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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

2

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Policy & Indirect Land Use Change (ILUC) Dr. Julie Witcover, Dr. Sonia Yeh Institute(jwitcover@ucdavis.edu), Sonia Yeh(slyeh@ucdavis.edu) Project Description Indirect land use change (ILUC) occurs when biofuel with a risk of substantial GHG emissions. Controversy over ILUCs inclusion in biofuel policies is due

California at Davis, University of

3

Scientific analysis is essential to assess biofuel policy effects: in response to the paper by Kim and Dale on "Indirect land use change for biofuels: Testing predictions and improving analytical methodologies"  

SciTech Connect

Vigorous debate on the effects of biofuels derives largely from the changes in land use estimated using economic models designed mainly for the analysis of agricultural trade and markets. The models referenced for land-use change (LUC) analysis in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Final Rule on the Renewable Fuel Standard include GTAP, FAPRI-CARD, and FASOM. To address bioenergy impacts, these models were expanded and modified to facilitate simulations of hypothesized LUC. However, even when models use similar basic assumptions and data, the range of LUC results can vary by ten-fold or more. While the market dynamics simulated in these models include processes that are important in estimating effects of biofuel policies, the models have not been validated for estimating land-use changes and employ crucial assumptions and simplifications that contradict empirical evidence.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have led to assigning biofuel producers with thetheir compliance with biofuel policies. We show that theother indirect effects of biofuel may need to be considered

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reflect the concern that biofuel production will lead tothe whole plant for biofuel production, not just parts ofbiofuel or expansion of biofuel production on land use is an

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

Davis, Noel R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

On the Use of GOES Thermal Data to Study Effects of Land Use on Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) infrared data were used to study the effect of land use on the diurnal surface temperature fluctuation. Five major land use types in southern Florida: the sandy soil agricultural area; the ...

S. F. Shih; E. Chen

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The Land-use Change Effect of Ethanol Plants in Iowa: 1997-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we test the local land-use change effects of ethanol plants in Iowa using county-level panel data between 1997 and 2009. Results show that the establishment of ethanol plants has a significant effect on land-use change in counties where the plants are located. Moreover, locally owned ethanol plants have slightly higher effects than non-locally owned ethanol plants have. Specifically, ceteris paribus, the average effect of a locally (or non-locally) owned 100-million gallon ethanol plant is to increase the corn acreage share by 5.9 (or 5.7) percentage points in its host-county if the plant’s corn supply area (defined as a round area center at the plant) is completely in the county. The land-use change effect is greater in counties with medium corn share than in counties with either low or high corn shares. Once rotation effects are controlled, the average prices in April for December corn future contracts no longer significantly affect corn acreage share. Key words: land-use change, ethanol plants, Iowa, Arellano-Bond difference GMM estimator.

Ruiqing Miao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Indirect Effects in China In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile...

13

THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON AGRICULTURAL LAND USE AND BIOMASS PRODUCTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project examines the influence that climate change and biofuel production could have on agricultural land use decisions in Pennsylvania. The first chapter develops a… (more)

Yenerall, Jacqueline

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Greenhouse Gas Policy Influences Climate via Direct Effects of Land-Use Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) representative ...

Andrew D. Jones; William D. Collins; James Edmonds; Margaret S. Torn; Anthony Janetos; Katherine V. Calvin; Allison Thomson; Louise P. Chini; Jiafu Mao; Xiaoying Shi; Peter Thornton; George C. Hurtt; Marshall Wise

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

18

Indirect measurement of the electrocaloric effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zr0.95Ti0.05O 3 𝑞 heat ?𝑞𝐼𝑆𝑂 heat change during isothermal process 𝑄 charge 𝑄𝑣𝑎𝑐 charge on electrode of empty capacitor 𝜌 material density / charge density 𝜌𝑓𝑟𝑒𝑒 free-charge density 𝑆 entropy 𝑠 entropy per unit... in the electrocaloric effect. However, in 2006, Alex Mischenko et al. [5] published a paper that made use of the indirect method and suggested cooling in zirconium-rich PZT 95/05 (PbZr0.95Ti0.05O 3) of up to 12 ºC, starting from 226 ºC. This reignited enthusiasm...

Young, James Scott

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect Shao, Hongfei Florida State University Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Category: Aerosols The aerosol first indirect effect is known to cool the Earth radiatively. However, its magnitude is very uncertain; large discrepancies exist among the observed values published in the literature. In this study, we first survey the published values of those parameters used for describing the first indirect effect. By analyzing the discrepancies among these values, we show that the first indirect effect has been overestimated by many investigators due to an improper parameter being used. Therefore, we introduce a more meaningful parameter to measure this effect. We estimated the first indirect effect using the new parameter based on observational

20

Biofuel Policies and Indirect Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Union sees the expansion of biomass production for bioenergy as one of the components of its strategy to replace fossil energy sources by non-fossil renewable sources. However, the target of 10 % renewables in the transport sector by 2020 set in the Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (EU-RED) has been widely criticised. Due to an increase in biomass demand for feedstocks for biofuel production and a continuously high demand of the food and feed sector, the demand for land to be used for both food and production and bioenergy is expected to increase globally (see e.g. Hertl et al. 2008, Haberl et al. 2011). Considering that already today deforestation for agricultural expansion and for conversion into pasture, but also forest degradation, infrastructure development, destructive logging and fires cause nearly 20 % of global GHG emissions (UN-REDD 2009), the contribution of biofuels to climate mitigation is at least questionable. To ensure that biofuels contribute to GHG emission savings and that their overall sustainability is maintained, the EU-RED has put forward a sustainability regulation in

Ruth Delzeit; Mareike Lange

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Critical Examination of the Observed First Aerosol Indirect Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative change in cloud droplet number concentration with respect to the relative change in aerosol number concentration, ?, is an indicator of the strength of the aerosol indirect effect and is commonly used in models to parameterize this ...

Hongfei Shao; Guosheng Liu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

25

Effect of Anthropogenic Land-Use and Land-Cover Changes on Climate and Land Carbon Storage in CMIP5 Projections for the Twenty-First Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the representative concentration pathway 2.6 (RCP2.6) and RCP8.5 scenarios performed for phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudré; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Investigation of the Effects of Different Land Use and Land Cover Patterns on Mesoscale Meteorological Simulations in the Taiwan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use (LU) data employed in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model classify most LU types in Taiwan as mixtures of irrigated cropland and forest, which is not an accurate representation of current ...

Fang-Yi Cheng; Yu-Ching Hsu; Pay-Liam Lin; Tang-Huang Lin

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much attention is being focused on water quality in rivers, lakes and streams. One of the contributors of pollution to rivers, lakes and streams is runoff from agriculture in the form of nutrients, pesticides and suspended solids. This study was designed to look at the amount of these substances produced in subwatersheds from corn, grain sorghum and cotton farming along the Colorado River in Travis and Bastrop counties. The study also looked at rangeland and row cropped familand to estimate which land use type produced more runoff and pollution to receiving streams. Best management practices were also looked at as a means of limiting the amount of runoff and pollution transport from row cropped areas. Three automated sampling sites were set up to collect water samples after rainfall events. Two of the sites were set up to sample from streams that drained subwatersheds of a tributary to the Colorado River. The land use at one subwatershed consisted primarily of rangeland and pastureland while the land use at the other site consisted mainly of row cropped farmland. The third site was set up to sample on a row cropped farm that employed certain best management practices. The accepted convention is that rangeland produces less runoff @ row cropped areas and therefore contributes less pollutants to receiving waters. The findings from this project generally support this. Additionally, it was found, through computer modeling, that best management practices in the form of terracing, contour plowing and filter strips significantly reduced the amount of runoff and pollutants that move off site from row cropped areas during rainfall events. The implications of these findings are that, where possible, efforts should be made to implement best management practices to reduce the amount of runoff and pollution to receiving waters. Producers also need to be educated as to how to implement and maintain best management practices to obtain optimal benefits.

Jayne, Andrew A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

29

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Agriculture, land use, and commercial biomass energy  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we have considered commercial biomass energy in the context of overall agriculture and land-use change. We have described a model of energy, agriculture, and land-use and employed that model to examine the implications of commercial biomass energy or both energy sector and land-use change carbon emissions. In general we find that the introduction of biomass energy has a negative effect on the extent of unmanaged ecosystems. Commercial biomass introduces a major new land use which raises land rental rates, and provides an incentive to bring more land into production, increasing the rate of incursion into unmanaged ecosystems. But while the emergence of a commercial biomass industry may increase land-use change emissions, the overall effect is strongly to reduce total anthropogenic carbon emissions. Further, the higher the rate of commercial biomass energy productivity, the lower net emissions. Higher commercial biomass energy productivity, while leading to higher land-use change emissions, has a far stronger effect on fossil fuel carbon emissions. Highly productive and inexpensive commercial biomass energy technologies appear to have a substantial depressing effect on total anthropogenic carbon emissions, though their introduction raises the rental rate on land, providing incentives for greater rates of deforestation than in the reference case.

Edmonds, J.A.; Wise, M.A.; Sands, R.D.; Brown, R.A.; Kheshgi, H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

33

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

34

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

35

Effects of Land-Use Policy, Forest Fragmentation, and Residential Parcel Size on Land-Cover and Carbon Storage in Southeastern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overarching goal of this dissertation is to improve our understanding of the coupled natural-human land-use system in Southeastern Michigan. To accomplish this task Chapter… (more)

Robinson, Derek Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

37

Fishing for sustainability: the effects of indirect and direct persuasion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Websites and technologies that promote sustainable behavior often employ direct persuasion by being open about persuasive intent. We examined the use of indirect persuasion, methods that do not make persuasive intent clear. We built two variants of a ... Keywords: consumer actions, consumer attitudes, information design, persuasive technology, sustainability

Turadg Aleahmad; Aruna D. Balakrishnan; Jeffrey Wong; Susan R. Fussell; Sara Kiesler

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models G. Feingold National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Lane Rutgers University Camden, New Jersey Q.-L. Min Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York Albany, New York Introduction The effect of aerosols on cloud microphysical and radiative properties (the "indirect effect") has the greatest uncertainty of all known climate-forcing mechanisms. Increases in aerosol concentrations result in higher concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increased cloud droplet concentrations, and smaller droplet sizes (Twomey 1974). A possible secondary effect is the suppression of rainfall.

39

FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

Koch, D

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

42

Direct and Indirect Effects of Latent Heat Release on a Synoptic-Scale Wave System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this paper is to diagnose, the “direct” and “indirecteffects of latent heat release on a synoptic-scale wave system containing an extratropical cyclone that developed over the eastern United States. To achieve this goal, ...

Patricia M. Pauley; Phillip J. Smith

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

Koch, D

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

OpenEI Community - solar land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90 en Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogsolar-land-use-data-openei

 

 

45

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

46

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

47

Evaluating the Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effect on Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one of the largest uncertainties in climate forcing studies is the effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols affect the radiation budget under both clear...

48

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Bartholomew, Mary Jane Brookhaven National Laboratory Daum, Peter Brookhaven National Laboratory Dunn, Maureen Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Liu, Yangang Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Andrews, Betsy NOAA/CMDL Ogren, John NOAA/CMDL Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Category: Field Campaigns Impacts of aerosol indirect effects are considered too uncertain for inclusion in reports issued by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A major reason for this uncertainty is an insufficient physical

49

The land use climate change energy nexus  

SciTech Connect

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and

51

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

52

Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Greenhouse Gas Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Development in the Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) Sector J. Kinsman (jkinsman@eei.org; 202-508-5711) Edison Electric Institute 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W....

54

Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains G. Feingold and W. L. Eberhard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. E. Vernon and M. Previdi Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract We have demonstrated first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The response of non-precipitating, ice-free clouds to changes in aerosol loading is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud-drop effective radius (r e ) for a relative change in aerosol extinction under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path (LWP). This is done in a single column of air at a temporal resolution of 20 s (spatial resolution of ~100 m).

55

Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

58

OpenEI - land-use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4170 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

59

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Light Duty Vehicles/Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to farmgate or forest roadside (not transportation or conversion) · Exogenous targets for biofuel production emissions related to biofuels ­ Emissions can be reduced by including a broad set of incentives targeting · Resource assessment and indirect land use change 2 #12;Increasing Feedstock Production for Biofuels

60

Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct and indirect effects of aerosols on the hurricane ‘Katrina’ have been investigated using the WRF model with a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme and modified Goddard shortwave radiation scheme. Simulations of the hurricane ‘Katrina’ are conducted under the three aerosol scenarios: 1) the clean case with an aerosol number concentration of 200 cm-1, 2) the polluted case with a number concentration of 1000 cm-1, and 3) the aerosol radiative effects (AR) case with same aerosol concentration as polluted case but with a modified shortwave radiation scheme. The polluted and AR cases have much larger amounts of cloud water and water vapor in troposphere, and the increased cloud water can freeze to produce ice water paths. A tropical cyclone in dirty and dusty air has active rainbands outside the eyewall due to aerosol indirect effects. The aerosol direct effect can lead to the suppressing of convection and weakening of updraft intensity by warming the troposphere and cooling the surface temperature. However, these thermal changes in atmosphere are concerned with the enhanced amounts of cloud hydrometeors and modification of downdraft and corresponding the low level winds in rainband regions. Thus, the AR case can produce the enhanced precipitation even in the weakest hurricane. When comparing the model performance between aerosol indirect and direct effect by ensemble experiments, the adjustment time of the circulation due to modification of the aerosol radiative forcing by aerosol layers may take a longer time than the hurricane lifetime, and the results from the simulated hurricane show that it is more sensitive to aerosol indirect effects which are related to the cloud microphysics process changes. From this aerosol study, we can suggest that aerosols can influence the cloudiness, precipitation, and intensity of hurricanes significantly, and there may be different results in the meso-scale convective clouds cases. The hurricane system is a large and complex convective system with enormous heating energy and moistures. Moreover, relationships between various hydrometeors in hurricane systems are difficult to isolate and thus, it needs further study with more realistic cloud microphysical processes, aerosol distributions, and parameterizations.

Lee, Keun-Hee

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

62

Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission  

SciTech Connect

Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O due to an impulse of CH{sub 4}. This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH{sub 4} resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O{sub 3} indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}27 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H{sub 2}O indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}2 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH{sub 4} GWPs vary from {approximately}53 at 20 yrs to {approximately}7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH{sub 4} GWP is {approximately}20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH{sub 4} GWP due to a CH{sub 4} response time ({approximately}17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH{sub 4} response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH{sub 4} impulse. The CH{sub 4} radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O{sub 3} radiative forcing calculations (10%).

Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Conservation An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and changed the Commission's name to the Land Use Planning Commission. Under the Act, permitting review for significant projects, such as

65

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report The Idaho National Laboratory announced recently that the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship...

66

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1990 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL...

67

Application for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for State Land Use Lease: Surface Lease (SL) - Coastal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease:...

68

Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land-Use Management Ordinance Town of Chapel Hill - Land-Use Management Ordinance Eligibility Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial...

69

Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

Noah, J.C.

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Aerosol indirect effects – general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (?a) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between ?a and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to rep¬resentation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive re¬lationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and ?a as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypo¬theses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld – ?a relation¬ship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between ?a and cloud top tem¬perature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - ?a relationship show a strong positive cor¬relation between ?a and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of ?a, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short-wave total aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5±0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estim¬ate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic ?a and satellite-retrieved Nd – ?a regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) es¬timate of -0.4±0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7±0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2±0.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

74

Indirection and computer security.  

SciTech Connect

The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

Berg, Michael J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use  

SciTech Connect

Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Memorandum on Land Use Change and the Global Food System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LUC (Land Use Change) term in an LCA assessment of a biofuel’s global warming effect (GW), while superposable for small excursions, is not independent of other events in the global food system. In particular, the GW effect of biofuel use resulting from remote land use change mediated by global grain markets is probably larger to the extent that food supplies are under pressure from whatever other causes. Fuel use of any inputs to food production, especially land, unambiguously causes an increase in food prices relative to what they would otherwise be as long as the demand curve for food slopes upward to the left. Limited opportunities do exist for what are termed ‘pro-poor ’ land use strategies; namely positve, synergestic, interactions of biofuel production and food availability. An example from Africa is included in this memo. Past experience with the ‘Green Revolution ’ of agricultural intensification suggests, however, that the chance to improve the sitation of the global poor can be exceedingly difficult to implement. Discussion Current analysis of the global warming (GW) effect resulting from the substitution of biofuels for petroleum recognizes that land use change (LUC) remote in space (and possibly time) induced by competition with food consumption for biofeedstocks may be large, and that the carbon releases from these changes may not only reduce the GW advantage of [some] biofuels over petroleum but actually reverse it. The discussion has been especially influenced by two recent journal articles (Fargione, Hill, Tilman, Polasky, & Hawthorne, 2008; Searchinger et al., 2007). Because LUC is ‘caused ’ directly by price changes for food crops, discussion of policy implications, including especially discussion in the popular press (for example, (Garber, 2008)), has noted the rapid worldwide increase in food prices, especially grains, over the past two or three years. A good part of that discussion comprises contradictory assertions about whether the increase in US corn ethanol production is responsible for the increases, part of them, or very little. Other

Richard Rhoda; Daniel Kammen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. : A parameterization of aerosol activation - 3. Sectionalclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oscillation influence aerosol variability? , J. Geophys.clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,2004. Albrecht, B. A. : Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aurélien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

82

Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

84

Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration and Land-Use Change Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential PDF file Full text Global Change Biology 6:317-327 (2000) Wilfred M. Post...

85

Toward a Methodology to Investigate the Downstream Flood Hazards on the American River due to Changes in Probable Maximum Flood due to Effects of Artificial Reservoir Size and Land-Use/Land-Cover Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research in mesoscale hydrology suggests that the size of the reservoirs and the land-use/land-cover (LULC) patterns near them impact the extreme weather [e.g., probable maximum flood (PMF)]. A key question was addressed by W. Yigzaw et al.:...

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; A. K. M. Azad Hossain; Jinwoo Kim; Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; C. K. Shum

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Towards methodology to investigate the downstream flood hazards on American River due to changes in Probable Maximum Flood due to effects of Artificial Reservoir Size and Land Use/Land Cover Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research in mesoscale hydrology suggests that the size of the reservoirs and the land use/land cover (LULC) patterns near them impact the extreme weather (such as probable maximum flood or PMF). A key question was addressed by Yigzaw et al.,...

