Sample records for indirect land-use effects

  1. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  2. A Dynamic Simulation of the Indirect Land Use Implications of Recent Biofuel Production and Use in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global indirect land use change (ILUC) implications of biofuel use in the United States of America (USA) from 2001 to 2010 are evaluated with a dynamic general equilibrium model. The effects of biofuels production on agricultural land area vary by year; from a net expansion of 0.17 ha per 1000 gallons produced (2002) to a net contraction of 0.13 ha per 1000 gallons (2018) in Case 1 of our simulation. In accordance with the general narrative about the implications of biofuel policy, agricultural land area increased in many regions of the world. However, oil-export dependent economies experienced agricultural land contraction because of reductions in their revenues. Reducing crude oil imports is a major goal of biofuel policy, but the land use change implications have received little attention in the literature. Simulations evaluating the effects of doubling supply elasticities for land and fossil resources show that these parameters can significantly influence the land use change estimates. Therefore, research that provides empirically-based and spatially-detailed agricultural land-supply curves and capability to project future fossil energy prices is critical for improving estimates of the effects of biofuel policy on land use.

  3. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  4. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  5. Effects of planning and policy decisions on residential land use in Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Noel R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of current land use in Singapore shows that through effective long-term space planning, the island city-state has maintained an adequate stock of developable residential land to meet its most ambitious maximum ...

  6. Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Short term effects of moderate carbon prices on land use in the New Zealand emissions trading Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was introduced through the Climate Change Response Act............................................................................ 14 #12;1 1 Introduction The New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) was legislated through

  7. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  8. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  9. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  10. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  11. Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    Irrigation cooling effect: Regional climate forcing by land-use change Lara M. Kueppers,1,2 Mark A to show that a regional irrigation cooling effect (ICE) exists, opposite in sign to urban heat island magnitude, but opposite sign, to predictions for future regional warming from greenhouse gases. Given our

  12. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  13. THE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH CREEKS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . The implications of existing and potential management practices for the restoration of the stream habitat the condition of stream habitat and should be considered in any restoration plan. The in-stream studies can thusTHE EFFECT OF WATER MANAGEMENT AND LAND USE PRACTICES ON THE RESTORATION OF LEE VINING AND RUSH

  14. aerosol indirect effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of direct reciprocal and indirect effects in a host-parasite network Shai Pilosof Fortuna, Miguel A. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19...

  15. aerosol indirect effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of direct reciprocal and indirect effects in a host-parasite network Shai Pilosof Fortuna, Miguel A. First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19...

  16. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  17. The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bosnia- Herzegovina a Decade Beyond War. Annals of AmericanBrauer, J. The Effect of War on the Natural Environment.of the Persian Gulf War, 1990-1991: Remote Sensing Datasets

  18. Investigating the effect of farmer land-use decisions on rural landscapes using an agent-based model approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Eleni

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and cover change (LUCC) is increasingly recognised as one of the most visible impacts of humans on nature. In rural areas, most of the observed LUCC is associated with agricultural activities. This has traditionally been attributed...

  19. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  20. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  1. New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Predicting Land Use Change and its Effect on Nonpoint Source Pollution Jennifer Thacher, and Janie Chermak, Department of Economics, University of New Mexico Project descriptors: Risk aversion, non-point source

  2. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  3. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  4. Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

  5. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

  6. The Effects of Land-Use Regulation on the Price of Housing: What Do We Know? What Can We Learn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to S housing can price development licenses to requireany real effect on prices, development patterns, or growth

  7. Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

  8. Expected magnitude of the aerosol shortwave indirect effect in springtime Arctic liquid water clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reflection of photons between the snow or sea ice surface and cloud base, the shortwave first indirect effect of high quality longwave spectral radiation measurements in the Arctic from which the indirect effect can clouds both absorb and scatter radiation. We therefore do not yet have a comparable spectral capability

  9. The effects of agricultural land use patterns on pollutant runoff from watersheds: rangeland/pastureland and row cropping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Andrew A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /22/94 through 1/12/95 were taken. Due to the intensity of several rainfall events, it was decided to double the volume of water that was required to pass through the H-flume during a pulse to 4000 cubic feet before an additional sample was taken.... This was done in an effort to try and spread the samples out over the entire hydrograph. This was done after the 1/12/95 storm event and remained in effect until the end of sampling on 6/1195. Subwatershed Study Stormwater samples were analyzed for nutrients...

  10. Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process Janet R to occur with climate change will likely influence how predators indirectly affect an essential ecosystem and severity of droughts (1, 2). Changes in rainfall will likely affect ecosystem processes such as primary

  11. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  12. Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun-Hee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation even in the weakest hurricane. When comparing the model performance between aerosol indirect and direct effect by ensemble experiments, the adjustment time of the circulation due to modification of the aerosol radiative forcing by aerosol layers...

  13. FY 2011 Third Quarter Report Estimate of Historical Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, D

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects estimated from Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations are -0.06 W m-2 and -1.39 W m-2, respectively.

