of Danish arable land cultivated with three perennial crops: ryegrass (Lolium perenne), willow (Salix viminalis) and Miscanthus giganteus. ... Soil carbon changes, direct and indirect land use changes as well as uncertainty analysis (sensitivity, MonteCarlo) were included in the LCA. ...

Davide Tonini; Lorie Hamelin; Henrik Wenzel; Thomas Astrup

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This statute establishes the Metropolitan Land Use Advisory Committee within the Metropolitan Council to coordinate plans, programs, and controls

73

Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic...

74

Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning AgencyCompany Organization: USAID LEAF Sector: Climate, Land...

75

Geothermal Direct-Use Minimizing Land Use and Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

76

Indirect land-use changes can overcome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fuel ethanol in Brazil (Government...Sao Paulo, Brazil). 5. Reinhardt...Institute for Energy and Environmental...php). 8. Renewable Energy...php). 4. Renewable Energy UK (2009...fuel ethanol in Brazil (Government...

David M. Lapola; Ruediger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Alberte Bondeau; Jennifer Koch; Christina Koelking; Joerg A. Priess

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Indirect land-use changes can overcome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the land rather than on allocating the market demand for livestock...the USDA (2009) Livestock and grain market news (http...WMJ, et al. (2008) Jatropha bio-diesel production and use. Biomass & Bioenergy...

David M. Lapola; Ruediger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Alberte Bondeau; Jennifer Koch; Christina Koelking; Joerg A. Priess

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Accounting for indirect land-use change in the life cycle assessment of biofuel supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...life cycle analysis (LCA) for estimating the...projections; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United...general equilibrium (GE) LCA flows; partial equilibrium...values for input to the LCA. The actual availability...g. US Department of Agriculture or Organization for Economic...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Accounting for indirect land-use change in the life cycle assessment of biofuel supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re.jrc.ec.europa.eu/bf-tp/ 9 Fritsche, U. R. , R. Sims...and guidelines. Technical Report ISO 14044:2006(E). Geneva, Switzerland...Organization. See http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_ics...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Indirect land-use changes can overcome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...influence deforestation rates. The modeled deforestation rate of Central Brazil...2 ) rather than rates (Mg CO 2 ha...for electrical energy expansion 2006...replacing fossil fuels . Atmos Chem Phys 8 : 389...University Press of Florida , Gainesville ), pp 283...

David M. Lapola; Ruediger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Alberte Bondeau; Jennifer Koch; Christina Koelking; Joerg A. Priess

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Indirect land-use changes can overcome carbon savings from biofuels in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...multicriteria evaluation of suitability...ethanol and biodiesel fuel production...year) of the biodiesel produced in...more accurate evaluation of the efficacy...soybean as the biodiesel feedstock...analytic hierarchy process (AHP) test...factors. Model Evaluation Crop...

David M. Lapola; Ruediger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Alberte Bondeau; Jennifer Koch; Christina Koelking; Joerg A. Priess

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

Watson, Craig A.

83

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

84

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

85

Assessing the land use suitability of mined areas in Appalachia  

SciTech Connect

The Land Use Decision Methodology (LUDM) is a planning framework for mined area land use planning. The LUDM was developed to consider the range of institutional and environmental factors that impact reclamation and land use planning for mined lands. The LUDM was developed as a generalized planning framework rather than a complex/rigid methodology. A matrix that supports the detailed site analysis component of the LUDM was also developed. The matrix has utility for illustrating the impacts that a number of mining related conditions/environmental problems can exert on the environmental feasibility and economics of alternative reclamation plans.

Gorton, W.T.; Yuill, C.B.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Climate Impacts of Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes in Tropical Islands under Conditions of Global Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes have significant climate impacts in tropical coastal regions with the added complexity of occurring within the context of a warming climate. The individual and combined effects of these two factors in ...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. Gonzlez; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Robert D. Bornstein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

88

GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 - Land Use Overview 1 - Land Use Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1 - Land Use Overview 01LandUseOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Farmland Protection Policy Act Sikes Act National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) - specifically, Section 106 Native American Graves Protection Act Archaeological Resource Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

89

Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Planning Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage Abstract This...

90

Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

Outka, Uma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Bureau of...

92

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

93

Direct and Indirect Effects of Agrochemicals on Bacterial Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Bacteria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The presence of agrochemical residues in both urban and agricultural water bodies has become ubiquitous, often producing deleterious effects in the impacted watershed including reductions (more)

Staley, Zachery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

97

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

98

A regional comparison of postmining land use practices  

SciTech Connect

Three case studies were undertaken to investigate the role of land use potential evaluation in reclamation planning and to determine the impact of regional differences on the evaluation process. The three surface mines studied were representative of operations in the Appalachian, Interior, and Northern Great Plains provinces. The scope of the investigations included a survey of regional characteristics, a detailed investigation of the mining operations and site conditions, and an assessment of local land use planning activities in the area of the mine. Special attention was given to key factors that presently determine the use of reclaimed land. Also, for each case study, the postmining land use potential was evaluated using site planning principles.

Sweigard, R.J.; Ramani, R.V.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

100

Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources State agencies, local governments, and other public entities engaging in land use planning shall work to promote clean and renewable energy use, increased energy efficiency, and sustainable design and construction standards, while emphasizing the protection, preservation, and restoration of natural resources, agricultural land, and cultural and historic

102

Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionscontribute to atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest2008), Fire-related carbon emissions from land use

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes p15 Introduction Process Overview Process Description 6.0 - Summary p19 7.0 - References p20 8.0 - Acronyms p21 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i

104

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate.....................................................................................8 NEW · Mitigation and Conservation Banking

California at Davis, University of

105

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical policies are warranted if use of degraded lands for bioenergy plantations is desired. 1. Introduction There are two main categories of bioenergy: residues and dedicated plantations. In this paper, we exclusively

106

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

107

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

SciTech Connect

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

109

Luminescence of coupled quantum wells:?Effects of indirect excitons in high in-plane magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Luminescence measurements of a Ga1?xAlxAs?GaAs double quantum well in in-plane magnetic fields up to 22T are reported. The properties of spatially direct and indirect excitons are studied. We show that the strong indirect exciton luminescence survives in samples with low nonradiative recombination up to high in-plane magnetic fields. This contrasts with previously published results, where its strong suppression, observed for magnetic fields as low as of 10T, was explained by the exciton center-of-mass momentum conservation. We attribute the discrepancy to a relatively low nonradiative recombination in the studied sample in comparison with the radiative recombination of localized indirect excitons.

M. Orlita, R. Grill, M. Zvra, G. H. Dhler, S. Malzer, M. Byszewski, and J. Soubusta

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp055 data Data PDF PDF graphics Graphics Please note: these data have been updated for the year 2000 Contributors Sandra Brown1 Greg Gaston2 Work on this project was initiated while at the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 61801, U.S.A. 1Present address: Winrock International, Arlington, Virgina. 2Present address: Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prepared by T.W. Beaty, and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

111

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

112

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

113

File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUseOverview.pdf LandUseOverview.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:01LandUseOverview.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:54, 28 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:54, 28 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:23, 30 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 30 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (41 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:55, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:55, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

114

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary of the results at the Solar+Land+Use page on OpenEI. As solar power becomes more popular, a big question that people have is "how much land does solar energy use?" This dataset and report provides answers to the solar land use question while also doing an in-depth analysis and evaluation of various factors related to solar land use. Both photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities were

115

Globalization and population drivers of rural-urban land-use change in Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thorough examination of the causes of land-use change is necessary to effectively deal with the magnitude of changes across the globe. Chihuahua, Mexico is experiencing rapid land-use changes due to processes of globalization. The emergence of Mexico's maquiladora program is an indicator of economic globalization that has had far-reaching social and environmental consequences. This article examines population and income patterns from 1970 to 2000 as part of a hierarchical system and tests whether or not processes of globalization can be detected in the patterns. Findings indicate that population and income concentrate primarily in Juarez, while simultaneously deconcentrating in most other municipios of the State. Moreover, these patterns correlate with patterns of maquiladora concentration. Additional findings identify proximity to the US and established urban centers as drivers of population concentration. These findings support the notion that patterns and processes of globalization are important drivers of population and income concentration at the local level in Chihuahua, Mexico. Finally, the findings support the conceptualization of population land-use and income concentration as part of a hierarchical system.

Nate Currit; William E. Easterling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To support research and development (R&D) planning efforts within the Thermochemical Conversion Program, the Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the Biomass Indirect Liquefaction (IDL)...

117

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion 5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

118

Projected land-use change impacts on ecosystem services in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to a large existing literature on land-use change and ecosystem...lessons learned . Annual Review of Resource Economics 1 : 409...BA ( 2012 ) Modeling bioenergy, land use...after an exhaustive review of the literature. Lubowski et al...

Joshua J. Lawler; David J. Lewis; Erik Nelson; Andrew J. Plantinga; Stephen Polasky; John C. Withey; David P. Helmers; Sebastin Martinuzzi; Derric Pennington; Volker C. Radeloff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fostering land use dialog : community preservation as a growth management strategy in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Community Preservation Initiative (CPI) was an innovative attempt by the Massachusetts state government to stimulate discussion about land use and growth management at the local level. Based on land use and zoning ...

Hodges, Christopher J. (Christopher Jon), 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in life cycle assessment (LCA). Some production processes,support impacts of land use in LCA. J Clean Prod 8(4):313010-0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

467 DOI 10.1007/s11367-010-0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA CouplingGIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use Part 1:while life cycle assessment (LCA) does not conventionally

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

An Evaluation of Biomass Energy Potential with a Global Energy and Land Use Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors evaluate global land use competition and bioenergy potential through developing a global energy and land use model using a SD ... The model describes competition among various uses of biomass such as ...

H. Yamamoto; K. Yamaji

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

Palmer, Margaret A.

124

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing...

Kim, Hee Ju

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

ABSTRACT: Increased riverine nitrogen (N) fluxes have been strongly correlated with land use changes and are now one of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Ipswich River basin in Massachusetts and to evaluate the effect of future land use scenarios on the water with the hydrology of the basin are likely to control the magnitude of nitrate loads to the aquatic system and nutrient fluxes from the land surface and soil profile to rivers and then down the river drainage network

Vallino, Joseph J.

127

2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

128

GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

129

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

130

GRR/Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-NV-a - State Land Use Planning -NV-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of State Lands Regulations & Policies NRS 278: Planning and Zoning Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 1-NV-a.1 - Inventory Population Data, Land Use Survey, Housing, and Economic Data According to the Planner's Guide, a land use plan ought to consider:

131

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

132

Quantifying the Uncertainties of Aerosol Indirect Effects and Impacts on Decadal-Scale Climate Variability in NCAR CAM5 and CESM1  

SciTech Connect

The main goal of this project is to systematically quantify the major uncertainties of aerosol indirect effects due to the treatment of moist turbulent processes that drive aerosol activation, cloud macrophysics and microphysics in response to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations using the CAM5/CESM1. To achieve this goal, the P.I. hired a postdoctoral research scientist (Dr. Anna Fitch) who started her work from the Nov.1st.2012. In order to achieve the project goal, the first task that the Postdoc. and the P.I. did was to quantify the role of subgrid vertical velocity variance on the activation and nucleation of cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals and its impact on the aerosol indirect effect in CAM5. First, we analyzed various LES cases (from dry stable to cloud-topped PBL) to check whether this isotropic turbulence assumption used in CAM5 is really valid. It turned out that this isotropic turbulence assumption is not universally valid. Consequently, from the analysis of LES, we derived an empirical formulation relaxing the isotropic turbulence assumption used for the CAM5 aerosol activation and ice nucleation, and implemented the empirical formulation into CAM5/CESM1, and tested in the single-column and global simulation modes, and examined how it changed aerosol indirect effects in the CAM5/CESM1. These results were reported in the poster section in the 18th Annual CESM workshop held in Breckenridge, CO during Jun.17-20.2013. While we derived an empirical formulation from the analysis of couple of LES from the first task, the general applicability of that empirical formulation was questionable, because it was obtained from the limited number of LES simulations. The second task we did was to derive a more fundamental analytical formulation relating vertical velocity variance to TKE using other information starting from basic physical principles. This was a somewhat challenging subject, but if this could be done in a successful way, it could be directly implemented into the CAM5 as a practical parameterization, and substantially contributes to achieving the project goal. Through an intensive research for about one year, we found appropriate mathematical formulation and tried to implement it into the CAM5 PBL and activation routine as a practical parameterized numerical code. During these processes, however, the Postdoc applied for another position in Sweden, Europe, and accepted a job offer there, and left NCAR in August 2014. In Sweden, Dr. Anna Fitch is still working on this subject in a part time, planning to finalize the research and to write the paper in a near future.

Park, Sungsu

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

134

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

135

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic land-use change Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Non-Proximal Ecosystem Service Summary: Anthropogenic Land Cover Change Wetlandswater management Dams River Engineering Land use impervious surfaces... Anthropogenic land...

137

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Semiarid unsaturated zone chloride profiles: Archives of past land use change impacts on water resources in the southern High Plains,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was quantified using chloride mass balance calculations. The timing of land use change was estimated using

Scanlon, Bridget R.

139

E:\Active Projects\Comprehensive Land Use Plan\fclup.prn.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERMILAB FERMILAB COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN f FERMILAB TABLE OF CONTENTS Comprehensive Land Use Report Contents * PAGE i * Revision 0 * April 15, 1998 Contents f Table of Contents I. Regional Conditions............................................................................. .1 1. History ............................................................................................. 1 2. Regional Overview........................................................................ 7 3. Specific Local Conditions ........................................................... 10 4. Public Transportation.................................................................. 17 5. Geology/Seismic Risk/Topography/Hydrology ................. 25 6. Meteorology..................................................................................

140

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Land Use Change from Jatropha Curcas-Based Jet Fuel in Brazil ... Life cycle GHG emissions of biojet fuel derived from Jatropha curcas is quantified based on empirical data from Brazilian producers accounting for land-use change. ... This is the methodology adopted by the European Community in its current Renewable Energy Directive (40). ...

Robert E. Bailis; Jennifer E. Baka

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

142

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

143

A land use decision methodology for mine lands in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the issues associated with the development of methodology for determining appropriate land uses for mined lands in Appalachia. The methodology which has been developed presents a framework which is useful for examining land use options for previously mined land, currently active mine sites and unmined land which has a high value or likelihood for future mining.

Yuill, C.; Gorton, W.T.; Frakes, M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND URBAN PLANNING WRRI Technical Completion Report No. 346 Gwendolyn A. Aldrich Janie Chermak Jennifer A. Thacher NEW MEXICO WATER-0001 Telephone (505) 646-4337 FAX (505) 646-6418 email: nmwrri@wrri.nmsu.edu #12;WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE

Johnson, Eric E.

145

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

146

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Regulations & Policies Open Beaches Act Dune Protection Act Beach Dune Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas General Land Office (GLO) is in charge of making sure construction on the Texas coast that affects the beach and dunes is

147

NREL: News - NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar Study shows solar for 1,000 homes would require 32 acres July 30, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published a report on the land use requirements of solar power plants based on actual land-use practices from existing solar facilities. "Having real data from a majority of the solar plants in the United States will help people make proper comparisons and informed decisions," lead author Sean Ong said. The report, "Land-use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States," was written with NREL colleagues Clinton Campbell, Robert Margolis, Paul Denholm and Garvin Heath. Ong gathered data from 72% of the solar power plants installed or under

148

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.sutp.org/component/phocadownload/category/25-2a?download=33:2a-lup Related Tools Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Which cities have succeeded in establishing land use patterns which support the more environmentally-friendly and efficient modes of transit, walking and cycling? What are the benefits of better land use planning for

149

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC § 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

150

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

151

Experimental Investigation of the Effect of M-Band Preheating in Indirectly-Driven Double-Shell Implosions  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results are presented from several series of experiments studying the effect of 2-4 keV M-shell radiation on the implosion of double-shell capsules on the Omega Laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics. In the First series of experiments, precision machined double-shell capsules implosions are performed. A discrepancy is observed between the experimentally measured M-band fraction and the simulated value. The application of a time-dependent multiplier to the simulated M-band level results in a decrease in predicted yield of 35% and a corresponding increase in the YoC to 20-35%. In order to further investigate this discrepancy, a series of ''M-Band driven'' targets has been designed. An oversized outer shell is used to preferentially allow the M-band radiation to drive the implosion of a CH-tamped glass inner shell. The inner shell radius-time history is measured and is shown to be consistent with the simulations using the time-dependent M-band multipliers. The spatial distribution of this M-band source is also varied using hohlraums of different length and adjusting the laser pointing accordingly. The resulting asymmetry of the inner shell implosion is diagnosed both by x-ray backlighting prior to shell collision and by core emission.

Robey, H F; Amendt, P A; Park, H-S; Landen, O L; Watt, R G; Varnum, W S

2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

153

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon- Climate Models (summary) submitted to the Terrestrial Ecology Program. It is presented as an example plan. Data Management Plan The proposed project will generate important new datasets of remote-sensing-based land-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessment, long-term archiving, and data sharing and dissemination (along with documentation

154

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-HI-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685535" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

155

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

156

GRR/Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A land use permit in Alaska covers a number of uses of state land that are less invasive and do not require a full property interest such as a lease

157

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880-1980 (1994) (NDP-046) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp046 data Data PDF PDF Contributors J. F. Richards and E. P. Flint Description This data base contains estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as encompassing nearly 8 × 106 km2 of the earth's land surface and includes the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia),

158

Projected land-use change impacts on ecosystem services in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...McCarl BA ( 2012 ) Modeling bioenergy, land use, and GHG...selected after an exhaustive review of the literature. Lubowski et al. (1) discuss...are found in similar physical environments and are influenced by similar...

Joshua J. Lawler; David J. Lewis; Erik Nelson; Andrew J. Plantinga; Stephen Polasky; John C. Withey; David P. Helmers; Sebastin Martinuzzi; Derric Pennington; Volker C. Radeloff

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Dyna-CLUE Model Improvement Based on Exponential Smoothing Method and Land Use Dynamic Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Response variables and their driving factors often vary with time in the process of land use dynamic simulation; however, there are few existing literatures mentioned it.In order to evaluate the impact of time fa...

Minghao Liu; Yaoxing Wang; Donghong Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Key Elements in a Framework for Land Use Impact Assessment Within LCA (11 pp)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use by agriculture, forestry, mining, house-building or industry leads to substantial impacts, particularly on biodiversity and on soil quality as a supplier of life support functions. Unfortunately ther...

Lloren Mil i Canals; Christian Bauer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratorys Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

162

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda Problem statement Kampala is the capital city of Uganda on the northern shores of Lake Victoria. Here, future climate change

Jetten, Victor

163

ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon and now use this model to explore the response of the central Amazonian forest to an increase in biomass

Chambers, Jeff

164

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility 6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE's proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the

165

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-MT-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685537" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

166

GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process -FD-a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process 01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976(FLPMA) CEQ CRF Regulations 40 C.F.R. 1501.7 Scoping 40 C.F.R. 1502.9 Draft, Final, and Supplemental Statements 40 C.F.R. 1502.14 Alternatives Including the Proposed Action 40 C.F.R. 1503.4 Response to Comments 40 C.F.R. 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During the NEPA Process

167

The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced (more)

Avila, Francia Bismonte

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Planners' Perceptions of Land Use Planning Tools in the U.S. Pacific States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. To address this void in the literature, the present study explores planners? perceptions of land use planning tools in the U.S. Pacific states?Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington?which have utilized a variety of land use planning tools... plans. However, in Alaska, due to the competition for land and resources by a variety of interests in this remote but resource-rich state, planning has focused on coordinating fragmented holdings by different landowners (Gallagher & Gasbarro, 1989...

Ge, Yue

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Water, earth, and fire: Land use and environmental planning in the New Jersey Pine Barrens  

SciTech Connect

Each major chapter in this land-use planning case study begins with an introductory overview of the historical and ecological context of land-use patterns and the resources on which people depend. Juxtaposed with these scientific analyses is a series of profiles of area residents and their view of the Pine Barrens. The concluding chapters present recommendations designed to help develop a regional plan for the area.