Alfred J. Kalyanapu; A. K. M. Azad Hossain; Jinwoo Kim; Wondmagegn Yigzaw; Faisal Hossain; C. K. Shum

87

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

88

Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Simulated Flash-flood Heavy Rainfall over Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates aerosol indirect effects on the development of heavy rainfall near Seoul, South Korea, on 12 July 2006, focusing on precipitation amount. The impact of the aerosol concentration on simulated precipitation is evaluated by varying the initial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Double-Moment 6-class (WDM6) microphysics scheme. The simulations are performed under clean, semi-polluted, and polluted conditions. Detailed analysis of the physical processes that are responsible for surface precipitation, including moisture and cloud microphysical budgets shows enhanced ice-phase processes to be the primary driver of increased surface precipitation under the semi-polluted condition. Under the polluted condition, suppressed autoconversion and the enhanced evaporation of rain cause surface precipitation to decrease. To investigate the role of environmental conditions on precipitation response under different aerosol number concentrations, a set of sensitivity experiments are conducted with a 5 % decrease in relative humidity at the initial time, relative to the base simulations. Results show ice-phase processes having small sensitivity to CCN number concentration, compared with the base simulations. Surface precipitation responds differently to CCN number concentration under the lower humidity initial condition, being greatest under the clean condition, followed by the semi-polluted and polluted conditions.

Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Songyou

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Land-use regulations to promote ridesharing: an evaluation of the Seattle approach  

SciTech Connect

The use of local land-use regulations to promote ridesharing in Seattle is described in detail. The approach is then critically evaluated, and recommendations are made to modify the approach and improve its effectiveness. 1 table.

McCutcheon, M.; Hamm, J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

91

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Land Use Allowance and Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

93

Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the southern Great Plains, the encroachment of grassland ecosystems by mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa), is widespread, and prescribed fire is commonly used in its control. Despite this, substantial quantitative information concerning their influences on the community composition, functional dynamics, and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage potential of grassland ecosystems is lacking. The objectives of this study were to: a) quantify the effects of seasonal prescribed fire treatments and mesquite encroachment on aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and herbaceous community composition; b) characterize SOC pool sizes, turnover, and storage potential relative to vegetation type and fire treatment; c) evaluate the structure and diversity of soil microbial communities relative to vegetation type; and d) characterize the functional diversity of these same microbes using the GeoChip functional gene microarray. Repeated winter and summer fires led to increased ANPP rates (average, 434 and 313 g m-2 y-1, respectively), relative to unburned controls (average, 238 g m-2 y-1), altered herbaceous community composition, and increased the storage of resistant forms of SOC, but did not affect overall SOC storage. Herbaceous ANPP rates did not differ significantly as a result of mesquite encroachment, but herbaceous community composition and SOC storage did. Mesquite soils contained significantly more total, slow-turnover, and resistant forms of SOC than those that occurred beneath C3 or C4 grasses. Similarity among the soil bacterial and fungal communities associated with the major vegetation types in this system was low to moderate. Significant differences were detected among soil fungi, with the mesquite-associated fungi harboring significant differences in community structure relative to the fungal communities associated with each of the other vegetation types examined. Despite this result, few significant differences were detected with respect to the functional diversity of these communities, suggesting either a high degree of functional redundancy, or that the functional differences harbored by these communities are beyond the scope of the GeoChip. The results of this study demonstrate that both fire and mesquite encroachment have the potential to alter ecosystem components and processes significantly, providing new insight regarding the effects of these widespread land use and land cover changes on ecosystem structure and function.

Hollister, Emily Brooke

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Implications of Limiting CO2 Concentrations for Land Use and Energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first to simultaneously examine the implications of extending the concept of placing a value on carbon beyond fossil fuel and industrial emissions to all sources, including those associated with land use and land use change. The paper reports a variety of results that have bearing on recent discussions in the literature regarding the role of bioenergy and the indirect emission of carbon through land-use change as well as the burgeoning literature on interactions between bioenergy and crop prices. This paper goes beyond results currently in the literature by using an integrated assessment model to assess energy use and supply, atmospheric composition, land use, and terrestrial carbon in the context of limiting the concentration of atmospheric CO2. We find that when the concept of valuing carbon emissions is extended to all carbon emissions, regardless of origin, that in contrast to a mitigation scenario where only fossil fuel and industrial carbon emissions are valued, deforestation is replaced by afforestation and expanded unmanaged ecosystems; the cost of limiting CO2 concentrations falls; crop prices rise; and human diets are transformed as people shift away from consumption of beef and other carbon-intensive protein sources. The increase in crop prices flows directly from the consideration of land-use change emissions in a comprehensive emissions mitigation program and occurs even in the absence of the use of purpose-grown bioenergy. Finally, we find that the assumed rate of improvement in food and fiber crop productivity (e.g. wheat, rice, corn) has a strong influence on land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially as important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations as energy technologies such as CO2 capture and storage.

Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald D.; Smith, Steven J.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Edmonds, James A.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and three aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign-averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without (NW) wet deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, especially in the activation parameterization, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions, and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, and may do so with the reliability required for policy analysis.

Saide P. E.; Springston S.; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, G. R.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Q.; Howell, S.; Leon, D. C.; Snider, J. R.; Bandy, A. R.; Collett, J. L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S. P.; Hawkins, L. N.; Allen, G.; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluating WRF-Chem aerosol indirect effects in Southeast Pacific marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx  

SciTech Connect

We evaluate a regional-scale simulation with the WRF-Chem model for the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), which sampled the Southeast Pacific's persistent stratocumulus deck. Evaluation of VOCALS-REx ship-based and aircraft observations focuses on analyzing how aerosol loading affects marine boundary layer (MBL) dynamics and cloud microphysics. We compare local time series and campaign averaged longitudinal gradients, and highlight differences in model simulations with (W) and without wet (NW) deposition processes. The higher aerosol loadings in the NW case produce considerable changes in MBL dynamics and cloud microphysics, in accordance with the established conceptual model of aerosol indirect effects. These include increase in cloud albedo, increase in MBL and cloud heights, drizzle suppression, increase in liquid water content, and increase in cloud lifetime. Moreover, better statistical representation of aerosol mass and number concentration improves model fidelity in reproducing observed spatial and temporal variability in cloud properties, including top and base height, droplet concentration, water content, rain rate, optical depth (COD) and liquid water path (LWP). Together, these help to quantify confidence in WRF-Chem's modeled aerosol-cloud interactions, while identifying structural and parametric uncertainties including: irreversibility in rain wet removal; overestimation of marine DMS and sea salt emissions and accelerated aqueous sulfate conversion. Our findings suggest that WRF-Chem simulates marine cloud-aerosol interactions at a level sufficient for applications in forecasting weather and air quality and studying aerosol climate forcing, including the reliability required for policy analysis and geo-engineering applications.

Saide, Pablo; Spak, S. N.; Carmichael, Gregory; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.; Yang, Qing; Howell, S. G.; Leon, Dolislager; Snider, Jefferson R.; Bandy, Alan R.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Benedict, K. B.; de Szoeke, S.; Hawkins, Lisa; Allen, Grant; Crawford, I.; Crosier, J.; Springston, S. R.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the possible affects of biofuels on deforestation have ledto the production of various biofuels, including ethanol andpolicies that promoted biofuels had a fuel-security emphasis

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions than corn ethanol. Sugarcane ethanol typicallybaseline gasoline while corn ethanol has 10% to 30% less (a fuel, such as corn into ethanol. Thus, more GHG emissions

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biofuels compared to gasoline vary by crop and their supply chains.biofuels are computed using lifecycle analysis (LCA) that takes into account the GHG emissions throughout the supply chain,

Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction...

102

Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous Easement...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: Miscellaneous EasementROW Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions...

103

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

104

Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Land Use Planning (Minnesota) Metropolitan Land Use Planning (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This statute establishes the Metropolitan Land Use Advisory Committee within the Metropolitan Council to coordinate plans, programs, and controls

105

Land use siting considerations for hydrothermal energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal resources are described and discussion is focused on some of the land use and social considerations involved in siting hydrothermal power plants. (MHR)

Oakes, K.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This Numeric Data Package Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

107

Assess technical and economic potential for land-use initiatives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

108

Accessibility, land use and transport. Accessibitliy evaluation of land-use and transport developments and policy strategies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??How can accessibility be defined? How useful are different accessibility approaches in evaluating land-use and transport policy strategies? How can the economic benefits associated with… (more)

Geurs, Karst Teunis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Land use suitability screening for power plant sites in Maryland  

SciTech Connect

Since 1974 Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged in developing an automated procedure for land use suitability screening. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has funded the project to aid in the selection of power plant sites in Maryland. Its purpose is to identify candidate areas from which specific candidate sites can be chosen for detailed analyses. The ORNL approach assures that certain key variables are examined empirically for every cell in the study region before candidate sites are selected. Each variable is assigned an importance weight and compatibility score based upon its effect on the economic, social, or ecologic costs associated with construction in a given cell. The weighted scores for each variable are aggregated and output as a suitability score for each cell. (auth)

Dobson, J.E.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Short communication: A generic framework for land-use modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the generic modelling system SITE (SImulation of Terrestrial Environments), a software package to develop and apply models simulating regional land-use dynamics. The modelling system includes (i) a framework managing the model ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Genetic algorithm, Integrated framework, Land-use model, Map comparison

Christian Schweitzer; Joerg A. Priess; Subhashree Das

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change California Leadership on Land Use and Climate Change Panama Bartholomy Advisor to the Chairman California Energy Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8

112

Sensitivity of the Aerosol Indirect Effect to Subgrid Variability in the Cloud Parameterization of the GFDL Atmosphere General Circulation Model AM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently developed GFDL Atmospheric Model version 3 (AM3), an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM), incorporates a prognostic treatment of cloud drop number to simulate the aerosol indirect effect. Since cloud drop activation depends on ...

Jean-Christophe Golaz; Marc Salzmann; Leo J. Donner; Larry W. Horowitz; Yi Ming; Ming Zhao

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) Environmental Land Use Restriction (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

114

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

115

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

60 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

116

An interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize progress achieved on an interactive land use VRML application (ILUVA) with servlet assist. The purpose of this application is to enable one to take a virtual land area and add buildings, roadways, landscaping and other features. The application ...

Lee A. Belfore, II; Suresh Chitithoti

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S....

118

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/67148/en/ RelatedTo: Mitigation of Climate Change in Agriculture (MICCA) Project Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database Screenshot References: AFOLU Mitigation Database[1] Global Survey of Agricultural Mitigation Projects Paper[2] "The AFOLU MP database endeavors to gather information on all mitigation activities currently ongoing within the agricultural and forestry sectors

119

GRR/Section 1 - Land Use Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 - Land Use Overview 1 - Land Use Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1 - Land Use Overview 01LandUseOverview.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management U S Army Corps of Engineers United States Environmental Protection Agency Fish and Wildlife Service United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Endangered Species Act Clean Water Act Clean Air Act Farmland Protection Policy Act Sikes Act National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) - specifically, Section 106 Native American Graves Protection Act Archaeological Resource Protection Act Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

120

Database Development of Land Use Characteristics along Major...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with TIGER files so that land use data can be collected at a more detailed level. D. Aerial photos and satellite images: Digital aerial photos and satellite images, panchromatic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

Peckett, Haley Rose

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Micro-level land use impacts of bioconversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable energy sources, among which are the bioconversion technologies. Crops, crop residues, manure and other organic wastes are potential sources of liquid, solid and gaseous fuels. These feedstocks originate on the farm or in the forest and therefore are land intensive. Implementation of the bioconversion technologies will involve actions which will impact existing land use patterns. Because of differences in crop type, yield per acre, existing land use conditions and agricultural practices, an aggregated national approach to the assessment of land use is not sufficient. If energy policy regarding bioconversion is to be successful, then it must be sensitive to micro-level information. This paper demonstrates the land use assessment work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in support of the Department of Energy's Technical Assessment of Solar Energy Program, (TASE). Local Biomass potential, existing and use and potential land use impacts from bio-energy implementation for three of the fifteen counties selected for the TASE study will be presented. The methodology creased for the evaluation is useful in determining the biomass potential for any community or county, and in identifying regional differences inherent in the trade-offs between existing land use and energy production.

Parsons, V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Climate Impacts of Land-Cover and Land-Use Changes in Tropical Islands under Conditions of Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-cover and land-use (LCLU) changes have significant climate impacts in tropical coastal regions with the added complexity of occurring within the context of a warming climate. The individual and combined effects of these two factors in ...

Daniel E. Comarazamy; Jorge E. González; Jeffrey C. Luvall; Douglas L. Rickman; Robert D. Bornstein

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Time Scales of Terrestrial Carbon Response Related to Land-Use Application: Implications for Initializing an Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic vegetation and carbon cycling component, LM3V, of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) prototype Earth system model (ESM2.1), has been designed to simulate the effects of land use on terrestrial carbon pools, including ...

Lori T. Sentman; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Biofuels and land-use A simpler approach to the problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and land-use change A simpler approach to the problem John J. Sheehan Presented of increased biofuels demand "Consequential" Life Cycle Assessment is a new concept #12;Technical uncertainty ethano #12;Political and ethical dilemmas The ceteris paribus argument: Biofuels effects should

127

Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satellite retrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirect effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud developmentclouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing, Nature, 432,1014– Albrecht, B. A. , Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) Missouri River Preservation and Land Use Authority (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The State Interagency Missouri River Authority engages in comprehensive

129

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

130

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

131

Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) Land Use - Smart Planning (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources State agencies, local governments, and other public entities engaging in land use planning shall work to promote clean and renewable energy use, increased energy efficiency, and sustainable design and construction standards, while emphasizing the protection, preservation, and restoration of natural resources, agricultural land, and cultural and historic

132

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Limits to the Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effect Derived from Observations of Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One-kilometer Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations of the effects of ships on low-level clouds off the west coast of the United States are used to derive limits for the degree to which clouds might be altered by increases ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Christopher D. Walsh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Large-Eddy Simulations of Trade Wind Cumuli: Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of aerosol on warm trade cumulus clouds are investigated using a large-eddy simulation with size-resolved cloud microphysics. It is shown that, as expected, increases in aerosols cause a reduction in precipitation and an increase in ...

Huiwen Xue; Graham Feingold

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A California Statewide Exploratory Analysis Correlating Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Density, Infrastructure Supply and Travel Behaviorof employment and infrastructure supply are used togetherCalifonia. Land use and infrastructure have a significant,

Yoon, Seo Youn; Golob, Thomas F.; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Director's Protest Resolution Report Programmatic Land Use Plan Amendments for Solar Energy......................................................................................... 68 #12;Reader How do The Dire excerpts Land Ma Report How do 1. F al 2. In n Issue T NEPA Issue N Organi Protest Issue E Rather renewab Summa There i Respon Specific decision 's Guide I read the R ector

Argonne National Laboratory

138

The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

short of the expected targets as laid forward by biofuel mandates. Cellulosic crops tend to be heavy of cellulosic biofuels yet exists. Such an ambitious target relies on the assumption from the DepartmentThe Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National

139

Land Use and natUraL resoUrces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION SPRING 2013 Including.m. Sacramento: Sutter Square Galleria, 2901 K St. $575 ($625 if postmarked after 03/28/2013). Enroll in section and site designs, create and prepare site plans, and analyze and develop planning staff reports. Emphasis

California at Davis, University of

140

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

Bertini, Robert L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2007 CTS 07-03 Asking the Right Questions About Transportation and Land Use Access to Destinations Study Research Summary No. 1 Getting There: Access and the Future of the Twin Cities Region #12;Published by the Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota March 2007 This research summary

Minnesota, University of

142

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil Christian Azar Department of Physical of Brazil on "good" versus "bad" lands is investigated. It is shown that the value of the higher yields) lands. The focus of the analysis is on the Northeast of Brazil (NE), where the prospects for dedicated

143

Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

No name listed on publication

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i Table of Contents 1.0 - Purpose p1 2.0 - Executive Summary p1 3.0 - SRS Land Use Overview p5 Assumptions Current Land Use Leases, Transfers and Other Land Use Actions Future Land Use Land Use Issues 4.0 - Land Use Planning and Control for Existing Missions p13 Cleanup, Production and Support Missions Natural and Cultural Resource Management 5.0 - Process for Future Land Use Changes p15 Introduction Process Overview Process Description 6.0 - Summary p19 7.0 - References p20 8.0 - Acronyms p21 Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i

145

Health Equity in a New Urbanist Environment: Land Use Planning and Community Capacity Building in Fresno, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the links between land use, air pollution and health inlinks between land use and air pollution were simultaneouslyof land- use siting and cumulative air pollution impacts. ”

ZUK, MIRIAM ZOFITH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An integrated approach to modelling land-use change on continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use and land-cover change are important drivers of global environmental change, affecting the state of biodiversity, the global carbon cycle, and other aspects of the earth system. In this article we describe the development of the land-use model ... Keywords: Continental and global scale land-use change modelling, Human-environment interaction, Land-use systems, Model framework

Rüdiger Schaldach; Joseph Alcamo; Jennifer Koch; Christina Kölking; David M. Lapola; Jan Schüngel; Jörg A. Priess

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp055 data Data PDF PDF graphics Graphics Please note: these data have been updated for the year 2000 Contributors Sandra Brown1 Greg Gaston2 Work on this project was initiated while at the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 61801, U.S.A. 1Present address: Winrock International, Arlington, Virgina. 2Present address: Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prepared by T.W. Beaty, and L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

148

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

149

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

150

File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUseOverview.pdf LandUseOverview.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:01LandUseOverview.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:54, 28 March 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 09:54, 28 March 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (42 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:23, 30 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:23, 30 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (41 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:55, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:55, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (34 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

151

Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary of the results at the Solar+Land+Use page on OpenEI. As solar power becomes more popular, a big question that people have is "how much land does solar energy use?" This dataset and report provides answers to the solar land use question while also doing an in-depth analysis and evaluation of various factors related to solar land use. Both photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities were

154

CALIFORNIA ENERGY EFFECT OF LAND USE CHOICES ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement Plans (STIP). STIPs are the aggregate of all of the individual RTIPs, along with projects Improvement Program (ITIP). Projects within the STIP nominated by RTIPs receive 75 percent of the STIP funds.iii Caltrans controls only 25 percent of the STIP funds through ITIP projects. · State Air Quality Management

155

Land Use and Reactive Nitrogen Discharge: Effects of Dietary Choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern agriculture alters natural biological and geophysical processes, with magnitudes proportional to its spatial extent. Cultivation is also the main cause of artificially enhanced reactive nitrogen (Nr) availability in natural ecosystems. ...

Gidon Eshel; Pamela A. Martin; Esther E. Bowen

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Coastal Erosion 5: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 505: Coastal Erosion Management (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation

157

Land use and environmental impacts of decentralized solar energy use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physical, spatial and land-use impacts of decentralized solar technologies applied at the community level by the year 2000 are examined. The results of the study are intended to provide a basis for evaluating the way in which a shift toward reliance on decentralized energy technologies may eventually alter community form. Six land-use types representative of those found in most US cities are analyzed according to solar penetration levels identified in the maximum solar scenario for the year 2000. The scenario is translated into shares of end use demand in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. These proportions become the scenario goals to be met by the use of decentralized solar energy systems. The percentage of total energy demand is assumed to be 36.5 percent, 18.8 percent and 22.6 percent in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors respectively. The community level scenario stipulated that a certain percentage of the total demand be met by on-site solar collection, i.e. photovoltaic and thermal collectors, and by passive design. This on-site solar goal is 31.9 percent (residential), 16.8 percent (commercial) and 13.1 percent (industrial).