  14. CLOUD DROPLET SPECTRAL DISPERSION AND THE INDIRECT AEROSOL EFFECT: COMPARISON OF TWO TREATMENTS IN A GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be a radiative forcing by Forster et al. [2007], but global climate models (GCMs) that include both effects canCLOUD DROPLET SPECTRAL DISPERSION AND THE INDIRECT AEROSOL EFFECT: COMPARISON OF TWO TREATMENTS effect are compared in a global climate model. The earlier scheme specifies , the ratio of droplet

  15. An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An Act to Reform Land Use Planning in the Unorganized Territory alters the makeup and responsibilities of Maine's Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC). It took effect on August 29, 2012 and...

  16. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  17. Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    Global Indirect Effects of U.S. Corn Ethanol Production: A Review of the Evidence Energy security) requires 36 billion gallons of ethanol by 2022 to replace about 20 percent of U.S. gasoline consumption. Since 2001 ethanol produc- tion, mainly from corn, has increased dramatically at an annual average

  18. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  19. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  20. Potential Aerosol Indirect Effects on Atmospheric Circulation and Radiative Forcing through Deep Convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol indirect effects, i.e., the interactions of aerosols with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN), constitute the largest uncertainty in climate forcing and projection. Previous IPCC reported aerosol indirect forcing is negative, which does not account for aerosol-convective cloud interactions because the complex processes involved are poorly understood and represented in climate models. Here we report that aerosol indirect effect on deep convective cloud systems can lead to enhanced regional convergence and a strong top-of atmosphere (TOA) warming. Aerosol invigoration effect on convection can result in a strong radiative warming in the atmosphere (+5.6 W m-2) due to strong night-time warming, a lofted latent heating, and a reduced diurnal temperature difference, all of which could remarkably impact regional circulation and modify weather systems. We further elucidated how aerosols change convective intensity, diabatic heating, and regional circulation under different environmental conditions and concluded that wind shear and cloud base temperature play key roles in determining the significance of aerosol invigoration effect for convective systems.

  1. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality ............................................. DESCRIPTION OF BRIDGE CREEK BASIN ........................ PHYSICAL SETTING'T. ................................ 5.1 CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ....................................... 5.1.1 Bridge Creek basin upstream

  2. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  3. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  4. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  5. 3476 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE VOLUME 16 Sensitivity of the First Indirect Aerosol Effect to an Increase of Cloud Droplet Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effect, but this is usually not parameterized in global climate models (GCMs). Empirical), and is usually broken down into two compo- nents. The "first indirect effect" refers to the radiative impact of a decrease in cloud droplet effective radius (re> that is associated with increased N. A decrease

  6. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 735?747, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/735/2009/ ? Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Quantifying the effect of land... al. (1999). These studies, which generally in- dicate that deforestation causes an increase in the mean an- nual discharge, have concentrated on the impacts of forest management on water yield (Siriwardena et al., 2006).While field experiments can...

  7. Purdue extension PurdueLandUseTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue extension Val Slack Jon Cain Co-Chairs, PurdueLandUseTeam PurdueUniversity ID-351 CAFOs. The role of the Agricultural & Natural Resources (ANR) Educator as a plan commission member is to help plan and natural resources and provide insight into the impact on these two areas when there are proposed changes

  8. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  9. Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size, liquid water path, and radiative impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Evaluation of the aerosol indirect effect in marine stratocumulus clouds: Droplet number, size stratocumulus clouds in the northeastern Pacific Ocean were analyzed to determine the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical and radiative properties. Seven nighttime and two daytime cases were

  10. A study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol and cloud parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    regions consistent with the global mean statistics. However, the effective cloud particle radius showedA study of the direct and indirect effects of aerosols using global satellite data sets of aerosol between aerosol and cloud parameters derived from satellite remote sensing for evaluating the radiative

  11. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  12. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  13. A COMPARISON OF SURFACE OBSERVATIONS AND ECHAM4-GCM EXPERIMENTS AND ITS RELEVANCE TO THE INDIRECT AEROSOL EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the indirect aerosol effect. The modeled annual cloud cover and solar radiation cycles for the present day at the surface, total cloud cover and precipitation rates have been used to evaluate aerosol. The model correctly predicts the annual mean total cloud cover in Germany and the US, whereas global solar

  14. Aerosol direct, indirect, semidirect, and surface albedo effects from sector contributions based on the IPCC AR5 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation. In addition, atmospheric aerosols alter cloud cover and cloud properties. Historically, aerosols the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only

  15. Employment and land-use impacts of resource program elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S A; Baechler, M C; Blondin, D W; Grover, S E

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated several power resource alternatives under consideration by the Bonneville Power Administration in its Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement (RPEIS). The purpose of this evaluation was to determine the potential impacts of each alternative in terms of land use and employment. We reviewed the literature that describes land-use and employment impacts to derive estimates of each type of effect. These estimates were scaled to a per-megawatt basis for use as multipliers in the RPEIS analysis. Multipliers for employment were taken from the literature and developed from power plant capital cost estimates. Land-use multipliers were taken from the literature or estimated from existing plants. In this report we compared information sources and estimates to develop the most applicable multipliers. Employment levels required (in terms of employee years per MW of plant capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternative analyzed are shown. The amounts of land required (in terms of acres per MW capacity) for the construction and operation phases of each energy-generating resource alternatives analyzed are also shown.

