Sample records for indirect land-use effects

  1. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  2. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  3. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  4. CALIFORNIA ENERGY EFFECT OF LAND USE CHOICES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Manager Natural Gas and Special Projects Office Rosella Shapiro Deputy Director Fuels and Transportation to Efficient Land Use Planning .................................................................. 2 Trends

  5. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  6. Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Noel R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

  7. LAND USE AND PARENT MATERIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND NITROGEN IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    LAND USE AND PARENT MATERIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND NITROGEN IN THE KONYA BASIN, TURKEY AND NITROGEN IN THE KONYA BASIN, TURKEY: METHODS AND DATA FOR LANDSCAPE-SCALE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING Marc T use practices and soil parent materials on soil biogeochemistry in the Konya Basin, south

  8. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  9. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  10. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  11. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  12. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  13. Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on the Effectiveness of Land Use and Demand Strategies in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    DOT $12,000 Cal Trans Total Project Cost $42,533 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 StartProject Information Form Project Title White Paper on the Effectiveness of Land Use and Demand and End Dates June 30, 2014 to January 30, 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Reducing vehicle

  14. THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

  15. Upland land-use and the effects on upper trophic level dynamics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    collected in forested rivers, restored cranberry bogs, active cranberry bogs and abandoned bogs provide important information for conservation and restoration of cranberry bogs. The best way to re land use. Parts of the Coonamessett are currently being used as an active cranberry bog and have

  16. The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M University in partial fu! fillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE December 1995 Rangeland Ecology and Management Range Science THE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL LAND USE PATTERNS ON POLLUTANT RUNOFF FROM WATERSHEDS: RANGELAND.../PASTUREI ttND AND ROW CROPPING A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by Andrew A. Jayne IV Approved as to style and content by: Way T. amilton (Committee Chair) Thomas L. Thurow (Member) Robert D. Baker (Member) Robert Whitson (Department Head) December 1995...

  17. Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium Oxide Thin Films.AdministrationAerosol Indirect

  18. SYMPOSIUM ON EFFECTS OF FOREST LAND USE ON EROSION AND SLOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TO EVALUATING OFF-SITE EFFECTS OF 1 T I MBER HARVEST ACTIVITIES ON CHANNEL ~lORPHOLOGY Gordon E. Grant, Michael effects. A study was undertaken to determine whether off-site effects of timber harvest activities were Range of Oregon. In this paper, we suggest a theoretical framework for predicting how different off-site

  19. aerosol indirect effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of direct reciprocal and indirect effects in a host-parasite network Shai Pilosof Fortuna, Miguel A. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19...

  20. aerosol indirect effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of direct reciprocal and indirect effects in a host-parasite network Shai Pilosof Fortuna, Miguel A. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19...

  1. The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bosnia- Herzegovina a Decade Beyond War. Annals of AmericanBrauer, J. The Effect of War on the Natural Environment.of the Persian Gulf War, 1990-1991: Remote Sensing Datasets

  2. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  3. Investigating the effect of farmer land-use decisions on rural landscapes using an agent-based model approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Eleni

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and cover change (LUCC) is increasingly recognised as one of the most visible impacts of humans on nature. In rural areas, most of the observed LUCC is associated with agricultural activities. This has traditionally been attributed...

  4. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  5. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

  6. Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    of temperature. The potentially confounding impact of land-cover and land- use change on trends in temperature signal caused by greenhouse gas increases. Citation: Kueppers, L.M., M. A. Snyder, and L. C. Sloan (2007-use change are known to alter local, regional and global climate. For example, conversion of natural vegeta

  7. Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

  8. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  9. Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

  10. Conceptualizing and testing random indirect effects and moderated mediation in multilevel models: New procedures and recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, D. J.; Preacher, K. J.; Gil, Karen M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean ...

  11. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  12. SPSS and SAS procedures for estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preacher, K. J.; Hayes, A. F.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers often conduct mediation analysis in order to indirectly assess the effect of a proposed cause on some outcome through a proposed mediator. The utility of mediation analysis stems from its ability to go beyond ...

  13. FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, D

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

  14. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    ............................................................................................9 Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 and Natural Resources Department UC Davis Extension #12;3 COnTEnTs Land Use PLanning Community InvolvementLand Use and natUraL resoUrces spring 2014 new Courses: Tribal Water Law and Policy Effective

  15. An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and...

  16. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  17. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security) requires 36 billion gallons of ethanol by 2022 to replace about 20 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption. Since 2001 ethanol produc- tion, mainly from corn, has increased dramatically at an annual average

  18. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  19. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  20. LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

  1. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    ..........................................................................9 natUraL resoUrces Cultural Resource Management: CEQA, NEPA and Section 106 Extension is expanding its Land Use and Natural Resource Planning portfolio to include courses (with and Natural Resource Planning portfolio can help you be more effective in achieving your goals. Julia Lave

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjusted indirect comparison Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies and Information Sciences 49 Summary of the August 2009 Forum Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) Summary: )? And how much would the indirect land-use...

  3. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  4. Direct and indirect effects of southern flounder predation on a spot population: Experimental and model analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, L.B.; Wright, R.A.; Martin, T.H.; Rice, J.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Zoology; Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously shown that southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma Jordan and Gilbert) influence the survival and size-distribution of spot (Leiostomus xanthurus Lafayette) and other small estuarine fishes in experimental ponds. In this paper, we seek to determine whether these of effects can be accounted for by direct size-dependent predation or if there is also evidence for indirect behavioral effects on spot foraging which might alter their survival or population size structure. In our experiment, spot were allowed to grow in the presence and absence of southern flounder in an experimental estuarine pond for 101 days. Each treatment was replicated three times. We also apply a recently published simulation model of the flounder-spot interaction to this experiment to independently test the model and to estimate the direct effects of flounder predation on spot survival and size structure.

  5. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  6. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  7. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  8. Indirection and computer security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Michael J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

  9. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

  10. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  11. Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

  12. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Symposium Essay explores the contours of the 'energy-land use nexus' – the rich set of interrelationships between land use and energy production and consumption. This underexplored nexus encapsulates barriers and ...

  13. BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRITISH COLUMBIA LAND USE PLANNING: BACKCOUNTRY TOURISM PERSPECTIVES by Rebekah Edwards-Craig B of Research Project: British Columbia Land Use Planning: Backcountry Tourism Perspectives Supervisory, including the backcountry tourism and outdoor recreation sectors, at a disadvantage in such planning

  14. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  15. Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Kurt R. Richter University of California Agricultural Issues Center October 2009 #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy II University of California Agricultural Issues Center #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy III Making

  16. Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    : Accommodating a Growing Biofuels Market Amelia French M.S. Candidate University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Turhollow, R.L.Graham, B.J. Stokes, and D.C. Erbach. 2005. Biomass as feedstock for a bioenergy/Demand of Biofuels? Traditional Crops Perennials Changing Markets Higher Market Values More Land Use #12

  17. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  18. Effect of Subgrid Cloud Variability on Parameterization of Indirect Aerosol Effect in Large-Scale Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYearEffect of

  19. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  20. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  1. Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the possible affects of biofuels on deforestation have ledto the production of various biofuels, including ethanol andpolicies that promoted biofuels had a fuel-security emphasis

  2. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  3. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities Stephen Mulkey, Ph June 2007 Revised 30 September 2007 #12;Climate change and land use ­ Report to the Century Commission - S. Mulkey, June 2007 2 Executive summary Over this century anthropogenic climate change will present

  4. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

  5. Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

  8. Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

  9. www.extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomases, Becca

    includes courses on land use, environmental law and policy, natural resources management, water policy, water quality management, housing and community development, transportation management, GIS applications.......................................................................13 A Low Impact Design Approach to Storm Water Management........................................13

  10. Town of Chapel Hill- Land-Use Management Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003, the Town of Chapel Hill adopted a land-use management ordinance that includes prohibitions against neighborhood or homeowners association covenants or other conditions of sale that...

  11. Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peckett, Haley Rose

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

  12. Black carbon radiative heating effects on cloud microphysics and implications for the aerosol indirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    thought. 1. Introduction Black Carbon (BC) has important effects on climate, owing to its ability of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125, USA Abstract. This work examines the effect of black carbon (BC) radiative heating on cloud droplet formation. Changes in cloud droplet concentration and cloud albedo due

  13. Relationship of land-use patterns to quail habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grevstad, Gerald Oscar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RELATIONSHIP OF LAND-USE PATTERNS TO QUAIL HABITAT A Thesis CFRALD OSCAR CRFFSTAD Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCF. August 1976 Major... Subject: Range Science RELATIONSHIP OP LAND-USE PATTERNS TO QUAIL HABITAT A Thesis by GERALD OSCAR GREVSTAD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of Department) (Member) (Member) August 1976 "a ABSTRACT Relationship...

  14. The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Ju

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel...

  15. Biofuels and land-use A simpler approach to the problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and land-use change A simpler approach to the problem John J. Sheehan Presented of increased biofuels demand "Consequential" Life Cycle Assessment is a new concept #12;Technical uncertainty ethano #12;Political and ethical dilemmas The ceteris paribus argument: Biofuels effects should

  16. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  17. Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun-Hee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ’ are conducted under the three aerosol scenarios: 1) the clean case with an aerosol number concentration of 200 cm-1, 2) the polluted case with a number concentration of 1000 cm-1, and 3) the aerosol radiative effects (AR) case with same aerosol concentration...

  18. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  19. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  20. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  1. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  2. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionscontribute to atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest2008), Fire-related carbon emissions from land use

  3. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  4. Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting 10 March 2008 7:00 p.m. - 9 will coordinate with a student the Sustainable Development Audit before Dr. Bardati leaves Bishop's University. Motion: Proceed with the Sustainable Development Audit in accordance with the CREPUQ guidelines. Proposed

  5. Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

  6. Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia Andre´s Etter a, Australia c Facultad de Estudios Ambientales y Rurales, Universidad Javeriana, Bogota´, Colombia Received 14, including Colombia. However, the location and extent of deforestation and associated ecological impacts

  7. Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical policies are warranted if use of degraded lands for bioenergy plantations is desired. 1. Introduction There are two main categories of bioenergy: residues and dedicated plantations. In this paper, we exclusively

  8. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

  9. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  10. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate making changes in our lives. We move to another city, change jobs or change our diet to be healthier. UC

  11. 4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

  12. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  14. Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

  15. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  16. The effectiveness of an indirect control message in decreasing the depreciative behavior of remote camping location users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barget, Robert George

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the number of visitors utilizing these resources and the ever expanding variety of activities in which people participate when they visit a particular natural resource setting. According to vernon D. Dame (Dame 1977), past chief of Interpretation..., a 12% increase over the previous year (Clark et al. 1972). Less tangible, but equally important are the indirect costs of depreciative behaviors (Clark et al. 1971). Cole 10 (1982) concluded that most site impacts do not appear to sharply reduce...

  17. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  18. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: MissouriProgramsCentral AsiaLand-use Impact Assessment

  19. Fostering land use dialog : community preservation as a growth management strategy in Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, Christopher J. (Christopher Jon), 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Preservation Initiative (CPI) was an innovative attempt by the Massachusetts state government to stimulate discussion about land use and growth management at the local level. Based on land use and zoning ...

  20. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein Faculty Mentor: Professor Mi-Huyn Park, Civil & Environmental Engineering features within each land use. In order to classify the aerial photo digital images, GIS (Geographic

  1. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  2. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use and Abandonment Through the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannion, A.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use andJ. Brett. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa. Land Use andcombination of the two. The Wadi al-Hasa, a canyon draining

  3. ABSTRACT: Increased riverine nitrogen (N) fluxes have been strongly correlated with land use changes and are now one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in the Ipswich River basin in Massachusetts and to evaluate the effect of future land use scenarios on the water with the hydrology of the basin are likely to control the magnitude of nitrate loads to the aquatic system and nutrient fluxes from the land surface and soil profile to rivers and then down the river drainage network

  4. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

  5. 2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

    matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

  6. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEMÃ?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

  7. Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from land-use change and forestry LUC area (100 km 2 yr ?1 )land-use change and forestry Table 6. Sum of Terrestrialfrom land-use change and forestry for the 1990s? A. Ito 1 ,

  8. Quantifying the Uncertainties of Aerosol Indirect Effects and Impacts on Decadal-Scale Climate Variability in NCAR CAM5 and CESM1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sungsu

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to systematically quantify the major uncertainties of aerosol indirect effects due to the treatment of moist turbulent processes that drive aerosol activation, cloud macrophysics and microphysics in response to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations using the CAM5/CESM1. To achieve this goal, the P.I. hired a postdoctoral research scientist (Dr. Anna Fitch) who started her work from the Nov.1st.2012. In order to achieve the project goal, the first task that the Postdoc. and the P.I. did was to quantify the role of subgrid vertical velocity variance on the activation and nucleation of cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals and its impact on the aerosol indirect effect in CAM5. First, we analyzed various LES cases (from dry stable to cloud-topped PBL) to check whether this isotropic turbulence assumption used in CAM5 is really valid. It turned out that this isotropic turbulence assumption is not universally valid. Consequently, from the analysis of LES, we derived an empirical formulation relaxing the isotropic turbulence assumption used for the CAM5 aerosol activation and ice nucleation, and implemented the empirical formulation into CAM5/CESM1, and tested in the single-column and global simulation modes, and examined how it changed aerosol indirect effects in the CAM5/CESM1. These results were reported in the poster section in the 18th Annual CESM workshop held in Breckenridge, CO during Jun.17-20.2013. While we derived an empirical formulation from the analysis of couple of LES from the first task, the general applicability of that empirical formulation was questionable, because it was obtained from the limited number of LES simulations. The second task we did was to derive a more fundamental analytical formulation relating vertical velocity variance to TKE using other information starting from basic physical principles. This was a somewhat challenging subject, but if this could be done in a successful way, it could be directly implemented into the CAM5 as a practical parameterization, and substantially contributes to achieving the project goal. Through an intensive research for about one year, we found appropriate mathematical formulation and tried to implement it into the CAM5 PBL and activation routine as a practical parameterized numerical code. During these processes, however, the Postdoc applied for another position in Sweden, Europe, and accepted a job offer there, and left NCAR in August 2014. In Sweden, Dr. Anna Fitch is still working on this subject in a part time, planning to finalize the research and to write the paper in a near future.

  9. RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution Control Hearings Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  10. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic land-use change Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Non-Proximal Ecosystem Service Summary: Anthropogenic Land Cover Change Wetlandswater management Dams River Engineering Land use impervious surfaces... Anthropogenic land...