Twiss, R.H.; Smith, P.L.; Gatzke, A.E.; McCreary, S.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Constraining the Influence of Natural Variability to Improve Estimates of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects in a Nudged Version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5  

SciTech Connect

Natural modes of variability on many timescales influence aerosol particle distributions and cloud properties such that isolating statistically significant differences in cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations (indirect effects) typically requires integrating over long simulations. For state-of-the-art global climate models (GCM), especially those in which embedded cloud-resolving models replace conventional statistical parameterizations (i.e. multi-scale modeling framework, MMF), the required long integrations can be prohibitively expensive. Here an alternative approach is explored, which implements Newtonian relaxation (nudging) to constrain simulations with both pre-industrial and present-day aerosol emissions toward identical meteorological conditions, thus reducing differences in natural variability and dampening feedback responses in order to isolate radiative forcing. Ten-year GCM simulations with nudging provide a more stable estimate of the global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing than do conventional free-running simulations. The estimates have mean values and 95% confidence intervals of -1.54 ± 0.02 W/m2 and -1.63 ± 0.17 W/m2 for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively. Nudging also substantially increases the fraction of the world’s area in which a statistically significant aerosol indirect effect can be detected (68% and 25% of the Earth's surface for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively). One-year MMF simulations with and without nudging provide global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing estimates of -0.80 W/m2 and -0.56 W/m2, respectively. The one-year nudged results compare well with previous estimates from three-year free-running simulations (-0.77 W/m2), which showed the aerosol-cloud relationship to be in better agreement with observations and high-resolution models than in the results obtained with conventional parameterizations.

Kooperman, G. J.; Pritchard, M. S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C.; Russell, Lynn

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

160

A technical modeler's interface for urbansim, a system for integrated land use, transportation, and environmental modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patterns of land use and available transportation systems play a critical role in determining the economic vitality, livability, and sustainability of urban areas. Transportation interacts strongly with land use. For example, automobile-oriented development ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GRR/Section 1a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection1a-LandUsePlanningProcess&oldid448257"...

162

GRR/Section 13-NV-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NV-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-NV-a - Land Use...

163

GRR/Section 13-MT-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-MT-a - Land Use...

164

GRR/Section 13-ID-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-ID-a - Land Use...

165

GRR/Section 13-OR-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-OR-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-OR-a - Land Use...

166

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Using neural networks and cellular automata for modelling intra-urban land-use dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Empirical models designed to simulate and predict urban land-use change in real situations are generally based on the utilization of statistical techniques to compute the land-use change probabilities. In contrast to these methods, artificial neural ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fuzzy similarity measures, Land-use dynamics, Neural networks, Town planning, Urban modelling

C. M. Almeida; J. M. Gleriani; E. F. Castejon; B. S. Soares-Filho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A Study on the Bioenergy Crop Production Function of Land Use in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of the bioenergy crop production function of land use, combined with the current situation of Chinese land use, this paper analyzes and discusses the cultivation of energy plants and the bioenergy crop production function of land ... Keywords: Land use, Bioenergy crop production function, farmers income

Zhang Kun; Duan Jiannan; Yang Jun; Li Ping

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optimizing Patterns of Land Use to Reduce Peak Runoff Flow and Nonpoint Source Pollution with an Integrated Hydrological and Land-Use Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to develop and apply a methodology for delineating optimal land-use patterns that minimize peak runoff flow at watershed outlets by coupling a hydrological model and a land-use model. Under the assumption supported in ...

In-Young Yeo; Steven I. Gordon; Jean-Michel Guldmann

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

171

GRR/Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit d - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-ID-d - Land Use Permit 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Idaho Department of Lands Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for non-invasive exploration on a case by case basis. 3-ID-d.1 to 3-ID-d.2 - Will Non-Invasive Exploration Be Preformed on State Lands? A Land Use Permit is required to preform non-invasive exploration on state

172

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

173

GRR/Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-NV-a - State Land Use Planning -NV-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-NV-a - State Land Use Planning 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Nevada Division of State Lands Regulations & Policies NRS 278: Planning and Zoning Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative _ 1-NV-a.1 - Inventory Population Data, Land Use Survey, Housing, and Economic Data According to the Planner's Guide, a land use plan ought to consider:

174

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning revealed by a prolonged drought at a temperate forest site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mechanism that controls the variation of surface energy partitioning between latent and sensible heat fluxes at a temperate deciduous forest site in central Missouri, USA. Taking advantage of multiple micrometeorological and ecophysiological measurements and a prolonged drought in the middle of the 2005 growing season at this site, we studied how soil moisture, atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD), and net radiation affected surface energy partitioning. We stratified these factors to minimize potential confounding effects of correlation among them. We found that all three factors had direct effects on surface energy partitioning, but more important, all three factors also had crucial indirect effects. The direct effect of soil moisture was characterized by a rapid decrease in Bowen ratio with increasing soil moisture when the soil was dry and by insensitivity of Bowen ratio to variations in soil moisture when the soil was wet. However, the rate of decrease in Bowen ratio when the soil was dry and the level of soil moisture above which Bowen ratio became insensitive to changes in soil moisture depended on atmospheric conditions. The direct effect of increased net radiation was to increase Bowen ratio. The direct effect of VPD was very nonlinear: Increased VPD decreased Bowen ratio at low VPD but increased Bowen ratio at high VPD. The indirect effects were much more complicated. Reduced soil moisture weakened the influence of VPD but enhanced the influence of net adiation on surface energy partitioning. Soil moisture also controlled how net radiation influenced the relationship between surface energy partitioning and VPD and how VPD affected the relationship between surface energy partitioning and net radiation. Furthermore, both increased VPD and increased net radiation enhanced the sensitivity of Bowen ratio to changes in soil moisture and the effect of drought on surface energy partitioning. The direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning identified in this paper provide a target for testing atmospheric general circulation models in their representation of land-atmosphere coupling.

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

177

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Energy, Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications Website: www.iisd.org/pdf/2009/climate_change_mitigation_land_use.pdf References: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors[1] Overview "This paper reviews the status of the post-2012 negotiations on climate change mitigation through land-use measures in the agriculture and forestry

178

Expanding the Role of "Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry" Projects and the Carbon Market in Addressing Global Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While the Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) sector is highly significant in any consideration of global climate change, the fact remains that the scale of LULUCF market activity currently is very small, particularly compared with its overall potential for carbon sequestration and importance as both a source and sink of carbon emissions. The underlying problem seems to be finding a workable policy framework. A flexible market-based policy at both international and domestic levels will score ...

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Aerosol First Indirect Effects on Non-Precipitating Low-Level Liquid Cloud Properties as Simulated by CAM5 at ARM Sites  

SciTech Connect

We quantitatively examine the aerosol first indirect effects (FIE) for non-precipitating low-level single-layer liquid phase clouds simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) running in the weather forecast mode at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites. The FIE is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud droplet effective radius for a relative change in aerosol accumulation mode number concentration under conditions of fixed liquid water content (LWC). CAM5 simulates aerosol-cloud interactions reasonably well for this specific cloud type, and the simulated FIE is consistent with the long-term observations at the examined locations. The FIE in CAM5 generally decreases with LWC at coastal ARM sites, and is larger by using cloud condensation nuclei rather than aerosol accumulation mode number concentration as the choice of aerosol amount. However, it has no significant variations with location and has no systematic strong seasonal variations at examined ARM sites.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Klein, Stephen A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Boyle, James; Zhang, Yuying

2012-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Planning for a Sustainable Nexus of Urban Land Use, Transport and Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Land use, transport, and energy systems create demands that are transferred to ecosystems. Urban sprawl is increasing, open space and farmland are disappearing and climate… (more)

Belaieff, Antoine; Moy, Gloria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastruc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land...

182

GRR/Section 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon GRRSection 1-AK-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY...

183

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC (2007) California biofuel goals and production potential.Many LCA studies of biofuel production and use have appearedand downstream of biofuel crop production that have land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through...

186

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

E:\Active Projects\Comprehensive Land Use Plan\fclup.prn.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FERMILAB FERMILAB COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN f FERMILAB TABLE OF CONTENTS Comprehensive Land Use Report Contents * PAGE i * Revision 0 * April 15, 1998 Contents f Table of Contents I. Regional Conditions............................................................................. .1 1. History ............................................................................................. 1 2. Regional Overview........................................................................ 7 3. Specific Local Conditions ........................................................... 10 4. Public Transportation.................................................................. 17 5. Geology/Seismic Risk/Topography/Hydrology ................. 25 6. Meteorology..................................................................................

188

Introducing a novel model of belief-desire-intention agent for urban land use planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use planning is a potentially demanding search and optimization task that has been challenged by numerous researchers in the field of spatial planning. Agent and multi-agent systems are examples of the modern concepts, which have been gaining more ... Keywords: Agent, BDI architecture, Commitment, Geospatial Information System (GIS), Interaction, Urban land use planning

Saeed Behzadi, Ali A. Alesheikh

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

190

Multi-Criteria Spatial Decision Support System DECERNS: Application to Land Use Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use planning and environmental management often requires an implementation of both geoyspatial information analysis and value-driven criteria within the decision-making process. DECERNS Decision Evaluation in Complex Risk Network Systems is a web-based ... Keywords: DECERNS, GIS, Housing Development, Land-Use Planning, MCDA, Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis, Spatial Decision Support System, WebSDSS

B. Yatsalo; V. Didenko; A. Tkachuk; G. Gritsyuk; O. Mirzeabasov; V. Slipenkaya; A. Babutski; I. Pichugina; T. Sullivan; I. Linkov

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

193

Simulation of land use spatial pattern of towns and villages based on CA-Markov model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firstly, this paper analyzes the basic principles and processes of the spatial pattern changes of land use in towns and villages, and the result shows that the land resource demands of urban development and population growth lead to the spatial pattern ... Keywords: Cellular automata, Fangshan district in Beijing, Land use change, Markov, Spatial pattern

Lingling Sang; Chao Zhang; Jianyu Yang; Dehai Zhu; Wenju Yun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

195

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Regulations & Policies Open Beaches Act Dune Protection Act Beach Dune Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas General Land Office (GLO) is in charge of making sure construction on the Texas coast that affects the beach and dunes is

197

NREL: News - NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar NREL Report Firms Up Land-Use Requirements of Solar Study shows solar for 1,000 homes would require 32 acres July 30, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has published a report on the land use requirements of solar power plants based on actual land-use practices from existing solar facilities. "Having real data from a majority of the solar plants in the United States will help people make proper comparisons and informed decisions," lead author Sean Ong said. The report, "Land-use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States," was written with NREL colleagues Clinton Campbell, Robert Margolis, Paul Denholm and Garvin Heath. Ong gathered data from 72% of the solar power plants installed or under

198

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: GIZ Sourcebook Module 2a: Land Use Planning and Urban Transport (Español) Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.sutp.org/component/phocadownload/category/25-2a?download=33:2a-lup Related Tools Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center Demonstrating Electric Vehicles in Canada Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Deployment Guidelines: British Columbia ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS Which cities have succeeded in establishing land use patterns which support the more environmentally-friendly and efficient modes of transit, walking and cycling? What are the benefits of better land use planning for

199

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC § 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

200

THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

JEWETT MA

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

1990-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

The Influence of Land Use/Land Cover on Climatological Values of the Diurnal Temperature Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal temperature range (DTR) at weather observation stations that make up the U.S. Historical Climatology Network was evaluated with respect to the predominant land use/land cover associated with the stations within three radii intervals (...

Kevin P. Gallo; David R. Easterling; Thomas C. Peterson

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product of

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Land Use Change in Central Florida and Sensitivity Analysis Based on Agriculture to Urban Extreme Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explored recent land use and land cover change in western central Florida, examining both socioeconomic and biophysical influences on land transformation and the impacts of that change. Between 1995 and 2006, a growth in population ...

José L. Hernández; Syewoon Hwang; Francisco Escobedo; April H. Davis; James W. Jones

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-ID-a - Land Use Considerations 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01IDALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-ID-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685536" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

210

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography University of Maryland The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon- Climate Models (summary) submitted to the Terrestrial Ecology Program. It is presented as an example plan. Data Management Plan The proposed project will generate important new datasets of remote-sensing-based land-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessment, long-term archiving, and data sharing and dissemination (along with documentation

211

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-HI-a - Land Use Considerations 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01HIALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-HI-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685535" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

212

GRR/Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use License Process d - Land Use License Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-MT-d - Land Use License Process 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation Regulations & Policies Surface Management Rule 36.25.103 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03MTDLandUseLicenseProcess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The land use license is intended to be used for short-term use of state-owned lands. This license may be used for casual use of the lands

213

GRR/Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-AK-e - Land Use Permit 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Alaska Department of Natural Resources Alaska Division of Mining Land and Water Regulations & Policies Alaska Statutes Alaska Administrative Code Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03AKELandUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A land use permit in Alaska covers a number of uses of state land that are less invasive and do not require a full property interest such as a lease

214

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: Historic Land Use and Carbon Estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880-1980 (1994) (NDP-046) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp046 data Data PDF PDF Contributors J. F. Richards and E. P. Flint Description This data base contains estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as encompassing nearly 8 × 106 km2 of the earth's land surface and includes the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia),

215

TRENDS Online - Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends graphic Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes 1850-2005 Richard A. Houghton The Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, Massachusetts 02540,...

216

Global Vegetation and Land Use: New High-Resolution Data Bases for Climate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global vegetation and land-use data bases (1° latitude by 1° longitude resolution), designed for use in studies of climate and climate change, were compiled in digital form drawing upon approximately 100 published sources complemented by a large ...

Elaine Matthews

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

McKay, Shannon Ashley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

GRR/Section 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-AK-a -...

219

GRR/Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Section 1-CA-a - State Land Use Planning < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-CA-a -...

220

Global Population Distribution and Urban Land Use in Geophysical Parameter Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial distribution of human population on the land surface is a fundamental determinant of land-use impacts on Earth's ecosystems. Census enumerations and satellite-detected night lights provide two complementary, but distinct, ...

Christopher Small

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Sean Ong, Clinton Campbell, Paul Denholm, Robert Margolis, and Garvin Heath Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-56290...

222

Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

Hallgren, Willow

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility 6: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE's proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the

224

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations GRR/Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-MT-a - Land Use Considerations 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01MTALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=GRR/Section_1-MT-a_-_Land_Use_Considerations&oldid=685537" Categories: Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections

225

GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process -FD-a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process 01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976(FLPMA) CEQ CRF Regulations 40 C.F.R. 1501.7 Scoping 40 C.F.R. 1502.9 Draft, Final, and Supplemental Statements 40 C.F.R. 1502.14 Alternatives Including the Proposed Action 40 C.F.R. 1503.4 Response to Comments 40 C.F.R. 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During the NEPA Process

226

Land Use for Wind, Solar, and Geothermal Electricity Generation Facilities in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale wind, photovoltaic (PV), concentrating solar power (CSP), and geothermal projects. The analysts evaluated 458 existing or proposed projects, representing (as of 2012 third quarter) 51% of installed wind capacity, 80% of PV and CSP capacity, and all known geothermal power plants in the United States. The report identifies two major land use classes: 1) direct area (land permanently or temporarily disturbed due to ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: a critical overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are three main objectives of this monograph: (i) to provide an introduction to geographical information technology along with an historical perspective on the evolving role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in planning, (ii) to overview relevant methods and techniques for GISbased land-use suitability mapping and modeling, and (iii) to identify the trends, challenges and prospects of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis. The monograph focuses on two perspectives of GIS-based land-use suitability analysis: the techno-positivist perspective and the socio-political, public participation perspectives. It is organized into six chapters. After an introductory setting chapter, which defines the scope of land-use suitability analysis, an overview of relevant GIS technology is provided in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 offers an historical account of the development of GIS. It also discusses the development of GIS in the context of evolving perspectives of planning. Chapter 4 gives an overview of the methods for GIS-based land-use suitability modeling. The overview provides a background against which selected case studies are discussed in Chapter 5. The concluding chapter summarized the main points of the monographs and discusses problems and prospects for GIS-based land-use suitability analysis.

Jacek Malczewski

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

IA-SDSS: A GIS-based land use decision support system with consideration of carbon sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) can play a positive role in mitigating global warming by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere into vegetation and soils. Local entities (e.g. local government, community, stockholders) have been making ... Keywords: Carbon models, Carbon sequestration, GIS, Integrated assessment, Land-use planning, RS, SDSS

Jun Wang; Jingming Chen; Weimin Ju; Manchun Li

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

231

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider

232

Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Agency of Natural Resources The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing

233

Two LBA-ECO Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover (LC-04) science teams associated with the ecology component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA), LBA-ECO: LBA-ECO LC-04 THMB Model Simulations for the Amazon and Tocantins Basins: 1939-1998 . Data set prepared by M.T. Coe, M.H. Costa, A. Botta, and C. Birkett. The model output data provided were generated by the THMB 1.2 (Terrestrial Hydrology Model with Biogeochemistry) model which simulates the flow of water through groundwater systems, rivers, lakes and wetlands. The model operates at a 5-minute latitude-by-longitude grid with a 1-hour time step and requires as boundary conditions: topography,

234

An Integrated Computer Modeling Environment For Regional Land Use, Air Quality, And Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menudriven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and areawide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future pr...

Charles Hanley Renewable; Norman L. Marshall; Charles J. Hanley; Charles J. Hanley

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL Brian O'Neill, NCAR, Boulder, CO

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development Near DOD Installations: Making the Case for Land Use Compatitbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mike Aimone, P.E. Mike Aimone, P.E. National Security Global Business Battelle Memorial Institute Utility Scale Renewable Energy Development near DOD Installations Making the Case for Land Use Compatibility Comments expressed are strictly those of the Briefer, and not necessarily the views or positions of the Battelle Memorial Institute or the Department of Defense 2 Sizing the Issue * Utility scale renewable energy development near DOD installations, ranges and Military Operational Areas/Special Use Airspace can affect mission operations and readiness * In the US, Land Use Planning is a "states-right" issue - tied to "Police Powers" - Goal: Acceptable zoning rules and consistent zoning

239

Integrated assessment and the relation between land-use change and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment is an approach that is useful in evaluating the consequences of global climate change. Understanding the consequences requires knowledge of the relationship between land-use change and climate change. Methodologies for assessing the contribution of land-use change to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are considered with reference to a particular case study area: south and southeast Asia. The use of models to evaluate the consequences of climate change on forests must also consider an assessment approach. Each of these points is discussed in the following four sections.

Dale, V.H.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Land-use conflicts in The Geysers-Calistoga KGRA: a preliminary study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary study of potential land use conflicts of geothermal development in The Geysers region, one component of the LLL/LBL socioeconomic program, focuses on Lake County because it has most of the undeveloped resource and the least regulatory capability. The land resource is characterized in terms of its ecological, hydrological, agricultural, and recreational value; intrinsic natural hazards; and the adequacy of roads and utility systems and each factor is depicted on a map. Then those factors are analyzed for potential conflicts with both geothermal and urban development and the conflicts displayed on respective maps. A brief review of laws and methods germane to geothermal land-use regulation is included.