  16. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

  17. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA V. Ramaswamy, Paul A. Ginoux, and Larry W. Horowitz Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New

  18. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicy Homepv land use Home

  19. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  20. The Effect of Equilibrating Mounted Dental Stone Casts in Maximum Intercuspation on the Occlusal Harmony of an Indirect Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Peter Andrew

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF EQUILIBRATING MOUNTED DENTAL STONE CASTS IN MAXIMUM INTERCUSPATION ON THE OCCLUSAL HARMONY OF AN INDIRECT RESTORATION A Thesis by PETER ANDREW BENSON Submitted to The Office of Graduate and Professional Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, William W. Nagy Committee Members, Peter M. Buschang Carl G. Wirth Head of Department, William W. Nagy...

  1. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  2. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  3. Effect of Subgrid Cloud Variability on Parameterization of Indirect Aerosol Effect in Large-Scale Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of Subgrid Cloud

  4. Land use regulation and intraregional population-employment interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, JH; Hewings, GJD

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levine J (2006) Zoned out: Regulation, markets, and choicesprices, externalities, and regulation in U.S. metropolitanCT (2000) Land use regulation and new construction. Regional

  5. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  6. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  7. Indirect Land Use Change: A second best solution to a first class problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberman, David D.; Hochman, Gal; Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the possible affects of biofuels on deforestation have ledto the production of various biofuels, including ethanol andpolicies that promoted biofuels had a fuel-security emphasis

  8. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

  9. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  10. Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

  11. be explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    cloud properties and their effect on the surface radiation budget: selected cases from FIRE ACE. Jbe explained by the indirect aerosol cloud effect. The use of a parcel model to determine the cloud droplet number concentration enables us to separate the effects of the cloud LWP and cloud droplet number

  12. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaas, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as cloud contamination or 3D radiation effects (Loebeffect relationship behind the aerosol – cloud/radiationradiation resulting in the “aerosol direct effect”. Hy- drophilic aerosols can serve as cloud

  13. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quaas, Johannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as cloud contamination or 3D radiation effects (Loebeffect relationship behind the aerosol – cloud/radiationradiation resulting in the “aerosol direct effect”. Hy- drophilic aerosols can serve as cloud

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Shouxian, China for the Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In a complex ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment, monitoring data was collected at four locations in China during 2008. The various sites are located in regions with different climate regimes and with high aerosol loadings of different optical, physical, and chemical properties. Measurements obtained at all the AMF sites during the 8-month deployment in China will help scientists to validate satellite-based findings, understand the mechanisms of the aerosol indirect effects in the region, and examine the roles of aerosols in affecting regional climate and atmospheric circulation, with a special focus on the impact of the East Asian monsoon system. As with other collections from the ARM Mobile Facility, the datasets are available from the ARM Archive. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Land use and climate change in Miami-Dade County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peckett, Haley Rose

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miami-Dade County, Florida, was one of the earliest jurisdictions to adopt a climate change plan in 1993. Land use features prominently in this plan as a means to reduce greenhouse gases through development patterns that ...

  16. Siting Renewable Energy: Land Use and Regulatory Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article takes up the increasingly important land use question of siting for renewable energy. As concern over climate change grows, new policies are being crafted at all levels of government to support renewable energy as a way of reducing...

  17. Comparing and modeling land use organization in cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenormand, Maxime; Cantú-Ros, Oliva G; Louail, Thomas; Herranz, Ricardo; Barthelemy, Marc; Frías-Martínez, Enrique; Miguel, Maxi San; Ramasco, José J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of geolocated ICT technologies opens the possibility of exploring how people use space in cities, bringing an important new tool for urban scientists and planners, especially for regions where data is scarce or not available. Here we apply a functional network approach to determine land use patterns from mobile phone records. The versatility of the method allows us to run a systematic comparison between Spanish cities of various sizes. The method detects four major land use types that correspond to different temporal patterns. The proportion of these types, their spatial organization and scaling show a strong similarity between all cities that breaks down at a very local scale, where land use mixing is specific to each urban area. Finally, we introduce a model inspired by Schelling's segregation, able to explain and reproduce these results with simple interaction rules between different land uses.

  18. Town of Chapel Hill- Land-Use Management Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2003, the Town of Chapel Hill adopted a land-use management ordinance that includes prohibitions against neighborhood or homeowners association covenants or other conditions of sale that...

  19. The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Ju

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel...