  12. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  13. DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    DECEMBER 2008 WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGULATION AND URBAN PLANNING WRRI Technical Completion Report No. 346 Gwendolyn A. Aldrich Janie Chermak Jennifer A. Thacher NEW MEXICO WATER-0001 Telephone (505) 646-4337 FAX (505) 646-6418 email: nmwrri@wrri.nmsu.edu #12;WATER QUALITY AND LAND USE

  14. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  15. Land-use transport systems: Comparing local policy dynamics in Swiss and French urban areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Land-use transport systems: Comparing local policy dynamics in Swiss and French urban areas GALLEZ LAND-USE TRANSPORT SYSTEMS: COMPARING LOCAL POLICY DYNAMICS IN SWISS AND FRENCH URBAN AREAS GALLEZ, there is a broad consensus among researchers and transport/urban planning professionals that more coherence

  16. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  17. Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

  18. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  19. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  20. Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

  1. aeronautical land-use assurance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY RULE 41.05.02.M1 Space and Land Use Management Approved October 6, 1999 Revised April 22 in Brazos and Burleson Counties. The President delegates...

  2. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  3. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  4. The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and

  5. Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Shannon Ashley

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

  6. Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jetten, Victor

    Impact of land use change on a hydro-meteorological event in Kampala, Uganda Problem statement Kampala is the capital city of Uganda on the northern shores of Lake Victoria. Here, future climate change

  7. Zoning administrators and others con-cerned with airport land use will soon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Zoning administrators and others con- cerned with airport land use will soon have help when of the current regulatory rules and climate. The manual describes proce- dural requirements and guidelines, along

  8. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  9. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product ofthe area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =

  10. The impacts of land use-induced land cover change on climate extremes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Francia Bismonte

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Simulations from the CSIRO Mk3L climate model, coupled to the CABLE land surface model, indicate that climate extremes indices are significantly affected by land use-induced… (more)

  11. Water, earth, and fire: Land use and environmental planning in the New Jersey Pine Barrens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, J.; Sinton, J.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each major chapter in this land-use planning case study begins with an introductory overview of the historical and ecological context of land-use patterns and the resources on which people depend. Juxtaposed with these scientific analyses is a series of profiles of area residents and their view of the Pine Barrens. The concluding chapters present recommendations designed to help develop a regional plan for the area.

  12. Planners' Perceptions of Land Use Planning Tools in the U.S. Pacific States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Yue

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , tools, and strategies have been extensively applied in growth management or development management (Daniels, 1999; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning (Beatley, Brower, & Schwab, 2002; Burby, 1998), emergency management and disaster..., 1999; Levy, 2009; Mantell et al., 1990; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning for natural hazard mitigation (Berke, 1998; Beatley, 2009; Beatley et al., 2002; Berke & Beatley, 1992; Berke & Conroy, 2000; Burby et al., 2000; Godschalk et al...

  13. Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Sustainable Food Sustainable Water Land Use & Wildlife Culture & Commun ble Transport Sustainable Materials Local & Sustainable Food Sustainable Wat appiness Zero Carbon Zero Waste Sustainable Transport Sustainable Materia munity Equity & Local Economy Health & Happiness Zero Carbon Zero Was Water Land Use

  14. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  15. Urban land-use regulations and housing markets in developing countries: Evidence from Indonesia on the importance of enforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    poverty: ?ndings from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Land UseAfrican cities of Dar es Salaam, Addis Ababa, and Nairobi.

  16. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioenergy program” land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the “with bioenergy

  17. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  18. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  19. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

  20. Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

  1. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL

    2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  2. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  3. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  4. Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making by Howard W. Reeves1 improve water resources management by illustrating the nonlinear behavior of the coupled system (Pahl systems arise from the decisions of many individuals and groups (Holland 1995; Batty 2005). For the agent

  5. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    that undisturbed neotropical forests remove a significant portion of human-derived CO2 emissions fromW ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon indicate that CO2 doubling enhances the production of woody tissue per unit leaf area by about 25% (ref. 5

  7. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein and Mi-Huyn Park Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University digital images, GIS (Geographic Information systems) and RS (Remote Sensing) software were used. A maximum

  8. Land use changes and raptor conservation in steppe habitats of Eastern Kazakhstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrete, Martina

    Land use changes and raptor conservation in steppe habitats of Eastern Kazakhstan Jose´ Antonio Sa, 480060 Almaty, Kazakhstan d Estacio´n Biolo´gica de Don~ana, CSIC, Avd. Mari´a Luisa s/n, Pabello´n del in western Europe. During June 1999 we conducted road surveys of raptors in Eastern Kazakhstan to detect

  9. Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles Pricope, N. G., G. López-Carr, D. Redo, M. Bonilla, M. Levy (2013). Deforestation and reforestation of Latin America and the Caribbean (2001-2010). Biotropica. 45(2): 262-271. López-Carr, D. and J. Burgdorfer (2013) "Deforestation

  10. MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use 0. Let's consider apartment complex under construction August 1, 2003 "If you build it we will burn it. The E.L.F.s are mad of life and the planet." Is ELF pursuing a sustainable "smart growth" strategy? 2. Is open space near

  11. Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station interest in "new outreach methods" ·!Demonstrated value added in more collaborative process #12;Lessons Learned 1.! Begin internal & external outreach earlier 2.! Our "good ideas" were not necessarily good

  12. Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judjahn, Stephanie K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this...

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  14. Attoyac Bayou GIS Inventory, Source Survey and Land Use Cover Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boitnott, N.; Castilaw, A.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency GIS geographic information system HUC hydrologic unit code LULC land use land cover NAIP National Agricultural Imagery Program NED National Elevation Dataset NHD National Hydrography Dataset... NLCD National Landcover Dataset NRCS U.S. Dept. of Agriculture – Natural Resources Conservation Service RRC Railroad Commission of Texas RUAA recreational use attainability analysis SELECT Spatially Explicit Load Enrichment Calculation Tool...

  15. A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    A Spatial Simulation Model of Land Use Changes in a Piedmont County in Georgia Monica Goigel Turner* Institute of Ecology University of Georgia Athens, Georgia ABSTRACT A spatial simulation model was developed be explicitly included in simulation models to gain an understanding of landscape level phenomena, and at least

  16. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy crops, whether corn, soybeans, switchgrass, trees, or something else, inevitably will put pressure on land uses worldwide and bring into cultivation

  17. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  18. Performance improvement of direct- and indirect-fired heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, G.W.; Hunter, J.D.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The operating performance of direct and indirect heaters is discussed, and principles and guidelines that can be applied to effect improvements in efficiency are presented. This paper also discusses the associated heater efficiencies and several useful operating techniques to approach the maximum, steady-state heater efficiency. The techniques presented apply to all types of direct-and indirect-fired heaters: salt bath heaters, propane vaporizers, heater/treaters, production heaters, and glycol and amine regenerators.

  19. Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    in developing countries, land management in the U.S. to enhance carbon sequestration would occur against carbon sequestration through land use is perceived or implemented in one region of the U.S., and howManaging carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon

  20. e-GTRSRS101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY AND RESULTING FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND RESULTING FOREST SUCCESSION IN THE ILLINOIS OZARK HILLS Saskia L. van de Gevel and Charles M. Ruffner1 on forest development in the Ozark Hills of southern Illinois. By incorporating land-use history research719 e-GTR­SRS­101Proceedings of the 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference LAND-USE HISTORY

  1. The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

  2. Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cash in advance foY docks, fishing camps, et cetera. Few permanent. imprdvements, how- ever, and the period of time since the construction of the reservoir has been so short that not much road construction has been possible. *That is, annual...LIBRARY. ' A & M COLLEGE. 1 - k TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas 'ULLETIN NO. 597 JANUARY 1941 LAND USE IN RELATION TO SEDIMENTA- TION IN RESERVOIRS, TRINITY RIVER BASIN, TEXAS I I 1...

  3. The influence of land use on gully erosion in Brazos County, Texas: an historical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Jeffrey Battle

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or weak valley- forming materials. If the geology is a major control of gully erosion in the county than the location of gullies should closely correlate with the edge of these weak units where they are adjacent to the resistant units...THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE ON GULLY EROSION IN BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS: AN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE A Thesis JEFFREY BATTLE CLARK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  4. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  6. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  7. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  8. INDIRECT SELECTION IN POULTRY BREEDING WITH SPECIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INDIRECT SELECTION IN POULTRY BREEDING WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SINGLE GENES P. MÃ?RAT Laboratoire Josas SUMMARY The interest of indirect selection in poultry breeding is discussed, with special

  9. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application ToAvoided Deforestation Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Sandra; Hall, Myrna; Andrasko, Ken; Ruiz, Fernando; Marzoli, Walter; Guerrero, Gabriela; Masera, Omar; Dushku, Aaron; Dejong,Ben; Cornell, Joseph

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although forest conservation activities particularly in thetropics offer significant potential for mitigating carbon emissions,these types of activities have faced obstacles in the policy arena causedby the difficulty in determining key elements of the project cycle,particularly the baseline. A baseline for forest conservation has twomain components: the projected land-use change and the correspondingcarbon stocks in the applicable pools such as vegetation, detritus,products and soil, with land-use change being the most difficult toaddress analytically. In this paper we focus on developing and comparingthree models, ranging from relatively simple extrapolations of pasttrends in land use based on simple drivers such as population growth tomore complex extrapolations of past trends using spatially explicitmodels of land-use change driven by biophysical and socioeconomicfactors. The three models of the latter category used in the analysis atregional scale are The Forest Area Change (FAC) model, the Land Use andCarbon Sequestration (LUCS) model, and the Geographical Modeling (GEOMOD)model. The models were used to project deforestation in six tropicalregions that featured different ecological and socioeconomic conditions,population dynamics, and uses of the land: (1) northern Belize; (2) SantaCruz State, Bolivia; (3) Parana State in Brazil; (4) Campeche, Mexico;(5) Chiapas, Mexico; and (6) Michoacan, Mexico. A comparison of all modeloutputs across all six regions shows that each model produced quitedifferent deforestation baseline. In general, the simplest FAC model,applied at the national administrative-unit scale, projected the highestamount of forest loss (four out of six) and the LUCS model the leastamount of loss (four out of five). Based on simulations of GEOMOD, wefound that readily observable physical and biological factors as well asdistance to areas of past disturbance were each about twice as importantas either sociological/demographic or economic/infrastructure factors(less observable) in explaining empirical land-use patterns. We proposefrom the lessons learned, a methodology comprised of three main steps andsix tasks can be used to begin developing credible baselines. We alsopropose that the baselines be projected over a 10-year period because,although projections beyond 10 years are feasible, they are likely to beunrealistic for policy purposes. In the first step, an historic land-usechange and deforestation estimate is made by determining the analyticdomain (size of the region relative to the size of proposed project),obtaining historic data, analyzing candidate historic baseline drivers,and identifying three to four major drivers. In the second step, abaseline of where deforestation is likely to occur --a potential land-usechange (PLUC) map is produced using a spatial model such as GEOMOD thatuses the key drivers from step one. Then rates of deforestation areprojected over a 10-year baseline period using any of the three models.Using the PLUC maps, projected rates of deforestation, and carbon stockestimates, baselineprojections are developed that can be used for projectGHG accounting and crediting purposes: The final step proposes that, atagreed interval (eg, +10 years), the baseline assumptions about baselinedrivers be re-assessed. This step reviews the viability of the 10-yearbaseline in light of changes in one or more key baseline drivers (e.g.,new roads, new communities, new protected area, etc.). The potentialland-use change map and estimates of rates of deforestation could beredone at the agreed interval, allowing the rates and changes in spatialdrivers to be incorporated into a defense of the existing baseline, orderivation of a new baseline projection.

  10. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  11. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  12. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations What’s Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

  13. Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L I A S TA H L w and J A N P. B A K K E R z *Institute for Inland Water Management and Wastewater Treatment RIZA, PO Box 17, 8200 AA Lelystad, The Netherlands, wAnimal Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological

  14. Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa, Mallorca:upGuidebookSolSolutionSolar Land Use

  15. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  16. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  17. Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

  18. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  19. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

  20. A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    , environmental impacts, biogas maize, permanent grassland, Germany. 1. Introduction Agricultural land use.laggner@ti.bund.de Abstract Agricultural land use in Germany and related im- pacts on the environment and the use of natural statistical analysis, we summarize impacts of increased biogas production on agricultural land use change

  1. The effects of climate change and extreme weather events on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    scenario anticipates a diminished water supply in the future.Thus, to safeguard future income from events such as heavy rainfall, cold spells, and heat waves. Implementing sustainable land management (SLM was tested as a water conservation measure. Mulching reduces evaporation in the short term, providing

  2. Effects of large-scale human land use on Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) populations in Finland.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirkiä, Saija

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) is often used as a focal species for landscape ecological studies: the minimum size for its lekking area is 300… (more)

  3. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

  4. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A.D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Community Earth System Model (CESM1):  Seasonal use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternativenow passed to the Earth system models (Taylor, Stouffer, &

  5. Designed by Zoning: Evaluating the Spatial Effects of Land Use Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Charles Reuben

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,gas Bottled, tank, or LP gas Electricity Subject Fuel oil,

  6. Measuring Land-Use Regulations and Their Effects in the Housing Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    41(2) (February): 389–421. Quigley, John M. , and Larry180. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. Quigley, John M. , and StevenReview 95(2): 323–329. Quigley, John M. , and Larry A.

  7. Measuring Land-Use Regulations and Their Effects in the Housing Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    February): 389–421. Quigley, John M. , and Larry Rosenthal.MA: Blackwell. Quigley, John M. , and Steven Raphael.95(2): 323–329. Quigley, John M. , and Larry A. Rosenthal.

  8. SEA in local land use planning - first experience in the Alpine States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiricka, Alexandra [Institute of Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: alexandra.jiricka@boku.ac.at; Proebstl, Ulrike [Institute of Institute of Landscape Development, Recreation and Conservation Planning (ILEN), Department of Spatial, Landscape and Infrastructure Science, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences Vienna, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: ulrike.proebstl@boku.ac.at

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Alpine area, planning decisions can result in far-reaching consequences because of the high sensitivity of the Alpine ecosystems. This article is based on two hypotheses: (1) The Alpine states/regions were aware of their sensitive environment and therefore recognized the necessity of introducing a comparable instrument to assess local land use planning. (2) By introducing this differentiated assessment tool, namely SEA, an increase in costs may be the consequence. However, better and more transparent planning can contribute to the enhancement of planning standards. To reveal the validity of these assumptions the legal implementation in the Alpine countries Austria, Germany, Italy and France was examined as well as first practical experience resulting from the determined procedures. The results of the implementation process in the four states were compared and discussed on the basis of selected process steps of SEA.

  9. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

  10. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Strategy Workshop: Summary Report Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Strategy Workshop: Summary Report This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE's Bioenergy Technologies...