Berger, J.; Sinton, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Connecting Land Use and Transportation Toward Sustainable Development: A Case Study of Houston-Galveston Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do land use characteristics affect individual and household travel behavior in a regional context? Can the investigation justify the land use policies to reduce automobile dependence and achieve the goals of sustainable development...

Lee, Jae Su

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

171

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Urban land-use regulations and housing markets in developing countries: Evidence from Indonesia on the importance of enforcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

poverty: ?ndings from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Land UseAfrican cities of Dar es Salaam, Addis Ababa, and Nairobi.

Monkkonen, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The environmental implications of intensified land use in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...removal of plant residues all damage local wildlife, though the impacts can be lessened...Probably the best documented effect on wildlife is that of the organochlorine insecticides...in West African soils is deposited by wind, from dry lake bottoms in the Sahara...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Indirect CP violation results and HFAG averages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current status of the search for indirect CP violation in the neutral D meson system at the B-factories and at LHCb is reported. The indirect CP asymmetry search is performed by the measurement of the proper-time asymmetry ($A_{\\Gamma}$) in decays of $D^0-\\bar{D^0}$ mesons to CP eigenstates, $K^-K^+$ and $\\pi^- \\pi^+$, and by $y_{CP}$, the ratio between the effective lifetime measured in decay to a CP eigenstate and that to the mixed eigenstate $K \\pi$. All results are consistent with the no CP violation hypothesis. The latest world averages for mixing and CP asymmetry in the charm sector evaluated by the Heavy Flavour Averaging Group are presented. The no mixing hypothesis is excluded at more than 12 standard deviations. The search for direct and indirect CP violation in the charm sector is consistent with no CP violation at 2.0% confident level.

Silvia Borghi

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Case studies: developing land uses in surface-mine reclamation  

SciTech Connect

Regulations adopted in 1978 by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 foreclosed many opportunities for development of postmining uses because of the requirement to return land to its approximate original contour (AOC), and the difficulty of qualifying for a variance. The regulations all but eliminated development of postmining uses with economic or community benefits. The effect of those regulations was to develop forestland, farmland, and rangeland similar to that which existed before mining. Recent changes in OSM's regulations have made development of postmining uses more feasible by removing many restrictive conditions and interpretations. This report documents the main types of uses that have been developed as postmining uses - recreation, forestry, housing, community facilities, industry, and commercial and mixed urban uses. Most of the cases presented predate the Act, and thus were not developed in a regulatory situation comparable to the present time. However, they demonstrate the practical feasibility and the benefits to local communities of developing postmining uses. The review of examples and case studies leads to three main conclusions: in certain situations surface-mined land may be an important resource for communities; most successful postmining developments required considerable vision and dedicated effort over many years; and an intended postmining use should be studied and planned during the preparation of mining permits so that the mining operation can be coordinated with the postmining use.

Seddon, J.; Petrich, C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

177

Calculation of direct and indirect excitons in GaAs?Ga1?xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells: The effects of in-plane magnetic fields and growth-direction electric fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The variational procedure, in the effective-mass and parabolic-band approximations, is used in order to investigate the effects of crossed electric and magnetic fields on the exciton states in GaAs?Ga1?xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells. Calculations are performed for double quantum wells under applied magnetic fields parallel to the layers and electric fields in the growth direction. The exciton envelope wave function is obtained through a variational procedure using a hydrogenic 1s-like wave function and an expansion in a complete set of trigonometric functions for the electron and hole wave functions. We take into account intersubband mixing brought about by the Coulomb interaction of electron-hole pairs in double quantum wells and present a detailed analysis of the properties of direct and indirect exciton states in these systems. The present study clearly reveals anticrossing effects on the dispersion with applied voltage (or growth-direction electric field) of the photoluminescence peaks associated with direct and indirect excitons. Calculated results are found in good agreement with available experimental measurements on the photoluminescence peak position associated with direct and indirect excitons in GaAs-Ga1?xAlxAs double quantum wells under growth-direction applied electric fields or under applied in-plane magnetic fields.

M. de Dios-Leyva, C. A. Duque, and L. E. Oliveira

2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Agency of Natural Resources The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing

180

Two LBA-ECO Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover (LC-04) science teams associated with the ecology component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), LBA-ECO: LBA-ECO LC-04 THMB Model Simulations for the Amazon and Tocantins Basins: 1939-1998 . Data set prepared by M.T. Coe, M.H. Costa, A. Botta, and C. Birkett. The model output data provided were generated by the THMB 1.2 (Terrestrial Hydrology Model with Biogeochemistry) model which simulates the flow of water through groundwater systems, rivers, lakes and wetlands. The model operates at a 5-minute latitude-by-longitude grid with a 1-hour time step and requires as boundary conditions: topography,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider

182

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mike Aimone, P.E. Mike Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use Compatibility Comments expressed are strictly those of the Briefer, and not necessarily the views or positions of the Battelle Memorial Institute or the Department of Defense 2 Sizing the Issue * Utility scale renewable energy development near DOD installations, ranges and Military Operational Areas/Special Use Airspace can affect mission operations and readiness * In the US, Land Use Planning is a "states-right" issue - tied to "Police Powers" - Goal: Acceptable zoning rules and consistent zoning

183

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

185

Climate is affected more by maritime than by continental land use change: A multiple scale analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical deforestation appears to have larger impacts on local, regional and global climate when it occurs under maritime conditions rather then under continental conditions. At the local scale, we compare results from a field experiment in Puerto Rico with other long-term studies of the changes in surface fluxes after deforestation. Changes in surface fluxes are larger in maritime situations because a number of feedback mechanisms appears less relevant (e.g. the dependency of soil moisture on recycling of water and the larger reduction of net radiation in the wet season due to clouds in continental regions). Pastures may evaporate at similarly high rates as forests when soil moisture is sufficient, which has a strong reducing effect on the sensible heat flux after deforestation. At the regional scale (?102km2), model simulations show that the meso-scale sea breeze circulation under maritime conditions is more effective in transporting heat and moisture to the upper troposphere than convection is in the continental case. Thus islands function as triggers of convection, whereas the intensity of the sea breeze-trigger is sensitive to land use change. At the global scale, using satellite-derived latent heating rates of the upper troposphere, it is shown that 40% of the latent heating associated with deep convection takes place in the Maritime Continent (Indonesia and surroundings) and may be produced mostly by small islands. Continents contribute only 20% of the latent heating of the upper troposphere. Thus, sea breeze circulations exert significant influence on the Hadley cell circulation. These results imply that, from a climate perspective, further deforestation studies would do well to focus more on maritime conditions.

M.K. van der Molen; A.J. Dolman; M.J. Waterloo; L.A. Bruijnzeel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

THE USE OF REMOTE SENSING AND GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO CREATE LAND USE AND LAND COVER MAPS AND TO DETERMINE THE CHANGES IN THE LAND USE AND LAND COVER OVER A TEN YEAR PERIOD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Construction of land use and land cover (LULC) maps was accomplished through the use of remote sensing and GIS. Remote sensing and GIS were used (more)

Johnson, Adam Bradford

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ris-R-1234(EN) Land Use Planning and Chemical Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1234(EN) Land Use Planning and Chemical Sites Summary Report Carsten Grønberg (editor) Risø chemical sites has been developed for making decisions in local and regional administrations methodology is a GIS based software platform enabling the users to generate alternatives, select the preferred

188

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Quantifying the impact of future land-use changes against increases in GHG concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the impact of future land-use changes against increases in GHG concentrations A changes relative to the increase in greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations is assessed in time-slice simula of vegetation change to GHG concentration increase is of the order of 10% for a B2 scenario, and can reach 30

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

Attoyac Bayou GIS Inventory, Source Survey and Land Use Cover Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency GIS geographic information system HUC hydrologic unit code LULC land use land cover NAIP National Agricultural Imagery Program NED National Elevation Dataset NHD National Hydrography Dataset... NLCD National Landcover Dataset NRCS U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service RRC Railroad Commission of Texas RUAA recreational use attainability analysis SELECT Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool...

Boitnott, N.; Castilaw, A.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia Monica Goigel Turner* Institute of Ecology University of Georgia Athens, Georgia ABSTRACT A spatial simulation model was developed be explicitly included in simulation models to gain an understanding of landscape level phenomena, and at least

Turner, Monica G.

192

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decades, intense human activities, such as over-grazing, mowing and crop cultivation have led to severeEnergy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index

Chen, Jiquan

193

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Presentation TRI Technology Update & IDL R&D Needs burciagatri.pdf More Documents & Publications...

194

A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy crops, whether corn, soybeans, switchgrass, trees, or something else, inevitably will put pressure on land uses worldwide and bring into cultivation

Delucchi, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF

196

Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45834 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

197

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

198

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 4 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

199

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

200

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 (NDP-050/R1) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp050 data Data PDF PDF The PDF of NDP-050/R1 (body of report, plus appendices A through E) and tellus51b.pdf (Appendix F, reprint of Houghton paper in Tellus, Vol. 51B; copyright 1999 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) Contributors Richard A. Houghton Joseph L. Hackler The Woods Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Please Note: Revised data through the year 2000 are available in CDIAC's Trends Online. Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The role of public participation in encouraging changes in rural land use to reduce flood risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Changes in rural land use to reduce flood risk are encouraged by governments in many countries, but they may face considerable opposition by land managers. Local participative processes are thought to help overcome opposition. This article presents an evaluation of an intensive participative process set up between land managers and governmental agencies following two severe floods in the transboundary BowmontGlen catchment in Scotland and England. A combination of interviews and documentary analysis is used. The research demonstrates that the participative process contributed to greater uptake of rural land use change and improved compliance with existing environmental policies. There were nevertheless low levels of social learning amongst participants. Two institutional designs for improving policy implementation are presented.

J.J. Rouillard; A.D. Reeves; K.V. Heal; T. Ball

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

e-GTRSRS101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY AND RESULTING FOREST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND RESULTING FOREST SUCCESSION IN THE ILLINOIS OZARK HILLS Saskia L. van de Gevel and Charles M. Ruffner1 on forest development in the Ozark Hills of southern Illinois. By incorporating land-use history research719 e-GTR­SRS­101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY

203

Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon, Boulder, 80309-0488, United States 1. Introduction Carbon management through changes in land, 2010). Human land-use change is the second largest contributor of increasing carbon dioxide

Neff, Jason

204

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Major Soil Group Areas", flows successively through seven physiographic divisions; namely, West Cross Timbers, Grand Prairie, East Cross Timbers, Blackland Prairie, Gulf Coastal Plain, Coastal Flatwoods and Coastal Prairie. Each of these physiographic.... The northwestern part is dominated by the grazing and ranching type of land-use. The portion of the watershed west of Fort Worth lies in the sub-humid climatic zone, while the remainder of the watershed becomes progressively more humid toward the Gulf Coast...

Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Evaluation of land use/land cover datasets for urban watershed modeling  

SciTech Connect

Land use/land cover (LULC) data are a vital component for nonpoint source pollution modeling. Most watershed hydrology and pollutant loading models use, in some capacity, LULC information to generate runoff and pollutant loading estimates. Simple equation methods predict runoff and pollutant loads using runoff coefficients or pollutant export coefficients that are often correlated to LULC type. Complex models use input variables and parameters to represent watershed characteristics and pollutant buildup and washoff rates as a function of LULC type. Whether using simple or complex models an accurate LULC dataset with an appropriate spatial resolution and level of detail is paramount for reliable predictions. The study presented in this paper compared and evaluated several LULC dataset sources for application in urban environmental modeling. The commonly used USGS LULC datasets have coarser spatial resolution and lower levels of classification than other LULC datasets. In addition, the USGS datasets do not accurately represent the land use in areas that have undergone significant land use change during the past two decades. We performed a watershed modeling analysis of three urban catchments in Los Angeles, California, USA to investigate the relative difference in average annual runoff volumes and total suspended solids (TSS) loads when using the USGS LULC dataset versus using a more detailed and current LULC dataset. When the two LULC datasets were aggregated to the same land use categories, the relative differences in predicted average annual runoff volumes and TSS loads from the three catchments were 8 to 14% and 13 to 40%, respectively. The relative differences did not have a predictable relationship with catchment size.

Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:08, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:08, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 17:06, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (55 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

208

Evaluation of approximate original contour and postmining land use in West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Surface Mining (OSM) has been working diligently with the West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) to improve the State`s administration of its approved program in two areas: (1) the standards used by the WVDEP in evaluating whether a particular postmining and land configuration constitutes a return to AOC (approximate original contour); and (2) the postmining land uses which WVDEP approves when it grants a waiver from the AOC requirement. In conjunction with OSM, the WVDEP recently announced proposed new procedures that should both enable the permit reviewer to more easily determine when a site achieves AOC and limit the placement of excess spoil in valleys and streams. In addition, OSM is developing a policy document that will clarify the acceptable postmining land uses for mountaintop-removal and steep slope mining operations with AOC variances. In particular, this document addresses the issue of whether commercial forestry, agriculture, and public facilities, including recreational facilities constitute approvable postmining land uses.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUsePlanning.pdf LandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:06, 14 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 14 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (124 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:52, 1 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:52, 1 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:58, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:58, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

210

File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit.pdf d - Land Use Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:56, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:56, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (28 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) 13:47, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:47, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (27 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

211

File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf -FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:25, 18 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:25, 18 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (136 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 16:00, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:00, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (86 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

212

ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 ERROR ESTIMATIONS FOR INDIRECT MEASUREMENTS: RANDOMIZED VS. DETERMINISTIC ALGORITHMS difficult or even impossible to directly measure the quantity in which we are interested: e.g., we cannot directly measure a distance to a distant galaxy or the amount of oil in a given well. Since we cannot

Kreinovich, Vladik

213

Performance improvement of direct- and indirect-fired heaters  

SciTech Connect

The operating performance of direct and indirect heaters is discussed, and principles and guidelines that can be applied to effect improvements in efficiency are presented. This paper also discusses the associated heater efficiencies and several useful operating techniques to approach the maximum, steady-state heater efficiency. The techniques presented apply to all types of direct-and indirect-fired heaters: salt bath heaters, propane vaporizers, heater/treaters, production heaters, and glycol and amine regenerators.

Sams, G.W.; Hunter, J.D.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impact of agricultural-based biofuel production on greenhouse gas emissions from land-use change: Key modelling choices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent regulations on biofuels require reporting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions related to feedstock-specific biofuels. However, the inclusion of GHG emissions from land-use change (LUC) into law and policy remains a subject of active discussion, with LUCGHG emissions an issue of intense research. This article identifies key modelling choices for assessing the impact of biofuel production on LUCGHG emissions. The identification of these modelling choices derives from evaluation and critical comparison of models from commonly accepted biofuelsLUCGHG modelling approaches. The selection and comparison of models were intended to cover factors related to production of agricultural-based biofuel, provision of land for feedstock, and GHG emissions from land-use conversion. However, some fundamental modelling issues are common to all stages of assessment and require resolution, including choice of scale and spatial coverage, approach to accounting for time, and level of aggregation. It is argued here that significant improvements have been made to address LUCGHG emissions from biofuels. Several models have been created, adapted, coupled, and integrated, but room for improvement remains in representing LUCGHG emissions from specific biofuel production pathways, as follows: more detailed and integrated modelling of biofuel supply chains; more complete modelling of policy frameworks, accounting for forest dynamics and other drivers of LUC; more heterogeneous modelling of spatial patterns of LUC and associated GHG emissions; and clearer procedures for accounting for the time-dependency of variables. It is concluded that coupling the results of different models is a convenient strategy for addressing effects with different time and space scales. In contrast, model integration requires unified scales and time approaches to provide generalised representations of the system. Guidelines for estimating and reporting LUCGHG emissions are required to help modellers to define the most suitable approaches and policy makers to better understand the complex impacts of agricultural-based biofuel production.

Luis Panichelli; Edgard Gnansounou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Indirect liquefaction processes. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the technology feasibility of the various coal gasification and indirect liquefaction technologies. Also included is the best-estimate costs for methanol and gasoline using the various technologies with three different coal/feedstocks by critically analyzing publicly available design studies and placing them on a common technical/financial basis. The following conclusion is that methanol from coal is cheaper than gasoline via either the Mobile MTG process or the Fisher/Tropsch process.

McGuckin, J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Combining empirical and theory-based land-use modelling approaches to assess economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC: Argentina as a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, a land-use modelling framework is presented combining empirical and theory-based modelling approaches to determine economic potential of biofuel production avoiding indirect land-use changes (iLUC) resulting from land competition with other functions. The empirical approach explores future developments in food and feed production to determine land availability and technical potential of biofuel production. The theory-based approach assesses the economic performance of biofuel crops on the surplus land in comparison with other production systems and determines the economic potential of biofuel production. The framework is demonstrated for a case study in Argentina to determine the development of biofuel potential from soy and switchgrass up to 2030. Two scenarios were considered regarding future developments of productivity in agriculture and livestock production. It was found that under a scenario reflecting a continuation of current trends, no surplus land is expected to become available. Nevertheless, the potential for soybean biodiesel is expected to keep increasing up to 103PJ in 2030, due to the existence of a developed agro-industrial sector jointly producing feed and biodiesel. In case large technological developments occur, 32Mha could become available in 2030, which would allow for a technical potential of 472PJ soybean biodiesel and 1445PJ switchgrass bioethanol. According to the economic assessment, an economic potential of 368PJ of soy biodiesel and 1.1EJ switchgrass bioethanol could be attained, at a feedstock production cost of 100155 US$/ton and 2045 US$/ton, respectively. The region of southwest Buenos Aires and La Pampa provinces appeared to be particularly promising for switchgrass. The ability of jointly assessing future developments in land availability, technical and economic potential of biofuel production avoiding iLUC and spatial distribution of viable locations for growing biofuel crops means that the proposed framework is a step forward in assessing the potential for biofuel production that is both economically viable and sustainably produced.

V. Diogo; F. van der Hilst; J. van Eijck; J.A. Verstegen; J. Hilbert; S. Carballo; J. Volante; A. Faaij

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application ToAvoided Deforestation Projects  

SciTech Connect

Although forest conservation activities particularly in thetropics offer significant potential for mitigating carbon emissions,these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena causedby the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle,particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has twomain components: the projected land-use change and the correspondingcarbon stocks in the applicable pools such as vegetation, detritus,products and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult toaddress analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparingthree models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of pasttrends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth tomore complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicitmodels of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomicfactors. The three models of the latter category used in the analysis atregional scale are The Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use andCarbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD)model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropicalregions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions,population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) SantaCruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana State in Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico;(5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoacan, Mexico. A comparison of all modeloutputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quitedifferent deforestation baseline. In general, the simplest FAC model,applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highestamount of forest loss (four out of six) and the LUCS model the leastamount of loss (four out of five). Based on simulations of GEOMOD, wefound that readily observable physical and biological factors as well asdistance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as importantas either sociological/demographic or economic/infrastructure factors(less observable) in explaining empirical land-use patterns. We proposefrom the lessons learned, a methodology comprised of three main steps andsix tasks can be used to begin developing credible baselines. We alsopropose that the baselines be projected over a 10-year period because,although projections beyond 10 years are feasible, they are likely to beunrealistic for policy purposes. In the first step, an historic land-usechange and deforestation estimate is made by determining the analyticdomain (size of the region relative to the size of proposed project),obtaining historic data, analyzing candidate historic baseline drivers,and identifying three to four major drivers. In the second step, abaseline of where deforestation is likely to occur --a potential land-usechange (PLUC) map is produced using a spatial model such as GEOMOD thatuses the key drivers from step one. Then rates of deforestation areprojected over a 10-year baseline period using any of the three models.Using the PLUC maps, projected rates of deforestation, and carbon stockestimates, baselineprojections are developed that can be used for projectGHG accounting and crediting purposes: The final step proposes that, atagreed interval (eg, +10 years), the baseline assumptions about baselinedrivers be re-assessed. This step reviews the viability of the 10-yearbaseline in light of changes in one or more key baseline drivers (e.g.,new roads, new communities, new protected area, etc.). The potentialland-use change map and estimates of rates of deforestation could beredone at the agreed interval, allowing the rates and changes in spatialdrivers to be incorporated into a defense of the existing baseline, orderivation of a new baseline projection.