  20. Biofuels and land-use A simpler approach to the problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and land-use change A simpler approach to the problem John J. Sheehan Presented of increased biofuels demand "Consequential" Life Cycle Assessment is a new concept #12;Technical uncertainty ethano #12;Political and ethical dilemmas The ceteris paribus argument: Biofuels effects should

  1. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  2. Black carbon radiative heating effects on cloud microphysics and implications for the aerosol indirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    thought. 1. Introduction Black Carbon (BC) has important effects on climate, owing to its ability of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125, USA Abstract. This work examines the effect of black carbon (BC) radiative heating on cloud droplet formation. Changes in cloud droplet concentration and cloud albedo due

  3. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  4. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  5. Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

  6. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  7. anthropogenic land-use change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David M. 35 Quantifying the impact of future land-use changes against increases in GHG concentrations Physics Websites Summary: Quantifying the impact of future land-use...

  8. Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being preserved as natural areas, others, including the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and Land Use Change Processes in East Africa While some regions of East Africa are being to agriculture. Some members of the Maasai tribe, traditionally a pastoral people, are changing to changes in climate. The land use box will involve further modeling of the effects of these concurrent

  9. Bioenergy to Biodiversity: Downscaling scenarios of land use change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Ian

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioenergy crops are a key component of Scotland’s strategy to meet 2050 carbon emissions targets. The introduction of these crops could have large scale impacts on the biodiversity of lowland farmland. These impacts depend on the change in land use...

  10. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    in other areas. Students in our Green Building and Sustainable Design and Renewable Energy certificate1 Land Use and natUraL resoUrces Fall 2013 Including: Mitigation and Conservation Banking Climate making changes in our lives. We move to another city, change jobs or change our diet to be healthier. UC

  11. Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought impacts and promoting recovery J response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Land classification based on the land's potential: soils response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Grassland Shrubland ­ high wind erosion Knowledge

  12. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

  13. The Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    -cropping intensification. Greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for the period 2001­06 due to conversion of natural; Hansen et al. 2008). Economic de- velopment and global markets have driven large-scale conversionsThe Amazon Frontier of Land-Use Change: Croplands and Consequences for Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  14. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  15. Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    Regional patterns of agricultural land use and deforestation in Colombia Andre´s Etter a, Australia c Facultad de Estudios Ambientales y Rurales, Universidad Javeriana, Bogota´, Colombia Received 14, including Colombia. However, the location and extent of deforestation and associated ecological impacts

  16. Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sustainable Development and Land Use Committee Minutes of Meeting 10 March 2008 7:00 p.m. - 9 will coordinate with a student the Sustainable Development Audit before Dr. Bardati leaves Bishop's University. Motion: Proceed with the Sustainable Development Audit in accordance with the CREPUQ guidelines. Proposed

  17. Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Linking Oil Prices, Gas Prices, Economy, Transport, and Land Use A Review of Empirical Findings Hongwei Dong, Ph.D. Candidate John D. Hunt, Professor John Gliebe, Assistant Professor #12;Framework Oil-run Short and Long-run #12;Topics covered by this presentation: Oil price and macro-economy Gas price

  18. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. energy policy tilts away from fossil fuels. The Essay argues that the energy-land use nexus provides a useful frame for approaching policy to minimize points of conflict between energy goals on the one hand and land conservation on the other....

  19. 4, 42654295, 2007 Impact of land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methodol- ogy which involves coupling a land-use change model with a water balance model and a groundwater groundwater model. Results show that the average recharge slowly de- creases for all scenarios, the decreases / Esc Printer-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 1 Introduction Groundwater is a major source

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  1. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  2. 7, 37193761, 2007 Aerosol indirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    effects and is defined as the difference in the top-of-the-atmosphere net radiation be- tween present when either a statistical cloud cover scheme or a different aerosol emission inventory are employed. 1ACPD 7, 3719­3761, 2007 Aerosol indirect effects in ECHAM5-HAM U. Lohmann et al. Title Page

  3. Meeting the Demand for Biofuels: Impact on Land Use and Carbon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu; Jain, Atul; Onal, Hayri; Scheffran, Jurgen; Chen, Xiaoguang; Erickson, Matt; Huang, Haixiao; Kang, Seungmo.

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to develop an integrated, interdisciplinary framework to investigate the implications of large scale production of biofuels for land use, crop production, farm income and greenhouse gases. In particular, we examine the mix of feedstocks that would be viable for biofuel production and the spatial allocation of land required for producing these feedstocks at various gasoline and carbon emission prices as well as biofuel subsidy levels. The implication of interactions between energy policy that seeks energy independence from foreign oil and climate policy that seeks to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions for the optimal mix of biofuels and land use will also be investigated. This project contributes to the ELSI research goals of sustainable biofuel production while balancing competing demands for land and developing policy approaches needed to support biofuel production in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly manner.