O'Banion, K.; Hall, C.; Haven, K.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

243

Integrated land use, transportation, and environmental simulation: UrbanSim project highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of planning and constructing a new light rail system or freeway, setting an urban growth boundary, changing tax policy, or modifying zoning and land use plans is often politically charged. Our goal in the UrbanSim project is to provide tools ...

Alan Borning; Paul Waddell

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evolution trends of land use/land cover in a mediterranean forest landscape in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the evolution trends of landscape, in particular those linked to urban/rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. The main goal of this paper is to interpret the forest landscape dynamics occurred over the period ... Keywords: Calabria (Italy), GIS, Mediterranean forest landscape, aerial photographs, land use/land cover (LULC) changes, transition matrices

Salvatore Di Fazio; Giuseppe Modica; Paolo Zoccali

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Implementation of state solar incentives: land-use planning to ensure solar access  

SciTech Connect

State incentives in land-use planning to ensure solar access are examined to determine issues in program design and implementation. Available incentives are reviewed to indicate their structure and purpose. These incentives include broad legislative grants of solar rights, application of nuisance law to solar-collector shading, removal of restrictive covenants or establishment of covenants to protect solar access, provision for privately-negotiated solar easements, and land-use planning and regulation to include passive solar design and provision for active solar collection in land-use development. State initiatives in the period 1973 to 1978 are cataloged. Case studies in four states (Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Minnesota) are reported. Oregon is currently engaged in a statewide, mandated local comprehensive planning process which includes consideration of energy conservation and renewable energy sources. California has recently adopted two solar access related bills which address private solar easements, subdivision design, restrictive covenants, and shading by vegetation. New Mexico has established a broad legislative grant of solar rights based on water rights law. And Minnesota has authorized the inclusion of solar energy as a factor in local land use planning and established a private easement procedure.

Pollock, P.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Land use analysis using GIS, radar and thematic mapper in Ethiopia: PhD showcase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land degradation, and poverty issues are very common in our world, especially in developing countries in Africa. There are fewer adaptation strategies for climate change in these countries. Ethiopia is a tropical country found in the horn of Africa. ... Keywords: GIS, classification algorithm, land use change, modeling, remote sensing

Haile K. Tadesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

digital images, GIS (Geographic Information systems) and RS (Remote Sensing) software were used. A maximum results by 6% on average. A Statistical analysis was conducted to find the relationships between land use References ·Stein, Eric D., Tiefenthaler, Liesl, Schiff, Kenneth C. Comparison of Sormwater Pollutant Loading

Mountziaris, T. J.

248

A hybrid analytical-heuristic method for calibrating land-use change models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatially explicit land-use models simulate the patterns of change on the landscape in response to coupled human-ecological dynamics. As these models become more complex involving larger than ever data sets, the need to improve calibration techniques ... Keywords: Amazon deforestation, Dinamica EGO, Genetic algorithm, Map comparison method, Spatial transition probability

Britaldo Soares-Filho; Hermann Rodrigues; Marco Follador

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Land-use barriers and incentives to the use of solar energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of land-use issues on solar technologies is analyzed and attention is focused specifically on a discussion of on-site uses of active and passive solar heating and cooling. The first area discussed involves land-use regulations which prohibit the installation of solar collectors. Such regulations include both public regulations (zoning laws) and private regulations (restrictive convenants). The widely discussed issue of secure access to sunlight, also known as solar rights, comprises the bulk of the report. The many different proposed methods of ensuring solar access are compared to an ideal solar right. The solar access problem is divided into two parts: access in new developments and access in existing neighborhoods. Solar access in new developments can be provided fairly easily, if desired, by a combination of land-use tools which allow for the flexible siting of buildings and restrictive convenants to control vegetation. The problem of access in existing neighborhoods does not lend itself to easy solutions. No proposals approximate the ideal. The main solutions analyzed-privately negotiated easements, zoning laws, and allocated sun rights, have drawbacks. The final area addressed is the variety of ways in which land-use regulations can be structured to provide an incentive to install solar equipment.

Spivak, P.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Dischargecalcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil or land use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discharge­calcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil ecosystem function. Throughout the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil rapid changes in land use and land with data from 28 streams throughout Brazil. These streams come from three distinct regions and varied

252

Relating United States Crop Land Use to Natural Resources and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop ...

K. G. Hubbard; F. J. Flores-mendoza

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

timber producing land while sediment pollution is associatedin Rural Land Use, Nonpoint Source Pollution, and Evolvingto reduce sediment pollution from private lands within the

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Land Use Affects on Modern Bankfull Hydraulic Geometry in Southwest Ohio and its Implications for Stream Restoration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Channel morphology is affected by land use change nationwide. In Southwest Ohio, streams are influenced by agricultural and urban landscapes. The purpose of this study… (more)

Ellison, Elizabeth J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Linking Job/Housing Balance, Land Use Mix and Commute to Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With gas prices rising rapidly, many people have started to believe that it has become imperative to reduce their vehicle miles travelled. Land use patterns have been found culpable of contributing to the extra VMT driven by the average. As such, urban planners have employed many strategies to attempt to reduce this portion of VMT. For example, research shows that smart growth in the form of mixed-use compact development results in a better match of jobs and housing since it brings trip origins and destinations closer, thereby making work trips shorter. This research uses spatial modeling in GIS and Multiple Linear regression/ANOVA in SPSS to analyze the link between job-housing (J/H) mismatch, land use mix and worker commute flows. The study examines J/H imbalance within a travel catchment area using a 7-mile buffer from the centroid of each census tract in Dallas County, Texas. Moreover, it uses jobs, workers local economic and community data in the form of Local Employment Dynamics, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics and Quarterly Workforce Indicators provided by the US Census Bureau to carry out area profile, area comparison, distance/direction, destination, inflow/outflow and paired area analysis for workers place of work and residential distributions in Dallas county. This analysis is linked in Geographical Information Systems to the land use map, which is classified as an entropy index. The GIS results present a spatial picture of labor- shed, commute-shed, job-housing balanced and imbalanced areas by relating the land use mix and commute flows of workers in Dallas County. Moreover, MLR regression model in SPSS shows that Land use mix, Job/housing balance and housing affordability are significant predictors of mean travel time to work. This strategic tool developed through Target Area Analysis and Hot Spot Analysis will act as a guideline for land use planners to understand the regional growth complexities related to work flows. The analytical model developed can also be deployed to direct land development patterns, which will ultimately improve the quality of life, halt urban sprawl, lower costs to businesses and commuters and produce related positive externalities.

Raja, Afia 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

257

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Land-use Policy and Program Design Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 4 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

258

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

259

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 (NDP-050/R1) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp050 data Data PDF PDF The PDF of NDP-050/R1 (body of report, plus appendices A through E) and tellus51b.pdf (Appendix F, reprint of Houghton paper in Tellus, Vol. 51B; copyright 1999 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) Contributors Richard A. Houghton Joseph L. Hackler The Woods Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Please Note: Revised data through the year 2000 are available in CDIAC's Trends Online. Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research

260

GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » GRR/Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-OR-a - Land Use Considerations 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 01ORALandUseConsiderations.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Add Text Print PDF

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-45834 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. WER9.3550 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

262

Historic land use and carbon estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880--1980  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital data base containing estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers, so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia), Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The most important change in land use over the 100 year period was the conversion of 107 {times} 10{sup 6} ha of forest/woodland to categories with lower biomass. Land thus transformed accounted for 13.5% of the total area of the study region. The estimated total carbon content of live vegetation in South and Southeast Asia has dropped progressively, from 59 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1880 to 27 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1980. Throughout the study period the carbon stock in forests was greater than the carbon content in all other categories combined, although its share of the total declined progressively from 81% in 1880 to 73% in 1980. The data base itself was developed in Lotus 1-2-3{trademark} using a sequential bookkeeping model. The source data were obtained at the local and regional level for each country from official agricultural and economic statistics from historical geographic and demographic texts, reports, and articles; and from any other available source. Because of boundary changes through time and disparities between the validity, availability, and scale of the data for each country, the data were aggregated into 94 ecological zones. The resulting data base contains land use and carbon information for 94 ecological zones and national totals for 13 countries.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Richards, J.F.; Flint, E.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of History

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Relating United States crop land use to natural resources and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop production depends not only on the yield but also on the area harvested. The yield response to climate change has been widely examined, but the sensitivity of crop land use to hypothetical climate change has not been examined directly. Crop land-use regression models for estimating crop area indices (CAIs)-the percent of land used for corn, soybean, wheat, and sorghum production-are presented. Inputs to the models include available water-holding capacity of the soil, percent of land available for rain-fed agricultural production, annual precipitation, and annual temperature. The total variance of CAI explained by the models ranged from 78% from wheat to 87% for sorghum, and the root-mean-square errors ranged from 1.74% for sorghum to 4.24% for corn. The introduction of additional climatic variables to the models did not significantly improve their performance. The crop land-use models were used to predict the CAI for every crop reporting district in the United States for the current climatic condition and for possible future climate change scenarios (various combinations of temperature and precipitation changes over a range of -3{degrees} to +6{degrees}C and -20% to +20% respectively). The magnitude of climatic warming suggested by GCMs (GISS and GFDL) is from 3.5{degrees} to 5.9{degrees}C for regions of the United States. For this magnitude of warming, the model suggests corn and soybean production areas may decline while wheat and sorghum production areas may expand. If the warming is accompanied by a decrease in annual precipitation from 1% to 10%, then the areas used for corn and soybean production could decrease by as much as 20% and 40%, respectively. The area for sorghum and wheat under these conditions would increase by as much as 80% and 70%, respectively; the exact amount depending strongly on the change in precipitation. 15 refs., 6 figs.

Flores-Mendoza, F.J.; Hubbard, K.G. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

265

File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01NVAStateLandUsePlanning (1).pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 75 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:08, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:08, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (75 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 17:06, 15 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 15 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (55 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

266

File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LandUsePlanning.pdf LandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:06, 14 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 17:06, 14 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (124 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 14:52, 1 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 14:52, 1 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 15:58, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 15:58, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (85 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

267

File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d - Land Use Permit.pdf d - Land Use Permit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-ID-d - Land Use Permit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 13:56, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:56, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (28 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) 13:47, 22 August 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 13:47, 22 August 2013 1,275 × 1,650 (27 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs) You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup instructions for more information)

268

File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf -FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 136 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:25, 18 December 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:25, 18 December 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (136 KB) Dfitzger (Talk | contribs) 16:00, 11 September 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:00, 11 September 2012 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (86 KB) Djenne (Talk | contribs)

269

Observational Evidence that agricultural Intensification and land use change may1 be reducing the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall2 Dev Niyogi1 , Chandra Kishtawal2 , Shivam Tripathi3 , Rao S. Govindaraju3 land use change and monsoonal rainfall climatology is10 analyzed. A combination of statistical analysis data over13 the Indian summer monsoon region, (ii) investigate the relation between land use change/14

Niyogi, Dev

270

Biofuels, causes of land-use change, and the role of fire in greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

IN THEIR REPORTS IN THE 29 FEBRUARY ISSUE ('LAND CLEARING AND THE BIOFUEL CARBON debt,' J. Fargione et al., p. 1235, and 'Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change,' T. Searchinger et al., p. 1238), the authors do not provide adequate support for their claim that biofuels cause high emissions due to land-use change. The conclusions of both papers depend on the misleading premise that biofuel production causes forests and grasslands to be converted to agriculture. However, field research, including a meta-analysis of 152 case studies, consistently finds that land-use change and associated carbon emissions are driven by interactions among cultural, technological, biophysical, political, economic, and demographic forces within a spatial and temporal context rather than by a single crop market. Searchinger et al. assert that soybean prices accelerate clearing of rainforest based on a single citation for a study not designed to identify the causal factors of land clearing. The study analyzed satellite imagery from a single state in Brazil over a 4-year period and focused on land classification after deforestation. Satellite imagery can measure what changed but does little to tell us why. Similarly, Fargione et al. do not rely on primary empirical studies of causes of land-use change. Furthermore, neither fire nor soil carbon sequestration was properly considered in the Reports. Fire's escalating contribution to global climate change is largely a result of burning in tropical savannas and forests. Searchinger et al. postulate that 10.8 million hectares could be needed for future biofuel, a fraction of the 250 to 400 million hectares burned each year between 2000 and 2005. By offering enhanced employment and incomes, biofuels can help establish economic stability and thus reduce the recurring use of fire on previously cleared land as well as pressures to clear more land. Neither Searchinger et al. nor Fargione et al. consider fire as an ongoing land-management tool. In addition, deep-rooted perennial biofuel feedstocks in the tropics could enhance soil carbon storage by 0.5 to 1 metric ton per hectare per year. An improved understanding of the forces behind land-use change leads to more favorable conclusions regarding the potential for biofuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Estimating The Effect of Biofuel on Land Cover Change Using Multi-Year Modis Land Cover Data  

SciTech Connect

There has been a growing debate on the effects of the increase in demands of biofuels on land use land cover (LULC) change with apprehension in some quarters that the growing demand for bioenergy as a clean fuel will result in widespread direct and indirect LULC change. However estimating both direct and indirect LULC change is challenging and will require development of accurate high frequency, high resolution (temporal and spatial) land use land cover data as well as new LULC models which can be used to locate, quantify and predict these changes. To assess whether the demand for biofuel has caused significant LULC we used MODIS land cover data (MCD12Q1) from 2001 to 2008 along with cropland data layer (CDL) to estimate cropland and grassland changes in United States for the years 2002-2008 as well as its correlation with biofuel growth.

Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Research Article Historical Pesticide Exposure in California Using Pesticide Use Reports and Land-Use Surveys: An Assessment of Misclassification Error and Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used California’s Pesticide Use Report (PUR) and land-use survey data to conduct a simulation study evaluating the potential consequences of misclassifying residential exposure from proximity to agricultural pesticide application in health effect studies. We developed a geographic model linking the PUR with crop location data from land-use surveys to assess the impact of exposure misclassification from simpler exposure models based solely on PUR or land-use data. We simulated the random selection of population controls recruited into a hypothetical case–control study within an agricultural region. Using residential parcel data, we derived annual exposure prevalences, sensitivity, and specificity for five pesticides and relied on the PUR plus land-use model as the “gold standard.” Based on these estimates, we calculated the attenuation of prespecified true odds ratios (ORs), assuming nondifferential exposure misclassification. True ORs were severely attenuated a) when residential exposure status was based on a larger geographic area yielding higher sensitivity but low specificity for exposure, in contrast to relying on a smaller area and increasing specificity; b) for less frequently applied pesticides; and c) with increasing mobility of residents among the study population. Considerable effect estimate attenuation also occurred when we used residential distance to crops as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Finally, exposure classifications based on annual instead of seasonal summaries of PUR resulted in highly attenuated ORs, especially during seasons when applications of specific pesticides were unlikely to occur. These results underscore the importance of increasing the spatiotemporal resolution of pesticide exposure models to minimize misclassification.

Rudolph P. Rull; Beate Ritz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Indirect liquefaction processes. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the technology feasibility of the various coal gasification and indirect liquefaction technologies. Also included is the best-estimate costs for methanol and gasoline using the various technologies with three different coal/feedstocks by critically analyzing publicly available design studies and placing them on a common technical/financial basis. The following conclusion is that methanol from coal is cheaper than gasoline via either the Mobile MTG process or the Fisher/Tropsch process.

McGuckin, J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Wheat Yield Functions for Analysis of Land-Use Change in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERES-Wheat, a dynamic process crop growth model is specified and validated for eight sites in the major wheat-growing regions of China. Crop model results are then used to test functional forms for yield response to nitrogen fertilizer, irrigation water, temperature, and precipitation. The resulting functions are designed to be used in a linked biophysical-economic model of land-use and land-cover change. Variables explaining a significant proportion of simulated yield variance are nitrogen, irrigation water, and precipitation; temperature was not a sig...

Chynthia Rosenzweig; Ana Iglesias; Yanhua Liu; Walter Baethgen (baethgen+aea-undp. Org. Uy; James W. Jones; Gordon J. Macdonald

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this, data are compiled on the environment, the ethnohistoric record, and the archaeology of the Post Oak Savannah. It is expected that boundaries can be found between areas of hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists. In order to evaluate the role of the environment, the climate, vegetation, geology, soils, and fauna are examined. Data from the journals and diaries of early European explorers are compiled and analyzed to determine the extent of agriculture during the Historic period. The final source of information is the archaeological record. Ceramic assemblages are analyzed and the information used to determine a possible boundary. Information from these diverse data all point to the Brazos River basin as the boundary between agricultural and bunter-gatherer land use in the Post Oak Savannah.

Judjahn, Stephanie K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use, the prevention and control of nonpoint source pollution,prevention and control of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution from rural private landspollution prevention, the protection and restoration of salmonid habitat, and/or land

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Increase in Near-Surface Atmospheric Moisture Content due to Land Use Changes: Evidence from the Observed Dewpoint Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use change can significantly affect root zone soil moisture, surface energy balance, and near-surface atmospheric temperature and moisture content. During the second half of the twentieth century, portions of the North American Great Plains ...

Rezaul Mahmood; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Ronnie D. Leeper; Stuart A. Foster

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Indirect evaporative cooling in retail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JCPenney Co., Inc., recently opened a 126,000-sq ft, two-level retail store in Albuquerque, NM. The project construction was accomplished using a design-build format. This process allows preliminary construction processes to begin while the design is finalized. Law/Kingdom, Inc. was assigned the architectural and engineering services for this building. During the process of design, the team decided to study the addition of evaporative cooling into the air system. This article reviews system design, selection, and performance using an indirect evaporative system in the HVAC system. It also demonstrates the company`s design approach on the original equipment selection for a typical anchor store.

Bartlett, T.A. [JCPenney Co., Plano, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Global Indirect Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Indirect cost of corrosion for the USA (1998 basis)...76.64 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Mining 27.86 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Petroleum refining 32.22 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical 111.04 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Pulp and paper 148.05 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Agricultural 126.28 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Food processing 123.66 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Electronics â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Home appliances 25.25 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Subtotal 671.00 Production loss 2.5â??5.5 26.84...

284

Determining Robust Impacts of Land-Use-Induced Land Cover Changes on Surface Climate over North America and Eurasia: Results from the First Set of LUCID Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project Land-Use and Climate, Identification of Robust Impacts (LUCID) was conceived to address the robustness of biogeophysical impacts of historical land use–land cover change (LULCC). LUCID used seven atmosphere–land models with a common ...

Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré; Juan-Pablo Boisier; Andy Pitman; G. B. Bonan; V. Brovkin; Faye Cruz; C. Delire; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; P. J. Lawrence; M. K. van der Molen; C. Müller; C. H. Reick; B. J. Strengers; A. Voldoire

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Verifying the Accuracy of Land Use Models Used in Transportation and Air Quality: A Case Study in the Sacramento, California Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulations for a future transportation plan that uses fixedfuture regional land use projections and transportationFutures for Tansportation and Land Use–Integrated Models Contrasted with ‘Trend Delphi’ Methods: The Portland Metro Results,” Transportation

Rodier, Caroline J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cover Sheet Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

288

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

289

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) E: FULL LISTING OF COMPARE.DAT (FILE 4) The following is a full listing of ascii file compare.dat (File 4), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file compare.wk1 (File 5). This file compares the estimated global total net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 to 1990, by year, for this database (Houghton 1999) and three earlier publications (Houghton et al. 1983, Houghton and Skole 1990, and Houghton and Hackler 1995). Note that the data for the period 1850 through 1859 attributed below to Houghton et al. (1983) were not actually presented in that publication but are present in the data used in that publication. Units = Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 1015 grams); -9.999 denotes missing value Year Houghton Houghton Houghton Houghton

290

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) D: FULL LISTING OF NDP050.DAT (FILE 2) The following is a full listing of ascii file ndp050.dat (File 2), which is also provided, in binary spreadsheet format, as file ndp050.wk1 (File 3). This file lists the estimated net flux of carbon, in units of 1000 Gg of carbon (1 gigagram = 109 g), to the atmosphere from land-use change, from 1850 through 1990, by year and by region, along with the global totals. The values in this listing replace the values in files netflux.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. Year North South and Europe North Tropical Former China South and Pacific TOTAL America Central Africa and Africa Soviet Southeast Developed FLUX America Middle East Union Asia Region

291

US areal wind resource estimates considering environmental and land-use exclusions  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy initiative, estimates of the land area with various levels of wind energy resource have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some land owing to environmental of land-use considerations. These exclusions assume that 100% of the environmentally sensitive land and various percentages of land designated as urban, agricultural or range would be unavailable for wind energy development. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource thus estimated is surprisingly large. For example, estimates of available wind resource and resultant wind electric potential from advanced turbine technology show that a group of 12 states in the midsection of the country could produce more than three times the nation's 1987 electric energy consumption. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Return Outcomes in Bosnia- Herzegovina a Decade Beyond War.Agricultural Land in Bosnia-Herzegovina After the 1992-1995was seen after the Bosnia-Herzegovina war when the war left

Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EFFECTS OF HUMAN LAND USE ON WESTERN BURROWING OWL FORAGING AND ACTIVITY BUDGETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 U.S.A. JAMES D. RAY BWXT Pantex LLC, Pantex

McIntyre, Nancy E.

295

EFFECTS OF LAND-USE HISTORY ON SOIL QUALITY: IMPLICATIONS FOR SANDPLAIN GRASSLAND RESTORATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Paper no. 23. Harvard University. Petersham, MA. Goodale, C. L. and J. D. Aber. 2001.The long

Vallino, Joseph J.

296

Designed by Zoning: Evaluating the Spatial Effects of Land Use Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Harris and Batty. Other agent-based models have simulatedagents, which seems like a natural next step based on Knaap et al using developers as players in a game-theory model.

Warren, Charles Reuben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Research papers Effects of land use change and sediment mobilization on coastal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)a 1970 2 015 424 ­ Cemet factory expansion (1972­1973)d ; sugar cane mill (1974); PEMEX oil refinery (1978) 1980 2 369 076 Miguel de la Madrid (1988) PEMEX oil refinery expansion (1981, 1983)e ; PEMEX

Long, Bernard

298

Designed by Zoning: Evaluating the Spatial Effects of Land Use Regulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil, kerosene, etc. Coal or coke All other fuels No fueloil, kerosene, etc. Coal or coke All other fuels No fueloil, kerosene, etc. Coal or coke All other fuels No fuel

Warren, Charles Reuben

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Direct and indirect effects of atmospheric conditions and soil moisture on surface energy partitioning revealed by a prolonged drought at a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, latent heat, and carbon dioxide as well as complementary vegetation and soil water status. As the drought stratified these factors to minimize potential confounding effects of correlation among them. We found that all three factors had direct effects on surface energy partitioning, but more important, all three

300

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies has been conducted. The alternative technologies are coal-gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Fusion was not included in this preliminary work but will be a part of the final evaluation based on available research, to identify a suitable assessment methodology, and to identify data deficiencies. The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts at comparative or single-technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research. (WHK)

Newsom, D.E.; Wolsko, T.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of very large pores associated with former root channels in NT and NS aggregates. Our findings indicate that mechanisms of macro-aggregate formation might differ in their importance in different land use and management practices.

Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L. (MSU); (UC)

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shuzhen Nong, and helpful comments on previous versions of the manuscript by Michael Roberts. The authors take responsibility for all remaining errors. The opinions expressed are the authors ’ only and do not necessarily When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies — such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation — should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically examine micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private land uses in a comprehensive analysis of the contiguous United States. The econometric estimates are used to simulate landowner responses to sequestration policies. Key commodity prices are treated as endogenous and a carbon sink model is used to predict changes in carbon storage. Our estimated marginal costs of carbon sequestration are greater than those from previous engineering cost analyses and sectoral optimization models. Our estimated sequestration supply function is similar to the carbon abatement supply function from energy-based analyses, suggesting that forest-based carbon

Ruben N. Lubowski; Andrew J. Plantinga; Robert N. Stavins

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The database documented in this numeric data package, a revision to a database originally published by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) in 1995, consists of annual estimates, from 1850 through 1990, of the net flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere resulting from deliberate changes in land cover and land use, especially forest clearing for agriculture and the harvest of wood for wood products or energy. The data are provided on a year-by-year basis for nine regions (North America, South and Central America, Europe, North Africa and the Middle East, Tropical Africa, the Former Soviet Union, China, South and Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Developed Region) and the globe. Some data begin earlier than 1850 (e.g., for six regions, areas of different ecosystems are provided for the year 1700) or extend beyond 1990 (e.g., fuelwood harvest in South and Southeast Asia, by forest type, is provided through 1995). The global net flux during the period 1850 to 1990 was 124 Pg of carbon (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams). During this period, the greatest regional flux was from South and Southeast Asia (39 Pg of carbon), while the smallest regional flux was from North Africa and the Middle East (3 Pg of carbon). For the year 1990, the global total net flux was estimated to be 2.1 Pg of carbon.

Houghton, R.A.

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

SciTech Connect

We investigated how climate, rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and land use change influenced continental river flow over the period 1948-2004 using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled river transfer model (RTM), a global river routing scheme. The model results indicate that the global mean river flow shows significant decreasing trend and climate forcing likely functions as the dominant controller of the downward trend during the study period. Nitrogen deposition and land use change account for about 5% and 2.5% of the decrease in simulated global scale river flow, respectively, while atmospheric CO2 accounts for an upward trend. However, the relative role of each driving factor is heterogeneous across regions in our simulations. The trend in river flow for the Amazon River basin is primarily explained by CO2, while land use change accounts for 27.4% of the downward trend in river flow for the Yangtze rive basin. Our simulations suggest that to better understand the trends of river flow, it is not only necessary to take into account the climate, but also to consider atmospheric composition, carbon-nitrogen interaction and land use change, particularly for regional scales.

Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Comparing the GLC2000 and GeoCover LC land cover datasets for use in economic modelling of land use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares two recent near-global land cover (GLC) datasets, GLC 2000 and GeoCover LC, with differing resolutions (1km versus 30 m) for their potential usefulness in economic analyses of the determinants of land use. The comparisons are ...

G. C. Nelson; R. D. Robertson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with req'd IDC) Principal Investigator's Justification for Indirect

Eustice, Ryan

309

Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Corredor Bioceanico is a major transportation project connecting the agricultural heartlands of South America to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The final link is in southeastern Bolivia - an underdeveloped area that is home to two indigenous groups and globally-significant woodlands and wetlands. Infrastructure developments - comprising a major highway upgrade, revitalized railway services and increased flows along gas pipelines to Brazil - pose major threats to livelihoods and the region's ecological integrity. There are two broad objectives: (i) to map and quantify the spatial patterns of land change using a time-series of coarse and medium resolution satellite imagery; and (ii) to understand the socio-economic and political drivers of change by linking household surveys and interviews with farmers; environmental, climatic, and political data; and classified satellite imagery. Overall, large-scale deforestation has occurred along the Corredor Bioceanico for mechanized commercial production of oil-seed crops such as soybeans and sunflower. The significance of these findings is that agriculture-driven deforestation is pushing into sensitive areas threatening world-renowned ecosystems such as the Chaco, Chiquitano and Pantanal as well as noteworthy national parks. Though quantity remains relatively small compared to other parts of South America, rates of forest loss match or exceed those of more publicized regions such as Rondonia or Mato Grosso, Brazil. Moreover, rates of forest loss are accelerating linearly with time due to policies implemented by incumbent president Evo Morales. Results also show that in the first years of cultivation, pasture is the dominant land-use, but it quickly gives way to intensively cropped farmland. The main findings in terms of percentage area cleared according to forest type is that farmers appear to be favoring transitional forest types on deep and poorly drained soils of alluvial plains. Semi-structured interviews with farmers and representatives of key institutions illustrate that price determined by the global market is not proportionally the most dominant motive driving LULCC in the lowlands of Santa Cruz, Bolivia - an area seen as a quintessential neoliberal frontier.

Redo, Daniel J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home or building's space heating system to heat water as part of an integrated or combination water and space heating system.

311

Indirect and Semi-direct Aerosol Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's ...

Greg M. McFarquhar; Steven Ghan; Johannes Verlinde; Alexei Korolev; J. Walter Strapp; Beat Schmid; Jason M. Tomlinson; Mengistu Wolde; Sarah D. Brooks; Dan Cziczo; Manvendra K. Dubey; Jiwen Fan; Connor Flynn; Ismail Gultepe; John Hubbe; Mary K. Gilles; Alexander Laskin; Paul Lawson; W. Richard Leaitch; Peter Liu; Xiaohong Liu; Dan Lubin; Claudio Mazzoleni; Ann-Marie Macdonald; Ryan C. Moffet; Hugh Morrison; Mikhail Ovchinnikov; Matthew D. Shupe; David D. Turner; Shaocheng Xie; Alla Zelenyuk; Kenny Bae; Matt Freer; Andrew Glen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

An economic analysis of land use alternatives on CRP land trees after the CRP contracts expire in east Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landowners who have planted trees on CRP land must decide whether to retain the trees or divert land to others uses after the contracts expire. An economic tool is developed to assist landowners in making the most profitable choice between retaining trees to produce sawlogs or pulpwood and reverting land to crops, corn, cotton, sorghum and wheat. A generic theoretical framework is formulated to compare various land use alternatives. Several scenarios are formulated to incorporate the changing patterns of variables and to examine the sensitivity of the outcome to these changes. The influence of implementing the conservation compliance plan (CCP) is also examined. The time frame of the analysis is determined by the financially optimal. single rotation length of the tree stand. The real discounted revenues of the land use alternatives, based in 1993, are compared on a per-acre basis. The results indicate that retaining trees on post-CRP land is a better option than reverting land to corn, cotton without a CCP, sorghum, or wheat under all scenarios. However, when compared with reverting land to cotton with a CCP, retaining trees does not seem to be a profitable land use alternative under several of the scenarios. Given that a large proportion of the land going into CRP in east Texas is wheat acres, it seems likely that majority of the CRP land in trees is going to be retained in trees upon expiration of contracts.

Arekere, Marigowda Dhananjaya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

An integrated multi-criteria scenario evaluation web tool for participatory land-use planning in urbanized areas: The Ecosystem Portfolio Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-use land-cover change is one of the most important and direct drivers of changes in ecosystem functions and services. Given the complexity of the decision-making, there is a need for Internet-based decision support systems with scenario evaluation ... Keywords: Decision support, Ecological value, Ecosystem restoration, Land-use planning, Quality of life, Sea level rise mitigation, Sustainability

W. B. Labiosa; W. M. Forney; A. -M. Esnard; D. Mitsova-Boneva; R. Bernknopf; P. Hearn; D. Hogan; L. Pearlstine; D. Strong; H. Gladwin; E. Swain

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

318

LandUse/Land Cover Map of the CF of ARM in the SGP Site Using...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the effects and interactions of sunlight, radiant energy, and clouds on temperatures, weather, and climate. (http:www.arm.govdocsabout.html) This energy balance is affected by...

319

GoMRC Website ‘Meta-analysis Report: Land-use and submerged aquatic vegetation change in the Gulf of Mexico’  

SciTech Connect

Over the past century, health and spatial extent of seagrasses has decreased dramatically in the Gulf of Mexico. While some of the changes can be explained by direct impacts to the seagrass beds, we hypothesize that changes in the land use in the watersheds can also be correlated with the decline of seagrasses. Through this meta-analysis, we researched historical and compared trends in seagrass populations and land use in five bays and their watersheds within the Gulf of Mexico: Mobile Bay, Perdido Bay, Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, and Galveston Bay. Using both historical records and spatial datasets, we examined land use and seagrass trends in these five areas.

Judd, Chaeli; Stefansson, Emily S.; Brushnahan, Heather

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Compiling for an indirect vector register architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The iVMX architecture contains a novel vector register file of up to 4096 vector registers accessed indirectly via a mapping mechanism, providing compatibility with the VMX architecture, and potential for dramatic performance benefits [7]. The large ... Keywords: compiler controlled cache, data reuse, rotating register file, simd, subword parallelism, vectorization, viterbi

Dorit Nuzman; Mircea Namolaru; Ayal Zaks; Jeff H. Derby

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Land Use Changes and Consequent CO2 Emissions due to US Corn Ethanol Production: A Comprehensive Analysis* By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are deeply indebted to Dr. Michael Wang for his many contributions to this research. Throughout the process, he has consistently posed excellent questions that have stimulated more thinking and modifications on our part. Also, for this final paper, he provided an excellent set of insightful suggestions and comments that have improved the paper significantly. Of course, the authors are solely responsible for the content of and any errors in the report. **The original April report was revised because in the review process errors were found in the magnitudes of the EU and Brazil ethanol shocks in moving from the 2001 data base to the updated 2006 data base. The impacts of the errors were small. However, we revised the report to reflect the corrected shocks. The model versions posted on the web include the corrected values and are consistent with this report. Executive Summary The basic objective of this research was to estimate land use changes associated with US corn ethanol production up to the 15 billion gallon Renewable Fuel Standard level implied by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We also used the estimated land use changes to calculate Greenhouse Gas Emissions associated with the corn ethanol production. The main model that was used for the analysis is a special version of the Global Trade

Wallace E. Tyner; Farzad Taheripour; Qianlai Zhuang; Dileep Birur; Uris Baldos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Climatic impacts of land-use change due to crop yield increases and a universal carbon tax from a scenario model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future land cover will have a significant impact on climate and is strongly influenced by the extent of agricultural land-use. Differing assumptions of crop yield increase and carbon pricing mitigation strategies affect projected expansion of ...

T. Davies-Barnard; P. J. Valdes; J. S. Singarayer; C. D. Jones

324

Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Indirect liquefaction of biomass: A fresh approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Indirect liquefaction of biomass is accomplished by first gasifying it to produce a synthesis gas consisting of hydrogen and oxides of carbon, which in turn are converted to any one of a number of liquid fuels and/or chemicals by suitable choice of catalyst, synthesis gas composition and reaction conditions. This approach to producing synthetic fuels and chemicals has been extensively investigated where coal is the carbonaceous feed material, but less so for biomass or other feedstocks. It is generally recognized that the gasification to produce the synthesis gas posses one of the major technical and economic challenges to improving this technology. Herein, is reported a different slant on the indirect liquefaction that could lead to improvements in the efficiency and economics of the process.

Cox, J.L.; Tonkovich, A.Y.; Elliott, D.C. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE/EIS-0222 Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Executive Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, 6 Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant 7 counties; and the City of Richland 8 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and 13 Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HRA-EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HRA-EIS Document Manager 18 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

328

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters August 19, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Illustration of a tankless coil water heater. The heater is...

329

A multi-regression analysis of airline indirect operating costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multiple regression analysis of domestic and local airline indirect costs was carried out to formulate cost estimating equations for airline indirect costs. Data from CAB and FAA sources covering the years 1962-66 was ...

Taneja, Nawal K.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director: Department: Project Title: Project Sponsor without fully recovering the institutional indirect costs which will be incurred in conducting the project COSTS 1. FULL: OF I. A. C. 2. PARTIAL: OF H. B. K. TOTAL PROJECT COSTS L. INDIRECT COSTS TO BE WAIVED, J

Krovi, Venkat

331

Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

1990-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

332

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters May 16, 2013 - 7:21pm Addthis An indirect water heater. An indirect water heater. How does it work? Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use your home's heating system to heat water. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home's space heating system to heat water. They're part of what's called integrated or combination water and space heating systems. How They Work A tankless coil water heater provides hot water on demand without a tank. When a hot water faucet is turned on, water is heated as it flows through a heating coil or heat exchanger installed in a main furnace or boiler. Tankless coil water heaters are most efficient during cold months when the heating system is used regularly but can be an inefficient choice for many

333

Effects of Land Use and Meteorological Conditions on Local and Regional Momentum Transport and Roughness for Midwestern Cropping Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eddy covariance measurements of wind speed u and shear velocity u* from tower- and aircraft-based systems collected over rapidly developing corn- (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] fields were used in determining the local and ...

William P. Kustas; John H. Prueger; J. Ian MacPherson; Mengistu Wolde; Fuqin Li

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Applying geographic information systems to support strategic environmental assessment: Opportunities and limitations in the context of Irish land-use plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strengthening of spatial database infrastructures, further promoted by the INSPIRE Directive adopted in 2007, has led to an increased use of spatial data in planning and decision-making. Given that land-use plans are intrinsically spatial, such evidence and approaches can significantly benefit plan-making. A spatial framework could especially support the specific Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) aspects of the plan-making process. Spatial tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are particularly well-placed to support the environmental integration sought in SEA by providing evidence through the spatial assessment of multiple environmental datasets. Moreover, GIS bring the opportunity to augment conventional assessment techniques (e.g. matrix-based assessments) by acting as visual mediators of spatial knowledge and by providing an effective tool for the spatial and temporal analysis of environmental impacts. This paper presents a GIS-based approach to SEA (GISEA), and analyses the above premise by evaluating the barriers, limitations, opportunities and benefits of its implementation. The GISEA approach has been applied to seven development plans of differing scales in the Republic of Ireland. The results of the case studies revealed that current issues in SEA (e.g. restricted time-frames and institutional arrangements) condition the implementation of a GIS-based approach. Moreover, GIS expertise, data accessibility and quality remain limiting factors to an effective GIS application in SEA. However, the results also confirmed that GIS have the potential to increase the objectivity and accuracy of the assessment, enhance both the understanding of environmental and planning considerations and the delivery of information, and, therefore, help to improve the effectiveness of SEA practice.

Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.co [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Gilmer, Alan, E-mail: alan.gilmer@dit.i [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Foley, Ronan, E-mail: ronan.foley@nuim.i [National Centre for Geo-computation, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Sweeney, John, E-mail: john.sweeney@nuim.i [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Fry, John, E-mail: john.fry@ucd.i [School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Campaign Campaign For the month of April, researchers are descending on and above Barrow, Alaska, to obtain data from the atmosphere that will help them understand the impacts that aerosols have on Arctic clouds and climate. Scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility are using a heavily instrumented aircraft to collect data from the sky, while instruments based at surface sites in Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, are obtaining measurements from the ground. Information obtained during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, will help scientists analyze the role of aerosols in climate, and represents a key contribution to Arctic climate research during International Polar Year.

337

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic ...

S. J. Ghan; X. Liu; R. C. Easter; R. Zaveri; P. J. Rasch; J.-H. Yoon; B. Eaton

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Uncovering land-use dynamics driven by human decision-making - A combined model approach using cellular automata and system dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an enhancement of a cellular automata (CA) model by integrating system dynamics (SD) to incorporate household dynamics and housing decisions as driving forces of residential development. CA macro-models used to simulate the quantitative ... Keywords: Berlin, Cellular automata, Residential choice, Shrinkage, System dynamics, Urban land use modeling

S. Lauf; D. Haase; P. Hostert; T. Lakes; B. Kleinschmit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory October 2010 Invited Talks and Presentations: October 17-20: Keith Kline gave a presentation on the Global Sustainable Bioenergy Project

340

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) http://www.ornl.gov/sci/besd/cbes/ 1 Bioenergy Sustainability and Land-Use Change Report Oak Ridge National Laboratory December 2010 Publication: Dale, VH, R and Environmental Change, pages 52-55, published by the Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Impacts of Post-Dam Land-use/Land-Cover Changes on Modification of Extreme Precipitation in Contrasting Hydro-climate and Terrain Features  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the impact of post-dam climate feedbacks, due to land-use/land-cover (LULC)variability, on modification of extreme precipitation (EP) remains a challenge for a 21st century approach to dam design and operation. In this study, we used ...

Abel T. Woldemichael; Faisal Hossain; Roger Pielke Sr.

342

Contribution of Land Use Changes to Near-Surface Air Temperatures during Recent Summer Extreme Heat Events in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of 1973–2005 land use–land cover (LULC) changes on near-surface air temperatures during four recent summer extreme heat events (EHEs) are investigated for the arid Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan area using the Weather Research and ...

Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Joseph A. Zehnder; Thomas Loridan; C. Sue B. Grimmond

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Federal Energy Subsidies Direct and Indirect Interventions in Energy Markets  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A one-time study defining direct and indirect Federal energy subsidies, methods of valuation of such subsidies, and a survey of existing subsidies.

Information Center

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Illustration of a tankless coil water heater. The heater is box-shaped, and has two pipes sticking out one end: one a cold water inlet, and one a hot water outlet. These pipes lead into the heater to a cylindrical coil called a heat exchanger. Long tubes surrounding the heat exchanger are labeled the heated water jacket. At the bottom of the box is a row of small flames, called the boiler heat source. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home or building's space heating system to heat water as part of an integrated or combination water and space heating system. How Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Work A tankless coil water heater uses a heating coil or heat exchanger

346

New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling New and Underutilized Technology: Multi-stage Indirect Evaporative Cooling October 4, 2013 - 4:33pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for multi-stage evaporative cooling within the Federal sector. Benefits Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is an advanced evaporative cooler that can lower air temperatures without adding moisture. These systems evaporate water in a secondary (or working) airstream, which is discharged in multiple stages. No water or humidity is added to the primary (or product) airstream in the process. Application Multi-stage indirect evaporative cooling is applicable in office, research and development, service, and school applications. Climate and Regional Considerations

347

Band-gap measurements of direct and indirect semiconductors using monochromated electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the development of monochromators for transmission electron microscopes, valence electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (VEELS) has become a powerful technique to study the band structure of materials with high spatial resolution. However, artifacts such as Cerenkov radiation pose a limit for interpretation of the low-loss spectra. In order to reveal the exact band-gap onset using the VEELS method, semiconductors with direct and indirect band-gap transitions have to be treated differently. For direct semiconductors, spectra acquired at thin regions can efficiently minimize the Cerenkov effects. Examples of hexagonal GaN (h-GaN) spectra acquired at different thickness showed that a correct band-gap onset value can be obtained for sample thicknesses up to 0.5 t/{lambda}. In addition, {omega}-q maps acquired at different specimen thicknesses confirm the thickness dependency of Cerenkov losses. For indirect semiconductors, the correct band-gap onset can be obtained in the dark-field mode when the required momentum transfer for indirect transition is satisfied. Dark-field VEEL spectroscopy using a star-shaped entrance aperture provides a way of removing Cerenkov effects in diffraction mode. Examples of Si spectra acquired by displacing the objective aperture revealed the exact indirect transition gap E{sub g} of 1.1 eV.

Gu Lin; Srot, Vesna; Sigle, Wilfried; Koch, Christoph; Aken, Peter van; Ruehle, Manfred [Max-Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Scholz, Ferdinand; Thapa, Sarad B.; Kirchner, Christoph [Institute of Optoelectronics, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Jetter, Michael [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Indirect impacts in Illinois from a renewable portfolio standard  

SciTech Connect

Indirect impacts associated with Illinois' RPS include a change in the laws concerning the planning and zoning for wind development, a market for renewable energy credits, and awareness of problems with the transmission grid. (author)

Ohler, Adrienne M.; Radusewicz, Kristi

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Indirect Coulomb energy for two-dimensional atoms  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we provide a family of lower bounds on the indirect Coulomb energy for atomic and molecular systems in two dimensions in terms of a functional of the single particle density with gradient correction terms.

Benguria, Rafael D.; Tusek, Matej [Departamento de Fisica, P. Universidad Catolica de Chile Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Cost study application of the guidebook on integrated community energy systems: indirect economic and energy impacts  

SciTech Connect

An ICES is being considered for a community located in a small New England city. (MCW) It is part of the city's newer development. It is a commercial park of offices, shopping center, bank, hospital, and hotel. The ICES for this community is designed to meet all heating, cooling, steam, and hot water needs. Electricity from the cogeneration unit is to be sold to the local utility, and electricity for the community will be purchased as at present. However, future electrical demand will be reduced, since absorption chillers, which will be powered by heat recovered from the central ICES unit, will partially replace electric air conditioners. In addition, hot-water heating from ICES will, in some cases, lower electrical use. Thus, the ICES involves substitution of energy forms as well as modification of fuel requirements. Examination of the integrated system, in comparison with existing energy systems, includes both indirect economic impacts (employment and fiscal effects on the city) and indirect energy impacts. The indirect economic analysis proceeds from an initial description of conditions that determine employment and fiscal results through specific estimates of employment and then revenues and costs to municipal government and finally to an evaluation of ICES's worth to the city. The indirect energy analysis compares energy resource requirements of the ICES with those for gas, oil, and electric systems now serving the community. (MCW)

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Analyses of Nocturnal Temperature Cooling-Rate Response to Historical Local-Scale Urban Land-Use/Land Cover Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanization affects near-surface climates by increasing city temperatures relative to rural temperatures [i.e., the urban heat island (UHI) effect]. This effect is usually measured as the relative temperature difference between urban areas and a ...

Winston T. L. Chow; Bohumil M. Svoma

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the ?rst indirect aerosol effect, Atmos. Chem. Phys. , 5,Cloud susceptibility and the ?rst aerosol indirect forcing:to black carbon and aerosol concentrations, J. Geophys.

Lohmann, Ulrike

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Green Data Center Cooling: Achieving 90% Reduction: Airside Economization and Unique Indirect Evaporative Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center's constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant change is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling system. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. This project's geographic location allowed maximizing the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling, but these strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the U.S.

Weerts, B. A.; Gallaher, D.; Weaver, R.; Van Geet, O.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Libyan supply disruption may have both direct and indirect effects ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Global crude oil flows will tend to adjust to best match ... Another way in which a ... Oil inventory levels are generally high by historical standards.

356

An Indirect Effect of Ice Nuclei on Atmospheric Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM) with observed large-scale forcing is used to study how ice nuclei (IN) affect the net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In all the numerical experiments carried out, the cloud ice ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Minghua Zhang; Arthur Y. Hou; Shaocheng Xie; Stephen Lang; Xiaowen Li; David O’C. Starr; Xiaofan Li; Joanne Simpson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Direct and Indirect Shortwave Radiative Effects of Sea Salt Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea salt aerosols play a dual role in affecting the atmospheric radiative balance. Directly, sea salt particles scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb the outgoing terrestrial radiation. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei, sea salt ...

Tarek Ayash; Sunling Gong; Charles Q. Jia

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392°, 9.501785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":56.26392,"lon":9.501785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Comparison of indirect cost multipliers for vehicle manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

In the process of manufacturing and selling vehicles, a manufacturer incurs certain costs. Among these costs are those incurred directly as a part of manufacturing operations and those incurred indirectly in the processes of manufacturing and selling. The indirect costs may be production-related, such as R and D and engineering; business-related, such as corporate staff salaries and pensions; or retail-sales-related, such as dealer support and marketing. These indirect costs are recovered by allocating them to each vehicle. Under a stable, high-volume production process, the allocation of these indirect costs can be approximated as multipliers (or factors) applied to the direct cost of manufacturing. A manufacturer usually allocates indirect costs to finished vehicles according to a corporation-specific pricing strategy. Because the volumes of sales and production vary widely by model within a corporation, the internal corporate percent allocation of various accounting categories (such as profit or corporate overheat) can vary widely among individual models. Approaches also vary across corporations. For these purposes, an average value is constructed, by means of a generic representative method, for vehicle models produced at high volume. To accomplish this, staff at Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Center for Transportation Research analyzed the conventional vehicle cost structure and developed indirect cost multipliers for passenger vehicles. This memorandum summarizes the results of an effort to compare and put on a common basis the cost multipliers used in ANL's electric and hybrid electric vehicle cost estimation procedures with those resulting from two other methodologies. One of the two compared methodologies is derived from a 1996 presentation by Dr. Chris Borroni-Bird of Chrysler Corporation, the other is by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA), as described in a 1995 report by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), Congress of the United States. The cost multipliers are used for scaling the component costs to retail prices.

Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Cuenca, R.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method  

SciTech Connect

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000{degrees}C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000[degrees]C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Questions and Answers - What is one example of indirect evidence that  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do I make amodel of an atom? How do I make a<br>model of an atom? Previous Question (How do I make a model of an atom?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is an element? How many elements are there?) What is an element? Howmany elements are there? What is one example of indirect evidence that scientists use to study an atom? Pretty much everything we know about atoms is indirect evidence. One can't really see atoms. We do see enough of their effects that we can, with confidence, describe the nature of atoms. Here at Jefferson Lab we have quite a few instruments to measure the properties and behavior of atoms. We use a few simple tricks to measure atoms. The most common method is to shoot the atoms through an easy-to-ionize gas or liquid. Argon is the most

364

Heavy-ion Collisions: Direct and indirect probes of the density and temperature dependence of Esym  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy-ion collisions provide a versatile terrestrial probe of the nuclear equation of state through the formation of nuclear matter at a wide variety of temperatures, densities, and pressures. Direct and indirect approaches for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using heavy-ion collisions have been developed. The direct approach relies on scaling methods which attempt to connect isotopic fragment distributions to the symmetry energy. Using the indirect approach constraints on the equation of state are extracted from comparison of experimental results and theoretical transport calculations which utilize effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. Besides exploring the density dependence of the equation of state, heavy-ion collisions are simultaneously probing different temperature gradients of nuclear matter allowing for the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy to be examined. The current progress and open questions related to constraining the density and temperature dependence of the symmetry energy with heavy-ion collisions are discussed in the review.

Z. Kohley; S. J. Yennello

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing  

SciTech Connect

Some of the global warming effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases is offset by increased solar reflection from clouds with smaller droplets that form on increased numbers of cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air. The global magnitude of the resulting indirect aerosol climate forcing is estimated to be comparable (and opposed) to the anthropogenic carbon dioxide forcing, but estimates are highly uncertain because of complexities in characterizing the physical process that determine global aerosol and cloud populations and their interactions. Beyond reflecting sunlight more effectively, smaller droplets are less efficient at producing precipitation, and decreased precipitation is expected to result in increased cloud water and cloud cover, further increasing the indirect forcing. Yet polluted marine boundary-layer clouds are not generally observed to hold more water. Here we use model simulations of stratocumulus clouds to show that suppression of precipitation from increased droplet concentrations leads to increased cloud water only when sufficient precipitation reaches the surface, a condition favored when the overlying air is moist. Otherwise, aerosol induced suppression of precipitation enhances entrainment of overlying dry air, thereby reducing cloud water and diminishing the indirect climate forcing.

Ackerman, A S; Kirkpatrick, M P; Stevens, D E; Toon, O B

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermally Indirect Motions in the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of the dry convective boundary layer is studied by partitioning the turbulent heat flux into thermally indirect (w???thermally direct (w???>0) components as a function of z/Zi. It is found that except for the inversion ...

J. M. Wilczak; Joost A. Businger

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change?, Science 319:1238–40  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most prior studies have found that substituting biofuels for gasoline will reduce greenhouse gases because biofuels sequester carbon through the growth of the feedstock. These analyses have failed to count the carbon emissions that occur as farmers worldwide respond to higher prices and convert forest and grassland to new cropland to replace the grain (or cropland) diverted to biofuels. Using a worldwide agricultural model to estimate emissions from land use change, we found that corn-based ethanol, instead of producing a 20 % savings, nearly doubles greenhouse emissions over 30 years and increases greenhouse gases for 167 years. Biofuels from switchgrass, if grown on U.S. corn lands, increase emissions by 50%. This result raises concerns about large biofuel mandates and highlights the value of using waste products.

Timothy Searchinger; Ralph Heimlich; R. A. Houghton; Fengxia Dong; Amani Elobeid; Jacinto Fabiosa; Simla Tokgoz; Dermot Hayes; Tun-hsiang Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Indirect detections and analyses of GRBs by ionospheric response  

SciTech Connect

We report on the independent and indirect detection of GRBs by their ionospheric response (SID--Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance) observed at VLF (Very Low Frequency), and discus its possible impact on GRB science and investigations in general. Although few such detections have been already reported in the past, the capability of such alternative and indirect investigations of GRBs still remains to be investigated in more details. We present and discuss examples of such VLF/SID detection of GRBs 060124A, GRB080319D a GRB080320A. A network of SID monitors has been created and is operated to detect more GRBs. The importance of these detections for GRB analyses and GRB science in general is still to be further and in full detail exploited. Some possible outcomes in this direction will be outlined and discussed.

Slosiar, R. [Partizanske Observatory, Amateur Astronomer, Bojnice (Slovakia); Hudec, R. [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 251 65 Ondrejov, Czech Republic and Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Elctrical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic)

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

Indirect detections and analyses of GRBs by ionospheric response  

SciTech Connect

We present and discuss the independent and indirect detection of GRBs by their ionospheric response (SID--Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance) observed at VLF (Very Low Frequency), and evaluate its possible impact on GRB science and investigations in general. Although few such detections have been already reported in the past, the capability of such alternative and indirect investigations of GRBs still remains to be investigated in more details. We present and discuss examples of such VLF/SID detection of GRBs 060124A, GRB080319D a GRB080320A. A network of SID monitors has been created and is operated to detect more GRBs. The importance of these detections for GRB analyses and GRB science in general is still to be further and in full detail exploited.

Hudec, Rene [Astronomical Institute, AS CR, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic); Slosiar, Rudolf [Bojnice and Partizanske Observatory (Slovakia)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to an integrated fuel cell power plant, and more specifically to a combination of cycles wherein a first fuel cell cycle tops an indirect-fired gas turbine cycle and a second fuel cell cycle bottoms the gas turbine cycle so that the cycles are thermally integrated in a tandem operating arrangement. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to the employer-employee relationship between the United States Department of Energy and the inventors.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Sudhoff, F.A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Indirect search for New Physics: complementarity to direct searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an overview on the interplay between direct searches for new physics at the LHC and indirect constraints from the flavour sector, with an emphasis on the implications of the recent LHCb results. The complementarity with the Higgs search results will also be addressed. We show the correlation and complementarity between the different sectors in the context of a few specific examples in supersymmetry.

F. Mahmoudi

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

375

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

380

Indirect Drive Warm-Loaded Ignition Target Design  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Indirect Drive Warm-Loaded Ignition Target design. These targets either use a fill tube or the capsule is strong enough to withstand the room temperature pressure of the DT fuel. Only features that affect the design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System (NCTS) are presented. The design presented is the current thinking and may evolve further. The NCTS should be designed to accommodate a range of targets and target scales, as described here. The interface location between the target and the NCTS cryostat is at the target base / gripper joint, the tamping gas gland/gland joint, and the electrical plug/receptacle joint.