Brown, Sandra; Hall, Myrna; Andrasko, Ken; Ruiz, Fernando; Marzoli, Walter; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar; Dushku, Aaron; Dejong,Ben; Cornell, Joseph

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century  

SciTech Connect

Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations Whats Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

Chiu, Peiwen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L I A S TA H L w and J A N P. B A K K E R z *Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment RIZA, PO Box 17, 8200 AA Lelystad, The Netherlands, wAnimal Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological

Kleyer, Michael

222

Indirect Cost Sharing Policies and Guidelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect Cost Sharing Policies and Guidelines University at Albany In the 1997 Fall semester% of the University's indirect cost return to the schools or colleges, departments, and centers. The allocations are determined in direct proportion to the units' contribution toward the total indirect cost recovery pool

Kidd, William S. F.

223

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

224

Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

Ryu, Hyung Cheal

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Land use change and carbon exchange in the tropics. I. Detailed estimates for Costa Rice, Panama, Peru, and Bolivia  

SciTech Connect

This group, composed of modelers working in conjunction with tropical ecologists, has produced a simulation model that quantifies the net carbon exchange between tropical vegetation and the atmosphere due to land use change. The model calculates this net exchange by combining estimates of land use change with several estimates of the carbon stored in tropical vegetation and general assumptions about the fate of cleared vegetation. In this report, the authors use estimates of land use and carbon of land use and carbon storage organized into six life zone (sensu Holdridge) categories to calculate the exchange between the atmosphere and the vegetation of four tropical countries. Their analyses of these countries indicate that this life zone approach has several advantages because (a) the carbon content of vegetation varies significantly among life zones, (b) much of the land use change occurs in life zones of only moderate carbon storage, and (c) the fate of cleared vegetation varies among life zones. Their analyses also emphasize the importance of distinguishing between temporary and permanent land use change, as the recovery of vegetation on abandoned areas decreases the net release of carbon due to clearing. They include sensitivity analysis of those factors that they found to be important but are difficult to quantify at present.

Hall, C.A.S.; Detwiler, R.P.; Bogdonoff, P.; Underhill, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, environmental impacts, biogas maize, permanent grassland, Germany. 1. Introduction Agricultural land use.laggner@ti.bund.de Abstract Agricultural land use in Germany and related im- pacts on the environment and the use of natural statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change

Köbben, Barend

228

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cover Sheet Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

229

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

230

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) The following is a full listing of ascii file compare.dat (File 4), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file compare.wk1 (File 5). This file compares the estimated global total net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 to 1990, by year, for this database (Houghton 1999) and three earlier publications (Houghton et al. 1983, Houghton and Skole 1990, and Houghton and Hackler 1995). Note that the data for the period 1850 through 1859 attributed below to Houghton et al. (1983) were not actually presented in that publication but are present in the data used in that publication. Units = Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 1015 grams); -9.999 denotes missing value Year Houghton Houghton Houghton Houghton

231

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) The following is a full listing of ascii file ndp050.dat (File 2), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file ndp050.wk1 (File 3). This file lists the estimated net flux of carbon, in units of 1000 Gg of carbon (1 gigagram = 109 g), to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 through 1990, by year and by region, along with the global totals. The values in this listing replace the values in files netflux.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Year North South and Europe North Tropical Former China South and Pacific TOTAL America Central Africa and Africa Soviet Southeast Developed FLUX America Middle East Union Asia Region

232

SEA in local land use planning - first experience in the Alpine States  

SciTech Connect

In the Alpine area, planning decisions can result in far-reaching consequences because of the high sensitivity of the Alpine ecosystems. This article is based on two hypotheses: (1) The Alpine states/regions were aware of their sensitive environment and therefore recognized the necessity of introducing a comparable instrument to assess local land use planning. (2) By introducing this differentiated assessment tool, namely SEA, an increase in costs may be the consequence. However, better and more transparent planning can contribute to the enhancement of planning standards. To reveal the validity of these assumptions the legal implementation in the Alpine countries Austria, Germany, Italy and France was examined as well as first practical experience resulting from the determined procedures. The results of the implementation process in the four states were compared and discussed on the basis of selected process steps of SEA.

Jiricka, Alexandra [Institute of Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.at; Proebstl, Ulrike [Institute of Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: ulrike.proebstl@boku.ac.at

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

Watson, Eliza

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intheCommunityEarthSystemModel(CESM1): Seasonaluse Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternativenow passed to the Earth system models (Taylor, Stouffer, &

Jones, A.D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Designed by Zoning: Evaluating the Spatial Effects of Land Use Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,

Warren, Charles Reuben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effects of large-scale human land use on Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) populations in Finland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) is often used as a focal species for landscape ecological studies: the minimum size for its lekking area is 300 (more)

Sirki, Saija

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Land Cover and Land Use Change and Its Effects of Carbon Dynamics in Monsoon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on land directly · agriculture - food production and raising livestock · forestry - production of wood products (such as timber or paper), and biomass as an energy source LUC activities impact our environment plantations to lower albedo and reduce atmospheric CO2 #12;Land Cover Change in MAR Biome Types Jain and Yang

Jain, Atul K.

238

Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Chloride-mass-balance for predicting increased recharge after land-use change  

SciTech Connect

The chloride-mass-balance (CMB) method has been used extensively to estimate recharge in arid and semi-arid environments. Required data include estimates of annual precipitation, total chloride input (from dry fallout and precipitation), and pore-water chloride concentrations. Typically, CMB has been used to estimate ancient recharge but recharge from recent land-use change has also been documented. Recharge rates below a few mm/yr are reliably detected with CMB; however, estimates above a few mm/yr appear to be less reliable. We tested the CMB method against 26 years of drainage from a 7.6-m-deep lysimeter at a simulated waste-burial ground, located on the Department of Energy s Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA where land-use change has increased recharge rates. Measured drainage from the lysimeter for the past 26 years averaged 62 mm/yr. Precipitation averaged 190 mm/yr with an estimated chloride input of 0.225 mg/L. Initial pore-water chloride concentration was 88 mg/L and decreased to about 6 mg/L after 26 years, while the drainage water decreased to less than 1 mg/L. A recharge estimate made using chloride concentrations in drain water was within 20 percent of the measured drainage rate. In contrast, recharge estimates using 1:1 (water: soil) extracts were lower than actual by factors ranging from 2 to 8 or more. The results suggest that when recharge is above a few mm/yr, soil water extracts can lead to unreliable estimates of recharge. For conditions of elevated recharge, direct sampling of pore water is the preferred method, because chloride concentrations are often 20 to 50 times higher in directly-sampled pore water than in pore-water extracts.

Gee, G.W.; Zhang, Z.F.; Tyler, S.W.; Albright, W.H.; Singleton, M.J.

2004-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental policy implications of working from home: Modelling the impacts of land-use, infrastructure and socio-demographics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Working from home is generally perceived as an effective means of reducing energy use and associated pollution from commuter transport. In order to consider the merits of mechanisms and policies to support a change in behaviour that results in greater take-up of home working, this paper applies energy consumption per commute calculations and a logit model using a case study of Ireland. In marked contrast with larger countries, the energy consumption per commute is relatively low in Ireland. Nonetheless, the analysis indicates that, on average, at least an average net saving of 9.33kWh per day can be achieved where an individual converts to working from home, after deducting the home energy consumption associated with home working. We find that land use patterns, public transport networks, internet infrastructure, commute distances and socio-demographic characteristics can serve to influence rates of home working. Encouraging the higher and lower professional categories and those in the service sectors to work from home should be the highest priority in terms of energy and emissions reductions. Increased coverage of internet services and railway coverage will support higher rates of home working. Increased dispersion of residential, commercial and industrial areas serves to encourage greater home working.

Miao Fu; J. Andrew Kelly; J. Peter Clinch; Fearghal King

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategy Workshop: Summary Report Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies...

242

Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOEs Bioenergy Technologies Office Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop.

243

Movement of white-tailed deer in the eastern Edwards Plateau in response to land use practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOVEHENT OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE EASTERN EDWARDS PLATEAU IN RESPONSE TO LAND USE PRACTICES A Thesis by RAY DUANE FAHLSING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of HASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences NOVEHENT OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE EASTERN EDWARDS PLATEAU IN RESPONSE TO LAND USE PRACTICES A Thesis by RAY DUANE FAHLSING Approved as to style and content by: Jack H...

Fahlsing, Ray Duane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Indirect Estimation of Radioactivity in Containerized Cargo  

SciTech Connect

Detecting illicit nuclear and radiological material in containerized cargo challenges the state of the art in detection systems. Current systems are being evaluated and new systems envisioned to address the need for the high probability of detection and extremely low false alarm rates necessary to thwart potential threats and extremely low nuisance and false alarm rates while maintaining necessary to maintain the flow of commerce impacted by the enormous volume of commodities imported in shipping containers. Maintaining flow of commerce also means that primary inspection must be rapid, requiring relatively indirect measurements of cargo from outside the containers. With increasing information content in such indirect measurements, it is natural to ask how the information might be combined to improved detection. Toward this end, we present an approach to estimating isotopic activity of naturally occurring radioactive material in cargo grouped by commodity type, combining container manifest data with radiography and gamma spectroscopy aligned to location along the container. The heart of this approach is our statistical model of gamma counts within peak regions of interest, which captures the effects of background suppression, counting noise, convolution of neighboring cargo contributions, and down-scattered photons to provide physically constrained estimates of counts due to decay of specific radioisotopes in cargo alone. Coupled to that model, we use a mechanistic model of self-attenuated radiation flux to estimate the isotopic activity within cargo, segmented by location within each container, that produces those counts. We demonstrate our approach by applying it to a set of measurements taken at the Port of Seattle in 2006. This approach to synthesizing disparate available data streams and extraction of cargo characteristics holds the potential to improve primary inspection using current detection capabilities and to enable simulation-based evaluation of new candidate detection systems.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Scherrer, Chad; Smith, Eric L.; Chilton, Lawrence; Anderson, K. K.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Trease, Lynn L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Please cite this article in press as: Gosnell, H., et al., Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence. Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2010.05.012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.elsevier.com/locate/landusepol Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence HannahPlease cite this article in press as: Gosnell, H., et al., Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence. Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j

Kurapov, Alexander

246

Influences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and beestings. Between 3000-4000 people in the Phoenix metro area report being stung by scorpions each yearInfluences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Nancy E. McIntyre Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University Summary Between 3000

Hall, Sharon J.

247

Web-GIS Based System for the Management of Objections to a Comprehensive Municipal Land Use Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web-GIS Based System for the Management of Objections to a Comprehensive Municipal Land Use Plan the land planning process. Geographic information Systems (GIS) have traditionally been used in daily municipalities in which the lack of resources or expert staff who can use this technology makes GIS

Touriño, Juan

248

The habitat use and selection of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in a land use landscape in Kenya, Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elephant populations in eastern Africa are in Tanzania (80% of regional population), Kenya (12% of regional in Kenya, Africa Ashley Coe Ashley Coe (Corresponding author) Montana State University Bozeman, MT Email) to determine what land use cover types support larger densities of elephants as a very general indicate

Hansen, Andrew J.

249

Response of Free-Living Nitrogen-Fixing Microorganisms to Land Use Change in the Amazon Rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...three different land use systems in the Amazon. Each...important implications for restoration of degraded areas since...The prokaryotes. A handbook on the biology of bacteria...Does disturbance and restoration of alpine grassland...in temperate cropping systems: influence of nitrogen...

Babur S. Mirza; Chotima Potisap; Klaus Nsslein; Brendan J. M. Bohannan; Jorge L. M. Rodrigues

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

250

Comparing land use regression and dispersion modelling to assess residential exposure to ambient air pollution for epidemiological studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractBackground Land-use regression (LUR) and dispersion models (DM) are commonly used for estimating individual air pollution exposure in population studies. Few comparisons have however been made of the performance of these methods. Objectives Within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) we explored the differences between LUR and DM estimates for NO2, PM10 and PM2.5. Methods The ESCAPE study developed LUR models for outdoor air pollution levels based on a harmonised monitoring campaign. In thirteen ESCAPE study areas we further applied dispersion models. We compared LUR and DM estimates at the residential addresses of participants in 13 cohorts for NO2; 7 for PM10 and 4 for PM2.5. Additionally, we compared the DM estimates with measured concentrations at the 2040 ESCAPE monitoring sites in each area. Results The median Pearson R (range) correlation coefficients between LUR and DM estimates for the annual average concentrations of NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 were 0.75 (0.190.89), 0.39 (0.230.66) and 0.29 (0.220.81) for 112,971 (13 study areas), 69,591 (7) and 28,519 (4) addresses respectively. The median Pearson R correlation coefficients (range) between DM estimates and ESCAPE measurements were of 0.74 (0.090.86) for NO2; 0.58 (0.360.88) for PM10 and 0.58 (0.390.66) for PM2.5. Conclusions LUR and dispersion model estimates correlated on average well for NO2 but only moderately for PM10 and PM2.5, with large variability across areas. DM predicted a moderate to large proportion of the measured variation for NO2 but less for PM10 and PM2.5.

Kees de Hoogh; Michal Korek; Danielle Vienneau; Menno Keuken; Jaakko Kukkonen; Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; Chiara Badaloni; Rob Beelen; Andrea Bolignano; Giulia Cesaroni; Marta Cirach Pradas; Josef Cyrys; John Douros; Marloes Eeftens; Francesco Forastiere; Bertil Forsberg; Kateryna Fuks; Ulrike Gehring; Alexandros Gryparis; John Gulliver; Anna L Hansell; Barbara Hoffmann; Christer Johansson; Sander Jonkers; Leena Kangas; Klea Katsouyanni; Nino Knzli; Timo Lanki; Michael Memmesheimer; Nicolas Moussiopoulos; Lars Modig; Gran Pershagen; Nicole Probst-Hensch; Christian Schindler; Tamara Schikowski; Dorothee Sugiri; Oriol Teixid; Ming-Yi Tsai; Tarja Yli-Tuomi; Bert Brunekreef; Gerard Hoek; Tom Bellander

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PAF Number College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost Principal Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect

Kamat, Vineet R.

252

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

SciTech Connect

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of Land Use Regression Models for elemental, organic carbon, PAH and hopanes/steranes in 10 ESCAPE/TRANSPHORM European study areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use regression (LUR) models have been used to model concentrations of mainly traffic related air pollutants (nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM) mass or absorbance). ...

Aleksandra Jedynska; Gerard Hoek; Meng Wang; Marloes Eeftens; Josef Cyrys; Menno Keuken; Christophe Ampe; Rob Beelen; Giulia Cesaroni; Francesco Forastiere; Marta Cirach; Kees de Hoogh; Audrey De Nazelle; Wenche Nystad; Christophe Declercq; Kirsten Thorup Eriksen; Konstantina Dimakopoulou; Timo Lanki; Kees Meliefste; Mark J Nieuwenhuijsen; Tarja Yli-Tuomi; Ole Raaschou-Nielsen; Bert Brunekreef; Ingeborg Kooter

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Estimating diesel engine performance by indirect methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was under taken with an instrumented John Deere 4440 tractor to investigate the feasibility of using indirect methods to measure engine power output and fuel consumption. Two indirectly related variables studied were exhaust gas temperature and injector... and assistance in the performance of research tasks. Steve Bandy and Costas Kotzabassis are also thanked for their contributions. The financial support of Deere 5 Company, the Center for Energy and Mineral Resources and the Texas Agricultural Experiment...

McKiernan, Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

256

Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Michigan State University in the Climate-Land Interaction Project (CLIP) . The overall objective of the project is to establish the mechanisms that determine how climate and land use (primarily in the human of climate to land use, a prerequisite for the potential of feedback. #12;Rationale This project will address

257

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Harris, Heather Grace

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Land use change emissions from oil palm expansion in Par, Brazil depend on proper policy enforcement on deforested lands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Brazil aims to increase palm oil production to meet the growing national and global demand for edible oil and biodiesel while preserving environmentally and culturally significant areas. As land use change (LUC) is the result of complex interactions between socio-economic and biophysical drivers operating at multiple temporal and spatial scales, the type and location of LUC depend on drivers such as neighboring land use, conversion elasticity, access to infrastructure, distance to markets, and land suitability. The purpose of this study is to develop scenarios to measure the impact of land conversion under three different enforcement scenarios (none, some, and strict enforcement). We found that converting 22.5 million hectares of land can produce approximately 29 billion gallons (110 billion liters) of biodiesel a year. Of that, 2271% of the area can come from forest land, conservation units, wetland and indigenous areas, emitting 1484gCO2eMJ?1. This direct land use emission alone can be higher than the carbon intensity of diesel that it intends to displace for lowering greenhouse gas emissions. This letter focuses narrowly on GHG emissions and does not address socio-economicecological prospects for these degraded lands for palm oil or for other purposes. Future studies should carefully evaluate these tradeoffs.

Sahoko Yui; Sonia Yeh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A comprehensive techno-economical review of indirect solar desalination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar powered desalination has been the focus of great interest recently worldwide. In the past, majority of the experimental investigations focused on solar coupled thermally driven conventional desalination technologies such as Multi-Stage Flash (MSF) and Multi-Effect Distillation (MED). With the advancement in membrane technology and its advantages such as high Recovery Ratios (RR) and low specific energy requirements Reverse Osmosis (RO) desalination has gained popularity. Currently, 52% of the indirect solar desalination plants are RO based with MED and MSF having a 13% and 9% share respectively. Membrane Distillation (MD) based plants represent 16% of the total and have been a focus of recent research efforts. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of all the indirect solar desalination technologies along with plant specific technical details. Efforts assessing the economic feasibility and cost affecting parameters for each desalination technology are also reviewed.

Muhammad Tauha Ali; Hassan E.S. Fath; Peter R. Armstrong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Theory of indirect exciton photoluminescence in elevated quantum trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Inspired by an experiment of indirect excitons photoluminescence (PL) in elevated quantum trap (High et al., 2009), we theoretically investigate the energy relaxation and nonlinear interactions of indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. It is shown that, when increasing the laser power, the intensity reversion of two PL peaks is due to the phonon necklace effect. In addition, we use a nonlinear Schrdinger equation including attractive two-body, repulsive three-body interactions and the excitation power dependence of energy distribution to understand the exciton states. This model gives a natural account for the PL blue shift with the increase of the excitation power. This study thus provides an alternative way to understand the underlying physics of the exciton dynamics in coupled potential wells.

C.S. Liu; T.F. Xu; Y.H. Liu; X.L. Jing

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Global climate policy impacts on livestock, land use, livelihoods, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...households, the effect of rising food prices on food consumption...of changing prices and consumption...the spending effect). When this...nutrition profile, average per capita...tax on fossil fuel CO2 emissions...paper. The net effect on abatement...global carbon price of $27/tCO2eq...

Alla A. Golub; Benjamin B. Henderson; Thomas W. Hertel; Pierre J. Gerber; Steven K. Rose; Brent Sohngen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

GoMRC Website Meta-analysis Report: Land-use and submerged aquatic vegetation change in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century, health and spatial extent of seagrasses has decreased dramatically in the Gulf of Mexico. While some of the changes can be explained by direct impacts to the seagrass beds, we hypothesize that changes in the land use in the watersheds can also be correlated with the decline of seagrasses. Through this meta-analysis, we researched historical and compared trends in seagrass populations and land use in five bays and their watersheds within the Gulf of Mexico: Mobile Bay, Perdido Bay, Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, and Galveston Bay. Using both historical records and spatial datasets, we examined land use and seagrass trends in these five areas.