  4. Land Use Manager Application Ensures Protectiveness Following Remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation - 13355

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, Sid; Brown, Sally; Sims, Lynn [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Darby, Jason [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term stewardship is the set of activities necessary to return contaminated land to safe and beneficial use. The activities include physical and legal controls to prevent inappropriate exposure to contamination left in place at a site. It is the longest phase of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program and ensures the protection of human health and the environment for varied end uses. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation an automated program has been developed and implemented that tracks the multitude of long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a large site that currently has over 50 actions requiring long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation consists primarily of three plant sites, and long-term stewardship will enable these sites to be leased to private entities (East Tennessee Technology Park), modernized for an evolving national security mission (Y-12 National Security Complex), and revitalized to continue multi-disciplinary research (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The varied site end uses of the individual plant sites coupled with the multitude of controls required by leaving waste in place presents challenges. A single remedial action may include surveillance and maintenance activities, media monitoring, property record notices as well as physical controls such as fences and signs. Thus, the array of long-term stewardship activities is complex and intermingled (over 200 inspections each year at various frequencies are required currently) and requires an effective tracking program, termed the Land Use Manager. The Land Use Manager is a web-based data management application for use by personnel responsible for implementing, maintaining, and verifying engineering and land use controls on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The program is a data entry and tracking tool, as well as a notification tool. The status and performance of engineering and land use controls are checked annually for evaluation in the required Remediation Effectiveness Report, and the automated Land Use Manager collects, maintains, tracks, notifies, monitors, and manages the information necessary to perform this evaluation. Land Use Manager tracks site information including type of contamination, regulatory requirements, locates land use controls; provides information on inspections, certification, and reporting; and provides reports. Most data access features, e.g., view, print, query, and download, are available to all users; however, data input, updating, and editing are restricted to the personnel directly responsible for monitoring and inspection. The Land Use Manager application was developed for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office by URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, Restoration Services Incorporated, and MIJARA Corporation to meet the specific needs of long-term stewardship tracking on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The successful implementation of long-term stewardship enables the future government and private activities being planned on the Oak Ridge Reservation to proceed. (authors)

  5. The effectiveness of an indirect control message in decreasing the depreciative behavior of remote camping location users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barget, Robert George

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the number of visitors utilizing these resources and the ever expanding variety of activities in which people participate when they visit a particular natural resource setting. According to vernon D. Dame (Dame 1977), past chief of Interpretation..., a 12% increase over the previous year (Clark et al. 1972). Less tangible, but equally important are the indirect costs of depreciative behaviors (Clark et al. 1971). Cole 10 (1982) concluded that most site impacts do not appear to sharply reduce...

  6. Constraining the Influence of Natural Variability to Improve Estimates of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects in a Nudged Version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooperman, G. J.; Pritchard, M. S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C.; Russell, Lynn

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural modes of variability on many timescales influence aerosol particle distributions and cloud properties such that isolating statistically significant differences in cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations (indirect effects) typically requires integrating over long simulations. For state-of-the-art global climate models (GCM), especially those in which embedded cloud-resolving models replace conventional statistical parameterizations (i.e. multi-scale modeling framework, MMF), the required long integrations can be prohibitively expensive. Here an alternative approach is explored, which implements Newtonian relaxation (nudging) to constrain simulations with both pre-industrial and present-day aerosol emissions toward identical meteorological conditions, thus reducing differences in natural variability and dampening feedback responses in order to isolate radiative forcing. Ten-year GCM simulations with nudging provide a more stable estimate of the global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing than do conventional free-running simulations. The estimates have mean values and 95% confidence intervals of -1.54 ± 0.02 W/m2 and -1.63 ± 0.17 W/m2 for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively. Nudging also substantially increases the fraction of the world’s area in which a statistically significant aerosol indirect effect can be detected (68% and 25% of the Earth's surface for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively). One-year MMF simulations with and without nudging provide global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing estimates of -0.80 W/m2 and -0.56 W/m2, respectively. The one-year nudged results compare well with previous estimates from three-year free-running simulations (-0.77 W/m2), which showed the aerosol-cloud relationship to be in better agreement with observations and high-resolution models than in the results obtained with conventional parameterizations.

  7. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  8. Property:FedLandUsePct | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Ezfeedflag PropertyFedLandUsePct Jump to:

  9. H.R.S. 205 - Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville ElectricControlon State - Land Use Jump to:

  10. Title 36 CFR 251 Land Uses | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson EthanolTillson,OpenOpen EnergyR. 297 Wild and8Land Uses

  11. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker Energy HoldingEnergyLand-use Impact Assessment

  12. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein Faculty Mentor: Professor Mi-Huyn Park, Civil & Environmental Engineering features within each land use. In order to classify the aerial photo digital images, GIS (Geographic

  13. Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the...