  11. Indirect Estimation of Radioactivity in Containerized Cargo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Scherrer, Chad; Smith, Eric L.; Chilton, Lawrence; Anderson, K. K.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Trease, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detecting illicit nuclear and radiological material in containerized cargo challenges the state of the art in detection systems. Current systems are being evaluated and new systems envisioned to address the need for the high probability of detection and extremely low false alarm rates necessary to thwart potential threats and extremely low nuisance and false alarm rates while maintaining necessary to maintain the flow of commerce impacted by the enormous volume of commodities imported in shipping containers. Maintaining flow of commerce also means that primary inspection must be rapid, requiring relatively indirect measurements of cargo from outside the containers. With increasing information content in such indirect measurements, it is natural to ask how the information might be combined to improved detection. Toward this end, we present an approach to estimating isotopic activity of naturally occurring radioactive material in cargo grouped by commodity type, combining container manifest data with radiography and gamma spectroscopy aligned to location along the container. The heart of this approach is our statistical model of gamma counts within peak regions of interest, which captures the effects of background suppression, counting noise, convolution of neighboring cargo contributions, and down-scattered photons to provide physically constrained estimates of counts due to decay of specific radioisotopes in cargo alone. Coupled to that model, we use a mechanistic model of self-attenuated radiation flux to estimate the isotopic activity within cargo, segmented by location within each container, that produces those counts. We demonstrate our approach by applying it to a set of measurements taken at the Port of Seattle in 2006. This approach to synthesizing disparate available data streams and extraction of cargo characteristics holds the potential to improve primary inspection using current detection capabilities and to enable simulation-based evaluation of new candidate detection systems.

  12. Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

  13. Understanding the drivers affecting land use change in Ecuador: an application of the Land Change Modeler software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishna Rajan, Dhruva

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in forest cover, satellite images (years 1996 and 2001) were used to produce land cover maps which were then used with the software to estimate probabilities of pixels changing from forests to other land use types. Various drivers of deforestation input...

  14. 1 Forecasting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Urban Regions: 2 Microsimulation of Land Use and Transport Patterns in Austin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    45 rural demands for travel and energy.46 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA 2005 2030 household energy 26 demands and GHG emissions estimates are compared under five different land use the highest rates of increase. Average energy consumption per household is estimated to fall over 30 time (by

  15. Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II the requirement of the Seveso II directive and an analysis of the use of LUP as part of a risk management policy management policy combining several tools. To describe the risk management policy implemented in France

  16. Influences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    and beestings. Between 3000-4000 people in the Phoenix metro area report being stung by scorpions each yearInfluences of Urban Land-Use on the Frequency of Scorpion Stings in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area Nancy E. McIntyre Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University Summary Between 3000

  17. The habitat use and selection of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in a land use landscape in Kenya, Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    in Kenya, Africa Ashley Coe Ashley Coe (Corresponding author) Montana State University Bozeman, MT Email) to examine how land use and cover types affect the distribution of African elephants in Kenya (2, Kenya had approximately 23,353 ­ 31,636 individuals (Blanc 2007); mainly, savannah African elephants

  18. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  19. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  20. Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of...

  1. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razavipour, S. G.

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum ...

  2. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  3. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  4. Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction Eric D. Larson Princeton Environmental@princeton.edu Ren Tingjin Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, China This paper reports detailed process designs and cost assessments for production of clean liquid fuels (methanol

  5. EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

  6. Local Land Use Controls and Demographic Outcomes in a Booming Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction: The Enactment and JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . EffectsUS Bureau of the Census. JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . Figure 1.represents 100 people. JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . Figure 7.

  7. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  8. Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

  9. Land use change and soil nutrient transformations in the Los Haitises region of the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    . Potential denitrification, microbial biomass C and N, and microbial respiration gK1 dry soil were mineralization, net nitrification, microbial biomass C, and microbial respiration were all significantly greater activity and C storage through its effect on SOM quality and quantity. While agriculture can significantly

  10. Unintended Consequences of Transportation Carbon Policies: Land-Use, Emissions, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    Abstract Renewable fuel standards, low carbon fuel standards, and ethanol subsidies are popular policies to incentivize ethanol production and reduce emissions from transportation. Compared to carbon trading standard (LCFS) and ethanol subsidies have similar effects while costs under an equivalent cap and trade

  11. Ecological catastrophes: threshold responses to climate, soil, and land use drivers of the Dust Bowl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on effects of abandoned agricultural land in a relatively small area centered on the panhandle of Oklahoma LTER and Jornada Experimental Range, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, NM, (3) Plant a multi-year drought. Combined with spatially-extensive cultivation and overgrazing, the drought led

  12. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

  13. Development of engineering geologic performance standards for land-use regulation in Sabine Pass, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaught, Richmond Murphy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STANDARDS 9 9 11 11 18 31 31 33 35 44 50 60 Definitions and Specified Concerns Technical Basis for Standards Construction and Urbanization Environmental Protection Mineral and Water Resources Physical model Computer model Impact of Mining... on geologic features (such as chenier ridges), the effects of storm surge on chenier ridges, altered by borrow mining, was modeled physically (wave tank) and mathematically (computer model). Comparison of the physical and mathe- matical models shows...

  14. REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director: Department: Project Title: Project Sponsor without fully recovering the institutional indirect costs which will be incurred in conducting the project COSTS 1. FULL: OF I. A. C. 2. PARTIAL: OF H. B. K. TOTAL PROJECT COSTS L. INDIRECT COSTS TO BE WAIVED, J

  15. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment1, 2011 (BETO)and Fuel09 THISDepartmentIndirect

  16. Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

  17. A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

  18. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  19. Corrosion aspects in indirect systems with secondary refrigerants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignatowicz, Monika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Aqueous solutions of organic or inorganic salts are used as secondary refrigerants in indirect refrigeration systems to transport and transfer heat. Water is known… (more)

  20. Massively Parallel Indirect Dielectrophoresis Controlled Placement of Carbon Nanotubes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conley, Hiram Jacob

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Placement of single walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated through massively parallel indirect dielectrophoresis (MPID). MPID is shown to be able to control the placement of… (more)

  1. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  2. Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    : although effective weed management and enhancement of soil quality are necessary components of sustainable275 18 Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality Richard G. Smith, crop yield, and agricultural sustainability (Kar- len et al., 2001), the impact that weed management

  3. Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    composition and soil profiles at each land use site. Nitrification increased from -0.012 g N gds-1 day-1 of downstream water quality. Nitrogen loading to estuaries is of particular concern because of widespread of 50% of the land area in Massachusetts was cleared at one point for agricultural use (Hall et al. 2002

  4. Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use In explaining variability in tropical deforestation, scholars have focused almost exclusively on in situ (or "on causes of deforestation in the humid tropics with a case study from Guatemala. To investigate the first

  5. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

  6. Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

  7. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L. White

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    White, D.L. 2004. Deerskins and Cotton. Ecological impacts of historical land use in the Central Savannah River Area of the Southeastern US before 1950. Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 324 pp. Abstract: The history of land use for an area is the history of the way in which humans have manipulated or altered the environment. Most land use activities can be viewed as disturbance to ecosystems. Within a given climatic regime, the interaction of the disturbance regime with vegetation, soil, and landform factors largely determines the distribution and composition of plant and associated animal communities. For these reasons, a greater understanding of the ecological impacts of both human and non-human related disturbance is needed to improve our ability to make natural resource management decisions. This document outlines the land use history of the Savannah River Site and surrounding areas from about 1780 thru 1950, when the site was converted to a government facility for the purposes of national defense.

  8. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

  9. The ECA indirectly heated Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlqvist, S.G.; Darche, M.; Ducroux, P.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the beginning of the 1980s the ECA Company designed and manufactured the first French Stirling engine, partially funded by the French government. The ECA engine has several design features of special interest: indirect heating by sodium heat pipes, cylinder block with four double-acting cylinders in line with a single crankshaft, four identical and demountable heat exchanger modules, piston rod seals with recuperation of leakage losses by means of four integrated rod pumps and with hermetic gas and oil seals using four roll socks, and power control by means of three gas valves and a 3.5-MPa helium bottle. The ECA engine ran for the first time and at the first attempt at the end of June 1982 and rapidly delivered a power of 5 kW at reduced pressure. Further testing of this 4-by 113-cm3 engine is under way to obtain a nominal power of 12 kW and an efficiency of 36% (heat to shaft power) with a very simplified design.

  10. INDIRECT COSTS OF RESEARCH University Policy No: FM5400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    recoveries towards the indirect costs associated with externally funded Research conducted at the University Research Funding Agreements supported by external funds; to all University Members as defined Funding Agreements). Distribution 10.00 The Indirect Costs recovered by the university from Research

  11. Indirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

  12. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  13. Direct/Indirect Costs - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs. g4301-1chp7.pdf -- PDF Document, 41 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: ID: DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 7...

  14. Final Report, DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER45780, "Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoke, david W. [University of Pittsburgh

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The is the final technical report for this project, which was funded by the DOE from 1999 to 2012. The project focused on experimental studies of spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells, with the aim of understanding the quantum physics of these particles, including such effects as pattern formation due to electron-hole charge separation, the Mott plasma-insulator transition, luminescence up-conversion through field-assisted tunneling, luminescence line shifts due to many-body renormalization and magnetic field effects on tunneling, and proposed effects such as Bose-Einstein condensation of indirect excitons and phase separation of bright and dark indirect excitons. Significant results are summarized here and the relation to other work is discussed.

  15. Horizontal Inequity and Vertical Redistribution with Indirect Taxes: the Greek Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplanoglou, G; Newbery, David

    license issue fee and an initial registration tax, varying according to the vehicle’s engine power and technology. Cars are also subject to an annual transport due, also varying according to engine power. Stamp duties are levied on a large number... preferences, while improvements in vertical redistribution can be achieved, albeit at the cost of increased horizontal inequity. Keywords: distributional effect of taxes, horizontal inequality, vertical redistribution, indirect tax reform, Greece JEL...

  16. A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe β-Research andAFishing forAAEIA'sNew

  17. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  18. Government Regulations and Housing Markets: An Index to Characterize Local Land Use Regulatory Environments for Residential Markets in the Houston - Galveston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estevez Jimenez, Luis

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    on the creation of such inventories. Notable efforts in administering surveys to obtain data on local land use regulations have been conducted by authors and institutions such as Linneman and Summers (1990); Pendall, Puentes et al. (2006); Gyourko, Saiz et al... have been considered as not so stringent in terms of its LUREs (Pendall, Puentes et al. 2006; Gyourko, Saiz et al. 2008). Empirical analysis looking at the overall role of local LUREs has not been fully addressed at the MSA level in Texas, thus...

  19. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  20. This figure shows annual transpiration rates in the Argentinean Pampas (circles and lines) under two land uses: perennial alfalfa pasture, widespread until the early nineties, and annual wheat-soybean-maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    two land uses: perennial alfalfa pasture, widespread until the early nineties, and annual wheat remain bare without any plant water use for part of the year. Deep-rooted, year-round alfalfa keeps soils

  1. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  2. Solar Physics (2004) 224: 34 C Springer 2005 The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Solar Physics (2004) 224: 3­4 C Springer 2005 PREFACE The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of Long-Term Solar Activity" is based on contributions presented at the First of solar activity, and their effects in the near-Earth environment and technoculture. As an analogy

  3. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when tar- geting stream restoration efforts and land-use2001), while urban stream restoration can signi?- cantlyAJ (2008) Effects of stream restoration on denitri- ?cation

  4. LEGAL REALISM IN ACTION: INDIRECT COPYRIGHT LIABILITY'S CONTINUING TORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 LEGAL REALISM IN ACTION: INDIRECT COPYRIGHT LIABILITY'S CONTINUING TORT FRAMEWORK AND SONY'S DE standard, derived in Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc. from patent law and reasserted for distributors of dual-use technologies. Yet, when one looks to cases decided since Sony, subsequent legislative

  5. Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

  6. Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermani, Paolo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

  7. Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1989-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments.

  8. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  9. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

  10. Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1 SpecialMaximizingResidential Buildings »Coil and Indirect

  11. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

  12. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

  13. High Precision Control of Indirect Drive Systems Based on End-effector Sensor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Cheng-Huei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Block diagram of a single-joint indirect drive train witha Figure 4.4: Block diagram of a single-joint indirect driveBlock diagram of the control system given in Section 3.6. Single-Joint

  14. Observer error in identifying species using indirect signs: analysis of a river otter track survey technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jonah Wy

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    procedure, participants misidentified the tracks of 12 species as otter. Inaccurate identification of indirect signs is a likely source of error in wildlife studies. I recommend that observer skill in identification of indirect signs be measured in order...

  15. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  16. Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

  17. LAND USE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    ....................................................................8 SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES AND GREEN BUILDING Green Building Design Studio.........................................................................................................................9 Green Building Materials and Construction Methods: Design Tools for Non-Design Professionals LEED Building Certification Overview of Environmental

  18. A high carrier injection terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirectly pumped scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razavipour, S. G., E-mail: sgrazavi@uwaterloo.ca; Xu, C.; Wasilewski, Z. R.; Ban, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, Ontario N2L3G1 (Canada); Dupont, E.; Laframboise, S. R. [National Research Council, Blg. M-50, 1200 Montreal Rd., Ottawa, Ontario K1A0R6 (Canada); Chan, C. W. I.; Hu, Q. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A Terahertz quantum cascade laser with a rather high injection coupling strength based on an indirectly pumped scheme is designed and experimentally implemented. To effectively suppress leakage current, the chosen quantum cascade module of the device is based on a five-well GaAs/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As structure. The device lases up to 151?K with a lasing frequency of 2.67 THz. This study shows that the effect of higher energy states in carrier transport and the long-range tunnel coupling between states that belong to non-neighbouring modules have to be considered in quantum design of structures with a narrow injector barrier. Moreover, the effect of interface roughness scattering between the lasing states on threshold current is crucial.

  19. Complementarity between collider, direct detection, and indirect detection experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Cahill-Rowley

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the capabilities of planned direct detection, indirect detection, and collider experiments in exploring the 19-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM, focusing on the complementarity between the different search techniques. In particular, we consider dark matter searches at the 7, 8 (and eventually 14) TeV LHC, \\Fermi, CTA, IceCube/DeepCore, and LZ. We see that the search sensitivities depend strongly on the WIMP mass and annihilation mechanism, with the result that different search techniques explore orthogonal territory. We also show that advances in each technique are necessary to fully explore the space of Supersymmetric WIMPs.

  20. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  1. Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

  2. Novel geminate recombination channel after indirect photoionization of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Martin K.; Rossmadl, Hubert; Iglev, Hristo [Physik-Department E 11, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the photolysis of neat protonated and heavy water using pump-probe and pump-repump-probe spectroscopy. A novel recombination channel is reported leading to ultrafast quenching (0.7 {+-} 0.1 ps) of almost one third of the initial number of photo-generated electrons. The efficiency and the recombination rate of this channel are lower in heavy water, 27 {+-} 5% and (0.9 {+-} 0.1 ps){sup -1}, respectively. Comparison with similar data measured after photodetachment of aqueous hydroxide provides evidence for the formation of short-lived OH:e{sup -} (OD:e{sup -}) pairs after indirect photoionization of water at 9.2 eV.