Judd, Chaeli; Stefansson, Emily S.; Brushnahan, Heather

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

264

Indirect Utilization of Solar Energy [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Indirect Utilization of Solar Energy [and Discussion] Hermann...a heat engine converting solar heat into the mechanical energy of wind, which in turn generates...readily be traced back to the solar input. Wind energy used to be a major source...

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Indirect costs of federally supported research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research support that is largely for the financial advantage of the university. Third...present. An important basis for the cur-rent large differences between indirect cost...research program were provided through the assistance of W. F. Raub, associate director...

KT Brown

1981-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

From spatially indirect excitons to momentum-space indirect excitons by an in-plane magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An in-plane magnetic field is found to change drastically the photoluminescence spectra and kinetics of interwell excitons in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs coupled quantum wells. This effect is due to the in-plane magnetic-field-induced displacement of the interwell exciton dispersion in momentum space, which results in the transition from the momentum-space direct exciton ground state to the momentum-space indirect exciton ground state. An in-plane magnetic field is, therefore, an effective tool for exciton dispersion engineering.

L. V. Butov, A. V. Mintsev, Yu. E. Lozovik, K. L. Campman, and A. C. Gossard

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climatic Impacts of Land-Use Change due to Crop Yield Increases and a Universal Carbon Tax from a Scenario Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future land cover will have a significant impact on climate and is strongly influenced by the extent of agricultural land use. Differing assumptions of crop yield increase and carbon pricing mitigation strategies affect projected expansion of ...

T. Davies-Barnard; P. J. Valdes; J. S. Singarayer; C. D. Jones

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Relationships among land ownership, land use, and landowner behavior changes in Gillespie and Washington Counties, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent trend of land parcelization and habitat fragmentation has prompted concern among scientists. This concern has led to studies exploring the causes and effects of both events, but has not targeted the owners of land as participants in all...

Steinbach, Mark Shane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison  

SciTech Connect

Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 1025% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Global land use change, economic globalization, and the looming land scarcity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...more complex by the processes of economic globalization. In...preservation (30). Evaluations of the effectiveness...rapeseed oil used for biodiesel. The market price...foreignisation of space: Seven processes driving the current...areas, because of processes as diverse as soil...

Eric F. Lambin; Patrick Meyfroidt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Research foundations: US private funder on indirect costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The JSMF, like many private foundations, considers it inappropriate for institutions to request indirect costs from ... foundations, considers it inappropriate for institutions to request indirect costs from private funders. In the United States, recovery of indirect costs by universities is negotiated with ...

Susan M. Fitzpatrick

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director: Department: Project Title: Project Sponsor without fully recovering the institutional indirect costs which will be incurred in conducting the project COSTS 1. FULL: OF I. A. C. 2. PARTIAL: OF H. B. K. TOTAL PROJECT COSTS L. INDIRECT COSTS TO BE WAIVED, J

Krovi, Venkat

273

DOE/EIS-0222 Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Executive Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, 6 Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant 7 counties; and the City of Richland 8 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and 13 Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HRA-EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HRA-EIS Document Manager 18 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

274

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters May 16, 2013 - 7:21pm Addthis An indirect water heater. An indirect water heater. How does it work? Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use your home's heating system to heat water. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home's space heating system to heat water. They're part of what's called integrated or combination water and space heating systems. How They Work A tankless coil water heater provides hot water on demand without a tank. When a hot water faucet is turned on, water is heated as it flows through a heating coil or heat exchanger installed in a main furnace or boiler. Tankless coil water heaters are most efficient during cold months when the heating system is used regularly but can be an inefficient choice for many

275

Strategies for advanced research in indirect liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 Energy Policy Act laid the foundation for a more efficient, less vulnerable, and environmentally sustainable energy future for the United States. The goals of the Act include developing economically advanced technologies both for oil substitution through coal liquefaction and for production of chemicals and chemical intermediates from coal-derived synthesis gas. The development of alternative fuels from coal will provide the U.S. with improved long-term energy security and economic competitiveness. The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Liquid Fuels Program, has actively supported the development of alternative fuels and chemicals from domestic coal resources. Within the Liquid Fuels Program, the primary technologies being investigated are the direct and indirect liquefaction of coal. Indirect liquefaction technologies offer an alternative for converting coal to hydrocarbons and oxygenates that are environmentally acceptable in the transportation fuel market. Engineering analyses indicate that it may be possible to produce liquid products from coal at a cost competitive with crude oil in the near future.

Stiegel, G.J.; McGurl, G.V. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Srivastava, R.D.; Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Nonlinear dynamics and inner-ring photoluminescence pattern of indirect excitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the photoluminescence dynamics of ultracold indirect excitons optically created in a double-quantum-well heterostructure in the regime in which the inner photoluminescence ring is formed. We show that the spectrally resolved dynamics is in agreement with an excitonic origin for the inner ring which appears due to the local heating of indirect excitons by laser excitation. To confirm this interpretation and exclude the ionization of indirect excitons, we evaluate the excitonic density that is extracted from the energy of the photoluminescence emission. It is shown that optically injected carriers play a crucial role in that context as these are trapped in our field-effect device and then vary the electrostatic potential controlling the confinement of indirect excitons. This disruptive effect blurs the estimation of the exciton concentration. However, it is suppressed by placing the double quantum well behind a superlattice where a fraction of photoinjected carriers remains trapped and then screens fluctuations of the electrostatic potential at the gate electrodes. In this improved geometry, we then estimate that the exciton density remains one order of magnitude smaller than the critical density for the ionization of indirect excitons (or Mott transition) in the regime where the inner ring is formed.

Mathieu Alloing, Aristide Lematre, Elisabeth Galopin, and Franois Dubin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campaign Campaign For the month of April, researchers are descending on and above Barrow, Alaska, to obtain data from the atmosphere that will help them understand the impacts that aerosols have on Arctic clouds and climate. Scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are using a heavily instrumented aircraft to collect data from the sky, while instruments based at surface sites in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, are obtaining measurements from the ground. Information obtained during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, will help scientists analyze the role of aerosols in climate, and represents a key contribution to Arctic climate research during International Polar Year.

279

A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining  

SciTech Connect

Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Corrosion aspects in indirect systems with secondary refrigerants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Aqueous solutions of organic or inorganic salts are used as secondary refrigerants in indirect refrigeration systems to transport and transfer heat. Water is known (more)

Ignatowicz, Monika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Massively Parallel Indirect Dielectrophoresis Controlled Placement of Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Placement of single walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated through massively parallel indirect dielectrophoresis (MPID). MPID is shown to be able to control the placement of (more)

Conley, Hiram Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

Ghan, Steve

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

284

Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950.  

SciTech Connect

White, D.L. 2004. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950. Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 324 pp. Abstract: The history of land use for an area is the history of the way in which humans have manipulated or altered the environment. Most land use activities can be viewed as disturbance to ecosystems. Within a given climatic regime, the interaction of the disturbance regime with vegetation, soil, and landform factors largely determines the distribution and composition of plant and associated animal communities. For these reasons, a greater understanding of the ecological impacts of both human and non-human related disturbance is needed to improve our ability to make natural resource management decisions. This document outlines the land use history of the Savannah River Site and surrounding areas from about 1780 thru 1950, when the site was converted to a government facility for the purposes of national defense.

D.L. White

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition and soil profiles at each land use site. Nitrification increased from -0.012 g N gds-1 day-1 of downstream water quality. Nitrogen loading to estuaries is of particular concern because of widespread of 50% of the land area in Massachusetts was cleared at one point for agricultural use (Hall et al. 2002

Vallino, Joseph J.

286

Conclusion: applying South East Asia Rainforest Research Programme science to land-use management policy and practice in a changing landscape and climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...East Asia Rainforest Research Programme science to land-use management policy and practice...are briefly reviewed and the roles which science can play in addressing questions are outlined...considered. Results from the atmospheric science and hydrology papers, and some of the...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washingtons 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Indirect Cost THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect Cost THE ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY Policy No. 4.2 Facilities & Administrative Cost Rates for Grants and Contracts Issued By: Date Issued policy for the determination of Facilities & Administrative (indirect) cost (overhead) rates for all

Brown, Lucy L.

289

New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling October 4, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for multi-stage evaporative cooling within the Federal sector. Benefits Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is an advanced evaporative cooler that can lower air temperatures without adding moisture. These systems evaporate water in a secondary (or working) airstream, which is discharged in multiple stages. No water or humidity is added to the primary (or product) airstream in the process. Application Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is applicable in office, research and development, service, and school applications. Climate and Regional Considerations

290

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Illustration of a tankless coil water heater. The heater is box-shaped, and has two pipes sticking out one end: one a cold water inlet, and one a hot water outlet. These pipes lead into the heater to a cylindrical coil called a heat exchanger. Long tubes surrounding the heat exchanger are labeled the heated water jacket. At the bottom of the box is a row of small flames, called the boiler heat source. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home or building's space heating system to heat water as part of an integrated or combination water and space heating system. How Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Work A tankless coil water heater uses a heating coil or heat exchanger

291

The utility of a geographic information system in facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site  

SciTech Connect

Facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints analysis, which is indispensable for the evaluation of potential future uses for a site, is essentially spatial in nature. Spatial analysis is best accomplished using a geographic information system (GIS), as a GIS allows the identification and reporting or mapping of complex relationships among multiple data layers such as geology, soils, vegetation, contamination, and facilities. GIS-based maps and reports are valuable tools for communicating facility/land use-related opportunities and constraints to decision makers. This paper defines the term {open_quotes}GIS,{close_quotes}, provides an example of how a GIS could be used to conduct opportunities and constraints analysis at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and summarizes the benefits of using a GIS for this analysis. Because a GIS is often seen as a {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} shrouded in technical jargon, this paper attempts to describe the concepts and benefits of a GIS in language understandable to decision makers who are not GIS experts but who migth profit from the use of GIS products. The purpose of this paper is to alert DOE decision makers to a valuable source of facility/land use-related information that already exists at many sites and that should not be overlook during the analysis of future use options.

Stewart, J. [S.M. Stoller Corp., Boulder, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Purely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purely Gasdynamic Multidimensional Indirect Detonation Initiation Using Localized Acoustic detonation initiation process is presented that can be independent of diffusion, viscosity and turbulence to accelerate detonation formation. It is shown that given sufficient resolution, the detonation formation time

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

294

Indirect suppression of photosynthesis on individual leaves by arthropod herbivory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Indirect suppression of photosynthesis on individual leaves by arthropod herbivory Paul D imaging tech- nologies revealed that alterations to photosynthesis and transpiration propagate of herbivory on photosynthesis, measured by gas exchange or chlorophyll fluorescence, and identifies four

DeLucia, Evan H.

295

Indirect Suppression of Photosynthesis on Individual Leaves by Arthropod Herbivory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Indirect Suppression of Photosynthesis on Individual Leaves by Arthropod Herbivory PAUL D tissues are unaltered, and plant photosynthesis and water balance function normally. However, recent application of thermal and fluorescent imaging technologies revealed that alterations to photosynthesis

DeLucia, Evan H.

296

Final Report, DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER45780, "Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells"  

SciTech Connect

The is the final technical report for this project, which was funded by the DOE from 1999 to 2012. The project focused on experimental studies of spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells, with the aim of understanding the quantum physics of these particles, including such effects as pattern formation due to electron-hole charge separation, the Mott plasma-insulator transition, luminescence up-conversion through field-assisted tunneling, luminescence line shifts due to many-body renormalization and magnetic field effects on tunneling, and proposed effects such as Bose-Einstein condensation of indirect excitons and phase separation of bright and dark indirect excitons. Significant results are summarized here and the relation to other work is discussed.

Snoke, david W. [University of Pittsburgh

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations  

SciTech Connect

Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Models (GCAMs) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAMs afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAMs pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling Heterogeneity in Indirect Effects: Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heterogeneity implicit in much of social science research can be accommodated by using complex modeling procedures such as SEM or MLM. Ignoring heterogeneity, particularly with regard to nested data structures, can have serious consequences...

Fall, Emily C.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Biofuel contribution to mitigate fossil fuel CO 2 emissions: Comparing sugar cane ethanol in Brazil with corn ethanol and discussing land use for food production and deforestation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper compares the use of sugar cane and corn for the production of ethanol with a focus on global warming and the current international debate about land use competition for food and biofuel production. The indicators used to compare the products are CO 2 emissions energy consumption sugar cane coproducts and deforestation. The life cycle emission inventory as a methodological tool is taken into account. The sustainability of socioeconomic development and the developing countries need to overcome barriers form the background against which the Brazilian government energy plans are analyzed.

Luiz Pinguelli Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Questions and Answers - What is one example of indirect evidence that  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do I make amodel of an atom? How do I make a<br>model of an atom? Previous Question (How do I make a model of an atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is an element? How many elements are there?) What is an element? Howmany elements are there? What is one example of indirect evidence that scientists use to study an atom? Pretty much everything we know about atoms is indirect evidence. One can't really see atoms. We do see enough of their effects that we can, with confidence, describe the nature of atoms. Here at Jefferson Lab we have quite a few instruments to measure the properties and behavior of atoms. We use a few simple tricks to measure atoms. The most common method is to shoot the atoms through an easy-to-ionize gas or liquid. Argon is the most

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

302

Temporal Analysis of Incompatible Land-Use and Land-Cover: The Proximity between Residential Areas and Gas Stations in Bucharest Suburban Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Incompatible land-use and land-cover indicate the trend in territorial planning and generate instability and conflicts leading to degradation in terms of environmental quality. Urban landscape structure of Bucharest suburban area has changed lately, especially due to expansion of residential areas, increasing the risks of a chaotic urban development. The consequences of this residential expansion have led to malfunctions, outlining a disadvantage area due to environmental problems. In this context, residential areas are frequently located in the proximity of gas stations in Bucharest suburban area. This paper presents the relation between residential areas and gas stations in order to evaluate causes that led to their proximity. Results have pointed out using a number of 60 gas stations (21 gas stations in residential areas and 39 in non-residential areas) the causes and the temporal dynamics of locational conflicts, suggesting that unplanned development and residential agglomeration are the main consequences of territorial conflicts. In this respect of incompatible land-use and land-cover expansion, it is required an evaluation and hierarchy in order to start new coherent plans of space development.

Cristian Ioan Ioj?; Constantina Alina Tudor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Improved direct and indirect systems of columns for ternary distillation  

SciTech Connect

Separation of a ternary mixture into almost pure components is discussed. Systems of distillation columns, with higher thermodynamic efficiency, are developed from a direct sequence (or indirect sequence) of distillation columns by allowing for two interconnecting streams of the same composition and different enthalpy. This increases the reversibility of distillation in the second column, which results in replacing a portion of the high-temperature boiling duty with a lower-temperature heat in the direct split case. For the indirect split case, the improvement allows a portion of the low-temperature condensing duty to be replaced with a higher-temperature condensation.

Agrawal, R.; Fidkowski, Z.T. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)] [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

CAS Indirect Cost Recovery Practices "Facilities and Administration" (F&A) Costs or, "Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR)," are costs incurred by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAS Indirect Cost Recovery Practices "Facilities and Administration" (F&A) Costs or, "Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR)," are costs incurred by the University for common or joint projects and cannot be specifically attributed to an individual project. Some examples of indirect costs include accounting staff

Vonessen, Nikolaus

305

Solar Physics (2004) 224: 34 C Springer 2005 The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Physics (2004) 224: 3­4 C Springer 2005 PREFACE The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of Long-Term Solar Activity" is based on contributions presented at the First of solar activity, and their effects in the near-Earth environment and technoculture. As an analogy

Usoskin, Ilya G.

306

Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O. (IIT); (Vermont)

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

307

Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island  

SciTech Connect

The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assessment and analysis of indirect lightning performance of overhead lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents an efficient method for the assessment of the indirect lightning performance of overhead power lines and analyses the influence of some relevant parameters on the flashover rate. The method is based on a formula to calculate the peak value of lightning-induced voltages in overhead lines over a lossy ground, which considers the front-time of the channel-base current. The results of the method are validated by comparison with results available in the literature. The method is then used to investigate the effect of subsequent strokes on the line flashover rate, leading to the conclusion that their contribution is negligible, as long as no correlation is assumed between front-time and peak value of the strokes (first and subsequent). In the following, the method is used to analyze the influence of some parameters on the lightning performance of overhead lines. The results show that the stroke current front-time influence decreases as the soil resistivity increases, and that a higher front-time leads to a lower flashover rate. It is shown that the use of a fixed front-time T=5.63?s for the first strokes leads to results that match well the results obtained from Cigrs front-time probabilistic distribution. Regarding the return stroke velocity, the results show that, for soils with resistivity higher than 100?m, the flashover rate increases as the return stroke velocity increases. The results also show that a relative velocity vr=0.4 leads to flashover rates that match well the results obtained considering some correlations between return stroke velocity and peak current proposed in the literature. The influence of the correlation between current peak value and front-time for first strokes is also analyzed and it is shown that the correlation reduces the flashover rate. It is also shown that considering this correlation for first strokes and not for subsequent strokes increases the contribution of the latter to the flashover rate, especially for good conducting soils.

J.O.S. Paulino; C.F. Barbosa; I.J.S. Lopes; W.C. Boaventura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

311

Indirect constraints on New Physics from the B-factories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of New Physics particles can be probed by performing precision measurements of physics phenomena at the few GeV energy scale. The decays of B and D mesons are an excellent example of relatively low energy phenomena that can be sensitive to New Physics scales at the TeV region or above. In this contribution, some recent results obtained by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations are presented, and their implications for the indirect searches for New Physics are discussed.

Gaz, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency  

SciTech Connect

Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments.

Daugherty, W.L.

1989-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spatially indirect excitons as primary photoexcitations in conjugated polymers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe competition between picosecond photoinduced absorption and stimulated emission in poly(paraphenylenevinylene) which demonstrates that they derive from two different pathways. We conclude that the photoinduced absorption originates from nonemissive spatially indirect singlet excitons which are formed with quantum yield as high as 0.9. Previous arguments about maximum possible electroluminescence device efficiencies and about lasers in conjugated polymer films are reexamined in light of the prevalence of this species.

M. Yan; L. J. Rothberg; F. Papadimitrakopoulos; M. E. Galvin; T. M. Miller

1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition  

SciTech Connect

Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Global Consequences of Land Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...purposes of illustration, we compare three hypothetical landscapes: a natural ecosystem...Russia, 1998 ). 28 S. L. Postel , Pillar of Sand: Can the Miracle...services in the long term. | Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE...

Jonathan A. Foley; Ruth DeFries; Gregory P. Asner; Carol Barford; Gordon Bonan; Stephen R. Carpenter; F. Stuart Chapin; Michael T. Coe; Gretchen C. Daily; Holly K. Gibbs; Joseph H. Helkowski; Tracey Holloway; Erica A. Howard; Christopher J. Kucharik; Chad Monfreda; Jonathan A. Patz; I. Colin Prentice; Navin Ramankutty; Peter K. Snyder

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme  

SciTech Connect

A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151?K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

318

The roles of land tenure reforms and land markets in the context of population growth and land use intensification in Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article reviews the past and potential future roles of land tenure reforms and land markets in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) as responses to population growth in the process of land use intensification and livelihood transformation. The farm size distribution and the existence of an inverse relationship (IR) between farm size and land productivity in SSA and the implications of this relationship for efficiency and equity are investigated. More secure property rights and removal of restrictions on land markets have the potential to create both efficiency and equity benefits, but there are high risks of elite capture of large land areas with inefficient and inequitable outcomes. This situation is the case not only in land-abundant areas but also in urban and peri-urban areas where increasingly larger proportions of people will make their living. Increasing population pressure in densely populated rural areas contributes to more rapid ruralurban migration, and creating alternative livelihood opportunities for the migrating youth population is essential to achieving economic development with social stability.