  14. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  15. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use and Abandonment Through the Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannion, A.M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa: Land Use andJ. Brett. Human Ecology in the Wadi Al-Hasa. Land Use andcombination of the two. The Wadi al-Hasa, a canyon draining

  16. 2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

    matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

  17. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions for soybean biodiesel (food fixed) . . . . . .distributions for soybean biodiesel (food not fixed) . . .land use from expanded biodiesel production. Technical

  18. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEMÃ?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

  19. Can we reconcile differences in estimates of carbon fluxes from land-use change and forestry for the 1990s?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from land-use change and forestry LUC area (100 km 2 yr ?1 )land-use change and forestry Table 6. Sum of Terrestrialfrom land-use change and forestry for the 1990s? A. Ito 1 ,

  20. Quantifying the Uncertainties of Aerosol Indirect Effects and Impacts on Decadal-Scale Climate Variability in NCAR CAM5 and CESM1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sungsu

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this project is to systematically quantify the major uncertainties of aerosol indirect effects due to the treatment of moist turbulent processes that drive aerosol activation, cloud macrophysics and microphysics in response to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations using the CAM5/CESM1. To achieve this goal, the P.I. hired a postdoctoral research scientist (Dr. Anna Fitch) who started her work from the Nov.1st.2012. In order to achieve the project goal, the first task that the Postdoc. and the P.I. did was to quantify the role of subgrid vertical velocity variance on the activation and nucleation of cloud liquid droplets and ice crystals and its impact on the aerosol indirect effect in CAM5. First, we analyzed various LES cases (from dry stable to cloud-topped PBL) to check whether this isotropic turbulence assumption used in CAM5 is really valid. It turned out that this isotropic turbulence assumption is not universally valid. Consequently, from the analysis of LES, we derived an empirical formulation relaxing the isotropic turbulence assumption used for the CAM5 aerosol activation and ice nucleation, and implemented the empirical formulation into CAM5/CESM1, and tested in the single-column and global simulation modes, and examined how it changed aerosol indirect effects in the CAM5/CESM1. These results were reported in the poster section in the 18th Annual CESM workshop held in Breckenridge, CO during Jun.17-20.2013. While we derived an empirical formulation from the analysis of couple of LES from the first task, the general applicability of that empirical formulation was questionable, because it was obtained from the limited number of LES simulations. The second task we did was to derive a more fundamental analytical formulation relating vertical velocity variance to TKE using other information starting from basic physical principles. This was a somewhat challenging subject, but if this could be done in a successful way, it could be directly implemented into the CAM5 as a practical parameterization, and substantially contributes to achieving the project goal. Through an intensive research for about one year, we found appropriate mathematical formulation and tried to implement it into the CAM5 PBL and activation routine as a practical parameterized numerical code. During these processes, however, the Postdoc applied for another position in Sweden, Europe, and accepted a job offer there, and left NCAR in August 2014. In Sweden, Dr. Anna Fitch is still working on this subject in a part time, planning to finalize the research and to write the paper in a near future.

  1. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  2. RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution Control Hearings Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  4. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  5. Investigation of the first and second aerosol indirect effects using data from the May 2003 Intensive Operational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effect (AIE) for a spring continental stratus cloud on the basis of data collected during the 17 May 2003. Introduction [2] Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions are an integral and important part of the climate system, or on both. [3] The first AIE, or ``Twomey'' effect, refers to the modification of the cloud droplet number

  6. Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

  7. Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

  8. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  9. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  10. 3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    changes in the extent and frequency of disturbance to an ecosystem #12;3) What makes a species invasive? i3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Many;3) What makes a species invasive? i) Disturbance and land use hypothesis Basic concepts: · Invasive

  11. THE ROLE OF LAND USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION MAKING AT THREE DOE MEGA-CLEANUP SITES FERNALD & ROCKY FLATS & MOUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JEWETT MA

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the role that future land use decisions have played in the establishment of cost-effective cleanup objectives and the setting of environmental media cleanup levels for the three major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites for which cleanup has now been successfully completed: the Rocky Flats, Mound, and Fernald Closure Sites. At each site, there are distinct consensus-building histories throughout the following four phases: (1) the facility shut-down and site investigation phase, which took place at the completion of their Cold War nuclear-material production missions; (2) the decision-making phase, whereby stakeholder and regulatory-agency consensus was achieved for the future land-use-based environmental decisions confronting the sites; (3) the remedy selection phase, whereby appropriate remedial actions were identified to achieve the future land-use-based decisions; and (4) the implementation phase, whereby the selected remedial actions for these high-profile sites were implemented and successfully closed out. At each of the three projects, there were strained relationships and distrust between the local community and the DOE as a result of site contamination and potential health effects to the workers and local residents. To engage citizens and interested stakeholder groups - particularly in the role of final land use in the decision-making process, the site management teams at each respective site developed new public-participation strategies to open stakeholder communication channels with site leadership, technical staff, and the regulatory agencies. This action proved invaluable to the success of the projects and reaching consensus on appropriate levels of cleanup. With the implementation of the cleanup remedies now complete, each of the three DOE sites have become models for future environmental-remediation projects and associated decision making.

  12. Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

  13. Long-term land use future scenarios for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to facilitate decision regarding environmental restoration activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) conducted analyses to project reasonable future land use scenarios at the INEL for the next 100 years. The methodology for generating these scenarios included: review of existing DOE plans, policy statements, and mission statements pertaining to the INEL; review of surrounding land use characteristics and county developments policies; solicitation of input from local, county, state and federal planners, policy specialists, environmental professionals, and elected officials; and review of environmental and development constraints at the INEL site that could influence future land use.