  3. An indirect transmission measurement-based spectrum estimation method for computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of an x-ray spectrum can greatly influence imaging and related tasks. In practice, due to the pile-up effect of the detector, it's difficult to directly measure the spectrum of a CT scanner using an energy resolved detector. An alternative solution is to estimate the spectrum using transmission measurements with a step phantom or other CT phantom. In this work, we present a new spectrum estimation method based on indirect transmission measurement and model spectra mixture approach. The estimated x-ray spectrum was expressed as weighted summation of a set of model spectra, which can significantly reduce the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the spectrum estimation problem. Next, an estimated projection can be calculated with the assumed spectrum. By iteratively updating the unknown weights, we minimized the difference between the estimated projection data and the raw projection data. The final spectrum was calculated with these calibrated weights and the model spectra. Both simulation and experim...

  4. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  5. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Jessie Shelton

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

  6. INTEGRATED DIRECT/INDIRECT ADAPTIVE ROBUST CONTROL OF MULTI-DOF HYDRAULIC ROBOTIC ARMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    INTEGRATED DIRECT/INDIRECT ADAPTIVE ROBUST CONTROL OF MULTI-DOF HYDRAULIC ROBOTIC ARMS Amit/indirect adaptive robust control (DIARC) strategy for a hydraulically actuated 3-DOF robotic arm. To avoid the need FOUNDATION GRANT NO. CMS-0600516. draulic robot arm (a scaled down version of an industrial back- hoe

  7. Indirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino on behalf of the ANTARES Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

  8. Optical absorption from an indirect transition in bismuth nanowires M. R. Black,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Steve

    Optical absorption from an indirect transition in bismuth nanowires M. R. Black,1, * P. L; published 30 December 2003 Simulations of the optical absorption in bismuth nanowires resulting from an indirect interband L-T-point transition are presented. The absorption dependence at room temperature

  9. Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

  10. Conferences Lost Password

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Session topic:large-scale land cover initiatives The effective reduction of global carbon emissions from biofuel production is highly dependent on the direct and indirect land use & land cover (LULC) change

  11. An indirectly pumped terahertz quantum cascade laser with low injection coupling strength operating above 150?K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razavipour, S. G.

    We designed and demonstrated a terahertz quantum cascade laser based on indirect pump injection to the upper lasing state and phonon scattering extraction from the lower lasing state. By employing a rate equation formalism ...

  12. Development of an indirect competitive ELISA for the detection of protective antibodies in pasteurella pneumonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sewell, Julie Elizabeth

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of antibodies against Pasteurella haemolytica was developed. The capsular material of the bacteria was extracted in saline for use as antigen. The antigen...

  13. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  14. Indirect ultraviolet photodesorption from CO:N2 binary ices - an efficient grain-gas process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Poderoso, Hugo A M; Michaut, Xavier; Philippe, Laurent; Jeseck, Pascal; Öberg, Karin I; Linnartz, Harold; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UV ice photodesorption is an important non-thermal desorption pathway in many interstellar environments that has been invoked to explain observations of cold molecules in disks, clouds and cloud cores. Systematic laboratory studies of the photodesorption rates, between 7 and 14 eV, from CO:N2 binary ices, have been performed at the DESIRS vacuum UV beamline of the synchrotron facility SOLEIL. The photodesorption spectral analysis demonstrates that the photodesorption process is indirect, i.e. the desorption is induced by a photon absorption in sub-surface molecular layers, while only surface molecules are actually desorbing. The photodesorption spectra of CO and N2 in binary ices therefore depend on the absorption spectra of the dominant species in the subsurface ice layer, which implies that the photodesorption efficiency and energy dependence are dramatically different for mixed and layered ices compared to pure ices. In particular, a thin (1-2 ML) N2 ice layer on top of CO will effectively quench CO photod...

  15. Measurement of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Cartelle, P Alvarez; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Gutierrez, O Aquines; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Gomez, M Calvo; Campana, P; Perez, D Campora; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Akiba, K Carvalho; Mohr, RCM Casanova; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Garcia, L Castillo; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Vidal, X Cid; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Torres, M Cruz; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C -T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Suárez, A Dosil; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, KD; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Rifai, I El; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Albor, V Fernandez; Rodrigues, F Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Torreira, A Gallas; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Pardiñas, J García; Garofoli, J; Tico, J Garra; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Gándara, M Grabalosa; Diaz, R Graciani; Cardoso, L A Granado; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Morata, J A Hernando; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Gac, R Le; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-dependent $CP$ asymmetries in the decay rates of the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\rightarrow \\pi^-\\pi^+$ are measured in $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The $D^0$ mesons are produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to determine the initial state as $D^0$ or $\\bar{D}^0$. The asymmetries in effective lifetimes between $D^0$ and $\\bar{D}^0$ decays, which are sensitive to indirect $CP$ violation, are determined to be \\begin{align*} A_{\\Gamma}(K^-K^+) = (-0.134 \\pm 0.077 \\; {}^{+0.026}_{-0.034})\\% \\ , \\\\ A_{\\Gamma}(\\pi^-\\pi^+) = (-0.092\\pm 0.145 \\; {}^{+0.025}_{-0.033})\\% \\ , \\end{align*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. This result is in agreement with previous measurements and with the hypothesis of no indirect $CP$ violation in $D^0$ decays.

  16. GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells with indirect-gap AlGaAs barriers for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noda, T., E-mail: NODA.Takeshi@nims.go.jp; Otto, L. M.; Elborg, M.; Jo, M.; Mano, T.; Kawazu, T.; Han, L. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sakaki, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Toyota Technological Institute, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have fabricated GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well (QW) solar cells in which 3?nm-thick QWs and indirect-gap Al{sub 0.78}Ga{sub 0.22}As barriers are embedded, and we studied extraction processes of photogenerated carriers in this QW system. The photocurrent under 700?nm light illumination at voltages close to the open-circuit voltage shows only a small reduction, indicating that the carrier recombination inside QWs is largely suppressed. We attribute this result to an efficient extraction of electrons from the QWs through the X-valley of AlGaAs. The insertion of QWs is shown to be effective in extending the absorption wavelengths and in enhancing the photocurrent. The use of indirect-gap materials as barriers is found to enhance carrier extraction processes, and result in an improved performance of QW solar cells.

  17. Development of a New Technique to Assess Susceptibility to Predation Resulting from Sublethal Stresses (Indirect Mortality)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G.F.

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. We evaluated a new technique for assessing indirect mortality, based on a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). We compare this technique to the standard predator preference test. The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. We subjected striped shiners and fathead minnows to varying intensities of either turbulence (10-, 20- or 30-min) or 2-min exposures to a fish anesthetic (100 or 200 mg/L of tricaine methanesulfonate), and evaluated their subsequent behavior. Individual fish were given a startle stimulus and filmed with a high-speed video camera. Each fish was startled and filmed twice before being stressed, and then at 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min post-exposure. The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of maximum C-shape, time to completion of C-shape, and completeness of C-shape. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether stressed fish exhibited a startle response. For striped shiners, the number of fish not responding to the stimulus was significantly different from controls at 1-min post-exposure and for fathead minnows at 1- and 5-min post-exposure. The greatest effects occurred with exposure to the fish anesthetic; in fathead minnows all of the recorded measures were significantly different from controls at 1-min and 5-min post-exposure at the 100 mg/L dose. For striped shiners all recorded behavioral measures were significantly different from controls at 1-min at the 200 and 100 mg/L doses and for selected behavioral measures at 5-min. Turbulence also had significant effects on striped shiner startle responses following 20- and 30-min exposures for all behavioral measures at 1-min. The patterns suggest that any effects on startle response due to turbulence or low doses of anesthetic are short-lived, but can be evaluated using the escape behavior technique. The most useful indication of changes in escape behavior in these tests was the simple reaction/no reaction to the startle stimulus. The startle response occurred reliably among unstressed fish, and was frequently reduced or eliminated in fish exposed to turbulence or anesthesia. The other behavioral parameters observed were often altered by the sublethal stresses as well. A standard predator preference test was also conducted with largemouth bass as the predators and fathead minnows as prey. In this test design, groups of 10 unstressed fish (controls) and 10 stressed fish were put in a tank with a predator. The stressed fathead minnows were exposed to turbulence or fish anesthetic. The predator was allowed to eat half of the prey, and the data were evaluated to determine whether predators consumed greater proportions of stressed minnows than control minnows. The predation test indicated that exposure to MS-222 resulted in significant predation in fathead minnows, but exposure to turbulence did not. This pattern was the same as seen in fathead minnows using the startle response (escape behavior) test. For the sublethal stresses we applied, evaluation of changes in fish escape behavior yielded results comparable to traditional predator preference tests. Because t

  18. Early time implosion symmetry from two-axis shock-timing measurements on indirect drive NIF experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, J. D., E-mail: moody4@llnl.gov; Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Barker, D. A.; Baker, K. L.; Döppner, T.; Hash, N. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; LaFortune, K.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Widmayer, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Boehly, T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative technique has been developed and used to measure the shock propagation speed along two orthogonal axes in an inertial confinement fusion indirect drive implosion target. This development builds on an existing target and diagnostic platform for measuring the shock propagation along a single axis. A 0.4?mm square aluminum mirror is installed in the ablator capsule which adds a second orthogonal view of the x-ray-driven shock speeds. The new technique adds capability for symmetry control along two directions of the shocks launched in the ablator by the laser-generated hohlraum x-ray flux. Laser power adjustments in four different azimuthal cones based on the results of this measurement can reduce time-dependent symmetry swings during the implosion. Analysis of a large data set provides experimental sensitivities of the shock parameters to the overall laser delivery and in some cases shows the effects of laser asymmetries on the pole and equator shock measurements.

  19. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed under a protective inert blanket, and we are in the process of analyzing them, but preliminary work presented here shows very little oxide by XRD. However, the catalyst that was used in these runs at CAER was a different composition than that used in previous runs, so the protective effect of an inert blanket will need further study. Finally, we point out how the interference by the wax can make it difficult in some cases to analyze the phases in a Fe catalyst. Several approaches have been used to remove the interference from the wax and we come to the surprising conclusion that Fe may be present in a working slurry reactor despite the high CO/ H{sub 2} ratio. Further work is underway to corroborate this finding.

  20. "How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks and outbreaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    "How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks applicable to zombies or, for that matter, ghosts, aliens, angels, and other hard-to-reach entities; for example, what if your wife2 is actually a zombie or an alien and you are not aware of the fact. This 2

  1. Entry Number: 1 GL THE ROLE OF INDIRECT HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTIONS IN SUBSTRATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entry Number: 1 GL THE ROLE OF INDIRECT HYDROPHOBIC INTERACTIONS IN SUBSTRATE RECOGNITION By-Arg-pNA since leucine is a truncated version of phenylalanine. Entry Number: 2 GL ISOLATING AND MAPPING cellular factors evolved to suit the particular needs of different cell types. #12;Entry Number: 3 GL

  2. Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic) of electro-hydraulic systems driven by single- rod hydraulic actuators. Unlike the tracking that the proposed IARC achieves good tracking performance and accurate parameter estimation. INTRODUCTION Electro-hydraulic

  3. Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirksen, Ruud

    Click Here for Full Article Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal variation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an indicator of surface air quality that is associated

  4. Improving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    and institutional campuses can significantly contribute to energy conservation. The rollout of smart grids of occupants, and is a micro-grid test-bed for the DoE sponsored Los Angeles Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectImproving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Saima Aman

  5. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  6. Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    Brief Communication High temperature pulses decrease indirect chilling injury and elevate ATP: Received 20 December 2009 Accepted 8 March 2010 Available online 15 March 2010 Keywords: ATP Energy supply by determining survival rates and ATP levels for flies that had undergone continuous long-term exposure at 0 °C

  7. Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct In this article we present electric field, magnetic field, and charged particle observations from the upward current region of the aurora focusing on the structure of electric fields at the boundary between

  8. The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF Directorate Chief Scientist Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Work performed under the auspices of the UThe Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell

  9. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and D. C. Wilson4 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA 2. INTRODUCTION A. Indirect-drive design The National Ignition Facility (NIF)1 is a 192 beam, 1.8 MJ 0.35 lm laser hohlraum target4 and NIF laser5 ) are shown in Fig. 1. A cm long high Z cylindrical hohlraum, currently

  10. Thermal Control Techniques for Improved DT Layering of Indirect Drive IFE Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    Thermal Control Techniques for Improved DT Layering of Indirect Drive IFE Targets J. E. Pulsifer, M while they are being staged for feeding to the injection system. Successful layering requires the filled capsule depends upon the thermal properties of the tube material, the capsule material

  11. A Wright-Fisher model with indirect Ludovic Goudenge and Pierre-Andr Zitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Wright-Fisher model with indirect selection Ludovic Goudenège and Pierre-André Zitt January 16 is then used as a building block for a variant of the classical Wright­ Fisher model. In the large population classically consid- ered in the Wright­Fisher model. Keywords: Wright­Fisher model; diffusion approximation

  12. The energy saving potential of precooling incoming outdoor air by indirect evaporative cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.; Qin, H.; Huang, Y.J.; Wu, H.; Blumstein, C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the energy saving potentials of using indirect evaporative coolers to precool incoming outdoor air as the first stage of a standard cooling system. For dry and moderately humid locations, either exhaust room air or outdoor air can be used as the secondary air to the indirect evaporative precooler with similar energy savings. Under these conditions, the use of outdoor air is recommended due to the simplicity in installing the duct system. For humid locations, the use of exhaust room air is recommended because the precooling capacity and energy savings will be greatly increased. For locations with short cooling seasons, the use of indirect evaporative coolers for precooling may not be worthwhile. The paper also gives some simplified indices for easily predicting the precooling capacity, energy savings and water consumption of an indirect evaporative precooler. These indices can be used for cooling systems with continuous operation, but further work is needed to determine whether the same indices are also suitable for cooling systems with intermittent operations.

  13. Performance of a high fill factor, indirect detection prototype flat-panel imager for mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; Wang Yi; Li Yixin; Du Hong; Sawant, Amit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical and theoretical investigations of the performance of a small-area, high-spatial-resolution, active matrix flat-panel imager, operated under mammographic conditions, is reported. The imager is based on an indirect detection array incorporating a continuous photodiode design, as opposed to the discrete photodiode design employed in conventional flat-panel imagers. Continuous photodiodes offer the prospect of higher fill factors, particularly for arrays with pixel pitches below {approx}100 {mu}m. The array has a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 75 {mu}m and a pixel format of 512x512, resulting in an active area of {approx}3.8x3.8 cm{sup 2}. The array was coupled to two commercially available, structured CsI:Tl scintillators of {approx}150 {mu}m thickness: one optimized for high light output (FOS-HL) and the other for high spatial resolution (FOS-HR), resulting in a pair of imager configurations. Measurements of sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were performed with a 26 kVp mammography beam at exposures ranging from {approx}0.5 to {approx}19 mR. MTF results from both CsI:Tl scintillators show that the array demonstrates good spatial resolution, indicating effective isolation between adjacent pixels. The effect of additive noise of the system on DQE was observed to be significantly higher for the FOS-HR scintillator compared to the FOS-HL scintillator due to lower sensitivity of the former. For the FOS-HL scintillator, DQE performance was generally high at high exposures, limited by the x-ray quantum efficiency, Swank factor and the MTF of the scintillators. For both scintillators, the DQE performance degrades at lower exposures due to the relatively large contribution of additive noise. Theoretical calculations based on a cascaded systems model were found to be in general agreement with the empirically determined NPS and DQE values. Finally, such calculations were used to predict potential DQE performance for hypothetical 50 {mu}m pixel pitch imagers, employing similar continuous photodiode design and realistic inputs derived from the empirical measurements.