Stein T. Holden; Keijiro Otsuka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced non-thermally by e.g. the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the Galactic Center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

Minoru Nagai; Kazunori Nakayama

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Direct/indirect detection signatures of nonthermally produced dark matter  

SciTech Connect

We study direct and indirect detection possibilities of neutralino dark matter produced nonthermally by, e.g., the decay of long-lived particles, as is easily implemented in the case of anomaly or mirage-mediation models. In this scenario, large self-annihilation cross sections are required to account for the present dark matter abundance, and it leads to significant enhancement of the gamma-ray signature from the galactic center and the positron flux from the dark matter annihilation. It is found that GLAST and PAMELA will find the signal or give tight constraints on such nonthermal production scenarios of neutralino dark matter.

Nagai, Minoru [Theory Group, KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nakayama, Kazunori [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Complementarity between collider, direct detection, and indirect detection experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the capabilities of planned direct detection, indirect detection, and collider experiments in exploring the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM, focusing on the complementarity between the different search techniques. In particular, we consider dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, and LZ. We see that the search sensitivities depend strongly on the WIMP mass and annihilation mechanism, with the result that different search techniques explore orthogonal territory. We also show that advances in each technique are necessary to fully explore the space of Supersymmetric WIMPs.

Matthew Cahill-Rowley

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

322

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

The influence of land-use change and landscape dynamics on the climate system: relevance to climate-change policy beyond the radiative effect of greenhouse gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to anthropogenic aerosols, solar variation and several of the...28 Guatemala 2 542 32 731 0 Mexico 2 441 20 11 110 30 Belize 1...changes the partitioning of solar insolation into its sensible...Earth's surface, QS is the solar irradiance, A is the surface...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A cost-effectiveness analysis of water security and water quality: impacts of climate and land-use change on the River Thames system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...there are point sources from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs...directives, including the Urban Wastewater Treatment Directive, WFD...practice in treatment and reuse/recycling of phosphorus at wastewater treatment works. Report no...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The influence of land-use change and landscape dynamics on the climate system: relevance to climate-change policy beyond the radiative effect of greenhouse gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Guatemala 2 542 32 731 0 Mexico 2 441 20 11 110 30 Belize...moisture and kinetic energy to higher latitudes that...components of the surface-energy budget could provide...with the surface-heat energy being separated into...Earth's surface, QS is the solar irradiance, A is the...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effects of land use on surfaceatmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...27 November 2011 research-article Articles...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...boundary layer using a research aircraft in Sabah...exchange fluxes of energy and trace gases...Geophys. Res. Abstracts 12, EGU2010-15408...trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Effects of land use on surfaceatmosphere exchanges of trace gases and energy in Borneo: comparing fluxes over oil palm plantations and a rainforest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...24 July 2008 [26]. Over the oil palm canopy, measurements of...the range 4-20 ppbv. At the oil palm site, the very calm nights...the air and lack of wind. The peak deposition values correspond...28]. Fluxes of O3 over the oil palm canopy are generally smaller...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Feasibility Analysis of Two Indirect Heat Pump Assisted Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an analysis of the simulated performance of two indirect heat pump assisted solar domestic hot water (i-HPASDHW) systems compared to two base (more)

Sterling, Scott Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Exergy analysis of biomass-to-synthetic natural gas (SNG) process via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an exergy analysis of SNG production via indirect gasification of various biomass feedstock, including virgin (woody) biomass as well as waste biomass (municipal solid waste and sludge). In indirect gasification heat needed for endothermic gasification reactions is produced by burning char in a separate combustion section of the gasifier and subsequently the heat is transferred to the gasification section. The advantages of indirect gasification are no syngas dilution with nitrogen and no external heat source required. The production process involves several process units, including biomass gasification, syngas cooler, cleaning and compression, methanation reactors and SNG conditioning. The process is simulated with a computer model using the flow-sheeting program Aspen Plus. The exergy analysis is performed for various operating conditions such as gasifier pressure, methanation pressure and temperature. The largest internal exergy losses occur in the gasifier followed by methanation and SNG conditioning. It is shown that exergetic efficiency of biomass-to-SNG process for woody biomass is higher than that for waste biomass. The exergetic efficiency for all biomass feedstock increases with gasification pressure, whereas the effects of methanation pressure and temperature are opposite for treated wood and waste biomass.

Caecilia R. Vitasari; Martin Jurascik; Krzysztof J. Ptasinski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ASPEN modeling of the Tri-State indirect liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

The ASPEN process simulator has been used to model an indirect liquefaction flowsheet patterned after that of the Tri-State project. This flowsheet uses Lurgi moving-bed gasification with synthesis gas conversion to methanol followed by further processing to gasoline using the Mobil MTG process. Models developed in this study include the following: Lurgi gasifier, Texaco gasifier, synthesis gas cooling, Rectisol, methanol synthesis, methanol-to-gasoline, CO-shift, methanation, and naphtha hydrotreating. These models have been successfully developed in modular form so that they can be used to simulate a number of different flowsheets or process alternatives. Simulations of the Tri-State flowsheet have been made using two different coal feed rates and two types of feed coal. The overall simulation model was adjusted to match the Tri-State flowsheet values for methanol, LPG, isobutane, and gasoline. As a result of this adjustment, the MTG reactor yield structure necessary to match the flowsheet product rates was determined. The models were exercised at different flow rates and were unaffected by such changes, demonstrating their range of operability. The use of Illinois No. 6 coal, with its lower ash content, resulted in slightly higher production rates for each of the products as compared to use of the Kentucky coal.

Begovich, J.M.; Clinton, J.H.; Johnson, P.J.; Barker, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Jessie Shelton

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

332

Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

INTEGRATED DIRECT/INDIRECT ADAPTIVE ROBUST CONTROL OF MULTI-DOF HYDRAULIC ROBOTIC ARMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTEGRATED DIRECT/INDIRECT ADAPTIVE ROBUST CONTROL OF MULTI-DOF HYDRAULIC ROBOTIC ARMS Amit/indirect adaptive robust control (DIARC) strategy for a hydraulically actuated 3-DOF robotic arm. To avoid the need FOUNDATION GRANT NO. CMS-0600516. draulic robot arm (a scaled down version of an industrial back- hoe

Yao, Bin

334

Optical absorption from an indirect transition in bismuth nanowires M. R. Black,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical absorption from an indirect transition in bismuth nanowires M. R. Black,1, * P. L; published 30 December 2003 Simulations of the optical absorption in bismuth nanowires resulting from an indirect interband L-T-point transition are presented. The absorption dependence at room temperature

Cronin, Steve

335

Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement. INTRODUCTION A. Indirect-drive design The National Ignition Facility (NIF)1 is a 192 beam, 1.8 MJ 0.35 lm laserCapsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign O. L. Landen,1

336

Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol  

SciTech Connect

A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

337

ASPEN simulation of an indirect coal-liquefaction plant  

SciTech Connect

The methanol synthesis, the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) conversion, and the synthetic natural gas (SNG) upgrading steps in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant were simulated and analyzed using the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN). The plant, proposed to be built for the Tri-State Synfuels Company in Western Kentucky, converts 19,900,000 kg/d (21,900 ST/D) of coal to 3.31 x 10/sup 6/ kg gasoline/day and 2.99 x 10/sup 6/ kg liquefied petroleum gas/day. Closure of the simulation with the design mass balance was within 99.7% through the MTG processing step. Simulated estimates for the mass flow of crude methanol were only 0.2% less than those for the proposed design. A molar recycle-to-feed ratio of 4.5 yielded a crude methanol product stream similar to the design case. The purity of the crude methanol was calulated to be 98%, in comparison with the proposed design purity of 95%. The ASPEN simulation revealed the design case to have overestimated gasoline production by 16,400 kg/h (36,000 lb/h) or 11.8%, and underestimated wastewater production by 15,000 kg/h (33,000 lb/h) or 7.2%. The alkylation section of the MTG step and the methanation section of the SNG upgrading steps were only partially simulated due to limited process information. An overall energy balance indicated a net production of energy (4.9 GW or 17 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/h) from the plant. Most (91%) of the energy comes from methanol synthesis.

Chien, P.S.J.; Luther, M.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Three-photon-absorption spectroscopy in an indirect-gap material: CdI2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The three-photon absorption (3PA) spectrum of an indirect-gap material (CdI2) has been measured at 10 K by monitoring the resulting self-trapped-exciton emission. The contribution of excitonic transitions has been evidenced for excitation energies near the indirect gap, while the contribution of allowed and forbidden indirect transitions has been shown for excitation energies far from the gap. The spectral behavior of the 3PA coefficient has been described by parametric formulas, which are analogous to the ones successfully applied for 3PA in direct-gap materials.

M. Lepore; R. Tommasi; I. M. Catalano

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Urban floodplain land-use - acceptable risk? : A case study of flood risk perception on the Guragunbah (Carrara-Merrimac) floodplain, Gold Coast.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In Australia, the developments of hazard-specific legislation, policy and guidelines aims to minimise community exposure to the adverse effects of natural hazards. This occurs under (more)

Godber, Allison Maree

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Biomass heat pipe reformerdesign and performance of an indirectly heated steam gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indirectly heated dual fluidized bed (DFB) gasifiers are a promising option for the production ... syngas, in particular in the small- and medium-scale range. The application of so-called ... pipes solves the key...

Jrgen Karl

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Development of an indirect competitive ELISA for the detection of protective antibodies in pasteurella pneumonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against Pasteurella haemolytica was developed. The capsular material of the bacteria was extracted in saline for use as antigen. The antigen...

Sewell, Julie Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

The hybrid plant concept: Combining direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to assess the technical and economic impacts of siting direct two-stage coal liquefaction and indirect liquefaction, using slurry Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reactors, at the same location. The incentives for this co-siting include the sharing of the large number of common unit process operations and the potential blending of the very different, but complementary, products from the two processes, thereby reducing the refining required to produce specification transportation fuels. Both direct and indirect coal liquefaction share a large number of unit operations. This paper reports on the results of a study that attempts to quantify the extent of these potential synergisms by estimating the costs of transportation fuels produced by direct liquefaction, indirect liquefaction, and by combined direct and indirect hybrid plant configuration under comparable conditions. The technical approach used was to combine the MITRE computer simulated coal liquefaction models for the direct and indirect systems into one integrated model. An analysis of refining and blending of the raw product streams to produce specification diesel and gasoline fuels was included in the direct, indirect and hybrid models so that comparable product slates could be developed. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.C.; El Sawy, A. (Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [NiFeS] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didnt result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [FeS] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Wada, Kei [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)] [Organization for Promotion of Tenure Track, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Fukuyama, Keiichi [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Sako, Yoshihiko, E-mail: sako@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Division of Applied Biosciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

345

Measurement of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-dependent $CP$ asymmetries in the decay rates of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+$ are measured in $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The $D^0$ mesons are produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to determine the initial state as $D^0$ or $\\bar{D}^0$. The asymmetries in effective lifetimes between $D^0$ and $\\bar{D}^0$ decays, which are sensitive to indirect $CP$ violation, are determined to be \\begin{align*} A_{\\Gamma}(K^-K^+) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077 \\; {}^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\% \\ , \\\\ A_{\\Gamma}(\\pi^-\\pi^+) = (-0.092\\pm 0.145 \\; {}^{+0.025}_{-0.033})\\% \\ , \\end{align*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with previous measurements and with the hypothesis of no indirect $CP$ violation in $D^0$ decays.

Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Cartelle, P Alvarez; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Gutierrez, O Aquines; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Gomez, M Calvo; Campana, P; Perez, D Campora; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Akiba, K Carvalho; Mohr, RCM Casanova; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Garcia, L Castillo; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Vidal, X Cid; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Torres, M Cruz; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C -T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Dlage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Surez, A Dosil; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, KD; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Rifai, I El; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Frber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Albor, V Fernandez; Rodrigues, F Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Torreira, A Gallas; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Pardias, J Garca; Garofoli, J; Tico, J Garra; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gian, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Gbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Gndara, M Grabalosa; Diaz, R Graciani; Cardoso, L A Granado; Graugs, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grnberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Morata, J A Hernando; van Herwijnen, E; He, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Gac, R Le; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefranois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Determination of moisture by an indirect conductivity method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changing Ratio 1 2 3 4 5 $ Water in Ternary ~ure 6 7 Plgo 4 Effect of Changing Alcohol-Acetone Ratio 450 400 Ql 350 300 0 4 5 g later in Soil 6 7 Fig. 5 DetersLination of Moistnre in Air-Dried Soils 19 wetted to the plastic and liquid limits...

Hudgins, Charles Milton

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with indirect-gap AlGaAs barriers for solar cell applications  

SciTech Connect

We have fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) solar cells in which 3?nm-thick QWs and indirect-gap Al{sub 0.78}Ga{sub 0.22}As barriers are embedded, and we studied extraction processes of photogenerated carriers in this QW system. The photocurrent under 700?nm light illumination at voltages close to the open-circuit voltage shows only a small reduction, indicating that the carrier recombination inside QWs is largely suppressed. We attribute this result to an efficient extraction of electrons from the QWs through the X-valley of AlGaAs. The insertion of QWs is shown to be effective in extending the absorption wavelengths and in enhancing the photocurrent. The use of indirect-gap materials as barriers is found to enhance carrier extraction processes, and result in an improved performance of QW solar cells.

Noda, T., E-mail: NODA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp; Otto, L. M.; Elborg, M.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Kawazu, T.; Han, L. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakaki, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

ARM - Field Campaign - Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) Campaign Links ISDAC Website Related Campaigns Parameterization of Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds During ISDAC 2010.10.01, Korolev, AAF ISDAC - Second Year Supplemental Surface Spectral Irradiance Measurements 2009.04.07, Lubin, NSA ISDAC - NASA ARCTAS Coordination with ARM 2008.04.01, Ferrare, NSA ISDAC / RISCAM - Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) 2008.04.01, Collins, NSA ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer 2008.03.31, Lubin, NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/isdac/

349

Value of IT: Indirect impact of IT on construction project performance via Best Practices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the indirect impact of IT use via work processes on construction project performance in the industrial sector. Specifically, using the project-level data in the Construction Industry Institute Benchmarking and Metrics database, the overall impact of 3D CAD use, including the direct impact of the use to project cost growth and its indirect impact via CII designated Best Practice(s), is tested by path analysis. The analysis results show that the direct impact of 3D CAD use on project cost growth is not statistically significant. On the other hand, the indirect impact of 3D CAD use via Best Practice(s) is statistically significant. Interpreting the path values reveal that the use of 3D CAD contributes to more use of Best Practice(s), which in turn leads to cost performance improvement. This finding highlights the importance of processes or practices when designing and implementing information technology.

Youngcheol Kang; William J. O'Brien; Stephen P. Mulva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Exergy method of optimisation of a wavy plate indirect evaporative cooler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper deals with the performance optimisation of a wavy plate surface of indirect evaporative coolers with cooling capacities of 10, 25, 45 kW. Based on the minimum entropy generation rate and by applying a number of geometrical constraints, as well as using a search method, the optimum apparatus's dimensions and the secondary air discharge and the primary air mass flow rates are calculated. The numerical results show that, to increase the cooling load of an indirect evaporative cooler, the optimisation of the above mentioned parameters by this method can increase energy efficiency by up to 65%.

A. Abbassi; M. Aliehyaei

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Early time implosion symmetry from two-axis shock-timing measurements on indirect drive NIF experiments  

SciTech Connect

An innovative technique has been developed and used to measure the shock propagation speed along two orthogonal axes in an inertial confinement fusion indirect drive implosion target. This development builds on an existing target and diagnostic platform for measuring the shock propagation along a single axis. A 0.4?mm square aluminum mirror is installed in the ablator capsule which adds a second orthogonal view of the x-ray-driven shock speeds. The new technique adds capability for symmetry control along two directions of the shocks launched in the ablator by the laser-generated hohlraum x-ray flux. Laser power adjustments in four different azimuthal cones based on the results of this measurement can reduce time-dependent symmetry swings during the implosion. Analysis of a large data set provides experimental sensitivities of the shock parameters to the overall laser delivery and in some cases shows the effects of laser asymmetries on the pole and equator shock measurements.

Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Barker, D. A.; Baker, K. L.; Dppner, T.; Hash, N. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; LaFortune, K.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Widmayer, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Boehly, T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of two mix model postprocessors for the investigation of shell mix in indirect drive implosion cores  

SciTech Connect

The presence of shell mix in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores is an important characteristic. Mixing in this experimental regime is primarily due to hydrodynamic instabilities, such as Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov, which can affect implosion dynamics. Two independent theoretical mix models, Youngs' model and the Haan saturation model, were used to estimate the level of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a series of indirect drive experiments. The models were used to predict the radial width of the region containing mixed fuel and shell materials. The results for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing provided by Youngs' model are considered to be a lower bound for the mix width, while those generated by Haan's model incorporate more experimental characteristics and consequently have larger mix widths. These results are compared with an independent experimental analysis, which infers a larger mix width based on all instabilities and effects captured in the experimental data.

Welser-Sherrill, L.; Mancini, R. C. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Haynes, D. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Haan, S. W.; Koch, J. A.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J. [Prism Computational Sciences, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Stimulated Scattering of Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells: Signature of a Degenerate Bose-Gas of Excitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe and analyze strongly nonlinear photoluminescence kinetics of indirect excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum wells at low bath temperatures, ?50 mK. The long recombination lifetime of indirect excitons promotes accumulation of these Bose particles in the lowest energy states and allows the photoexcited excitons to cool down to temperatures where the dilute 2D gas of indirect excitons becomes statistically degenerate. Our main resulta strong enhancement of the exciton scattering rate to the low-energy states with increasing concentration of the indirect excitonsreveals bosonic stimulation of exciton scattering, which is a signature of a degenerate Bose-gas of excitons.

L. V. Butov, A. L. Ivanov, A. Imamoglu, P. B. Littlewood, A. A. Shashkin, V. T. Dolgopolov, K. L. Campman, and A. C. Gossard

2001-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification ... National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401, United States ... Similar activation energies (9-10 kcal/mol) were measured for ZnO and Zn-Ti-O sulfidation. ...

Abhijit Dutta; Singfoong Cheah; Richard Bain; Calvin Feik; Kim Magrini-Bair; Steven Phillips

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Thermal Control Techniques for Improved DT Layering of Indirect Drive IFE Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Control Techniques for Improved DT Layering of Indirect Drive IFE Targets J. E. Pulsifer, M while they are being staged for feeding to the injection system. Successful layering requires the filled capsule depends upon the thermal properties of the tube material, the capsule material

Tillack, Mark

356

The energy saving potential of precooling incoming outdoor air by indirect evaporative cooling  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the energy saving potentials of using indirect evaporative coolers to precool incoming outdoor air as the first stage of a standard cooling system. For dry and moderately humid locations, either exhaust room air or outdoor air can be used as the secondary air to the indirect evaporative precooler with similar energy savings. Under these conditions, the use of outdoor air is recommended due to the simplicity in installing the duct system. For humid locations, the use of exhaust room air is recommended because the precooling capacity and energy savings will be greatly increased. For locations with short cooling seasons, the use of indirect evaporative coolers for precooling may not be worthwhile. The paper also gives some simplified indices for easily predicting the precooling capacity, energy savings and water consumption of an indirect evaporative precooler. These indices can be used for cooling systems with continuous operation, but further work is needed to determine whether the same indices are also suitable for cooling systems with intermittent operations.

Chen, P.; Qin, H.; Huang, Y.J.; Wu, H.; Blumstein, C.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP: Received 20 December 2009 Accepted 8 March 2010 Available online 15 March 2010 Keywords: ATP Energy supply by determining survival rates and ATP levels for flies that had undergone continuous long-term exposure at 0 °C

Lee Jr., Richard E.