  14. FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Sohngen

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

  15. Zoning administrators and others con-cerned with airport land use will soon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Zoning administrators and others con- cerned with airport land use will soon have help when of the current regulatory rules and climate. The manual describes proce- dural requirements and guidelines, along

  16. The Evaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and GIS Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to base the economic evaluation travel no state isurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devlsing andEvaluation of Transportation and Land Use Plans Using Linked Economic and

  17. Land use politics southern style : the case of cash proffers in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Shannon Ashley

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linkage between the political dynamics at the state level and actual implementation of land use regulations at the local level is the focus of this dissertation. This focus is explored through the genesis and efficacy ...

  18. Baselines For Land-Use Change In The Tropics: Application To Avoided Deforestation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Mexico: making carbon sequestration a by-product ofthe area of the pilot carbon sequestration projects in theseLUCS = Land Use and Carbon Sequestration model, and GEOMOD =

  19. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  20. aeronautical land-use assurance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: UNIVERSITY RULE 41.05.02.M1 Space and Land Use Management Approved October 6, 1999 Revised April 22 in Brazos and Burleson Counties. The President delegates...

  1. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  3. Impacts of Land Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hallgren, Willow

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on climate of future land use and energy policy scenarios is explored using two landuse frameworks: (i) Pure Cost Conversion Response (PCCR), or 'extensification', where the price of land is the only constraint ...

  4. Planners' Perceptions of Land Use Planning Tools in the U.S. Pacific States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Yue

    2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , tools, and strategies have been extensively applied in growth management or development management (Daniels, 1999; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning (Beatley, Brower, & Schwab, 2002; Burby, 1998), emergency management and disaster..., 1999; Levy, 2009; Mantell et al., 1990; Porter, 2008), environmental land use planning for natural hazard mitigation (Berke, 1998; Beatley, 2009; Beatley et al., 2002; Berke & Beatley, 1992; Berke & Conroy, 2000; Burby et al., 2000; Godschalk et al...

  5. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  6. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioenergy program” land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the “with bioenergy

  7. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  8. New Technique for Retrieving Liquid Water Path over Land using Satellite Microwave Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deeter, M.N.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new methodology for retrieving liquid water path over land using satellite microwave observations. As input, the technique exploits the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for earth observing plan (EOS) (AMSR-E) polarization-difference signals at 37 and 89 GHz. Regression analysis performed on model simulations indicates that over variable atmospheric and surface conditions the polarization-difference signals can be simply parameterized in terms of the surface emissivity polarization difference ({Delta}{var_epsilon}), surface temperature, liquid water path (LWP), and precipitable water vapor (PWV). The resulting polarization-difference parameterization (PDP) enables fast and direct (noniterative) retrievals of LWP with minimal requirements for ancillary data. Single- and dual-channel retrieval methods are described and demonstrated. Data gridding is used to reduce the effects of instrumental noise. The methodology is demonstrated using AMSR-E observations over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during a six day period in November and December, 2003. Single- and dual-channel retrieval results mostly agree with ground-based microwave retrievals of LWP to within approximately 0.04 mm.

  9. Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

  10. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  11. Integrated Dynamic Gloabal Modeling of Land Use, Energy and Economic Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Jain, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL

    2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this collaborative project is to integrate an existing general equilibrium energy-economic growth model with a biogeochemical cycles and biophysical models in order to more fully explore the potential contribution of land use-related activities to future emissions scenarios. Land cover and land use change activities, including deforestation, afforestation, and agriculture management, are important source of not only CO2, but also non-CO2 GHGs. Therefore, contribution of land-use emissions to total emissions of GHGs is important, and consequently their future trends are relevant to the estimation of climate change and its mitigation. This final report covers the full project period of the award, beginning May 2006, which includes a sub-contract to Brown University later transferred to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) when Co-PI Brian O'Neill changed institutional affiliations.

  12. Land-use practices in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia, Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedlowski, M.A.; Dale, V.H.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road development and colonization projects have brought about wide-scale deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The state of Rondonia, located in the western Amazon Basin, best exemplifies the problems related to land-use changes because it has the highest rates of deforestation in the Amazon Basin. In order to identify the main land-use practices in Rondonia, interviews with local farmers were carried out in the central part of Rondonia, in the PIC (Integrated Colonization Project) Ouro Preto do Oeste. This is the oldest colonization project in the state. The governmental colonization programs attracted migrants to the area through the construction of roads and infrastructure necessary for the colonists to occupy the land for agricultural practices. The interviews were done on lots of the PIC Ouro Preto and in PAD Urupa to define the background of the colonists, their land-use practices, their economic situation, and their relationships with governmental institutions.

  13. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  14. GCAM 3.0 Agriculture and Land Use: Data Sources and Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Emanuel, William R.; Nathan, Mayda; Zhou, Yuyu

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the data processing methods used in the GCAM 3.0 agriculture and land use component, starting from all source data used, and detailing all calculations and assumptions made in generating the model inputs. The report starts with a brief introduction to modeling of agriculture and land use in GCAM 3.0, and then provides documentation of the data and methods used for generating the base-year dataset and future scenario parameters assumed in the model input files. Specifically, the report addresses primary commodity production, secondary (animal) commodity production, disposition of commodities, land allocation, land carbon contents, and land values.