  14. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

  15. A Markov model of land use dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campillo, Fabien; Raherinirina, Angelo; Rakotozafy, Rivo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the Markov chain to modeling agricultural succession is well known. In most cases, the main problem is the inference of the model, i.e. the estimation of the transition matrix. In this work we present methods to estimate the transition matrix from historical observations. In addition to the estimator of maximum likelihood (MLE), we also consider the Bayes estimator associated with the Jeffreys prior. This Bayes estimator will be approximated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also propose a method based on the sojourn time to test the adequation of Markov chain model to the dataset.

  16. POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case of internalizing pollution externalities, Journaltension between industrial pollution and households has beenas a means of controlling pollution. Separating polluter and

  17. Purdue Land Use Update March 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and research (DEAD) · HB 1265 - Oil, gas, and coal bed methane property. (ALIVE) · SB 177 - Indiana Historic state parks and reservoirs (DEAD) IDEM is working to update the CAFO/CFO rules, in part because EPA has

  18. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  19. Land Use and the Chinatown Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ralph Henn, Chinatown in Hunters Point, S. F. Mag. (1970).had simply said that Hunters Point or any remote area was

  20. Purdue extension PurdueLandUseTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    commission and local elected officials. The landowner must request any change to the zoning designation Cooperative Extension Service, David C. Petritz, Director, that all persons shall have equal opportunity to develop educational programs for the public and elected officials. The information received from

  1. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as a feedstock forMEETINGS

  2. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance forGeospatialSession)

  3. Land Use License | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) Jump to:LamarJump to:Lanco Solar Pvt LtdLand

  4. Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) Jump to:LamarJump to:Lanco Solar Pvt

  5. Residential agents and land use change modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Corentin M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanisation is driven by the complex interactions of many physical and human factors where human actions and decisions, individually and collectively, ultimately shape the patterns of urban landscapes. Agentbased modelling ...

  6. Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hopkins University Press. Quigley and Swoboda Oates, W. E.Tax Journal, 50: 1–21. Quigley, J. M. and Raphael, S. (2005)Economic Review, 95: 323–328. Quigley, J. M. and Swoboda, A.

  7. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012 - 08:20Emission ReductionUse

  8. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXX OfficeLand and Facility Use Policy

  9. Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to:Information Silver Peak AreaOutline JumpHold JumpManagementtext

  10. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data03. U.S. EIA Conference52.5.6.

  11. csp land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats GeothermalElectric Coop Home7 August,contentcsp

  12. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Home Water Home Jweers'suser Home Developer

  13. solar land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Home Water Homerequestsoftware Home Home

  14. Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation, searchTo encourage the< Geothermal(Redirected

  15. OpenEI Community - csp land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast, 2012Coast UtilitiesUpdateHighwayoverviewen

  16. OpenEI Community - pv land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast,

  17. OpenEI Community - solar land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast,Logistics Agency (DLA) RFP - Deadline -

  18. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  19. Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct and indirect effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct exclusion cages to expose periphyton to recycled nutrients in the absence of direct grazing. In experiment 1 phosphorus and high body N:P. In experiment 1, we found that increasing catfish density led to lower biomass

  20. Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation ofthe APSDiscoverDisorder-InducedDisordering

  1. Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy SystemsFebruary 7-8,March 8,8)Normal 27 1 54In

  2. Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn|Oil andU.S.methods

  3. Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline GalliumSuppression of conductivitySurface based

  4. Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvancedJanuaryNETL-2010/????QualityQuality

  5. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

  6. The controlled indirect coupling between spatially-separated qubits in antiferromagnet-based NMR quantum registers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Kokin

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is considered the indirect inter-qubit coupling in 1D chain of atoms with nuclear spins 1/2, which plays role of qubits in the quantum register. This chain of the atoms is placed by regular way in easy-axis 3D antiferromagnetic thin plate substrate, which is cleaned from the other nuclear spin containing isotopes. It is shown that the range of indirect inter-spin coupling may run to a great number of lattice constants both near critical point of quantum phase transition in antiferromagnet of spin-flop type (control parameter is external magnetic field) and/or near homogeneous antiferromagnetic resonance (control parameter is microwave frequency).

  7. An alternative route for efficient optical indirect-gap excitation in Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Shuhei; Fukatsu, Susumu, E-mail: cfkatz@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Yasutake, Yuhsuke [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored optical excitation pathways in the multivalley semiconductor Ge in an attempt to expedite selective electron injection into the indirect L-band-edge. An off-peak resonant excitation route was developed, which offers the pumping efficiency outperforming the phonon-assisted near-indirect-edge absorption by more than six orders of magnitude. The valley selectivity results from the intra-valley relaxation that separates electrons and holes in momentum space following excitation. Fortuitously, the widely used green laser, 532?nm, is found to be nearly ideally suited to the efficient L-valley-selective excitation in Ge. Such valley-specific pumping may help clarify the otherwise complicated electron dynamics involving intervalley processes.

  8. Comparison of direct and indirect positron-generation by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Yonghong [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, Bo; Wu, Yuchi; Dong, Kegong; Gu, Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yao, Zeen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive comparison of the properties of positron beams produced by an ultra-intense femtosecond laser in direct and indirect schemes has been performed with two-dimensional particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the positron beam generated in the indirect scheme has a higher yield (10{sup 10}), a higher temperature (28.8 MeV), a shorter pulse duration (5 ps), and a smaller divergence (8°) than in the direct case (10{sup 9} yield, 4.4 MeV temperature, 40 ps pulse duration, and 60° divergence). In addition, it was found that the positron/gamma ratio in the indirect scheme is one order of magnitude higher than that in the direct one, which represents a higher signal/noise ratio in positron detection. Nevertheless, the direct generation method still has its own unique advantage, the so-called target normal sheath acceleration, which can result in quasi-monoenergetic positron beams that may serve in some specialized applications.

  9. Serum proteins, indirect fluorescent antibody titers and complement fixing antibody titers in dexamethasone exacerbated anaplasmosis carrier calves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Lloran Wesley

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SERUM PROTEINS, INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TITERS AND COMPLEMENT FIXING ANTIBODY TITERS IN DEXAMETHASONE EXACERBATED ANAPLASMOSIS CARRIER CALVES A Thesis by Lloran Wesley Johnson Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MAS TER 0 F SC I ENC E August 1979 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology SERUM PROTEINS, INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TITERS AND COMPLEMENT FIXING ANTIBODY TITERS IN DEXAMETHASONE EXACERBATED...

  10. Fuzzy logic enhanced speed control of an indirect field-oriented induction machine drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heber, B.; Xu, L.; Tang, Y. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field orientation control (FOC) of induction machines has permitted fast transient response by decoupled torque and flux control. However, field orientation detuning caused by parameter variations is a major difficulty for indirect FOC methods. Traditional probability density function (PID) controllers have trouble meeting a wide range of speed tracking performance even when proper field orientation is achieved. PID controller performance is severely degraded when detuning occurs. This paper presents a fuzzy logic design approach that can meet the speed tracking requirements even when detuning occurs. Computer simulations and experimental results obtained via a general-purpose digital signal processor (DSP) system are presented.

  11. Indirect measurement of diluents in a multi-component natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Owen, Thomas E.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of indirectly measuring the diluent (nitrogen and carbon dioxide) concentrations in a natural gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. A set of reference gas mixtures with known molecular weights and diluent concentrations is used to calculate the constant values. For the gas in question, if the speed of sound in the gas is measured at three states, the three resulting expressions of molecular weight can be solved for the nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the gas mixture.

  12. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  13. A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

  14. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

  15. Synchronization in hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmoy Banerjee; Debabrata Biswas

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper explores the synchronization scenario of hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment. We show that depending upon the coupling parameters a hyperchaotic time-delayed system can show in-phase or complete synchronization, and also inverse-phase or anti-synchronization. This paper reports the first experimental confirmation of synchronization of hyperchaos in time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly through a common environment. We confirm the occurrence of in-phase and inverse-phase synchronization phenomena in the coupled system through the dynamical measures like generalized autocorrelation function, correlation of probability of recurrence, and the concept of localized sets computed directly from the experimental time-series data. We also present a linear stability analysis of the coupled system. The experimental and analytical results are further supported by the detailed numerical analysis of the coupled system. Apart from the above mentioned measures, we numerically compute another quantitative measure, namely, Lyapunov exponent spectrum of the coupled system that confirms the transition from the in-phase (inverse-phase) synchronized state to the complete (anti-) synchronized state with the increasing coupling strength.

  16. Indirect conversion of coal to methanol and gasoline: product price vs product slate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wham, R.M.; McCracken, D.J.; Forrester, R.C. III

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts process analysis and engineering evaluation studies for the Department of Energy to provide, on a consistent basis, technical and economic assessments of processes and systems for coal conversion and utilization. Such assessments permit better understanding of the relative technical and economic potential of these processes. The objective of the work described here was to provide an assessment of the technical feasibility, economic competitiveness, and environmental acceptability of selected indirect coal liquefaction processes on a uniform, consistent, and impartial basis. Particular emphasis is placed on production of methanol as a principal product or methanol production for conversion to gasoline. Potential uses for the methanol are combustion in peaking-type turbines or blending with gasoline to yield motor fuel. Conversion of methanol to gasoline is accomplished through the use of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Under the guidance of ORNL, Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Houston Division, prepared four conceptual process designs for indirect conversion of a Western subbituminous coal to either methanol or gasoline. The conceptual designs are based on the use of consistent technology for the core of the plant (gasification through methanol synthesis) with additional processing as necessary for production of different liquid products of interest. The bases for the conceptual designs are given. The case designations are: methanol production for turbine-grade fuel; methanol production for gasoline blending; gasoline production with coproduction of SNG; and gasoline production maximized.

  17. Optimized analysis method for indirect dark matter searches with imaging air Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksi?, J.; Martinez, M. [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rico, J., E-mail: jelena@ifae.es, E-mail: jrico@ifae.es, E-mail: martinez@ifae.es [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a dedicated analysis approach for indirect Dark Matter searches with Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes. By using the full likelihood analysis, we take complete advantage of the distinct features expected in the gamma ray spectrum of Dark Matter origin, achieving better sensitivity with respect to the standard analysis chains. We describe the method and characterize its general performance. We also compare its sensitivity with that of the current standards for several Dark Matter annihilation models, obtaining gains of up to factors of order of 10. We compute the improved limits that can be reached using this new approach, taking as an example existing estimates for several benchmark models as well as the recent results from VERITAS on observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. Furthermore, we estimate the sensitivity of Cherenkov Telescopes for monochromatic line signals. Predictions are made on improvement that can be achieved for MAGIC and CTA. Lastly, we discuss how this method can be applied in a global, sensitivity-optimized indirect Dark Matter search that combines the results of all Cherenkov observatories of the present generation.

  18. Resonant indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} in AlN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishizu, Yuta; Tsuji, Kazuma; Harada, Yukihiro; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Chigi, Yoshitaka; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Mikihiro [YUMEX INC., 400 Itoda, Yumesaki, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2114 (Japan); Ishihara, Tsuguo; Izumi, Hirokazu [Hyogo Prefectural Institute of Technology, 3-1-12 Yukihira, Suma, Kobe 654-0037 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the efficient indirect excitation of Gd{sup 3+} ions in AlN thin films. C-axis oriented polycrystalline thin films of Al{sub 0.997}Gd{sub 0.003}N/AlN were grown on fused silica substrates using a reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The intra-orbital electron transition in Gd{sup 3+} showed a narrow luminescence line at 3.9?eV. The photoluminescence (PL) excitation (PLE) spectrum exhibited a peak originating from efficient indirect energy transfer from the band edge of AlN to Gd{sup 3+} ions. The PLE peak shifted and the PL intensity showed a dramatic change when the AlN band gap was varied by changing the temperature. Energy scanning performed by changing the band-gap energy of AlN with temperature revealed several resonant channels of energy transfer into the higher excited states of Gd{sup 3+}.

  19. United States Submission on Land-Use, Land-Use Change, and Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the objective and principles of the Convention and its Kyoto Protocol F. General U.S. views on narrowly 3.3 and 3.4 activities A. Monitoring and measuring GHGs B. Accounting for non-CO2 GHG emissions of greenhouse gases at safe levels, by taking into account the entire contribution ­ both positive and negative

  20. Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

  1. Indirect evaporative cooler using membrane-contained, liquid desiccant for dehumidification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kozubal, Eric Joseph; Slayzak, Steven Joseph

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect evaporative cooler for cooling inlet supply air from a first temperature to a second, lower temperature using a stream of liquid coolant and a stream of exhaust or purge air. The cooler includes a first flow channel for inlet supply air and a second flow channel adjacent the first for exhaust air. The first and second flow channels are defined in part by sheets of a membrane permeable to water vapor such that mass is transferred as a vapor through the membrane from the inlet supply air to a contained liquid desiccant for dehumidification and also to the exhaust air as heat is transferred from the inlet supply air to the liquid coolant. A separation wall divides the liquid desiccant and the coolant but allows heat to be transferred from the supply air to the coolant which releases water vapor to the counter or cross flowing exhaust air.

  2. Synchronized states in chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Resmi; G. Ambika; R. E. Amritkar

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider synchronization of chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a common environmnet where the environment has an intrinsic dynmics of its own modulated via feedback from the systems. We find that a rich vareity of synchronization behavior, such as in-phase, anti-phase,complete and anti- synchronization is possible. We present an approximate stability analysis for the different synchronization behaviors. The transitions to different states of synchronous behaviour are analyzed in the parameter plane of coupling strengths by numerical studies for specific cases such as Rossler and Lorenz systems and are characterized using various indices such as correlation, average phase difference and Lyapunov exponents. The threshold condition obtained from numerical analysis is found to agree with that from the stability analysis.

  3. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H., E-mail: ye-wenhua@iapcm.ac.cn; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  4. A comparison of direct and indirect methods of determining tensile strength of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James Timon

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -sectional area of the cylinder. Typical failures and close-up of broken aggregate are shown in Figures 12 and 13 respectively, TABLE II RESULTS OP STRENGTH TESTS - BATCH DESIGN "A" greet Tensi1e T. Indi~et ' HochiLus oS Cespress9. ve . . &358. M5 A~v... ~ 2 ' ~8z Av ~ 8 1 ~~8 z8g 263 --? 308 F8~8 1 2e 1800 75 1200 0 %7 Av ~ TABLE III RESULTS OP STHt"NGTH TESTS BATCH DESIGlTT "B" Age oi' Test Avgas A. rect Tensile +3 Indirect Tens e 4. 07 62 282 28 261 2 286 2865 3617 3533...