358

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct In this article we present electric field, magnetic field, and charged particle observations from the upward current region of the aurora focusing on the structure of electric fields at the boundary between

California at Berkeley, University of

359

"How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks and outbreaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks applicable to zombies or, for that matter, ghosts, aliens, angels, and other hard-to-reach entities; for example, what if your wife2 is actually a zombie or an alien and you are not aware of the fact. This 2

Gelman, Andrew

360

A Hybrid Direct-Indirect Estimator of Network Internal K. G. Anagnostakis, M. B. Greenwald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Hybrid Direct-Indirect Estimator of Network Internal Delays K. G. Anagnostakis, M. B. Greenwald-wide measurement infrastructure. This report presents a network tomography technique that achieves accuracy infrastructure, and is much more widely applicable than previous techniques with com- parable accuracy. Our

Plotkin, Joshua B.

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361

A Hybrid DirectIndirect Estimator of Network Internal K. G. Anagnostakis, M. B. Greenwald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Hybrid Direct­Indirect Estimator of Network Internal Delays K. G. Anagnostakis, M. B. Greenwald­wide measurement infrastructure. This report presents a network tomography technique that achieves accuracy infrastructure, and is much more widely applicable than previous techniques with com­ parable accuracy. Our

Plotkin, Joshua B.

362

Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click Here for Full Article Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal variation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an indicator of surface air quality that is associated

Dirksen, Ruud

363

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

Finley Jr., Russell L.

364

Pro-poor indirect tax reforms, with an application to Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Section4 applies the methodology to Mexicos indirect tax system using Mexicos 2004 ENIGH database. We find for...Food or on Energy would be relatively pro-poor, and that this conclusion would be valid for a ve...

Jean-Yves Duclos; Paul Makdissi; Abdelkrim Araar

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Simulation and Economic Analysis of Indirect Coal-to-Liquid Technology Coupling Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation and Economic Analysis of Indirect Coal-to-Liquid Technology Coupling Carbon Capture and Storage ... How to ensure sufficient CO2 emission reductions for coal utilization in a low-carbon economy is an important issue regarding the development of CTL technology. ...

Li Zhou; Wen-Ying Chen; Xi-Liang Zhang; Tian-Yu Qi

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Wright-Fisher model with indirect Ludovic Goudenge and Pierre-Andr Zitt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Wright-Fisher model with indirect selection Ludovic Goudenège and Pierre-André Zitt January 16 is then used as a building block for a variant of the classical Wright­ Fisher model. In the large population classically consid- ered in the Wright­Fisher model. Keywords: Wright­Fisher model; diffusion approximation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

367

Indirect evidence for elastic energy playing a role in limb recovery during toad hopping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1001 25 Indirect evidence for elastic energy playing a role in limb recovery during...Massachusetts, , Amherst, MA 01003, USA Elastic energy is critical for amplifying muscle power...playing a role. toads|muscle|elastic energy|electromyography|kinematics|jumping...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Performance of a high fill factor, indirect detection prototype flat-panel imager for mammography  

SciTech Connect

Empirical and theoretical investigations of the performance of a small-area, high-spatial-resolution, active matrix flat-panel imager, operated under mammographic conditions, is reported. The imager is based on an indirect detection array incorporating a continuous photodiode design, as opposed to the discrete photodiode design employed in conventional flat-panel imagers. Continuous photodiodes offer the prospect of higher fill factors, particularly for arrays with pixel pitches below {approx}100 {mu}m. The array has a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 75 {mu}m and a pixel format of 512x512, resulting in an active area of {approx}3.8x3.8 cm{sup 2}. The array was coupled to two commercially available, structured CsI:Tl scintillators of {approx}150 {mu}m thickness: one optimized for high light output (FOS-HL) and the other for high spatial resolution (FOS-HR), resulting in a pair of imager configurations. Measurements of sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were performed with a 26 kVp mammography beam at exposures ranging from {approx}0.5 to {approx}19 mR. MTF results from both CsI:Tl scintillators show that the array demonstrates good spatial resolution, indicating effective isolation between adjacent pixels. The effect of additive noise of the system on DQE was observed to be significantly higher for the FOS-HR scintillator compared to the FOS-HL scintillator due to lower sensitivity of the former. For the FOS-HL scintillator, DQE performance was generally high at high exposures, limited by the x-ray quantum efficiency, Swank factor and the MTF of the scintillators. For both scintillators, the DQE performance degrades at lower exposures due to the relatively large contribution of additive noise. Theoretical calculations based on a cascaded systems model were found to be in general agreement with the empirically determined NPS and DQE values. Finally, such calculations were used to predict potential DQE performance for hypothetical 50 {mu}m pixel pitch imagers, employing similar continuous photodiode design and realistic inputs derived from the empirical measurements.

El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; Wang Yi; Li Yixin; Du Hong; Sawant, Amit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Purdue extension PurdueLandUseTeam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commission and local elected officials. The landowner must request any change to the zoning designation Cooperative Extension Service, David C. Petritz, Director, that all persons shall have equal opportunity to develop educational programs for the public and elected officials. The information received from

370

Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

certain public lands in their natural condition; that will provide food and habitat for fish and wildlife and domestic animals; that will provide for outdoor recreation and human...

371

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

372

An OWL2 Land Use Ontology: LBCS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the Land Based Classification Standards (LBCS) OWL2 ontology used as a basic structure for the City Information Modelling (CIM) model developed within a larger research project ... Land u...

Nuno Montenegro; Jorge Gomes; Paulo Urbano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Land-Use Efficiency of Big Solar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(8) When realized generation data are available, some studies have reported generation-based LUE (e.g., m2 GWh1), which is a function of a plants location (e.g., climatic conditions and solar resources), technological efficiency, and thermal energy storage, the latter enabling the instantaneous capacity to exceed the nameplate (turbine) capacity. ... For example, in the western United States, oil and gas energy systems have impacted approximately 2 orders of magnitude more land (?21 million ha) than solar (?100?000 ha), but given the regions vast solar resources, solar energy development could impact up to 18.6 million hectares of land. ...

Rebecca R. Hernandez; Madison K. Hoffacker; Christopher B. Field

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Light Duty Vehicle Workshop in Washington, D.C. on July 26, 2010.

375

Sandia National Laboratories: land use policy analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doppler Velocimeter EC Top Publications A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study Nonlinear Time-Domain...

376

Processes limiting the emergence of detectable aerosol indirect effects on tropical warm clouds in global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and HARTMUT GRA?L2 , 1 ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, School of Mathematical Sciences oxidation pathways is very low and ii) a possible observational signal is blurred out by high variability of buffering mechanisms on micro- and macroscopic scales which limit the emergence of such climate forcings

Peters, Karsten

377

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercomputing through a grant of computer time. The GFDLand NASA grant NNX08AL83G and acknowledge computer time

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercomputing through a grant of computer time. The GFDLand NASA grant NNX08AL83G and acknowledge computer time

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model, Hadley Centre Technical Noteclimate sensitivity in the Hadley Centre climate model, J.DFG). The Met Office Hadley Centre is funded by the Joint

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of HadGEM2 model, Hadley Centre Technical Noteclimate sensitivity in the Hadley Centre climate model, J.ETH Zurich, Switzerland 9 Hadley Centre for Climate Change /

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hierarchical path analysis of deer responses to direct and indirect effects of climate in northern forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...001, respectively. An initial burn-in of 20000 iterations was...food and habitat selection by roe deer Capreolus capreolus along...differs between local and foreign roe deer hunters: trophy stalkers...Schmitz, O.J , Post, E, Burns, C.E, Johnstone, K.M2003Ecosystem...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Test of Direct and Indirect Effects of Agrochemicals on the Survival of Fecal Indicator Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...none of the agrochemicals had significant...coli strain composition or on densities...revealed that agrochemical treatments...genotype composition of E. coli...in strain composition may be induced by agrochemical treatments...

Zachery R. Staley; Jason R. Rohr; Valerie J. Harwood

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

The controlled indirect coupling between spatially-separated qubits in antiferromagnet-based NMR quantum registers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is considered the indirect inter-qubit coupling in 1D chain of atoms with nuclear spins 1/2, which plays role of qubits in the quantum register. This chain of the atoms is placed by regular way in easy-axis 3D antiferromagnetic thin plate substrate, which is cleaned from the other nuclear spin containing isotopes. It is shown that the range of indirect inter-spin coupling may run to a great number of lattice constants both near critical point of quantum phase transition in antiferromagnet of spin-flop type (control parameter is external magnetic field) and/or near homogeneous antiferromagnetic resonance (control parameter is microwave frequency).

A. A. Kokin

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

384

Reading and Listening to Music Increase Resting Energy Expenditure during an Indirect Calorimetry Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Indirect calorimetry is often done early in the morning in a fasting state, with the subject unshowered and abstained from caffeine or other stimulants. Subjects often fall asleep, resulting in measurement of a sleeping metabolic rate rather than a resting metabolic rate. The objective of this study was to determine whether listening to self-selected relaxing music or reading an electronic device or magazine affects resting energy expenditure (REE) during measurement in healthy adults. A randomized trial comparing three different conditions (ie, resting, reading, and listening to music) wasperformed. Sixty-five subjects (36 female and 29 male) were used in final dataanalysis. Inclusion criteria included healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50years with a stable weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnant or lactating women or use of medications known to affect metabolism. Results showed that reading either amagazine or an electronic device significantly increased REE by 102.7 kcal/day when compared with resting (Pdevice and magazine. Listening to self-selected relaxing music increased REE by 27.6 kcal/day compared with rest (P=0.0072). Based on our results, we recommend subjects refrain from reading a magazine or electronic device during an indirect calorimetry test. Whether or not the smaller difference found while listening to music ispractically significant would be a decision for the indirect calorimetry test administrator.

Blaire Snell; Susan Fullmer; Dennis L. Eggett

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Kinetics of indirect photoluminescence in GaAs/AlxGa1?x As double quantum wells in a random potential with a large amplitude  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of indirect photoluminescence of GaAs/AlxGa1?x As double quantum wells, characterized by a random potential with a large amplitude (the linewidth of the indirect photoluminescence is ...

L. V. Butov; A. V. Mintsev; A. I. Filin

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Exploration of regional and global costsupply curves of biomass energy from short-rotation crops at abandoned cropland and rest land under four IPCC SRES land-use scenarios  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explored the production cost of energy crops at abandoned agricultural land and at rest land at a regional and a global level to the year 2050 using four different land-use scenarios. The estimations were based on grid cell data on the productivity of short-rotation crops on the available land over time and assumptions regarding the capital and the labour input required to reach these productivity levels. It was concluded that large amounts of grown biomass at abandoned agricultural land and rest land, 130270EJyr?1 (about 4070% of the present energy consumption) may be produced at costs below $2GJ?1 by 2050 (present lower limit of cost of coal). Interesting regions because of their low production cost and significant potentials are the Former USSR, Oceania, Eastern and Western Africa and East Asia. Such low costs presume significant land productivity improvements over time and cost reductions due to learning and capital-labour substitution. An assessment of biomass fuel cost, using the primary biomass energy costs, showed that the future costs of biomass liquid fuels may be in the same order of the present diesel production costs, although this may change in the long term. Biomass-derived electricity costs are at present slightly higher than electricity baseload costs and may directly compete with estimated future production costs of fossil fuel electricity with CO2 sequestration. The present world electricity consumption of around 20PWhyr?1 may be generated in 2050 at costs below $45MWh?1 in A1 and B1 and below $55MWh?1 in A2 and B2. At costs of $60MWh?1, about 18 (A2) to 53 (A1)PWhyr?1 can be produced.

Monique Hoogwijk; Andr Faaij; Bert de Vries; Wim Turkenburg

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Optimal tuning of PI controller using PSO optimization for indirect power control for DFIG based wind turbine with MPPT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, an artificial intelligence method particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is presented for determining the optimal PI controller parameters for the indirect control active and reactive power of...

Youcef Bekakra; Djilani Ben Attous

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Numerical Study on the Operating Performance of an Indirect Expansion Solar Assisted Multifunctional Heat Pump in Water Heating Mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An indirect expansion solar assisted multifunctional heat pump (IE-SAMHP) is ... SAMHP consists of an all-glass evacuated-tube solar collector system, a compressor, two air-...

Ji Jie; Jiang Aiguo; Yang Jichun; Pei Gang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Photoluminescence kinetics of indirect excitons in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs coupled quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) kinetics of long-lifetime indirect excitons in a GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs coupled quantum well characterized by a small in-plane random potential was studied at temperatures 1.5<~T<~15 K for a wide range of exciton densities. Strong deviations of the indirect exciton PL kinetics from monoexponential PL rise/decay were observed at low temperatures and high exciton densities. In particular, right after the excitation is switched off, the spectrally integrated indirect exciton PL intensity increased sharply. Simultaneously, the indirect exciton energy distribution was observed to narrow significantly. The observed increase in intensity is attributed to the sharp increase of occupation of the optically active exciton states. The energy distribution narrowing is explained in terms of the phonon mediated exciton energy relaxation in momentum space and in the in-plane random potential.

L. V. Butov, A. Imamoglu, A. V. Mintsev, K. L. Campman, and A. C. Gossard

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Serum proteins, indirect fluorescent antibody titers and complement fixing antibody titers in dexamethasone exacerbated anaplasmosis carrier calves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERUM PROTEINS, INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TITERS AND COMPLEMENT FIXING ANTIBODY TITERS IN DEXAMETHASONE EXACERBATED ANAPLASMOSIS CARRIER CALVES A Thesis by Lloran Wesley Johnson Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MAS TER 0 F SC I ENC E August 1979 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology SERUM PROTEINS, INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TITERS AND COMPLEMENT FIXING ANTIBODY TITERS IN DEXAMETHASONE EXACERBATED...

Johnson, Lloran Wesley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Many-Body Perturbation Calculation of the Indirect Spin-Spin Coupling Constant in HD Molecule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The linked-cluster many-body perturbation approach has been applied to the study of indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant JHD in HD molecule. The complete set of states used were the bound and continuum states of H2+ molecular ion with the internuclear separation appropriate to H2 molecule. Our calculated value of JHD through the Fermi contact interaction mechanism is +42.57 Hz in good agreement with the most recent experimental value of +42.70.7 Hz.

C. M. Dutta; N. C. Dutta; T. P. Das

1970-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Resonant indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} in AlN thin films  

SciTech Connect

We studied the efficient indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} ions in AlN thin films. C-axis oriented polycrystalline thin films of Al{sub 0.997}Gd{sub 0.003}N/AlN were grown on fused silica substrates using a reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The intra-orbital electron transition in Gd{sup 3+} showed a narrow luminescence line at 3.9?eV. The photoluminescence (PL) excitation (PLE) spectrum exhibited a peak originating from efficient indirect energy transfer from the band edge of AlN to Gd{sup 3+} ions. The PLE peak shifted and the PL intensity showed a dramatic change when the AlN band gap was varied by changing the temperature. Energy scanning performed by changing the band-gap energy of AlN with temperature revealed several resonant channels of energy transfer into the higher excited states of Gd{sup 3+}.

Ishizu, Yuta; Tsuji, Kazuma; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Chigi, Yoshitaka; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Mikihiro [YUMEX INC., 400 Itoda, Yumesaki, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2114 (Japan); Ishihara, Tsuguo; Izumi, Hirokazu [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12 Yukihira, Suma, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Direct and indirect excitons in semiconductor coupled quantum wells in an applied electric field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An accurate calculation of the exciton ground and excited states in AlGaAs and InGaAs coupled quantum wells (CQWs) in an external electric field is presented. An efficient and straightforward algorithm of solving the Schrdinger equation in real space has been developed and exciton binding energies, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, and absorption spectra are calculated for applied electric fields up to 100 kV/cm. It is found that in a symmetric 848-nm GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As CQW structure, the ground state of the system switches from direct to indirect exciton at approximately 5 kV/cm with dramatic changes of its binding energy and oscillator strength while the bright excited direct-exciton state remains almost unaffected. It is shown that the excitonic lifetime is dominated either by the radiative recombination or by tunneling processes at small/large values of the electric field, respectively. The calculated lifetime of the exciton ground state as a function of the bias voltage is in a quantitative agreement with low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. We have also made freely available a numerical code for calculation of the optical properties of direct and indirect excitons in CQWs in an electric field.

K. Sivalertporn, L. Mouchliadis, A. L. Ivanov, R. Philp, and E. A. Muljarov

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

United States Submission on Land-Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the objective and principles of the Convention and its Kyoto Protocol F. General U.S. views on narrowly 3.3 and 3.4 activities A. Monitoring and measuring GHGs B. Accounting for non-CO2 GHG emissions of greenhouse gases at safe levels, by taking into account the entire contribution ­ both positive and negative

395

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

A comparison of direct and indirect methods of determining tensile strength of concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sectional area of the cylinder. Typical failures and close-up of broken aggregate are shown in Figures 12 and 13 respectively, TABLE II RESULTS OP STRENGTH TESTS - BATCH DESIGN "A" greet Tensi1e T. Indi~et ' HochiLus oS Cespress9. ve . . &358. M5 A~v... ~ 2 ' ~8z Av ~ 8 1 ~~8 z8g 263 --? 308 F8~8 1 2e 1800 75 1200 0 %7 Av ~ TABLE III RESULTS OP STHt"NGTH TESTS BATCH DESIGlTT "B" Age oi' Test Avgas A. rect Tensile +3 Indirect Tens e 4. 07 62 282 28 261 2 286 2865 3617 3533...

Brown, James Timon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility  

SciTech Connect

In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H., E-mail: ye-wenhua@iapcm.ac.cn; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Indirect evaporative cooler using membrane-contained, liquid desiccant for dehumidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect evaporative cooler for cooling inlet supply air from a first temperature to a second, lower temperature using a stream of liquid coolant and a stream of exhaust or purge air. The cooler includes a first flow channel for inlet supply air and a second flow channel adjacent the first for exhaust air. The first and second flow channels are defined in part by sheets of a membrane permeable to water vapor such that mass is transferred as a vapor through the membrane from the inlet supply air to a contained liquid desiccant for dehumidification and also to the exhaust air as heat is transferred from the inlet supply air to the liquid coolant. A separation wall divides the liquid desiccant and the coolant but allows heat to be transferred from the supply air to the coolant which releases water vapor to the counter or cross flowing exhaust air.

Kozubal, Eric Joseph; Slayzak, Steven Joseph

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge(001) quantum wells: Examining indirect band gap bowing  

SciTech Connect

A study of the bandgap character of compressively strained GeSn{sub 0.060-0.091}/Ge(001) quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. The built-in strain in GeSn wells leads to an increased separation between L and {Gamma} conduction band minima. The prevalent indirect interband transitions in GeSn were probed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. As a result we could simulate the L-valley bowing parameter in GeSn alloys, b{sub L} = 0.80 {+-} 0.06 eV at 10 K. From this we conclude that even compressively strained GeSn/Ge(001) alloys could become direct band gap semiconductors at the Sn-fraction higher than 17.0 at. %.

Tonkikh, Alexander A. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institute for Physics of Microstructures RAS, GSP-105, Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Eisenschmidt, Christian; Schmidt, Georg [Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3 D-01620, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Talalaev, Vadim G. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); ZIK SiLi-Nano, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Karl-Freiherr-von-Fritsch-Str. 3 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Zakharov, Nikolay D.; Werner, Peter [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Schilling, Joerg [ZIK SiLi-Nano, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Karl-Freiherr-von-Fritsch-Str. 3 D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning  

SciTech Connect

The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in {sup 1}H detected 2D {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional {sup 13}C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear {sup 1}H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5{sub m}{sup {bar x}}, PMLG5{sub mm}{sup {bar x}x} and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLG{sub m}{sup {bar x}} during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the {sup 1}H resolution during t{sub 1} evolution in the traditional, {sup 13}C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted {sup 29}Si direct polarization and {sup 29}Si{sup 19}F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements. Furthermore, conformational details of two types of PFP were confirmed by theoretical calculation, operated by Dr. Takeshi Kobayashi. Finally, the arrangement of two surfactants, cetyltrimetylammoium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), mixed inside th

Mao, Kanmi

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The City of San Jos is considering the installation of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system on the roof of the San Jos Convention Center. The installation would be on a lower section of the roof covering approximately 21,000 ft2. To assist city staff in making a decision on the PV installation, the Department of Energy Tiger Team has investigated potential indirect benefits of installing a solar PV system on the Convention Center roof. The indirect benefits include potential increase in roof life, as well as potential reduced heating and cooling load in the building due to roof shading from the PV system.