Bernat, T P; Gibson, C R

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination- Merger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company ("CY"), and Yankee Atomic Electric Company ("YR") (each a "Yankee Company," and together, "the Yankee Companies"), hereby respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ("NRC") Third Request for Additional Information for Application for NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination (TAC Nos. L24496, L24497, and L24498) ("RAI 3") received by the Yankee Companies on August 5, 2011. If you have questions or require additional information, please contact me or Joe Fay at (207) 350-0300. Sincerely, Wayne Norton

The Yankee Companies

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CHANGES IN LAND USE PATTERNS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON RIO GRANDE TURKEYS IN THE ROLLING PLAINS OF TEXAS (Annual Report-2001)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Savannah River DOE Site, Oak Ridge DOE Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, DOE Mound Site, UMTRA training of two populations of workers: Native American tribal members and employees, and public safety Diffusion Plant, KY; Portsmouth Site, OH; Oak Ridge Operations, TN; and the Savannah River Site, SC

383

A decision-oriented model to evaluate the effect of land use and agricultural management on herbicide contamination in stream water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling stream water pollution by herbicides in agricultural areas is a critical issue since numerous and incompletely known processes are involved. A decision-oriented model, SACADEAU-Transf, which represents water and pesticide transfer in medium-sized ... Keywords: Agriculture, Catchment, Decision oriented, Herbicide, Modelling, Pesticide, Stream water quality, Subsurface flow, Surface flow

Chantal Gascuel-Odoux; Pierre Aurousseau; Marie-Odile Cordier; Patrick Durand; Frederick Garcia; Véronique Masson; Jordy Salmon-Monviola; Florent Tortrat; Ronan Trepos

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Opportunities for reducing product costs in indirect liquefaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MITRE indirect liquefaction simulation model for the advanced configuration that includes Shell gasification and slurry-phase F-T synthesis was downsized to coincide with the Bechtel/Amoco conceptual plant with a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per stream day. Then the kinetic parameters used by Bechtel/Amoco in the slurry F-T model were substituted in the model. This resulted in the same per pass conversion and in the same number of reactors as estimated in the Bechtel basecase. The total capital cost for this plant was estimated to be $2982 million using the MITRE model. This agrees well with the preliminary Bechtel/Amoco capital cost of $2961 million for the same size plant(3). Once the WM simulation of the basecase plant was shown to be in agreement with the Bechtel/Amoco case, the analysis of further potential cost reductions beyond the basecase could be investigated. This analysis only investigated the potential cost reductions that could result from improvements in the F-T area of the conceptual plant. This is the area that is impacted by the research and development underway in the indirect program. The cost impact of the following potential improvements were investigated using the MITRE simulation model: Doubling the baseline catalyst activity; doubling the catalyst loading; and doubling the superficial gas velocity.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; ElSawy, A. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Framatome ANP Indirect-Cycle Very High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Framatome ANP is developing a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, relying on its previous experience with high temperature reactor designs, from its participation in the MODUL and the GT-MHR designs. The Framatome ANP VHTR design is based on an indirect cycle coupled to an 'off-the-shelf' combined cycle gas turbine. Although direct cycle HTR's are being promoted for their high efficiency, preliminary evaluations show that the Framatome ANP design efficiency is on par with a direct cycle while avoiding PGS (Power Generation System) developments and keeping the PGS contamination free. This concept was independently evaluated with sensitivity analysis by EDF. Moreover, the nuclear heat source of the indirect cycle could also be used to qualify the direct cycle components without risk of contamination behind the IHX, thus assisting in the preparation for the later introduction of that technology. Relying to the maximum extent on available technology, the Framatome ANP VHTR plant can demonstrate high-efficiency electricity generation and carbon-free hydrogen production. (authors)

Copsey, Bernie [Framatome ANP, Inc., 3315 Old Forest Road Lynchburg, VA (United States); Lecomte, Michel [Framatome ANP, SAS, Tour AREVA Paris, La Defense (France); Brinkmann, Gerd [Framatome ANP, GmbH, 49 (9131) 18-96630, Erlangen (Germany); Capitaine, Alain; Deberne, Nicolas [EDF/SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Indirect detection of dryout in simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The method of indirect dryout detection was developed by an examination of the data from THORS Bundle 6A. This was a 19-pin bundle of FFTF configuration. The pin size, wire-wrap size and axial pitch were identical to those in Bundle 9; the major difference between the Bundle 6A and Bundle 9 FPSs was the length of the upper unheated zone, which simulated, in Bundle 6A, the reflector and fission gas plenum in FFTF (1.19 m) and, in Bundle 9, the upper axial blanket and fission gas plenum in CRBR (1.54 m). In addition, Bundle 6A had half-size (0.71 mm) edge channel wire-wraps and a low thermal inertia (0.51 mm thick) duct wall surrounded by calcium silicate insulation in an attempt to flatten the bundle temperature profile.

Levin, A.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

An Indirect Search for WIMPs with Super-Kamiokande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A potential source of high energy neutrinos is the annihilation of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) collecting in gravitational potential wells such as the centers of the Earth, the Sun, or the Galaxy. A search for such a WIMP annihilation signal using the Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) detector is presented. Super-K observes 1.1 upward through-going muons per day. These events are caused by high energy (typical E_nu ~ 100 GeV) nu_mu interactions in the rock under the detector, and are generally consistent with the expected flux from atmospheric neutrinos. No enhancement of the neutrino signal due to WIMP annihilation is seen, so upper limits on the possible flux of WIMPS are set. These limits are compared to those from other such indirect searches, and a model-independent method is used to compare the Super-K results with direct-detection WIMP experiments.

A. Habig; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 7, Direct/Indirect Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Indirect control with quantum accessor (I): coherent control of multi-level system via qubit chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indirect controllability of an arbitrary finite dimensional quantum system (N-dimensional qudit) through a quantum accessor is investigated. Here, The qudit is coupled to a quantum accessor which is modeled as a fully controllable spin chain with nearest neighbor (anisotropic) XY-coupling. The complete controllability of such indirect control system is investigated in detail. The general approach is applied to the indirect controllability of two and three dimensional quantum systems. For two and three dimensional systems, a simpler indirect control scheme is also presented.

H. C. Fu; Hui Dong; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal Infrared Exposure of Cryogenic Indirect Drive ICF Targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets at the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be protected from thermal infrared radiation by a cold shroud. As the shroud is removed just before the laser pulse, infrared radiation will heat and possibly degrade the symmetry of the solid hydrogen fuel layer. A lumped component mathematical model has been constructed to calculate how long an indirect drive target can be exposed to thermal radiation before the fuel layer degrades. The allowed exposure time sets the maximum shroud removal time and therefore has important implications for the design of the cryogenic shroud systems. The model predicts that the maximum exposure time is approximately 0.18 s for plastic capsules inside hohlraums with transparent laser entrance holes. By covering the laser entrance holes with a partially reflective coating, the exposure time can be increased to approximately 1 s. The exposure time can be increased to about 2 s by using beryllium capsules. Several other design concepts could increase the exposure time even further. Lengthening of the allowed exposure time to 1 s or longer could allow a significant cost savings for the shroud system.

London, R A; Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Sater, J D; Haid, B J; Bittner, D N

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-493 Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride I. Ursu National Center- vation of235 U NMR signal in liquid UF6 at B = 11.747 T has been recently reported [7]. The aim of this Letter is to investigate the effect of the 23 5U enrichment on the 19F NMR spectra in gaseous UF6. Using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

394

Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

imap: Indirect measurement of air pollution with cellphones. PerCOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—In this paper, we introduce the cellphonebased indirect sensing problem. While participatory sensing aims at monitoring of a phenomenon by deploying a dense set of sensors carried by individuals, our indirect sensing problem aims at inferring the manifestations of a sparsely monitored phenomenon on the individuals. The main advantage of the indirect sensing method is that, by making use of existing exposure modeling and estimation methods, it provides a more feasible alternative to direct sensing. Collection of time-location logs using the cellphones plays a major role in our indirect sensing method, while direct sensing at the cellphones is unneeded. We focus on the air pollutant exposure estimation problem as an application of the indirect sensing technique and propose a web-based framework, iMAP, for addressing this problem. I.

Murat Demirbas; Carole Rudra; Atri Rudra; Murat Ali Bayir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

doi:10.1093/aob/mcn127, available online at www.aob.oxfordjournals.org REVIEW Indirect Suppression of Photosynthesis on Individual Leaves by Arthropod Herbivory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

† Background Herbivory reduces leaf area, disrupts the function of leaves, and ultimately alters yield and productivity. Herbivore damage to foliage typically is assessed in the field by measuring the amount of leaf tissue removed and disrupted. This approach assumes the remaining tissues are unaltered, and plant photosynthesis and water balance function normally. However, recent application of thermal and fluorescent imaging technologies revealed that alterations to photosynthesis and transpiration propagate into remaining undamaged leaf tissue. † Scope and Conclusions This review briefly examines the indirect effects of herbivory on photosynthesis, measured by gas exchange or chlorophyll fluorescence, and identifies four mechanisms contributing to the indirect suppression of photosynthesis in remaining leaf tissues: severed vasculature, altered sink demand, defence-induced autotoxicity, and defence-induced down-regulation of photosynthesis. We review the chlorophyll fluorescence and thermal imaging techniques used to gather layers of spatial data and discuss methods for compiling these layers to achieve greater insight into mechanisms contributing to the indirect suppression of photosynthesis. We also elaborate on a few herbivore-induced gene-regulating mechanisms which modulate photosynthesis and discuss the difficult nature of measuring spatial heterogeneity when combining fluorescence imaging and gas exchange technology. Although few studies have characterized herbivore-induced indirect effects on photosynthesis at the leaf level, an emerging literature suggests that the loss of photosynthetic capacity following herbivory may be greater than

Paul D. Nabity; Jorge A. Zavala; Evan H. Delucia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Measure of Human Error: Direct and Indirect Performance Shaping Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of performance shaping factors (PSFs) is to provide measures to account for human performance. PSFs fall into two categories—direct and indirect measures of human performance. While some PSFs such as “time to complete a task” are directly measurable, other PSFs, such as “fitness for duty,” can only be measured indirectly through other measures and PSFs, such as through fatigue measures. This paper explores the role of direct and indirect measures in human reliability analysis (HRA) and the implications that measurement theory has on analyses and applications using PSFs. The paper concludes with suggestions for maximizing the reliability and validity of PSFs.

Ronald L. Boring; Candice D. Griffith; Jeffrey C. Joe

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

iCheat: a representation for artistic control of indirect cinematic lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thanks to an increase in rendering efficiency, indirect illumination has recently begun to be integrated in cinematic lighting design, an application where physical accuracy is less important than careful control of scene appearance. This paper presents ...

Juraj Obert; Jaroslav K?ivánek; Fabio Pellacini; Daniel Sykora; Sumanta Pattanaik

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Plant Engineering: Evaluation of Indirect Assessment Techniques for Coating Flaw Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a description of the work performed and conclusions resulting from an investigation of indirect assessment techniques for coating flaw detection on buried piping in nuclear generating power plant environments. Indirect assessment techniques have been developed and successfully used in the oil and gas industry to identify coating flaws on buried transmission and distribution pipelines. These techniques involve the use of electrochemical measurements taken at the soil surface (grade) to dete...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Indirect Detection of GRBs by Ionospheric Response - Detection of GRB060124A  

SciTech Connect

We report on the independent and indirect detection of GRBs by their ionospheric response (SID-Sudden Ionospheric Disturbance) observed at VLF (Very Low Frequency). Although few such detections have been already reported in the past, the capability of such alternative and indirect investigations of GRBs still remains to be investigated in more details. We present and discuss an example of such VLF/SID detection of the GRB 060124A.

Slosiar, Rudolf [Astronomical Union of Amateur Astronomers, Bojnice (Slovakia); Hudec, Rene [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ 251 65 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

ASPEN simulation of the SNG production process in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The synthetic natural gas (SNG) production process (methanation, CO-shift, and hydrogen removal) in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant was simulated using the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN). The simulation of the methanation unit agreed to within 12% of Fluor's design for converting carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. A parametric study examined the effect of four important operating parameters on product composition, process thermal efficiency, and outlet temperature from the second methanation reactor. The molar split of gas feed to the CO-shift unit before methanation was varied from 0.2 to 0.6; variations of molar recycle ratio (0.01 - 0.67), molar steam-to-feed ratio (0.04 - 0.19), and feed temperature (478 - 533 K, 400-500/sup 0/F) to the first methanation reactor were also studied. A 50%-lower split improved thermal efficiency by 6%, but the mole % hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the product SNG required to meet pipeline-quality standards and temperature constraints were not met. Increasing the steam-to-feed ratio from 0.04 to 0.19 improved product quality but decreased thermal efficiency by 8%. By decreasing the feed temperature from 533 to 477 K (500 to 400/sup 0/F), product specifications and temperature constraints were met with no effect on thermal efficiency. However, it may be impractical to operate the reactor at 477 K (400/sup 0/F) because the kinetics are too slow. Increasing the recycle ratio from 0.4 to 0.67 had no effect on thermal efficiency, and temperature constraints and product specifications were met. The SNG production process should be optimized at recycle ratios above 0.67.

Bistline, J E; Shafer, T B

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

ARM - Field Campaign - Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) govCampaignsIndirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) Campaign Links ISDAC Website Related Campaigns Parameterization of Extinction Coefficient in Ice and Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds During ISDAC 2010.10.01, Korolev, AAF ISDAC - Second Year Supplemental Surface Spectral Irradiance Measurements 2009.04.07, Lubin, NSA ISDAC - NASA ARCTAS Coordination with ARM 2008.04.01, Ferrare, NSA ISDAC / RISCAM - Humidified Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) 2008.04.01, Collins, NSA ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer 2008.03.31, Lubin, NSA Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) 2008.04.01 - 2008.04.30 Website : http://acrf-campaign.arm.gov/isdac/

404

Indirect control with quantum accessor: coherent control by initial state preparation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the second one in our series of papers on indirect quantum control assisted by quantum accessor. In this paper we propose and study a new class of indirect quantum control(IDQC) scheme based on the initial states preparation of the accessor. In the present scheme, after the initial state of the accessor is properly prepared, the system is controlled by repeatedly switching on and off the interaction between the system and the accessor. This is different from the protocol of our first paper, where we manipulate the interaction between the controlled system and the accessor. We prove the controllability of the controlled system for the proposed indirect control scheme. Furthermore, we give an example with two coupled spins qubits to illustrate the scheme, the concrete control process and the controllability.

H. Dong; X. F. Liu; H. C. Fu; C. P. Sun

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

Deactivation by carbon of iron catalysts for indirect liquefaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes recent progress in a fundamental, three-year investigation of carbon formation and its effects on the activity and selectivity of promoted iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, the objectives of which are: determine rates and mechanisms of carbon deactivation of unsupported Fe and Fe/K catalysts during CO hydrogenation over a range of CO concentrations, CO:H{sub 2} ratios, and temperatures; model the rates of deactivation of the same catalysts in fixed-bed reactors. During the thirteenth quarter design of software for a computer-automated reactor system to be used in the kinetic and deactivation studies was continued. Further progress was made toward the completion of the control language, control routines, and software for operating this system. Progress was also made on the testing of the system hardware and software. H{sub 2} chemisorption capacities and activity selectivity data were also measured for three iron catalysts promoted with 1% alumina. 47 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Bartholomew, C.H.

1990-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

406

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via pipeline compressed in CA 68.0 0 68.0 Liquefied natural gas Overseas sourced LNG delivered to Baja, regasified and reliquefied at 80% efficiency 93.37 0 93.37...

407

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

408

Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices, land rents, capital intensity of housing and housingrents and capital intensities. A richer formulation, inof development and the capital intensity of development. His

Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Purdue Land Use Update March 1, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and research (DEAD) · HB 1265 - Oil, gas, and coal bed methane property. (ALIVE) · SB 177 - Indiana Historic for a lifetime (DEAD) #12;Jamie Palmer, AICP IU Public Policy Institute APA Indiana jlpalmer@iupui.edu 317

410

LAND USE, COVER AND FORMS CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon request other state agencies in their mapping activities. Although our primary responsibility. 1 #12;2 A committee representing eight state agencies was formed in 1973 to improve land resources data coordination within the various state agencies by reducing duplication of effort and increasing

Binford, Michael W.

411

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

412

Resolution of Indirect Anaphora in Japanese Sentences Using Examples "X no Y (Y of X)"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A noun phrase can indirectly refer to an entity that has already been mentioned. For example, "I went into an old house last night. The roof was leaking badly and ..." indicates that "the roof" is associated with "an old house", which was mentioned in the previous sentence. This kind of reference (indirect anaphora) has not been studied well in natural language processing, but is important for coherence resolution, language understanding, and machine translation. In order to analyze indirect anaphora, we need a case frame dictionary for nouns that contains knowledge of the relationships between two nouns but no such dictionary presently exists. Therefore, we are forced to use examples of "X no Y" (Y of X) and a verb case frame dictionary instead. We tried estimating indirect anaphora using this information and obtained a recall rate of 63% and a precision rate of 68% on test sentences. This indicates that the information of "X no Y" is useful to a certain extent when we cannot make us...

Masaki Murata; Hitoshi Isahara; Makoto Nagao

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell Prize Address APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting November 15, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF

414

Office of Research and Sponsored Programs Charging Direct and Indirect Costs Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

institutional activity." All costs charged to a sponsored project must comply with any terms and conditions direct charges on a sponsored project. However, there are exceptions when these costs may be chargedOffice of Research and Sponsored Programs Charging Direct and Indirect Costs Policy Revised 10

de la Torre, José R.

415

Revised 1/17/12 Indirect Cost Recovery/Overhead Distribution Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the sponsored project whereas indirect cost items cannot be identified readily and specifically with a particular sponsored project. A. Direct Costs Direct costs, as defined by the federal government, are those costs that can be identified specifically with a particular sponsored project, an instructional activity

416

An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 044177 Comparison of Direct vs. Indirect Ventilation Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 044177 Comparison of Direct vs. Indirect. Direct measurement of ventilation rate in livestock housing can be a formidable task due of a commercial laying hen house with manure belt (manure removed daily) obtained from direct measurement based

Kentucky, University of

417

Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Effects of Land Use on the Mobility of Elderly and Disabled and Their Homecare Workers, and the Effects of Care on Client Mobility: Findings from Contra Costa, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aides caring for elderly and disabled adults (Doctoralcare for the elderly and disabled has not shifted to home-to aged, blind, or disabled persons . . . who are unable to

Decker, Annie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Effects of Land Use on the Mobility of Elderly and Disabled and Their Homecare Workers, and the Effects of Care on Client Mobility: Findings from Contra Costa, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis zones and for the zip code tabulation areas, seeCounty, with city names and zip codes. Note. Based on U.S.in Contra Costa County by zip code. Note. Based on U.S.

Decker, Annie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008  

SciTech Connect

The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Different Approaches for Constraining Global Climate Models of the Anthropogenic Indirect Aerosol Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments of the influence of aerosol emissions from human activities on the radiation budget, in particular via the modification of cloud properties, have been a challenge. In light of the variability to both aerosol properties and ...

U. Lohmann; J. Quaas; S. Kinne; J. Feichter

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Study of the Aerosol Indirect Effect by Large-Eddy Simulation of Marine Stratocumulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 98 three-dimensional large-eddy simulations (LESs) of marine stratocumulus clouds covering both nighttime and daytime conditions were performed to explore the response of cloud optical depth (?) to various aerosol number concentrations ...

Miao-Ling Lu; John H. Seinfeld

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT Title: Estimate the Indirect Aerosol Effect and Retrieval of Related Parameters from Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of cloud liquid water [Ackerman et al. 1995]. Another mechanism may lead to desiccation of clouds due to aerosol-cloud interaction is by enhanced solar absorption [e.g., Ackerman and Toon, 1996]. Calculations clouds. J. Geophys. Res., 100, 7121-7133. Ackerman, A. S., and O. B. Toon, 1996: Unrealistic desiccation

426

Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while the two others (CAM-PNNL and CAM-Umich) indicate ain T42L26 resolution. CAM-PNNL: The simulations were doneCAM- NCAR CAM- Oslo CAM- PNNL CAM- Umich ECHAM5 GFDL GISS

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while the two others (CAM-PNNL and CAM-Umich) indicate ain T42L26 resolution. CAM-PNNL: The simulations were doneCAM- NCAR CAM- Oslo CAM- PNNL CAM- Umich ECHAM5 GFDL GISS

Quaas, Johannes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Cancellation of Aerosol Indirect Effects in Marine Stratocumulus through Cloud Thinning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying perturbation theory within a mixed layer framework, the response of the marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud thickness h to imposed increases of the cloud droplet concentration Nd as a surrogate for increases in cloud condensation nuclei (...