  5. Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

  6. Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavalle, J; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Bussons-Gordo, J; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Giraud, E; Jacholkowska, A; Lott, B; M"unz, F; Manseri, H; Nuss, E; Piron, Frédéric; Reposeur, T; Smith, D A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

  7. Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lavalle; H. Manseri; A. Jacholkowska; E. Brion; R. Britto; P. Bruel; J. Bussons-Gordo; D. Dumora; E. Durand; E. Giraud; B. Lott; F. Münz; E. Nuss; F. Piron; T. Reposeur; D. A. Smith

    2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

  8. In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/cm^3, for 150 GeV winos current data constrains the reheat temperature to be above 1.4 GeV. As a result, for models in which the wino mass is a loop factor below the gravitino mass, the data favor moduli that are more than an order of magnitude heavier than the gravitino. We discuss some of the sobering implications of this result for the status of supersymmetry. We also comment on other neutralino dark matter scenarios, in particular the case of mixed bino/higgsino dark matter. We show that in this case, direct and indirect searches are complementary to each other and could potentially cover most of the parameter space.

  9. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in {sup 1}H detected 2D {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional {sup 13}C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear {sup 1}H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5{sub m}{sup {bar x}}, PMLG5{sub mm}{sup {bar x}x} and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLG{sub m}{sup {bar x}} during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the {sup 1}H resolution during t{sub 1} evolution in the traditional, {sup 13}C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted {sup 29}Si direct polarization and {sup 29}Si{sup 19}F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements. Furthermore, conformational details of two types of PFP were confirmed by theoretical calculation, operated by Dr. Takeshi Kobayashi. Finally, the arrangement of two surfactants, cetyltrimetylammoium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), mixed inside th

  10. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  11. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

  12. "How many zombies do you know?" Using indirect survey methods to measure alien attacks and outbreaks of the undead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zombie menace has so far been studied only qualitatively or through the use of mathematical models without empirical content. We propose to use a new tool in survey research to allow zombies to be studied indirectly without risk to the interviewers.

  13. Signal and noise characteristics induced by unattenuated x rays from a scintillator in indirect-conversion CMOS photodiode array detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Ian

    -conversion CMOS photodiode array detectors Seung Man Yun1 , Chang Hwy Lim1 , Ho Kyung Kim1,* , Thorsten Graeve2 by the direct x-rays in an indirect-conversion CMOS photodiode array detector. In order to isolate the signal-absorbing blackout material between a phosphor screen and the photodiode array. From the images irradiated when

  14. INT. J. ('ONTROL, 1989, VOI.. 50, N(). 5, 1941 1959 indirect adaptive techniques for fixed controller performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    INT. J. ('ONTROL, 1989, VOI.. 50, N(). 5, 1941 ­ 1959 indirect adaptive techniques for fixed controller performance enhancement T. T. TAYt~, J. B. MOORE?, and R. HOROWITZ$ This paper develops, as by Tay and Moore ( 1988) and Wittenmark ( 1988), is to find convenient parametrizations which allow

  15. Probabilistic evaluation of main coolant pipe break indirectly induced by earthquakes: Savannah River Project L and P Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, S.A.; Wesley, D.A.; Awadalla, N.G.; Kennedy, R.P. (Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA); Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic evaluation of seismically-induced indirect pipe break for the Savannah River Project (SRP) L- and P-Reactor main coolant (process water) piping has been conducted. Seismically-induced indirect pipe break can result primarily from: (1) failure of the anchorage of one or more of the components to which the pipe is anchored; or (2) failure of the pipe due to collapse of the structure. The potential for both types of seismically-induced indirect failures was identified during a seismic walkdown of the main coolant piping. This work involved: (1) identifying components or structures whose failure could result in pipe failure; (2) developing seismic capacities or fragilities of these components; (3) combining component fragilities to develop plant damage state fragilities; and (4) convolving the plant seismic fragilities with a probabilistic seismic hazard estimate for the site in order to obtain estimates of seismic risk in terms of annual probability of seismic-induced indirect pipe break. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  17. Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30 1 to integrate information and data on climate change and its impacts in a similar way for a number of sectors (climate, hydrology, ecosystems, agriculture, land use) among others through a web portal and integrated

  18. How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes and Different Coastal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    sufficient to damage power generation will all lead to increased environmental damage. We suggest a numberHow Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes characteristics of hurricanes interact with human land use to lead to various types and degrees of environmental

  19. Creep-induced cleavage fracture in WIPP salt under indirect tension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of cleavage fracture initiation in rock salt undergoing concurrent creep was studied experimentally using the Brazilian indirect tension test technique. The tensile creep and cleavage fracture behaviors were characterized for rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. The Brazilian test consists of a compressive line load applied diametrically on a disk specimen to produce a region of tensile stress in the center of the disk. The damage processes were documented using video photography. The experimental results were analyzed in terms of a wing-crack fracture model and an independently developed, coupled time-dependent, mechanism-based constitutive model whose parameters were obtained from triaxial compression creep tests. Analytical results indicate that coupling between creep and cleavage fracture in WIPP salt results in a fracture behavior that exhibits time-dependent characteristics and obeys a failure criterion involving a combination of stress difference and tensile stress. Implications of creep-induced cleavage fracture to the integrity of WIPP structures are discussed.

  20. In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, JiJi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/...

  1. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  2. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of effluent standards and limitations for the metal finishing industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of the metal finishing industry. The analysis considers the cost-effectiveness of the final metal finishing regulations for direct and indirect dischargers.

  4. CAMEA ESS - The Continuous Angle Multi-Energy Analysis Indirect Geometry Spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, P G; Markó, M; Bertelsen, M; Larsen, J; Christensen, N B; Lefmann, K; Jacobsen, J; Niedermayer, Ch; Juranyi, F; Ronnow, H M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CAMEA ESS neutron spectrometer is designed to achieve a high detection efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane, and to maximize the use of the long pulse European Spallation Source. It is an indirect geometry time-of-flight spectrometer that uses crystal analysers to determine the final energy of neutrons scattered from the sample. Unlike other indirect gemeotry spectrometers CAMEA will use ten concentric arcs of analysers to analyse scattered neutrons at ten different final energies, which can be increased to 30 final energies by use of prismatic analysis. In this report we will outline the CAMEA instrument concept, the large performance gain, and the potential scientific advancements that can be made with this instrument.

  5. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

  6. The Effect of Equilibrating Mounted Dental Stone Casts in Maximum Intercuspation on the Occlusal Harmony of an Indirect Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Peter Andrew

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    /CO discrepancy. Ramfjord found 0.3 to 0.5 forward of CO to be physiologic [8]. Celenza, using the RUM definition of CR, found MI to be 0.02 to 0.36 mm forward of CO [9]. Parker recommends a maximum MI/CO discrepancy of 0.5 mm forward as a criterion... .............................................. 8 Overview.............................................................................................................. .8 Introduction .......................................................................................................... .9...

  7. BEYOND BUDGET RATIONALITIES: THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF PERFORMANCE BUDGETING AND ITS INDIRECT EFFECTS ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE WITHIN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nye, Robert Kennedy

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .2 ........................................................................................................................................... 112 Figure 5.1 ........................................................................................................................................... 158 Figure 5....4 ........................................................................................................................................... 160 Figure 5.5 ........................................................................................................................................... 160 Figure A.1...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aesthetic indirect restorative Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Bay, Unalaska, ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 23 THE COST EFFECTIVENESS...

  9. Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

  10. Measurements of Indirect CP Asymmetries in D[superscript 0] ? K[superscript ?K[superscript +] and D[superscript 0] ? ?[superscript ?]?[superscript +] Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Michael

    A study of indirect CP violation in D[superscript 0] mesons through the determination of the parameter A[subscript ?] is presented using a data sample of pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ...

  11. Direct and indirect capture of carriers into the lasing ground state and the light-current characteristic of quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yuchang, E-mail: yuchangw@vt.edu; Asryan, Levon V., E-mail: asryan@vt.edu [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the light-current characteristic (LCC) of a quantum dot (QD) laser under the conditions of both direct and indirect capture of carriers from the optical confinement layer into the lasing ground state in QDs. We show that direct capture is a dominant process determining the ground-state LCC. Only when direct capture is slow, the role of indirect capture (capture into the QD excited state and subsequent intradot relaxation to the ground state) becomes important.

  12. Digital hydrographic, land use/land cover, and hydrologic unit boundary files for the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and southeastern California processed from US Geological Survey 1:100,000- and 1:250,000-scale digital data files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, A.K.; D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital hydrographic and land-use/land-cover data have been compiled into a digital geographic data base for an {approx}100,000-km{sup 2} area of the Southern Great Basin, the Death Valley region of southern Nevada and SE California, located between lat 35{degree}N, long 115{degree}W and lat 38{degree}N, long 118{degree}W. This region includes the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent parts of southern Nevada and eastern California. The data base was compiled from USGS data files distributed by the USGS Earth Scinece Information Center. The data files were converted into six thematic ARC/INFO map coverages representing the Death Valley region.

  13. Measurement of indirect CP-violating asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0\\to ?^+?^-$ decays at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou; S. Zucchelli

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the indirect CP-violating asymmetries ($A_{\\Gamma}$) between effective lifetimes of anticharm and charm mesons reconstructed in $D^0\\to K^+ K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment and corresponding to $9.7$~fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The strong-interaction decay $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+$ is used to identify the meson at production as $D^0$ or $\\overline{D}^0$. We statistically subtract $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons originating from $b$-hadron decays and measure the yield asymmetry between anticharm and charm decays as a function of decay time. We measure $A_\\Gamma (K^+K^-) = (-0.19 \\pm 0.15 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst))\\%$ and $A_\\Gamma (\\pi^+\\pi^-)= (-0.01 \\pm 0.18 (stat) \\pm 0.03 (syst))\\%$. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry and their combination yields $A_\\Gamma = (-0.12 \\pm 0.12)\\%$.

  14. Techno-Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhijit Dutta; Michael Talmadge; Jesse Hensley; Matt Worley; Doug Dudgeon; David Barton; Peter Groenendijk; Daniela Ferrari; Brien Stears; Erin Searcy; Christopher Wright; J. Richard Hess

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This techno-economic study investigates the production of ethanol and a higher alcohols coproduct by conversion of lignocelluosic biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas-to-liquids synthesis over a precommercial heterogeneous catalyst. The design specifies a processing capacity of 2,205 dry U.S. tons (2,000 dry metric tonnes) of woody biomass per day and incorporates 2012 research targets from NREL and other sources for technologies that will facilitate the future commercial production of cost-competitive ethanol. Major processes include indirect steam gasification, syngas cleanup, and catalytic synthesis of mixed alcohols, and ancillary processes include feed handling and drying, alcohol separation, steam and power generation, cooling water, and other operations support utilities. The design and analysis is based on research at NREL, other national laboratories, and The Dow Chemical Company, and it incorporates commercial technologies, process modeling using Aspen Plus software, equipment cost estimation, and discounted cash flow analysis. The design considers the economics of ethanol production assuming successful achievement of internal research targets and nth-plant costs and financing. The design yields 83.8 gallons of ethanol and 10.1 gallons of higher-molecular-weight alcohols per U.S. ton of biomass feedstock. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance.

  15. Hydrogen Generation through Indirect Biophotolysis in Batch Cultures of the Non-Heterocystous Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Carter, Blaine M.; Gerschler, Jared J.; Benemann, John R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nitrogen-fixing non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO2 to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg?day or 7.3 ?mol/mg?day) ) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 ?mol/m2?sec. The addition of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU did not reduce hydrogen production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 hours, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at photosystem II (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

  16. Identifying biological monitoring tools to evaluate the chronic effects of chemical exposures in terrestrial plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When contamination of any habitat, such as a wetland impacted by heavy metals or a high desert disposal area impacted by chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides, is considered within an ecological risk assessment context, long-term land use goals should be included as part of the decision-making process, especially when remediation options are being considered for the site. If imminent threats to human health and the environment are highly unlikely, and environmental management and projected land use allow, remediation options and monitoring programs for a site should be developed that assure long-term habitat use, while continuing surveillance for evaluating potential chronic ecological effects. For example, at Milltown Reservoir wetlands on the Clark Fork River in western Montana the baseline ecological risk assessment suggested that no current adverse biological or ecological effects warranted extensive remediation at the site. But, given the land use goals currently anticipated for the wetland habitat and the hydroelectric facility located on the Clark Fork River, a program,should be developed that, in part, continues assessing plant communities and sublethal biological effects as cost-effective monitoring tools for evaluating long-term effects associated with metal-contaminated soils. Similarly, high desert sites that have been impacted by past disposal activities like that at Alkali Lake, Oregon, should be monitored using cost-effective methods that continue to monitor terrestrial plants as a field screening tool for evaluating soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides.

  17. Scheduling Direct and Indirect Trains and Containers in an Intermodal Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transportation to compete effectively with long-haul trucking. To improve the scheduling and coordination transportation consists of combining modes, usually ship, truck, or rail to transport freight. The focus of our research is on rail transpor- tation of intermodal containers for the long-haul portion of their journey

  18. extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomases, Becca

    Writing for Planners, Engineers and Policymakers n Bicycle Planning and Design n Green Building DesignAiNABilitY ANd grEEN BUildiNg Free Information Session: Green Building, Sustainability and Renewable Energy.........14 Green Building Design Studio

  19. Land Use Change Detection of Lowland Savanna in Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna ecosystems cover one fifth of the earth’s usable land and are home to billions of people and species. The ecosystem is threatened by human activities to a large extent, for instance, by grazing livestock, agriculture and fire management...

  20. Global Consequences of Land Use Jonathan A. Foley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    , and urban areas have expanded in recent decades, accompanied by large increases in energy, water, fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations trade-offs between imme- diate human needs and maintaining the capacity of the biosphere to provide

  1. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  2. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  3. Synthesis and Summary: Land Use Decisions and Fire Risk1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    was spent in fire suppres- sion. The bill for all costs and damages amounted to more than $1 billion. Given of fuel management and fire protection. The complexity of watershed manage- ment was defined growth on fuel management and fire protection, concerns stated or implied in all presentations. Jim Davis

  4. Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upgrading programmes in Argentina: the cases of Promeba andand Bermu´dez, G. (2011) Argentina’s housing market in theREGULATION AND PRICE IN ARGENTINA Libertun de Duren, N. (

  5. Altered Belowground Carbon Cycling Following Land-Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    , University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 2 Energy Bioscience Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 3 Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 4 Photosynthesis Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; 5

  6. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  7. Sampling techniques for testing the accuracy of land use maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newton, Michael John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2). Generally, N = nk; however, due to the 20 Table 2. Composition of the k Systematic Samples Unit 11 12 13 Y21 Y. 3 kl k3 ln 2n Y. in Y kn Means Yl Y2 Y. SOURCE: W. G. C h h. S ~1i I hir h. (N 1 h: J h Wil y and Sons, 1953) pg. 162... E'u D nj 0 5 5- nj +3 QL (/5 LJ 0 I LI O Vi D Ql nj C OI 0 LLI D QJ 0 Ql rn 4 (n I rn 5- 0 Z (Q QJ E (/j Ql D QJ 4 C PI r(l nj C I/I 28 since it depends upon the number of successes 1n the sample. Since approximately half...