403

Effects of Urban Surfaces and White Roofs on Global and Regional Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use, vegetation, albedo, and soil-type data are combined in a global model that accounts for roofs and roads at near their actual resolution to quantify the effects of urban surface and white roofs on climate. In 2005, ~0.128% of the ...

Mark Z. Jacobson; John E. Ten Hoeve

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A protocol for correcting experimental fusion enthalpies to 298.15 K and it's application in indirect measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in indirect measurements of sublimation enthalpy at 298.15 K James S. Chickos* Department of Chemistry sublimation and vaporization enthalpies with temperature. This new protocol provides improved accuracy to experimental sublimation enthalpy values at 298.15 K deviates from the experimental values by approximately ?4

Chickos, James S.

405

"How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks and outbreaks of the undead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zombie menace has so far been studied only qualitatively or through the use of mathematical models without empirical content. We propose to use a new tool in survey research to allow zombies to be studied indirectly without risk to the interviewers.

Gelman, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Signal and noise characteristics induced by unattenuated x rays from a scintillator in indirect-conversion CMOS photodiode array detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-conversion CMOS photodiode array detectors Seung Man Yun1 , Chang Hwy Lim1 , Ho Kyung Kim1,* , Thorsten Graeve2 by the direct x-rays in an indirect-conversion CMOS photodiode array detector. In order to isolate the signal-absorbing blackout material between a phosphor screen and the photodiode array. From the images irradiated when

Cunningham, Ian

407

SRAD Distribution Detail for FY06 ( Indirect cost charged during period July 1, 2004 -June 30, 2005 )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PI Name Adjusted Indirect Cost Charged Exclusions PANAMA CITY CAMPUS College Code: 11 Panama City Campus.00%$58.59 $0.00 Totals: $31,495.17 100.00%Panama City Campus $31,495.17 $0.00 Totals: $31,495.17PANAMA CITY

Weston, Ken

408

Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

409

ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, 44, 1, 2008, p. 1-9 Ship tracks have been considered the Rosetta Stone demonstrating the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud radia-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the signatures of indirect aerosol effects (e.g. enhanced droplet concentration) caused by ship emissions. Key words:Ship tracks, cloud parameterization, indirect aerosol effect, effective radius, mean in preexisting marine stratiform clouds, and argued that ship tracks served as good examples of the Twomey effect

410

In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/...

Fan, JiJi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Cost model for optimum thicknesses of insulated walls considering indirect impacts and uncertainties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays, insulation is increasingly used for houses and buildings for its economic and environmental advantages. The performance of an insulated construction depends mainly on the thickness and the properties of the used insulation material. However, this performance is subjected to various uncertainties related for instance to the manufacturing process of the material and to the different workmanship errors that affect the thermal resistance of the insulated construction. In practice, these uncertainties are still rarely considered in energy analysis. Nevertheless, beyond a given level of uncertainties, the insulation system does not perform as expected which induces additional unexpected costs related to energy and pollution. This work aims first, at showing the impact of these uncertainties on the reliability of the insulated construction and second, at developing a new formulation of the global cost for the design of insulation system considering additional costs related to user and environment. The proposed cost formulation allows us to provide a better estimation of the payback period. Three configurations are considered with different insulation schemes in order to show the impact of uncertainties and indirect costs on the insulation performance.

A. Assani; A. Chateauneuf; J.-P. Fontaine; Ph. Audebert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

ASPEN modeling of the Tri-State indirect-liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

The ASPEN process simulator has been used to model an indirect-liquefaction flowsheet patterned after that of the Tri-State project. This flowsheet uses Lurgi moving-bed gasification with synthesis-gas conversion to methanol folowed by further processing to gasoline using the Mobil MTG process. Models developed in this study include the following: Lurgi gasifier, Texaco gasifier, synthesis gas cooling, Rectisol, methanol synthesis, methanol-to-gasoline, CO-shift, methanation, and naphtha hydrotreating. These models have been successfully developed in modular form so that they can be used to simulate a number of different flowsheets or process alternatives. Simulations of the Tri-State flowsheet have been made using two different coal-feed rates and two types of feed coal. The overall simulation model was adjusted to match the Tri-State flowsheet values for methanol, LPG, isobutane, and gasoline. As a result of this adjustment, the MTG reactor yield structure necessary to match the flowsheet product rates was determined. The models were exercised at different flow rates and were unaffected by such changes, demonstrating their range of operability. The use of Illinois No. 6 coal, with its lower ash content, resulted in slightly higher production rates of each of the products as compared to use of the Kentucky coal.

Barker, R.E.; Begovich, J.M.; Clinton, J.H.; Johnson, P.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Prospects for indirect detection of sneutrino dark matter with IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the prospects for indirect detection of right-handed sneutrino dark matter at the IceCube neutrino telescope in a U(1)B-L extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The capture and annihilation of sneutrinos inside the Sun reach equilibrium, and the flux of produced neutrinos is governed by the sneutrino-proton elastic scattering cross section, which has an upper bound of 810-9??pb from the Z? mass limits in the B-L model. Despite the absence of any spin-dependent contribution, the muon event rates predicted by this model can be detected at IceCube since sneutrinos mainly annihilate into leptonic final states by virtue of the fermion B-L charges. These subsequently decay to neutrinos with 100% efficiency. The Earth muon event rates are too small to be detected for the standard halo model irrespective of an enhanced sneutrino annihilation cross section that can explain the recent PAMELA data. For modified velocity distributions, the Earth muon events increase substantially and can be greater than the IceCube detection threshold of 12 events km-2?yr-1. However, this only leads to a mild increase of about 30% for the Sun muon events. The number of muon events from the Sun can be as large as roughly 100 events km-2?yr-1 for this model.

Rouzbeh Allahverdi; Sascha Bornhauser; Bhaskar Dutta; Katherine Richardson-McDaniel

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

Minnesota, University of

416

Table 1: Specifications for Federal Indirect Cost Data: Expense Function, IC Location, and IC Rate Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Ship Operation 2401 2400 Research 2600 Other Sponsored Projects IC Rate in effect during period: IC Rate in effect during period: IC Rate in effect during period: Competitive Award NOA Date: 6/09/04 - 6

Hone, James

417

Energy savings from indirect evaporative pre-cooling: Control strategies and commissioning  

SciTech Connect

Package rooftop air conditioning units (RTU) with evaporative pre-cooling systems were installed at an Agricultural History Museum and conference center in the northern Sacramento Valley in California, a hot and dry summer climate region. The evaporative pre-coolers serve to extend the economizer range of the RTU's. A commissioning team monitored the performance of the RTU evaporative pre-coolers. The purpose of the monitoring was to determine if changes were warranted to optimize the system's energy efficiency. The commissioning process revealed that the RTU evaporative pre-coolers were being controlled by the economizer control cycle. With this control cycle, the evaporative pre-cooler operates when the outdoor air temperature is falling below the space return air temperature. This means that the pre-cooler will never operate at peak load conditions. The conference center is an assembly occupancy. Building codes require significant levels of outdoor air for ventilation. The evaporative pre-cooler system provides the means to significantly offset the energy requirements for cooling down and heating up this ventilation air. A DOE2 energy simulation analysis indicated that the evaporative pre-cooler could cut energy use by over 50% if it were working correctly. Investigation concludes that in buildings with high outdoor air requirements, evaporative pre-cooling, using building exhaust air as the indirect evaporative cooling source, significantly reduce building energy consumption. This evaporative pre-cooling technology works in any climate, regardless of outdoor conditions, since the return air stream exhausted from the building provides a relatively constant temperature and humidity source for evaporative cooling. An added benefit is that the evaporative pre-cooler heat exchanger recovers heat from the exhausted air stream in cold weather.

Felts, D.; Jump, D.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Experimental demonstration of early time, hohlraum radiation symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition experiments  

SciTech Connect

Early time radiation symmetry at the capsule for indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] will be inferred from the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern of a high-Z sphere replacing the ignition capsule. This technique was tested on the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, T. Boehly et al., Laser Part. Beams 11, 317 (1991)] in near full ignition scale vacuum hohlraums using an equivalent experimental setup to the one planned for NIF. Two laser cones entering each laser entrance hole heat the hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 100 eV, mimicking the NIF ignition pulse foot drive. The experiments have demonstrated accuracies of {+-}1.5% ({+-}2%) in inferred P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} (P{sub 4}/P{sub 0}) Legendre mode incident flux asymmetry and consistency between 900 eV and 1200 eV re-emission patterns. We have also demonstrated the expected tuning capability of P{sub 2}/P{sub 0}, from positive (pole hot) to negative (waist hot), decreasing linearly with the inner/outer beams power fraction. P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} on the other hand shows very little variation with power fraction. We developed a simple analytical viewfactor model that is in good agreement with both measured P{sub 2}/P{sub 0} and P{sub 4}/P{sub 0} and their dependence on inner beam power fraction.

Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J.; Thomas, C.; Sorce, C.; Glenn, S.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kline, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology Lack of Direct Effects of Agrochemicals on Zoonotic Pathogens and Fecal Indicator...South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA Agrochemicals, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB...that previously observed effects of agrochemicals on FIB were indirect. TEXT Many endemic...

Zachery R. Staley; Jacob K. Senkbeil; Jason R. Rohr; Valerie J. Harwood

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

420

CAMEA ESS - The Continuous Angle Multi-Energy Analysis Indirect Geometry Spectrometer for the European Spallation Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CAMEA ESS neutron spectrometer is designed to achieve a high detection efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane, and to maximize the use of the long pulse European Spallation Source. It is an indirect geometry time-of-flight spectrometer that uses crystal analysers to determine the final energy of neutrons scattered from the sample. Unlike other indirect gemeotry spectrometers CAMEA will use ten concentric arcs of analysers to analyse scattered neutrons at ten different final energies, which can be increased to 30 final energies by use of prismatic analysis. In this report we will outline the CAMEA instrument concept, the large performance gain, and the potential scientific advancements that can be made with this instrument.

Freeman, P G; Mark, M; Bertelsen, M; Larsen, J; Christensen, N B; Lefmann, K; Jacobsen, J; Niedermayer, Ch; Juranyi, F; Ronnow, H M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SRAD Distribution Detail for FY05 ( Indirect cost charged during period July 1, 2003 -June 30, 2004 )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PI Name Adjusted Indirect Cost Charged Exclusions PANAMA CITY CAMPUS College Code 11 Panama City Campus ($1,845.74)Shaw, K. -6.75% -0.01%($1,845.74) $0.00 Totals: $27,358.31 100.00%Panama City Campus $27,358.31 $0.00 Totals: $27,358.31PANAMA CITY CAMPUS Department Total Percent of College Total: $27,358.31 100

Weston, Ken

422

Drift-Diffusion Model of the Fragmentation of the External Ring Structure in the Photoluminescence Pattern Emitted by Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Under optical excitation, coupled quantum wells are known to reveal fascinating features in the photoluminescence pattern originating from dipole orientated indirect excitons. The appearance of an external ring has been attributed to macroscopic charge separation in the quantum well plane. We present a classical model of nonlinear diffusion to account for the observed fragmentation of the external ring into a periodic array of islands. The model incorporates the Coulomb interactions between electrons, holes, and indirect excitons. At low temperatures, these interactions lead to pattern formation similar to the experimentally observed ring fragmentation. The fragmentation is found to persist to temperatures above the quantum degeneracy temperature of indirect excitons.

J. Wilkes, E. A. Muljarov, and A. L. Ivanov

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...no such positive effects were observed because...had the opposite effect among conservatives...visible indication of fuel efficiency, perhaps via...of changes in the price at which they have...associated with the average marginal effect of observability...

Erez Yoeli; Moshe Hoffman; David G. Rand; Martin A. Nowak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

The relative importance of direct and indirect effects of hunting mortality on the population dynamics of brown bears  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...survival by increasing male turnover. We aimed to evaluate the relative importance of direct...under high hunting pressure, which led to a decline in population growth under high...dynamics of exploited species is essential to determine sustainable harvest rates for...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Multidimensional modelling of the effect of engine load on various exergy terms in an indirect injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this investigation, the energy and exergy analyses are carried out in a Lister 8.1 IDI diesel engine for different loads (25%, 50%, 75% and full loads operation) at maximum torque engine speed (730 rpm). The energy analysis is done during a closed cycle using of a three dimensional CFD code. The results by this model for the pressure in cylinder at 50% and full load operations are compared with the corresponding experimental data and show good agreements. Second-law analysis is carried out by a developed in house computational code. Various rate and accumulative exergy components are identified and calculated separately with crank position for various loads. The results show that when the load increases from 25% to full load in steps by 25%, the percentage of combustion irreversibility decreases from 33.7% to 25% of fuel burn exergy. Also, exergy efficiency reaches its peak of 36.7% at 75% load.

S. Jafarmadar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The other side of acceptance: studying the direct and indirect effects of emotions on information technology use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much ado has been made regarding user acceptance of new information technologies. However, research has been primarily based on cognitive models and little attention has been given to emotions. This paper argues that emotions are important drivers of ... Keywords: IT use, IT-related behaviors, acceptance, adaptation behaviors, appraisal theory, emotions, user reaction

Anne Beaudry; Alain Pinsonneault

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Effect of Equilibrating Mounted Dental Stone Casts in Maximum Intercuspation on the Occlusal Harmony of an Indirect Restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if equilibration of dental stone casts mounted in maximum intercuspation can improve occlusal harmony of a cast gold restoration. A dentoform mounted on an articulator with crown preparation on tooth #19...

Benson, Peter Andrew

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effects of Biodiesel from Used Frying Palm Oil on the Exhaust Emissions of an Indirect Injection (IDI) Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

McDonald (27) studied a 50% blend of yellow grease methyl ester with No. 2 diesel fuel (B50) used in a General Motors L65 GMT 600 turbo-charged, IDI diesel engine. ... This is typical for diesel engines because the air?fuel equivalence ratio slightly decreases with an increasing engine speed. ... A 1994 Dodge 2500 turbocharged and intercooled diesel pickup fueled with 100% Et ester of rapeseed oil was driven by personnel representing the University of Idaho, Agricultural Engineering Department from Moscow, Idaho to Los Angeles, California and back to Moscow and then from Moscow to Ocean City, Maryland and back to Moscow, Idaho. ...

Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin

2008-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

430

The effectiveness of an indirect control message in decreasing the depreciative behavior of remote camping location users  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of human waste on ground surface. According to Cole and Dalle-Molle (1982) the most significant problems include: 1) proliferation of fire sites, 2) the creation of elaborate fire rings, 3) litter, and 4) chopped trees and downed logs. These impacts... when the users first arrived at the site, and an impact data sheet, on which the impacts (e. g. , litter) left behind were quantified (e. g. , weighed). A total of 119 observations were completed. Results showed that the remote camping location users...

Barget, Robert George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs … Cost Accounting Standard 418 … at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, OAS-L-13-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allocation of Direct and Indirect Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418 - at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OAS-L-13-07 April 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 11, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, LIVERMORE SITE OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418 - at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The attached report presents the results of the audit of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (Livermore) Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418, conducted to address the performance audit objective described below. The Office of

432

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Measurements of Indirect CP Asymmetries in D[superscript 0] ? K[superscript ?K[superscript +] and D[superscript 0] ? ?[superscript ?]?[superscript +] Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of indirect CP violation in D[superscript 0] mesons through the determination of the parameter A[subscript ?] is presented using a data sample of pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

Williams, Michael

434

Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files  

SciTech Connect

Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

E-Print Network 3.0 - aesthetic indirect restorative Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer Bay, Unalaska, ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 23 THE COST EFFECTIVENESS...

436

Effects of Future Climate and Biogenic Emissions Changes on Surface Ozone over the United States and China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future projections of near-surface ozone concentrations depend on the climate/emissions scenario used to drive future simulations, the direct effects of the changing climate on the atmosphere, and the indirect effects of changing temperatures and ...

Jin-Tai Lin; Kenneth O. Patten; Katharine Hayhoe; Xin-Zhong Liang; Donald J. Wuebbles

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Direct and indirect capture of carriers into the lasing ground state and the light-current characteristic of quantum dot lasers  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the light-current characteristic (LCC) of a quantum dot (QD) laser under the conditions of both direct and indirect capture of carriers from the optical confinement layer into the lasing ground state in QDs. We show that direct capture is a dominant process determining the ground-state LCC. Only when direct capture is slow, the role of indirect capture (capture into the QD excited state and subsequent intradot relaxation to the ground state) becomes important.

Wu, Yuchang, E-mail: yuchangw@vt.edu; Asryan, Levon V., E-mail: asryan@vt.edu [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

438

Measurement of indirect CP-violating asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the indirect CP-violating asymmetries ($A_{\\Gamma}$) between effective lifetimes of anticharm and charm mesons reconstructed in $D^0\\to K^+ K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment and corresponding to $9.7$~fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The strong decay $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+$ is used to identify the meson at production as $D^0$ or $\\overline{D}^0$. We statistically subtract $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons originating from $b$-hadron decays and measure the yield asymmetry between anticharm and charm decays as a function of decay time. We measure $A_\\Gamma (K^+K^-) = (-0.19 \\pm 0.15 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst))\\%$ and $A_\\Gamma (\\pi^+\\pi^-)= (-0.01 \\pm 0.18 (stat) \\pm 0.03 (syst))\\%$. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry and their combination yields $A_\\Gamma = (-0.12 \\pm 0.12)\\%$.

Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernndez; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Lpez, O Gonzlez; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Luc, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernndez, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vzquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizn, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurement of indirect CP-violating asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0\\to ?^+?^-$ decays at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a measurement of the indirect CP-violating asymmetries ($A_{\\Gamma}$) between effective lifetimes of anticharm and charm mesons reconstructed in $D^0\\to K^+ K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment and corresponding to $9.7$~fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The strong-interaction decay $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+$ is used to identify the meson at production as $D^0$ or $\\overline{D}^0$. We statistically subtract $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons originating from $b$-hadron decays and measure the yield asymmetry between anticharm and charm decays as a function of decay time. We measure $A_\\Gamma (K^+K^-) = (-0.19 \\pm 0.15 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst))\\%$ and $A_\\Gamma (\\pi^+\\pi^-)= (-0.01 \\pm 0.18 (stat) \\pm 0.03 (syst))\\%$. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry and their combination yields $A_\\Gamma = (-0.12 \\pm 0.12)\\%$.

CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernndez Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. Gonzlez Lpez; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Luc; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernndez; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vzquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizn; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou; S. Zucchelli

2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Detection of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in acid mine environments by indirect fluorescent antibody staining.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Industrial Waste | Coal Mining Epitopes Fluorescent...materials associated with coal. J. Bacteriol. 117...Effects of surface mining on fish and wildlife in Appalachia. Report, U.S...plasma acidophilum in coal refuse material. Appl...

W A Apel; P R Dugan; J A Filppi; M S Rheins

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Modelling and Simulation of a Defense Strategy to Face Indirect DDoS Flooding Attacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) flooding attack is one of the most diffused and effective threat against services and applications running over the Internet. Its distributed and cooperative nature makes i...