Robert Wood

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Aerosol Indirect Effects on Tropical Convection Characteristics under Conditions of Radiative–Convective Equilibrium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of enhanced aerosol concentrations such as those associated with dust intrusions on the trimodal distribution of tropical convection have been investigated through the use of large-domain (10 000 grid points), fine-resolution (1 km), ...

Susan C. van den Heever; Graeme L. Stephens; Norman B. Wood

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Indirect vector control of a squirrel cage induction generator wind turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper deals with a squirrel cage induction generator connected to the grid through a back-to-back converter driven by vector control. The stator-side converter controls the generator torque by means of an indirect vector control scheme. In order ... Keywords: Back-to-back converter, Low voltage ride through, Squirrel cage induction generator (SCIG), Torque regulation, Vector control, Wind power generation

José Luis DomíNguez-GarcíA; Oriol Gomis-Bellmunt; LluíS Trilla-Romero; Adrií Junyent-Ferré

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This reports on a project to develop an indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Development has continued on a vehicle-installed prototype for EPA certification and demonstration. Focus of development is on the use of this technology for retrofitting existing diesel vehicles to reduce emissions rather than exclusively upon deployment in the OEM market. Technical obstacles that have been encountered and their solutions and remaining project tasks are described.

MacCarley, C.A.

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r{sup 2} of signal mean to kV: 0.91, 0.93, 0.86, and 0.99 for 0.1-mm Sn, 0.2-mm Cu, 1.5-mm Al, and 0.05-mm Ag, respectively; r{sup 2} of signal variance to kV: 0.99 for all four filters). The comparison of the signal and noise (mean, variance, and NPS) between the simulated and measured air scan images suggested that this model was reasonable in predicting accurate signal statistics of air scan images using absolute percent error. Overall, the model was found to be accurate in estimating signal statistics and spatial correlation between the detector elements of the images acquired with indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors. Conclusions: The semiempirical linear model of the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors was described and validated with images of air scans. The model was found to be a useful tool in understanding the signal and noise transfer within indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector systems.

Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 92106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp  

SciTech Connect

High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Indirect measurements of reactions in hot p-p chain and CNO cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several reactions have been experimentally studied, including the {sup 12}N(d,n){sup 13}O and the ones induced by the {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C entrance channel. The former was carried out at the CRIB facility of University of Tokyo, aiming to indirectly determine the astrophysical reaction rates of the {sup 12}N(p,{gamma}){sup 13}O reaction. For the {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C entrance channel, many excited states of several nuclei are populated and the angular distribution of each state is being analyzed.

Wang, Y. B.; Guo, B.; Jin, S. J.; Li, Z. H.; Binh, D. N.; Hashimoto, H.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Hu, J.; Iwasa, N.; Kahl, D. M.; Kubono, S.; Kume, N.; Li, E. T.; Li, Y. J.; Liu, X.; Su, J.; Xu, S. W.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yan, S. Q. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, PO Box 275 (10), Beijing 102413 (China); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako (Japan); Institute of Modern Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Department of Physics, Tohoku university, Sendai (Japan); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku university, Sendai (Japan); China Institute of Atomic Energy, PO Box 275 (10), Beijing 102413 (China); Institute of Modern Physics, China Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China); Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako (Japan); China Institute of Atomic Energy, PO Box 275 (10), Beijing 102413 (China); and others

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

436

Indirect control of quantum system via accessor: pure coherent control without system excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A pure indirect control of quantum systems via quantum accessor is investigated. In this control scheme, we do not apply any external classical excitation fields on the controlled system and we control a quantum system via a quantum accessor and classical control fields control the accessor only. Complete controllability is investigated for arbitrary finite dimensional quantum systems and exemplified by 2 and 3 dimensional systems. The scheme exhibits some advantages; it uses less qubits in accessor and does not depend on the energy-level structure of the controlled system.

H. C. Fu; Hui Dong; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: A pilot study in humans  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. Methods and Materials: We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. Results: The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. Conclusions: We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Draney, Mary T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sivanandan, Ranjiv [Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Ruehm, Stefan G. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Herfkens, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fully relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shieldings and indirect nuclear spin-spin couplings in group-15 and -16 hydrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fully relativistic calculations of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of both indirect nuclear spin–spin couplings 1 J(X- H ) and 2 J( H-H ) and nuclear magnetic shieldings ?(X) and ?(H) for the group-15 and -16 hydrides are presented. Relativistic calculations were performed with Dirac–Fock wave functions and the random phase approximation method. Results are compared to its nonrelativistic counterpart. Paramagnetic and diamagnetic contributions to the nuclear magnetic shielding constants are also reported. We found very large relativistic corrections to both properties in the sixth-row hydrides ( BiH 3 and PoH 2 ). Our calculations of the relativistic corrections to the isotropic part of ? at the heavy nucleus X show that it is roughly proportional to Z 3.2 in both series of molecules. Paramagnetic term ? p is more sensitive to the effects of relativity than the diamagnetic one ? d even though both have a behavior proportional to third power of the nuclear charge Z.

Sergio S. Gomez; Rodolfo H. Romero; Gustavo A. Aucar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurements of indirect CP asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^-K^+$ and $D^0\\to\\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of indirect CP violation in $D^0$ mesons through the determination of the parameter $A_\\Gamma$ is presented using a data sample of $pp$ collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector and recorded at the centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the LHC. The parameter $A_\\Gamma$ is the asymmetry of the effective lifetimes measured in decays of $D^0$ and $\\bar{D}^0$ mesons to the CP eigenstates $K^-K^+$ and $\\pi^-\\pi^+$. Fits to the data sample yield $A_\\Gamma(KK)=(-0.35\\pm0.62\\pm0.12)\\times 10^{-3}$ and $A_\\Gamma(\\pi\\pi)=(0.33\\pm1.06\\pm0.14)\\times 10^{-3}$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results represent the world's best measurements of these quantities. They show no difference in $A_\\Gamma$ between the two final states and no indication of CP violation.

Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Microstructure and mechanical properties of 7075 aluminum alloy nanostructured composites processed by mechanical milling and indirect hot extrusion  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured composites of 7075 aluminum alloy and carbon coated silver nanoparticles were produced by mechanical milling and indirect hot extrusion. The milling products were obtained in a high energy SPEX ball mill, and then were compacted by uniaxial load and pressure-less sintered under argon atmosphere. Finally, the sintered product was hot extruded. Carbon coated silver nanoparticles were well distributed in the matrix of the extruded material. Tensile tests were carried out to corroborate the hypothesis that second phase particles, well dispersed in the matrix, improve the strength of the material. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was employed to locate and make sure that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously and finely dispersed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 7075 Al nanostructured composites can be produced by mechanical milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon coated silver nanoparticles are well dispersed into aluminum matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ductile Ag-C NP's improve the mechanical properties of the 7075 Al-alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-C NP's content has an important effect in the particle and crystallite size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-C NP's keep their morphology after milling and conformation processes.

Flores-Campos, R., E-mail: ruben.flores@itesm.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, Chih., Mexico (Mexico); Tecnologico de Monterrey Campus Saltillo, Departamento de Ingenieria, Prol. Juan de la Barrera No. 1241 Ote., Col. Cumbres, CP 25270, Saltillo, Coah., Mexico (Mexico); Estrada-Guel, I., E-mail: ivanovich.estrada@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, Chih., Mexico (Mexico); Miki-Yoshida, M., E-mail: mario.miki@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, Chih., Mexico (Mexico); Martinez-Sanchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, Chih., Mexico (Mexico); Herrera-Ramirez, J.M., E-mail: martin.herrera@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnologia, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, Chih., Mexico (Mexico)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "indirect land-use effects" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Synchronization in hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present paper explores the synchronization scenario of hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment. We show that depending upon the coupling parameters a hyperchaotic time-delayed system can show in-phase or complete synchronization, and also inverse-phase or anti-synchronization. This paper reports the first experimental confirmation of synchronization of hyperchaos in time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly through a common environment. We confirm the occurrence of in-phase and inverse-phase synchronization phenomena in the coupled system through the dynamical measures like generalized autocorrelation function, correlation of probability of recurrence, and the concept of localized sets computed directly from the experimental time-series data. We also present a linear stability analysis of the coupled system. The experimental and analytical results are further supported by the detailed numerical analysis of the coupled system. Apart from the above mentioned measures, we numerically compute another quantitative measure, namely, Lyapunov exponent spectrum of the coupled system that confirms the transition from the in-phase (inverse-phase) synchronized state to the complete (anti-) synchronized state with the increasing coupling strength.

Tanmoy Banerjee; Debabrata Biswas

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Time-optimal CNOT between indirectly coupled qubits in a linear Ising chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give analytical solutions for the time-optimal synthesis of entangling gates between indirectly coupled qubits 1 and 3 in a linear spin chain of three qubits subject to an Ising Hamiltonian interaction with equal coupling $J$ plus a local magnetic field acting on the intermediate qubit. The energy available is fixed, but we relax the standard assumption of instantaneous unitary operations acting on single qubits. The time required for performing an entangling gate which is equivalent, modulo local unitary operations, to the $\\mathrm{CNOT}(1, 3)$ between the indirectly coupled qubits 1 and 3 is $T=\\sqrt{3/2} J^{-1}$, i.e. faster than a previous estimate based on a similar Hamiltonian and the assumption of local unitaries with zero time cost. Furthermore, performing a simple Walsh-Hadamard rotation in the Hlibert space of qubit 3 shows that the time-optimal synthesis of the $\\mathrm{CNOT}^{\\pm}(1, 3)$ (which acts as the identity when the control qubit 1 is in the state $\\ket{0}$, while if the control qubit is in the state $\\ket{1}$ the target qubit 3 is flipped as $\\ket{\\pm}\\rightarrow \\ket{\\mp}$) also requires the same time $T$.

A. Carlini; A. Hosoya; T. Koike; Y. Okudaira

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Time-optimal CNOT between indirectly coupled qubits in a linear Ising chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give analytical solutions for the time-optimal synthesis of entangling gates between indirectly coupled qubits 1 and 3 in a linear spin chain of three qubits subject to an Ising Hamiltonian interaction with equal coupling $J$ plus a local magnetic field acting on the intermediate qubit 2. The energy available is fixed, but we relax the standard assumption of instantaneous unitary operations acting on single qubits. The time required for performing an entangling gate which is equivalent, modulo local unitary operations, to the $\\mathrm{CNOT}(1, 3)$ between the indirectly coupled qubits 1 and 3 is $T=\\sqrt{3/2} J^{-1}$, i.e. faster than a previous estimate based on a similar Hamiltonian and the assumption of local unitaries with zero time cost. Furthermore, performing a simple Walsh-Hadamard rotation in the Hlibert space of qubit 3 shows that the time-optimal synthesis of the $\\mathrm{CNOT}^{\\pm}(1, 3)$ (which acts as the identity when the control qubit 1 is in the state $\\ket{0}$, while if the control qubit...

Carlini, A; Koike, T; Okudaira, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Impact of Dark Matter Microhalos on Signatures for Direct and Indirect Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting dark matter as it streams through detectors on Earth relies on knowledge of its phase space density on a scale comparable to the size of our solar system. Numerical simulations predict that our Galactic halo contains an enormous hierarchy of substructures, streams and caustics, the remnants of the merging hierarchy that began with tiny Earth mass microhalos. If these bound or coherent structures persist until the present time, they could dramatically alter signatures for the detection of weakly interacting elementary particle dark matter (WIMP). Using numerical simulations that follow the coarse grained tidal disruption within the Galactic potential and fine grained heating from stellar encounters, we find that microhalos, streams and caustics have a negligible likelihood of impacting direct detection signatures implying that dark matter constraints derived using simple smooth halo models are relatively robust. We also find that many dense central cusps survive, yielding a small enhancement in the signal for indirect detection experiments.

Aurel Schneider; Lawrence M. Krauss; Ben Moore

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Synchronized states in chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a dynamic environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider synchronization of chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a common environmnet where the environment has an intrinsic dynmics of its own modulated via feedback from the systems. We find that a rich vareity of synchronization behavior, such as in-phase, anti-phase,complete and anti- synchronization is possible. We present an approximate stability analysis for the different synchronization behaviors. The transitions to different states of synchronous behaviour are analyzed in the parameter plane of coupling strengths by numerical studies for specific cases such as Rossler and Lorenz systems and are characterized using various indices such as correlation, average phase difference and Lyapunov exponents. The threshold condition obtained from numerical analysis is found to agree with that from the stability analysis.

V. Resmi; G. Ambika; R. E. Amritkar

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam by indirect quantum feedback control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study cooling and squeezing the fluctuations of a nanomechanical beam using quantum feedback control. In our model, the nanomechanical beam is coupled to a transmission line resonator via a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The leakage of the electromagnetic field from the transmission line resonator is measured using homodyne detection. This measured signal is then used to design a quantum-feedback-control signal to drive the electromagnetic field in the transmission line resonator. Although the control is imposed on the transmission line resonator, this quantum-feedback-control signal indirectly affects the thermal motion of the nanomechanical beam via the inductive beam-resonator coupling, making it possible to cool and squeeze the fluctuations of the beam, allowing it to approach the standard quantum limit.

Jing Zhang; Yu-xi Liu; Franco Nori

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Design of generic coal conversion facilities: Indirect coal liquefaction, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive review of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology, including fixed, fluidized, and bubble column reactors, was undertaken in order to develop an information base before initiating the design of the Fischer-Tropsch indirect liquefaction PDU as a part of the Generic Coal Conversion Facilities to be built at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The pilot plant will include a fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactor for the F-T mode of operation. The review encompasses current status of both these technologies, their key variables, catalyst development, future directions, and potential improvement areas. However, more emphasis has been placed on the slurry bubble column reactor since this route is likely to be the preferred technology for commercialization, offering process advantages and, therefore, better economics than fixed and fluidized bed approaches.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ce-doped EuO: Magnetic properties and the indirect band gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have prepared and investigated thin films of EuO doped with the rare-earth element cerium. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to determine the quality of these films prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Ce doping leads to an enhanced Curie temperature near 150 K, close to that seen for oxygen-deficient EuO{sub 1-x}. However, the magnetization of Ce-doped EuO exhibits differences from that observed for Gd-doped and oxygen-deficient samples. The high-resolution angular-resolved photoemission from Ce-doped EuO reveals filling of conduction-band states near the X point. This indicates that the band gap in EuO is indirect, and that at 2% doping Ce-doped EuO{sub 1-x} is at least semimetallic.

Liu Pan; Tang Jinke [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Colon Santana, Juan A.; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Dowben, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Integrated Process Configuration for High-Temperature Sulfur Mitigation during Biomass Conversion via Indirect Gasification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sulfur present in biomass often causes catalyst deactivation during downstream operations after gasification. Early removal of sulfur from the syngas stream post-gasification is possible via process rearrangements and can be beneficial for maintaining a low-sulfur environment for all downstream operations. High-temperature sulfur sorbents have superior performance and capacity under drier syngas conditions. The reconfigured process discussed in this paper is comprised of indirect biomass gasification using dry recycled gas from downstream operations, which produces a drier syngas stream and, consequently, more-efficient sulfur removal at high temperatures using regenerable sorbents. A combination of experimental results from NREL's fluidizable Ni-based reforming catalyst, fluidizable Mn-based sulfur sorbent, and process modeling information show that using a coupled process of dry gasification with high-temperature sulfur removal can improve the performance of Ni-based reforming catalysts significantly.

Dutta. A.; Cheah, S.; Bain, R.; Feik, C.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Phillips, S.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Facilities and Administration (F&A) cost is another term used for indirect cost. F&A/Indirect cost are calculated based on the direct expenditures of sponsored projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are calculated based on the direct expenditures of sponsored projects. F&A/Indirect cost can not be readily. These costs are "real" though they can not be associated with a specific project. Examples of F and departmental administration. Penn will apply the appropriate F&A rate to the direct cost of the project based

Bushman, Frederic

452

Comparison of airborne asbestos levels determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using direct- and indirect-transfer techniques. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A subset of air samples from a 1988 EPA study was reanalyzed for asbestos by TEM using an indirect transfer technique. The samples were originally analyzed using a direct transfer technique. The document presents the results of the reanalysis and extends the discussion to include data from six other studies. The development of the two techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages are described. The data support the general opinion that TEM analysis of air samples using indirect transfer methods tends to provide estimates of total airborne asbestos structure concentration that are higher than those obtained using direct transfer methods. There is no single factor that can be used to convert measurements made by one method to a value that is comparable with measurements made by the other because the quantitative relationship is expected to depend on details of the sampling and analytical protocols and the nature of the asbestos in the air. The ratio of indirect measurements to direct measurements ranges from 3.8 to 1,700 for the studies considered. Additional research is needed to determine which transfer technique more accurately reflects biologically meaningful airborne asbestos concentrations. Breakdown of larger structures into smaller ones during indirect preparation does not appear to be sufficient to explain the difference in measured concentrations.

Chesson, J.; Hatfield, J.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Indirect adaptive H$_{&infty;}$ output feedback control based on LS-SVM for uncertain nonlinear systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel framework of indirect adaptive H$_{&infty;}$ control method based on least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) is proposed for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with unavailable states and external disturbance. In this method, a state ... Keywords: H$_{&infty;}$ control, Least squares support vector machines, adaptive control, feedback control, nonlinear systems

Chunli Xie; Shao; Jiangtao Cao; Dandan Zhao

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The development of a 20-inch indirect fired fluidized bed gasifier  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the design, fabrication and operation of a 20'' I.D. fluidized bed gasifier producing medium Btu gas. The reactor is indirectly heated using 30 x 1-inch U-tubes inserted in the inert bed. The U-tubes are heated using flue gases produced from a propane burner system located at the bottom of the reactor. The feed material was dry wood chips fed into the bed with a 6in. auger. The reactor was fed both into the bed and at the top of the bed. The fluidizing medium was superheated steam which was superheated to 1000/degree/F. The gas produced from the reactor was passed through a cyclone for char removal and routed to the flare for combustion and disposal. The parameters measured during the experimental runs were wood feed rate, steam flow rate, steam temperatures, bed temperatures, free board temperatures, product gas temperatures, bed differential pressures, char production, gas production, gas analyses, and tar production. The parameters measured in the laboratory were moisture contents (wood and char), ash contents (wood and char), and tar content. 9 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

Flanigan, V.J.; Sitton, O.C.; Huang, W.E

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Precise measurements of the $W$ mass at the Tevatron and indirect constraints on the Higgs mass  

SciTech Connect

I describe the latest D0 and CDF W boson mass measurements. The D0 measurement is performed with 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in the electron decay channel with a data set of 1.68 x 10{sup 8} W candidates. The value of the W boson mass measured by D0 is M{sub W} = 80.375 {+-} 0.023 GeV when combined with the previously analyzed 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The CDF measurement uses 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity in both electron and