  8. extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Ession: sept. 7 Green Building, sustainability and Renewable Energy #12;2 For more information or to enroll EDUCATION COURSES TO CONSIDER n Regional Planning & Sustainable Communities Strategies: The Road So Far n for Watershed Analysis: Intermediate n LEED for Existing Buildings: Operations + Maintenance FREE inFoRmation s

  9. Bishop's University Minutes Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the merged committee: 1) Sustainability, Building and Grounds; 2) Sustainable Campus. Drew suggested starting

  10. Land use and macroclimate in Presidio County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellermeier, Duane Carl

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in 'igg0 "rom cire 13ex, r District arid; =-. formally or ger:ised. In 1875. 'I'hc?o(ee is derived !rem P -esidio dc-. . l N rte, as it r!as c;el I ed 'cy the Spani=h cxplorers, meaning gateuey on. Rio Craiide. 'I'hc county is loc:i, i. cl in the Trar... completion o. two major higtways. Cne of these routes, FN 170 or El Carnino del Rio, nas been completed. from Presidio to the Big Bend National Park. Money has beer acorcpriated to complete thi- road to El Paso, thereby pzoviding a. I'ighway from t'?e west...

  11. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    students. Katrina will do a presentation to help students approach their schools about becoming bottle water free. 5. Construction Progress Update - M. Caron Energy Efficiency with Ameresco - Michel Caron Development Audit - M. Caron - Amanda Hamel has been hired to do the Sustainable Development Audit - the audit

  12. California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8 for residences and 2030 for commercial buildings. CPUC and CEC Big, Bold Initiatives ·Will invest over $15 Transportation to Buildings vs. Buildings Transportation Energy Usage for Average Office Building in CA: 127 KBTU

  13. Arnold Schwarzenegger A REVIEW OF LAND USE/LAND COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research (PIER) Program Guido Franco, Contract Manager Kelly Birkinshaw, Program Area Team Lead Energy areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grant Program · Energy) is sponsored by the PIER program and coordinated by its Energy-Related Environmental Research area. The Center

  14. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race attracted migrants from others regions, searching for agricultural land ; It remains a frontier region the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

  15. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for smaller farmers to buy land and increased the incentives for migrating to the frontier generating a race ; It remains a frontier region, mainly due to the long distance from main centers; Almost 85% of its original the financial support to wait the advance of frontier to eventually begin any activity; #12;Also

  16. The impact of biofuel mandates on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Suhail, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector in the United States and European Union is attributed mainly to the binding mandates, Renewable Fuel Standard in the US and European Directive on the Promotion of ...

  17. Hawaii State Land Use Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer CountyCorridor | OpenOpenInformation Plan Permit Brief Name:

  18. MSU at Work in Africa: Land Use, Strategic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    connectivity between producers and markets, cities and villages, and tourists and ecotourism activities, opportunities in ecotourism, small-scale processing of food and nonfood farm-based products, mining

  19. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a villageBucyrus,Burbank, Oklahoma:FONSIs Jump to:Statement

  20. Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJuno Beach,October, 2012 - 08:20Emission

  1. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DCKickoff MeetingKuda TrainingCeramic.# .

  2. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHISBrickyardRepowerBull CreekInformation

  3. Montana - Land Use License Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places inMonson042161°,Lands |Lands

  4. INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure linkLet's GetINL

  5. Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy Information Lightning Dock Area274907°,Agassizis aAgni

  6. Property:FedLandUsePct | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:

  7. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeaugaInformation Mexico - A Survey ofJump to:

  8. Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowatt Energies JumpAgProMRV ofEnergy Information

  9. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008District No 3formPermitsEnergy

  10. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Plans | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008District No

  11. Resource Assessment and Land Use Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGY FORPresentation fromResource Assessment

  12. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligenceGainSpanRate-MakingGeothermalGeothermal(Redirected

  13. California Land Use Planning Information Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais3: Crystalline

  14. Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:Photon Place:Net Jump Agency/Company /OrganizationWasteCities

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaski County,RAPID/BulkTransmission/Hawaii < RAPID‎Land

  16. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting< RAPID‎ |Utah <

  17. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting< RAPID‎ |Utah <Geothermal/Land

  18. Title 36 CFR 251 Land Uses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump JumpAl., 1978)TillmanMunicipal539RulesPolicyEnergyF.R.or3651

  19. File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37.California: EnergyFeilden Clegg| OpenHIALandUseConsiderations.pdf

  20. About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | Guidelines for Land Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)Productssondeadjustsondeadjust DocumentationARMStreamsUSBudgetEnterprise

  1. Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    and consequent crop production with prescribed population, GDP and yield data. The model simulates a decline markets and turbulence in global energy markets can affect food prices and supply costs. Therefore% of the global population with less than 9% of the world's cultivated land (Chen 2007). Furthermore, heavy

  2. Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy that enables incremental housing development in Argentina anddecades. Argentina does not have a national urban policy,ARGENTINA way housing is actually accessed by most lower-income households, as housing policy

  3. Comparison between upwind FEM and new algorithm based on the indirect BIEM for 3D moving conductor problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.H. (LG Electronics Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Living System Research Lab.); Jeon, D.Y.; Hahn, S.Y. (Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, an electromagnetic apparatus such as linear induction motors, MAGLEV vehicles or electromagnetic launchers, involves conducting parts in motion. This paper presents a new algorithm based on the indirect boundary integral equation method to analyze the electromagnetic system with a moving conductor. The proposed algorithm yields relatively stable and accurate solutions because a fundamental Green's function of diffusion type is used which is valid for any value of the Peclet number. In addition, computer memory and computing time for 3D computation can be saved considerably by using the boundary integral equations of minimum order and the singular property of the Green's function. In order to prove these, numerical results obtained by the proposed algorithm and the upwind finite element method are compared with their analytic solutions.

  4. High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

  5. Indirect rotor position sensing in real time for brushless permanent magnet motor drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ertugrul, N. [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering; Acarnley, P.P. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering] [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a modern solution to real-time rotor position estimation of brushless permanent magnet (PM) motor drives. The position estimation scheme, based on flux linkage and line-current estimation, is implemented in real time by using the abc reference frame, and it is tested dynamically. The position estimation model of the test motor, development of hardware, and basic operation of the digital signal processor (DSP) are discussed. The overall position estimation strategy is accomplished with a fast DSP (TMS320C30). The method is a shaft position sensorless method that is applicable to a wide range of excitation types in brushless PM motors without any restriction on the motor model and the current excitation. Both rectangular and sinewave-excited brushless PM motor drives are examined, and the results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method with dynamic loads in closed estimated position loop.

  6. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutronEnvironmentZIRKLE FRUITYearEffect0/2002 Yun (Helen)

  7. Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dans le UF6 gazeux. L'examen de la raie d'absorption du 19F appartenant au UF6 gazeux isotopiquement in indirect detection of the 235U nucleus in gaseous UF6 is discussed. The 19F absorption spectra linewidths in gaseous UF6 was investigated as a function of 235U enrichment, revealing a dependence on the isotope

  8. A Note on the Logic of PMI Development for FNSF or Demo There is only indirect interaction between Plasma-Material-Interface (PMI) issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Note on the Logic of PMI Development for FNSF or Demo Abstract · There is only indirect interaction between Plasma-Material-Interface (PMI) issues and Neutron-Material Interaction (NMI) issues interaction between PMI issues and plasma performance. As a result while tests of advanced PMI concepts

  9. Reply to "Reply to comments on defining biominerals and organominerals: Direct and indirect indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology, 201, 157­179]" by R.S. Perry and M.A. Sephton and organominerals: direct and indirect indicators of life [Perry et al., Sedimentary Geology, 201, 157 reply to Perry and Sephton's (2009) reply to comments by (Altermann et al., 2009) and (Défarge et al

  10. Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig cells: an in vitro study.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Direct and indirect impact of 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)1 on adult mouse Leydig,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related substances are ubiquitous22 environmental pollutants that exert words: Dioxin; Leydig cell; in vitro; AhR; chemokine39 40 inserm-00816472,version1-22Apr2013 #12;3 1

  11. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  12. DIFFUSE EMISSION MEASUREMENT WITH THE SPECTROMETER ON INTEGRAL AS AN INDIRECT PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchet, Laurent; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Strong, Andrew W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1603, 85740 Garching (Germany); Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V., E-mail: bouchet@cesr.fr [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the diffuse Galactic hard X-ray continuum emission using data from the INTEGRAL observatory. The diffuse hard power-law component seen with the SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) has been identified with inverse-Compton emission from relativistic (GeV) electrons on the cosmic microwave background and Galactic interstellar radiation field. In the present analysis, SPI data from 2003 to 2009, with a total exposure time of {approx}10{sup 8} s, are used to derive the Galactic ridge hard X-ray spatial distribution and spectrum between 20 keV and 2.4 MeV. Both are consistent with predictions from the GALPROP code. The good agreement between measured and predicted emission from keV to GeV energies suggests that the correct production mechanisms have been identified. We discuss the potential of the SPI data to provide an indirect probe of the interstellar cosmic-ray electron distribution, in particular for energies below a few GeV.

  13. Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Talmadge, M.; Hensley, J.; Worley, M.; Dudgeon, D.; Barton, D.; Groendijk, P.; Ferrari, D.; Stears, B.; Searcy, E. M.; Wright, C. T.; Hess, J. R.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This design report describes an up-to-date benchmark thermochemical conversion process that incorporates the latest research from NREL and other sources. Building on a design report published in 2007, NREL and its subcontractor Harris Group Inc. performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for a biomass-to-ethanol process via indirect gasification. The conceptual design presented herein considers the economics of ethanol production, assuming the achievement of internal research targets for 2012 and nth-plant costs and financing. The design features a processing capacity of 2,205 U.S. tons (2,000 metric tonnes) of dry biomass per day and an ethanol yield of 83.8 gallons per dry U.S. ton of feedstock. The ethanol selling price corresponding to this design is $2.05 per gallon in 2007 dollars, assuming a 30-year plant life and 40% equity financing with a 10% internal rate of return and the remaining 60% debt financed at 8% interest. This ethanol selling price corresponds to a gasoline equivalent price of $3.11 per gallon based on the relative volumetric energy contents of ethanol and gasoline.

  14. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du Hong; Wang Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); dpiX, 3406 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 {mu}m. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 {mu}m pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of {approx}80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 {mu}m pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous photodiode arrays was observed to result in no degradation in MTF due to charge sharing between pixels. While the continuous designs exhibited relatively high levels of charge trapping and release, as well as shorter ranges of linearity, it is possible that these behaviors can be addressed through further refinements to pixel design. Both the continuous and the most recent discrete photodiode designs accommodate more sophisticated pixel circuitry than is present on conventional AMFPIs - such as a pixel clamp circuit, which is demonstrated to limit signal saturation under conditions corresponding to high exposures. It is anticipated that photodiode structures such as the ones reported in this study will enable the development of even more complex pixel circuitry, such as pixel-level amplifiers, that will lead to further significant improvements in imager performance.

  15. arid land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

  16. amphibians rana spp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    individuals in aquatic and ter- restrial environments (Werner 1986). Agricultur- al cultivation (i.e., arable 79409, USA Abstract: Agricultural land use may indirectly affect the...

  17. Modeling regret effects on consumer post-purchase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    emotions, and ruminative thinking, firms can potentially enhance a brand's image and instil brand loyalty satisfaction levels, extent of rumination, and brand-switching intention. The paper also seeks to examine any and increases brand-switching intention. Negative emotion was found to demonstrate an indirect effect between

  18. Indirect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Multi-Component Gas By Measuring The Speed Of Sound At Two States Of The Gas.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the speed of sound in the gas is measured at two states and diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, two equations for molecular weight can be equated and solved for the nitrogen concentration in the gas mixture.

  19. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

  20. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

  1. In-space power rejection management via indirect annular flow liquid film management - process design and feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Rube Ben

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the effective liquid level. The discharge head required depends on the net positive suction head (NPSH) required by the RPP liquid feed pump. Therefore the mechanical separator must be designed such that at some given constant or maximum angular speed... of the separator, the required NPSH is supplied when the discharge valve is full open and the effective liquid level is at a specified minimum level. VAPOR COMPRESSION For a compressor pumping the vapor from the mechanical separator, a valve in the vapor...

  2. Estimating the Macroeconomic Rebound Effect in China1 Jiangshan Zhang and C.-Y. Cynthia Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    as follows: 1 1 direct indirectF FF R , (1) #12;where R denotes the rebound effect; F denotes energy Abstract The rebound effect measures the fraction of an energy efficiency improvement that is offset by increased energy consumption. In this paper we use three methods to estimate the macroeconomic rebound

  3. Constraining the influence of natural variability to improve estimates of global aerosol indirect effects in a nudged version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J; Pritchard, Michael S; Ghan, Steven J; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C. J; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zhao (2006), A simulated climatology of Asian dust aerosolN) PI (F) ? PI (F) ? X ? 2000 (PD Climatology) ? ? 2000 (PD Climatology) ? PD (F) X a All simulations used the same

  4. Constraining the influence of natural variability to improve estimates of global aerosol indirect effects in a nudged version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J; Pritchard, Michael S; Ghan, Steven J; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C. J; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the northern hemisphere Pacific Ocean and along the westernacross the northern Pacific Ocean, coincident with regionsthe Northern Hemisphere Pacific Ocean and off the northwest

  5. Constraining the influence of natural variability to improve estimates of global aerosol indirect effects in a nudged version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J; Pritchard, Michael S; Ghan, Steven J; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C. J; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by direct emission inventories; sea salt and dust enter the32 ] Direct emission inventories represent the only sourcesemissions from prescribed inventories and parameterized

  6. Process Design, Simulation and Integration of Dimethyl Ether (DME) Production from Shale Gas by Direct and Indirect Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagoz, Secgin

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of partial oxidation is exothermic and the residence time is very short (? = 3.6-72 ms). The overall reaction between CH4 and O2 is; CH 4 + 0.5O 2 ? CO + 2H 2 ?H o 298K = ?36 kJ/mol (3... sufficient cooling of reactor to continue healthy reactor conditions because the reactions that occur in reactor are highly exothermic [32]. Type of reactor has significant effect on the final products in reactor. Multitubular fixed-bed reactors...

  7. Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Second semi-annual progress report, January 5, 1996--July 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, work was continued on understanding the attrition of precipitated iron catalysts and work initiated on synthesizing catalysts containing silica binders. Use of a sedigraph particle size analyzer with an ultrasonic probe provides a simple method to test the strength of catalyst agglomerates, allowing the strength comparison of silica and hematite catalysts (the former is considerably stronger). Study of Fe/silica interactions was continued. Addition of a colloidal silica precursor to calcined Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst had no detrimental effect on reducibility of the hematite to {alpha}-Fe. XRD and electron microscopy will be used to analyze the crystal structure and types of C present in samples from long Fischer-Tropsch runs.