Angelo Furfaro; Pasquale Pace; Andrea Parise

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Cost of electricity difference for direct and indirect drive targets for inertial fusion energy using a diode pumped solid state laser driver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed systems analysis code has been used to compare the projected cost of electricity (COE) for inertial fusion energy for direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) target scenarios, based on a diode pumped solid state laser driver with Yb:S-FAP (Yb doped Sr5(PO4)3F) gain media. Previously published target gain curves which resulted in a target gain at the optimal DD operating point that is 30% higher than that for the ID scenario have been used. This gain advantage for DD is offset by a requirement for improved beam smoothing, which was obtained via smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) with a 1THz bandwidth at 349nm. Such a large SSD bandwidth has a number of effects on laser performance, including greater risk of optics damage from non-linear effects, lowered harmonic conversion efficiency, altered extraction parameters and higher front-end costs. The non-linear effects, which contribute to optical component damage by amplification of intensity non-uniformities, were parameterized through a constraint on the maximum allowable Bintegral (i.e. the total average phase retardation due to the non-linear indices of all materials traversed by the beam). If we constrain B to be no larger than 1.8rad, which is the presently accepted safe value based on observations in single shot glass laser facilities, the COEs for DD and ID are predicted to be the same within the uncertainties. If technology permits the B limit to be raised, the optimized COE for DD is predicted to decrease relative to that for ID.

C.D. Orth

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Identifying biological monitoring tools to evaluate the chronic effects of chemical exposures in terrestrial plants  

SciTech Connect

When contamination of any habitat, such as a wetland impacted by heavy metals or a high desert disposal area impacted by chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides, is considered within an ecological risk assessment context, long-term land use goals should be included as part of the decision-making process, especially when remediation options are being considered for the site. If imminent threats to human health and the environment are highly unlikely, and environmental management and projected land use allow, remediation options and monitoring programs for a site should be developed that assure long-term habitat use, while continuing surveillance for evaluating potential chronic ecological effects. For example, at Milltown Reservoir wetlands on the Clark Fork River in western Montana the baseline ecological risk assessment suggested that no current adverse biological or ecological effects warranted extensive remediation at the site. But, given the land use goals currently anticipated for the wetland habitat and the hydroelectric facility located on the Clark Fork River, a program,should be developed that, in part, continues assessing plant communities and sublethal biological effects as cost-effective monitoring tools for evaluating long-term effects associated with metal-contaminated soils. Similarly, high desert sites that have been impacted by past disposal activities like that at Alkali Lake, Oregon, should be monitored using cost-effective methods that continue to monitor terrestrial plants as a field screening tool for evaluating soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides.

Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Powering up with indirect reciprocity in a large-scale field experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...public good message in a pooled...program as a public good. The effect...the domain of energy efficiency...at promoting energy conservation via nonfinancial...about their own energy use and how...the observable public goods treatment...

Erez Yoeli; Moshe Hoffman; David G. Rand; Martin A. Nowak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

446

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 and TG-06 Data Sets Published 2 and TG-06 Data Sets Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of data sets from two LBA-ECO science themes: Carbon Dynamics and Trace Gases. Both data sets provide data from similar time periods and study areas. LBA-ECO CD-32 Flux Tower Network Data Compilation, Brazilian Amazon: 1999-2006. Data set prepared by S.R. Saleska, H.R. da Rocha, A.R. Huete, A.D. Nobre, P. Artaxo, and Y.E. Shimabukuro. This data set is a compilation of carbon and energy eddy covariance flux, meteorology, radiation, canopy temperature, humidity, CO2 profiles, soil moisture, and temperature profile data that were collected at nine towers across the Brazilian Amazon. Independent investigators provided the data from a variety of flux tower projects over the period 1999 thru 2006 for use in a model intercomparison.

447

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published LBA Model Intercomparison Project Meteorological Forcing Data Published The ORNL DAAC announces the release of LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) meteorological forcing data from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. LBA-ECO CD-32 LBA Model Intercomparison Project (LBA-MIP) Meteorological Forcing Data. Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, N. Restrepo-Coupe, H.R. da Rocha, S.R. Saleska, and R. Stockli. This data set provides gap-filled meteorological observations from nine Brazilian flux towers for periods between 1999 and 2006. The measurements include: air temperature, specific humidity, module of wind speed, downward long wave and shortwave radiation at the surface, surface pressure, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These atmospheric data are provided at 1-hour time-steps,

448

Synthesis and Summary: Land Use Decisions and Fire Risk1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was spent in fire suppres- sion. The bill for all costs and damages amounted to more than $1 billion. Given of fuel management and fire protection. The complexity of watershed manage- ment was defined growth on fuel management and fire protection, concerns stated or implied in all presentations. Jim Davis

Standiford, Richard B.

449

Small Body Landings Using Autonomous Onboard Optical Navigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spacecraft landings on small bodies (asteroids and comets) present special challenges from a navigation perspective ... , with the resultant accuracy requirement to target landing areas fairly tight. Because the ...

Shyam Bhaskaran; Sumita Nandi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Air Pollution Mapping Using Nonlinear Land Use Regression Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air pollution in cities is an important problem influencing ... due to a very complex distribution of the pollution sources, the morphology of cities and the ... processes leading to a multivariate nature of the

Alexandre Champendal; Mikhail Kanevski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Integrating ecosystem-service tradeoffs into land-use decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...InVEST software tool to evaluate the...existed between carbon storage and water quality...improved carbon storage (0.5% increase...food, water, and energy security and in climate...explicit modeling tool, Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services...

Joshua H. Goldstein; Giorgio Caldarone; Thomas Kaeo Duarte; Driss Ennaanay; Neil Hannahs; Guillermo Mendoza; Stephen Polasky; Stacie Wolny; Gretchen C. Daily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a manner that protects the quality of scientific, scenic, historical, ecological, environmental, air and atmospheric, water resource, and archaeological values that will preserve...

453

Sugarbush system: a post-mining land use alternative  

SciTech Connect

Viable, potentially-profitable, post-mining options for high elevation sites in the Appalachian coal fields are limited. Sugar maple groves designed for long term profitable system operation seems to be one such option. This is a design document for a sugarbush system with equations for optimizing the system, subject to local constraints. Mine land reclamation specialists may consider and explore options using an available computer program (IBM-PC BASIC). Creating a sugarbush may suggest the long term interest of some mined-land owners in their land and it may represent an acceptable post-mining alternative on some sites to conventional reclamation practices. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Giles, R.H. Jr.

1985-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The procedures developed for and applied in this work are shown in the flowchart in Fig.2. In the LCA system, all conventional cradle-to-gate processes and flows of an agriculture-based end-product are shown (Ki...

Roland Geyer; David M. Stoms; Jan P. Lindner

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Relationship of land-use patterns to quail habitat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were ground cherry (Physals sp. ), yellow wood sorrel (Oxalis dillenii), p lyp ' l~y) p p b ), 'ldb (~gh 1 ~1' ), d d d (~Gh 11' p. ) (1 bl 5). G d h y d y 11 d sorrel represented approximately 62X of the composition. No grass species were... 170. 1 28. 9 23. 1 22. 6 55. 3 Yaupon Indian Cherry Misc. 527 36 35 155. 6 22, 2 22. 2 Total 898 300. 0 598 200. 0 29 blackjack oak, eastern redcedar, and yaupon. Post oak was the most important species, with an importance value...

Grevstad, Gerald Oscar

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................5 Public Real Estate Transactions it to someone starting out? I believe that, given our real need to find integrative solutions to complex or sustainable community design. Whether you are new to the profession or currently work as a developer, engineer

California at Davis, University of

457

Integrating ecosystem-service tradeoffs into land-use decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...provided estimates of real estate prices for bulk sale of...action in the pursuit of sustainable water-resources...Land-rental rates and estimated real estate prices for bulk sale...unirrigated) 24,711 Real property taxes were...

Joshua H. Goldstein; Giorgio Caldarone; Thomas Kaeo Duarte; Driss Ennaanay; Neil Hannahs; Guillermo Mendoza; Stephen Polasky; Stacie Wolny; Gretchen C. Daily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Global Consequences of Land Use Jonathan A. Foley,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and urban areas have expanded in recent decades, accompanied by large increases in energy, water, fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations trade-offs between imme- diate human needs and maintaining the capacity of the biosphere to provide

Rey Benayas, José María

459

The environmental implications of intensified land use in developing countries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...emissions of greenhouse gases or for loss of biodiversity...releases the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the...Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (1989) has...whereas those who pay the price are in the rural parts...Cameroon 7 0.59 3 0.4 0 Egypt 2.6 0.05 361 6.6...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fire-free land use in pre-1492 Amazonian savannas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...39 Lovell WG ( 1992 ) Heavy shadows and black night: Disease and...Spores of Barro Colorado Island ( Missouri Botanical Garden , St...and were mounted in silicone oil for analysis. Thirty horizons...before mounting in silicone oil. Pollen slides were scanned...

Jos Iriarte; Mitchell J. Power; Stphen Rostain; Francis E. Mayle; Huw Jones; Jennifer Watling; Bronwen S. Whitney; Doyle B. McKey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Land Use Influences on Trip Chaining in Portland, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heating Oil, Diesel Fuel, And Distillate Most Recent Weekly Data Weekly On-Highway Diesel Prices.

Greenwald, Michael J.; McNally, Michael G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Altered Belowground Carbon Cycling Following Land-Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 2 Energy Bioscience Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 3 Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 4 Photosynthesis Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 5

DeLucia, Evan H.

463

Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

464

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Reduction ~341 MMTCO2E #12;California Energy Commission CA Greenhouse Gas Emissions 2004 Commercial 3 Reduce carbon content of the fuel Reduce the miles of travel #12;California Energy Commission Energy Billion in efficiency by 2030 #12;California Energy Commission Energy EfficiencyEnergy Efficiency Per

465

How can land-use modelling tools inform bioenergy policies?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioethanol). New conversion technologies for...and advanced conversion systems to high-density energy carriers [1]. These...chains (advanced conversion systems to high-density energy carriers) have a much...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

their environmental performance. However, how far these improvements reach depends on factors such as the assumed technologies, agricultural practices, technological learning, and...

467

extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ession: sept. 7 Green Building, sustainability and Renewable Energy #12;2 For more information or to enroll EDUCATION COURSES TO CONSIDER n Regional Planning & Sustainable Communities Strategies: The Road So Far n for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate n LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations + Maintenance FREE inFoRmation s

Ferrara, Katherine W.

468

Land use and macroclimate in Presidio County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 'igg0 "rom cire 13ex, r District arid; =-. formally or ger:ised. In 1875. 'I'hc?o(ee is derived !rem P -esidio dc-. . l N rte, as it r!as c;el I ed 'cy the Spani=h cxplorers, meaning gateuey on. Rio Craiide. 'I'hc county is loc:i, i. cl in the Trar... completion o. two major higtways. Cne of these routes, FN 170 or El Carnino del Rio, nas been completed. from Presidio to the Big Bend National Park. Money has beer acorcpriated to complete thi- road to El Paso, thereby pzoviding a. I'ighway from t'?e west...

Ellermeier, Duane Carl

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The project will cost approximately $20,000 and funding is being requested from the CLU, Sports Plex water free. 5. Construction Progress Update - M. Caron Energy Efficiency with Ameresco - Michel Caron met with Ameresco today as they were presenting their geothermal design - they will be doing

470

Minimizing Land Use and Nitrogen Intensity of Bioenergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Table 1 classifies the analyzed biomass feedstocks into categories with similar characteristics. ... Biomass Feedstocks Separated by Category ...

Shelie A. Miller

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

How can land-use modelling tools inform bioenergy policies?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...information and processes to assess the consequences...fuels (e.g. biodiesel, bioethanol...a comprehensive evaluation of these different...occur. Realistic evaluations of bioenergy scenarios...tequila-making process can be used as...palm or soya bean biodiesel [10]. While...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

4. Title and Subtitle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1998, the Oregon Department of Transportation undertook a study of the impacts of highway capacity improvements on land uses and growth, particularly at the urban fringe. The objective was to better understand the cause and effect relationships among highway capacity, travel demand and development patterns. A variety of factors to resulting growth were evaluated for their ability to predict growth. Case studies of six communities provided an in-depth understanding of the pressures which drive development decisions and land use change. This guidebook provides guidance to ODOT staff for completing environmental analysis and documentation on indirect land use impacts of highway improvements, based on findings of the study. One finding was that most highway capacity increases do not cause development to be dramatically different from local land use plan guidance, or from what would have occurred in absence of the highway improvement. In Oregon, local

Terry Moore Econorthwest

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion of Lignocellulosic Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis A. Dutta, M. Talmadge, and J. Hensley National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado M. Worley and D. Dudgeon Harris Group Inc. Atlanta, Georgia and Seattle, Washington D. Barton, P. Groenendijk, D. Ferrari, and B. Stears The Dow Chemical Company Midland, Michigan E.M. Searcy, C.T. Wright, and J.R. Hess Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho Technical Report NREL/TP-5100-51400 May 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

474

High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste  

SciTech Connect

SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Selective collection as a pretreatment for indirect solid recovered fuel generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective selective collection (SC) has been increasing in many countries of the European Union. As a consequence the composition of residual municipal solid waste (RMSW) is changing not only because of economic development, but also due to the collection system. The input of RMSW treatment plants is thus not homogeneous. This paper analyses two case studies involving a total of five SC scenarios and their impact on the generation of solid recovered fuel (SRF) with/without bio-drying, post-treatment and packaging take back programs (TBPs). These case studies are based on two types of SC: kerbside and drop-off. The latest regulation on SRF classification is taken into account: energy content, Cl and Hg concentrations are assessed and discussed. The role of the respirometric index (RI) is also analyzed. Results show that when SC is highly efficient RMSW can be classified directly as SRF, but only if the introduction of RI does not set stringent respirometric targets. The role of packaging \\{TBPs\\} is important as the residual waste remaining after the packaging has been processed, can be valorized increasing the lower heating value (LHV) of the residual RMSW and minimizing the streams that should be landfilled. The source separation of food waste has a significant impact on the suitability of bio-drying: when the SC of food waste is very efficient, its percentage in the RMSW may be too low for effective bio-drying.

Elena Cristina Rada; Marco Ragazzi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Indirect rotor position sensing in real time for brushless permanent magnet motor drives  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a modern solution to real-time rotor position estimation of brushless permanent magnet (PM) motor drives. The position estimation scheme, based on flux linkage and line-current estimation, is implemented in real time by using the abc reference frame, and it is tested dynamically. The position estimation model of the test motor, development of hardware, and basic operation of the digital signal processor (DSP) are discussed. The overall position estimation strategy is accomplished with a fast DSP (TMS320C30). The method is a shaft position sensorless method that is applicable to a wide range of excitation types in brushless PM motors without any restriction on the motor model and the current excitation. Both rectangular and sinewave-excited brushless PM motor drives are examined, and the results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method with dynamic loads in closed estimated position loop.

Ertugrul, N. [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Acarnley, P.P. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Evaluation of Indirect Combined Cycle in Very High Temperature Gas--Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy and Idaho National Laboratory are developing a very high temperature reactor to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is twofold: (a) efficient, low-cost energy generation and (b) hydrogen production. Although a next-generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual purpose, as assumed here. A dual-purpose design with a combined cycle of a Brayton top cycle and a bottom Rankine cycle was investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting heat to a hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a helium-nitrogen mixture were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms of the cycle efficiency. The relative component sizes were estimated for the different working fluids to provide an indication of the relative capital costs. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the cycle were performed to determine the effects of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of the cycle to various operating conditions as well as trade-offs between efficiency and component size. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling.

Chang Oh; Robert Barner; Cliff Davis; Steven Sherman; Paul Pickard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Comparison of Direct and Indirect Measures of Critical Bands of the Monaural Chinchilla  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typically it is found that lower forms (rats cats and chinchillas) require a greater S/N ratio than does man in order to detect the presence of a pure?tone signal in a broad?band noise. Assuming Fletcher's formula to be an adequate means of estimating the operating bandwidth of the auditory system one could come to the conclusion that these lower forms have larger critical ratios larger critical bands and therefore poorer frequency resolving ability than does man. However the behavioral index of auditory sensitivity utilized in these experiments does not permit separation of behavioral criterion and auditory sensitivity. It seems probable that lower forms are trained to maintain a high criterion (low false?alarm rate) and thereby produce threshold measures of relatively high S/N ratio. Our efforts have been directed toward measuring both critical ratios and critical bands (band narrowing paradigm) utilizing both traditional threshold measures and criterion free indices of signal detection theory. Data obtained at signal frequencies of 500 Hz 1 2 and 4 kHz will be discussed in terms of (1) the relationship of critical ratios to critical bands as a function of frequency and (2) the effect of criterion contamination on the estimate of the critical ratio and therefore on the estimate of the frequency resolving power of the organism.

W. H. Seaton; C. Trahiotis

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Reply to "Reply to comments on defining biominerals and organominerals: Direct and indirect indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology, 201, 157­179]" by R.S. Perry and M.A. Sephton and organominerals: direct and indirect indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology, 201, 157 reply to Perry and Sephton's (2009) reply to comments by (Altermann et al., 2009) and (Défarge et al

Boyer, Edmond

480

Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig cells: an in vitro study.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related substances are ubiquitous22 environmental pollutants that exert words: Dioxin; Leydig cell; in vitro; AhR; chemokine39 40 inserm-00816472,version1-22Apr2013 #12;3 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center provide a method to determine the presence of 23 5U in liquid uranium hexafluoride. The first proposed on physical properties of uranium hexa- fluoride molecule in the gas phase it is possible to predict [9

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

482

Direct and indirect exciton states in GaAs-(Ga, Al)As double quantum wells under crossed electric and magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical study of the direct and indirect exciton states in GaAs/Ga1-xAlxAs coupled double quantum wells under crossed electric and magnetic fields is presented. The setup of the system under consideration consists of an ... Keywords: 71.55.Eq, 73.20.Mf, 73.21.Fg, Diamagnetic shifts, Double quantum-wells, Magnetoexcitons

L. E. Oliveira; M. de Dios-Leyva; C. A. Duque

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

DIFFUSE EMISSION MEASUREMENT WITH THE SPECTROMETER ON INTEGRAL AS AN INDIRECT PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS  

SciTech Connect

Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the diffuse Galactic hard X-ray continuum emission using data from the INTEGRAL observatory. The diffuse hard power-law component seen with the SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) has been identified with inverse-Compton emission from relativistic (GeV) electrons on the cosmic microwave background and Galactic interstellar radiation field. In the present analysis, SPI data from 2003 to 2009, with a total exposure time of {approx}10{sup 8} s, are used to derive the Galactic ridge hard X-ray spatial distribution and spectrum between 20 keV and 2.4 MeV. Both are consistent with predictions from the GALPROP code. The good agreement between measured and predicted emission from keV to GeV energies suggests that the correct production mechanisms have been identified. We discuss the potential of the SPI data to provide an indirect probe of the interstellar cosmic-ray electron distribution, in particular for energies below a few GeV.

Bouchet, Laurent; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Strong, Andrew W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1603, 85740 Garching (Germany); Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V., E-mail: bouchet@cesr.fr [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

484

VOLUME 85, NUMBER 9 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 AUGUST 2000 Nature, Strength, and Consequences of Indirect Adsorbate Interactions on Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Consequences of Indirect Adsorbate Interactions on Metals A. Bogicevic,1, * S. Ovesson,2 P. Hyldgaard,2 B. I adsorbed on metals affect each other indirectly even over considerable distances. Via systematic density-functional calculations, we establish the nature and strength of such interactions, and explain for what adsorbate systems

Brune, Harald

485

An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays  

SciTech Connect

Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 {mu}m. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 {mu}m pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of {approx}80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 {mu}m pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous photodiode arrays was observed to result in no degradation in MTF due to charge sharing between pixels. While the continuous designs exhibited relatively high levels of charge trapping and release, as well as shorter ranges of linearity, it is possible that these behaviors can be addressed through further refinements to pixel design. Both the continuous and the most recent discrete photodiode designs accommodate more sophisticated pixel circuitry than is present on conventional AMFPIs - such as a pixel clamp circuit, which is demonstrated to limit signal saturation under conditions corresponding to high exposures. It is anticipated that photodiode structures such as the ones reported in this study will enable the development of even more complex pixel circuitry, such as pixel-level amplifiers, that will lead to further significant improvements in imager performance.

Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du Hong; Wang Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); dpiX, 3406 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect

We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.