  8. Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. First semi-annual progress report, July 5, 1995--January 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1996-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to study factors controlling attrition resistance of slurry phase Fe catalysts, synthesize novel precipitated catalysts that overcome some of the limitations of current generation catalysts, and study catalyst-binder interactions using model catalysts. A study of Fe/silica (binder) interactions has been started. Study of effects of Cu on reducibility of Fe catalysts showed that small amounts of Cu can facilitate reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {alpha}-Fe. Work with Nancy Jackson (Sandia) on carbon deposits in Fe F-T catalysts showed good correlation between peak temperature in TPR and the carbon as seen by TEM. Analyses of samples from Dr. Burtron Davis (U. KY) by XRD and TEM showed that the active catalyst contains small crystallites of iron carbide while the deactivated catalyst had significant transformation into large magnetite crystals. It is felt that improper passivation of these catalysts can lead to mis-identification of the phase in working F-T catalysts.

  9. Herbicide-tolerant plant varieties Agronomic, environmental and socio-economic effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    1 Herbicide-tolerant plant varieties Agronomic, environmental and socio-economic effects Weed, environmental, socio-economic and legal impacts, both direct and indirect, of the utilisation of varieties possessing herbicide-tolerant traits (potential impacts on human health being excluded from the purview

  10. Ecological Effects of Micropterus Introductions: the Dark Side of Black Bass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass M. dolomieu are two widely introduced species of fish prized various direct and indirect effects of bass occurrence in reducing diversity of small-bodied fish species the negative impacts that bass may have on aquatic ecosystems. Introduction Recreational fishing represents

  11. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the aerosols have an indirect effect by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, and their interaction latent heating (6), leading to an enhanced pre- cipitation efficiency (7­12), invigorated convection Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and high-resolution infrared sounder. In addition, a trend of increasing

  12. Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  13. INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey that integrates demography with market-based factors such as transportation costs and accessibility. In essence and Resource Use in the Amazon (SBR-95-11965)," and also by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  14. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental

  15. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological

  16. Effects of unseeded areas on species richness of coal mines reclaimed with municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halofsky, J.E.; McCormick, L.H. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). School for Forest Resources

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land application of municipal biosolids on coal mine spoils can benefit vegetation establishment in mine reclamation. However, the application of biosolids leads to domination by early-successional species, such as grasses, and low establishment of woody and volunteer species, thus reducing potential for forestry as a postmining land use. In this experiment, tree seedlings were planted in strips (0.6-, 1-, and 4-m wide) that were not seeded with grasses, and the effects of unseeded strip width on seedling growth and species richness were assessed. Planted seedling mortality was high; therefore, the effect of unseeded strip width on seedling growth could not be determined. However, it was found that natural plant invasion and species richness were highest in the 4-m unseeded strips. The practice of leaving 4-m-wide unseeded strips in mine reclamation with biosolids in the eastern United States, along with the improvement of tree seedling planting practices and planting stock, would help promote a more species-rich plant community that could be utilized for forestry or a variety of other postmining land uses.

  17. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  18. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Biorefinery for the Direct Production of Synthetic Fuel from Waste Carbonaceous Feedstocks

  19. Direct, Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    during creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public evaluations and input from independent, variances and non-compliance of permit conditions after the EIS is completed prevents public comment on the natural and human environment from mining in the Peace River Watershed. Environmental Impacts from

  20. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  1. Theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis-, and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozirov, Farhod, E-mail: teobaldk@gmail.com, E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway Riverdale, New York 10471 (United States)] [Department of Physics, 4513 Manhattan College Parkway Riverdale, New York 10471 (United States); Stachów, Micha?, E-mail: michal.stachow@gmail.com [Faculty of Chemistry, Opole University, 48, Oleska Street, 45-052 Opole (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, Opole University, 48, Oleska Street, 45-052 Opole (Poland); Kupka, Teobald, E-mail: teobaldk@gmail.com, E-mail: farhod.nozirov@gmail.com

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical prediction of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect spin-spin coupling constants in 1,1-, cis- and trans-1,2-difluoroethylenes is reported. The results obtained using density functional theory (DFT) combined with large basis sets and gauge-independent atomic orbital calculations were critically compared with experiment and conventional, higher level correlated electronic structure methods. Accurate structural, vibrational, and NMR parameters of difluoroethylenes were obtained using several density functionals combined with dedicated basis sets. B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) optimized structures of difluoroethylenes closely reproduced experimental geometries and earlier reported benchmark coupled cluster results, while BLYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) produced accurate harmonic vibrational frequencies. The most accurate vibrations were obtained using B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) with correction for anharmonicity. Becke half and half (BHandH) density functional predicted more accurate {sup 19}F isotropic shieldings and van Voorhis and Scuseria's ?-dependent gradient-corrected correlation functional yielded better carbon shieldings than B3LYP. A surprisingly good performance of Hartree-Fock (HF) method in predicting nuclear shieldings in these molecules was observed. Inclusion of zero-point vibrational correction markedly improved agreement with experiment for nuclear shieldings calculated by HF, MP2, CCSD, and CCSD(T) methods but worsened the DFT results. The threefold improvement in accuracy when predicting {sup 2}J(FF) in 1,1-difluoroethylene for BHandH density functional compared to B3LYP was observed (the deviations from experiment were ?46 vs. ?115 Hz)

  2. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  3. REVIEW Open Access Land cover, land use and malaria in the Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, France (French Guiana), Guyana, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela. The subregion in the Americas [3]. The three Guyanas (Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana) have the highest annual parasite index (Bolivia, Ecuador, French Guiana and Suriname) in this subregion have seen malaria incidence rates re

  4. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    preference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmentalpreference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmentalpreference, and the social cost of carbon." Environmental

  5. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2009-2010 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to improve recycling and composting on campus. One of the things that they have asked to change is to remove the black garbage bags from the composting containers in The Grill as the composting containers look like

  6. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2008-2009 #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the issue. Composting for residences ­ students are not composting. The SDAG group will consider a new

  7. Bishop's University -Environment and Land Use Committee Minutes for the Meeting #1 -July 10, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's. Composting: The composting of yard waste from the campus is underway at a site behind the old tool shed. Kit

  8. Community Land Use Planning on First Nations Reserves and the Influence of Land Tenure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Associate Professor Joan Phillip Supervisor Lands Manager Penticton Indian Band Date Defended to Joan Phillip, PIB's land manager and my committee member and project mentor, for helping to guide me Armstrong. Your classes, writings, and conversations opened a world of learning and introspection that I

  9. A Ming Landscape: Settlement, Land Use, Labor, and Estheticism in T’ai-ho County, Kiangsi.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dardess, John W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ' M ^ f e , Ch'un- pai lei-kao M f ^ t K S I (CHTS ed.) 19.13b-l.la. T H E CHENG COMMUNAL FAMILY 13 teems i\\ nine generations they have lived together) and have the scrolls sent by special courier from the provincial capital at Hang- chou.18 Six... to institute within the family a modern facsimile of "antique" society, a regime enforcing not so much the letter as the spirit of some fundamental ancient prescriptions con- cerning human relations. Among these prescriptions, the Cheng ap- pear to have...

  10. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."Drought in California and Patagonia During Medieval Time."

  11. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to first and second generation biofuels and uncertaintyIntroducing First and Second Generation Biofuels into GTAP

  12. Real options theory and the pricing of residential land-use rights in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Victor L. H., 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China's shift away from the welfare housing scheme has generated tremendous demand for private home ownership since the early 1990's. The resulting growth in the housing market fueled the country's transformation towards ...

  13. Ris-R-1106(EN) Multi-objective decisions in land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -economic objective 33 6 Case study - expansion of refinery 34 6.1 Formulation of the decision situation 34 6.2 Factual information about the case 35 The refinery 35 The area 35 6.3 Objectives and attributes 35 6 41 6.6 Evaluation and conclusion 41 6.7 Lessons learned from the refinery case study 43 7 Case study

  14. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consisting of wind and solar power by meeting seasonaldemand to be met by wind and solar power. The motivation forintermittency of wind and solar power (3). This analysis

  15. A physical model to estimate snowfall over land using AMSU-B observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    . Weinman,3 W. S. Olson,4,5 D.-E. Chang,6 G. Skofronick-Jackson,7 and J. R. Wang7 Received 26 February 2007.-J., J. A. Weinman, W. S. Olson, D.-E. Chang, G. Skofronick-Jackson, and J. R. Wang (2008), A physical; Skofronick-Jackson et al., 2004; Liu, 2004; Noh et al., JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 113, D09201

  16. Capturing the impacts of land use on travel behavior : comparison of modeling approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannan, Veronica Adelle

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most urban planning literature suggests that compact and mixed-use neighborhoods correlate with lower vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT), and accordingly, lower energy consumption and transportation-related emissions. ...

  17. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United StatesSustainable Food and Energy Production in the United Statesquality of renewable energy production and then assessing

  18. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate...

  19. Land-Use Analysis of Croplands for Sustainable Food and Energy Production in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zumkehr, Andrew Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quality of renewable energy production and then assessingmagnitude of the renewable energy production (wind and/ora renewable energy portfolio to increase production capacity

  20. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesLife-Cycle Assessment of Biofuels. Environmental Science &cellulosic ethanol. Biotechnol Biofuels 6 (1), 51. Elliott,

  1. Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This trend is associated with increased fragmentation of farms associated with the agrarian reform activities of the 1980's, during which many of the large land-holdings were confiscated and redistributed to many peasant families. Also the increasing...

  2. Characterizing the Impact of Land Use and Land Cover Change on Freshwater Inflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferijal, Teuku

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in mean annual and winter precipitation. Analyses of Landsat images of the watershed using an unsupervised classification method showed an increase in forest, urban and irrigated land by 13, 42 and 7%, respectively, from 1987 to 2002. Urbanized areas were...

  3. GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    What can developing cities do to address increasing problems of urban sprawl and automobile dependency? This module addresses all of these questions and provides policy...

  4. There's no justice in transit! : transit equity, land use, and air quality in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machala, Laura Beth

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of air pollution created by the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (CA/T), aka "the Big Dig," transit and other air quality mitigation projects were incorporated into the State Implementation Plan (SIP). The SIP is ...

  5. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and production of commodities such as soya and palm oil.production, including soya in Latin America [Morton et al. , 2006] and palm oil

  6. Codornices Creek Corridor: Land Use Regulation, Creek Restoration, and their Impacts on the Residents’ Perceptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokenberga, Aiga; Sen, Arijit

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and perception of biodiversity and ecology is their activecommunity and perception of area ecology: individual-levelOutcomes 2 & 3: Perception of Area Ecology & Creek’s Role in

  7. Industrial Risks and Land use Planning Study of blast window resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    glasses with or without anti-explosion film, laminated glasses...), mobile frames or window locking a short time (inferior to 10 ms). Coevert and al. [5] also studied security window film and insulating/16/4 with Insulating glass fabricated with laminated glass (a) Figure 4: (a) security window film, (c) · The behaviour

  8. Risk Analysis for Water Resources Under Climate Change, Population Growth, and Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiparsky, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data source Donnells (11292600), Relief (11291000), Bearsdley BDRstor BDRdstor + BDRrel + BDRevap Beardley Powerhouse, (

  9. Land use change in Maasailand drivers, dynamics and impacts on largeherbivores and agro-pastoralism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Msoffe, Fortunata Urban

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maasailand of Kenya and Tanzania supports one of the richest wildlife populations remaining on Earth. However, over the last century, Maasailand has experienced land transformation notably through conversion of former ...

  10. The Necessary Interrelationship between Land Use and Preservation of Groundwater Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malone, Linda A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    brines between the production, and surface casing of oil and gas wells must have a program as well to control such contamination.

  11. Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From Typical Land Uses in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Nicholas D

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    correlation with measured traffic counts collected on local thoroughfares. Due to a presumed small bias in the flux calculation methodology, neither flux contribution truly measured zero, so anthropogenic and biogenic “background” fluxes were calculated (0...

  12. Land-use intensification reduces functional redundancy and response diversity in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    identify functional groups using multivariate analysis of plant traits which influence ecosystem processes as the multivariate within-group dispersion in response trait space, using traits that influence responses communities Etienne Laliberte´,1 * Jessie A. Wells,2 Fabrice DeClerck,3 Daniel J. Metcalfe,4 Carla P

  13. Developing an Enterprise GIS for Interdisciplinary Research to Model Farmers’ Land Use Decisions in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Dana

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    for water quality prediction in Kansas reservoirs • Factors Affecting Farmers’ Willingness to Grow Alternative Biomass Feedstocks for Biofuels across Kansas • Crop Supply Dynamics and the Illusion of Partial Adjustment • Opportunities and Constraints: Actor...

  14. Pre-Columbian land use and human impact in the Bolivian Amazon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, John Francis

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a polarised debate amongst Neotropical archaeologists and ecologists over the extent of Pre-Columbian (pre-AD 1492) anthropogenic environmental impacts in Amazonia. While some maintain the old paradigm of ...

  15. A generalized land use study of the San Jacinto River watershed of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckley, Frank A.

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pi ? ? ft o ] 00 I to jco jco j ? co 03 ? 5 ^ O aS ?? ?? ?p U Pi ? ? ft O 4? CQ ? U O aS ?? ?* 43 U Pi ? ? ft O BG uo CM n CM c> o 2 0 t - cr... ?P = Q ?* ^ft ? = -p ? c3 ^ O > T i ? n3 *H ? <35 J i JL, DO * CQ CJ -PCO O ciJ o CO ft O 4= P i ? O O o CO ? Q

  16. The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Daniel Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variable deficiencies in phosphorous, potassium, and zinc. ”Calcisols are rich in phosphorous but low in nitrogen andof the root system, and phosphorous retention is another

  17. Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Duane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the marine environment: phosphorous promote excessive al-year .. 0.7 kg Phosphorous/year Pigs 1,800year 8 kg Phosphorous/year Total

  18. A Study of Unbalanced Morphological Understanding: Morphological Land Use Patterns Analysis of U.S. Megaregions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Youngho

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    clustering pattern index ....................................... 76 2. Local spatial clustering analysis results ................................... 82 2.1. The Northeast megaregion .............................................. 82 2.2. The Texas... .................................................. 152 2.6. The Gulf Coast megaregion ............................................ 168 2.7. The Front Range megaregion .......................................... 184 2.8. The Arizona Sun Corridor megaregion ........................... 199 2...

  19. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Plains Aquifer is extremely important to the economic life of Kansas and the surrounding states, but water is being withdrawn from the aquifer much faster than it is being recharged. Due to the importance of ...

  20. Forecasting land use change and its environmental impact at a watershed scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can also degrade the quality of the storm water runoff. Monitoring and modeling studies have shown: Urbanization; Hydrologic modeling; Runoff; Non-point source pollution; GIS; Forecasting 1. Introduction behavior due to urbanization include increased lake and wetlands water levels (Calder et al., 1995