  15. Land use implications of future energy system trajectories – the case of the UK 2050 Carbon Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konadu, D. Dennis; Mourão, Zenaida Sobral; Allwood, Julian M.; Richards, Keith S.; Kopec, Grant; McMahon, Richard; Fenner, Richard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of „biodiversity protection and food production, before low-carbon energy/GHG sequestration?. This is consistent with 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36... Highlights ? The Carbon Plan could result in significant land use change for bioenergy by 2050 ? Higher Nuclear; less efficiency pathway has the highest land use change impact ? Higher Renewables; more energy efficiency pathway has the lowest...

  16. MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    MAE 124/ESYS 103 Discussion: Week 9 Buildings, Building Codes, Land Use 0. Let's consider apartment complex under construction August 1, 2003 "If you build it we will burn it. The E.L.F.s are mad of life and the planet." Is ELF pursuing a sustainable "smart growth" strategy? 2. Is open space near

  17. Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Successes, Challenges, Lessons Learned in Land Use Planning Efforts Adjacent to an LRT Station interest in "new outreach methods" ·!Demonstrated value added in more collaborative process #12;Lessons Learned 1.! Begin internal & external outreach earlier 2.! Our "good ideas" were not necessarily good

  18. TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    at the NSF`s U.S.-China Workshop on Pathways to Low Carbon Cities Hong Kong Polytechnic University, December1 TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SOLUTIONS FOR LOW-CARBON CITIES Kara Kockelman Professor and William prove helpful as cities grow. For example, densification facilitates carbon- saving reductions in trip

  19. Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Identifying Stormwater Pollution Sources from Land Use Deconstruction Using Digital Image Processing Liz Isenstein and Mi-Huyn Park Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University digital images, GIS (Geographic Information systems) and RS (Remote Sensing) software were used. A maximum

  20. Dischargecalcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil or land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discharge­calcium concentration relationships in streams of the Amazon and Cerrado of Brazil: soil ecosystem function. Throughout the Amazon and Cerrado regions of Brazil rapid changes in land use and land with data from 28 streams throughout Brazil. These streams come from three distinct regions and varied

  1. Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judjahn, Stephanie K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this...

  2. Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making by Howard W. Reeves1 improve water resources management by illustrating the nonlinear behavior of the coupled system (Pahl systems arise from the decisions of many individuals and groups (Holland 1995; Batty 2005). For the agent

  3. Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Publications on Land Use/Cover Change and Deforestation Peer-Reviewed Articles Pricope, N. G., G. López-Carr, D. Redo, M. Bonilla, M. Levy (2013). Deforestation and reforestation of Latin America and the Caribbean (2001-2010). Biotropica. 45(2): 262-271. López-Carr, D. and J. Burgdorfer (2013) "Deforestation

  4. ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    that undisturbed neotropical forests remove a significant portion of human-derived CO2 emissions fromW ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon indicate that CO2 doubling enhances the production of woody tissue per unit leaf area by about 25% (ref. 5

  5. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  7. Land use in the late prehistoric Post Oak Savannah of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judjahn, Stephanie K.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to look at land use in the Late Prehistoric period in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. The goal is to determine the geographic extent of agriculture and what inhibits the extent and degree. In order to accomplish this...

  8. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  9. Using soft-systems methods to evaluate the outputs from multi-objective land use planning tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    of soft-systems based analysis of land-use planning tool outputs is recommended, not only for evaluating? This paper reports on a soft-systems based evaluation of the multi-objective land-use planning tools within-off between objectives. The paper then details the soft- systems-based evaluation strategy. Land managers

  10. The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

  11. Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon, Boulder, 80309-0488, United States 1. Introduction Carbon management through changes in land, 2010). Human land-use change is the second largest contributor of increasing carbon dioxide

  12. Connecting seas: western Palaearctic continental flyway for water birds in the perspective of changing land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    of changing land use and climate M E N N O B A R T R . VA N E E R D E N *, R U D O L F H . D R E N T w, J U L the tundra and taiga belts of Russia with north-west Europe is the major migratory avenue for an estimated 9; accepted 24 January 2005 Introduction Profound changes have occurred in the European landscape during

  13. Land Use in Relation to Sedimentation in Reservoirs : Trinity River Basin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Garin, Alexis N.

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cash in advance foY docks, fishing camps, et cetera. Few permanent. imprdvements, how- ever, and the period of time since the construction of the reservoir has been so short that not much road construction has been possible. *That is, annual...LIBRARY. ' A & M COLLEGE. 1 - k TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas 'ULLETIN NO. 597 JANUARY 1941 LAND USE IN RELATION TO SEDIMENTA- TION IN RESERVOIRS, TRINITY RIVER BASIN, TEXAS I I 1...

  14. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  16. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land-Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m2. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m2 when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  17. Impacts of Array Configuration on Land Use Requirements for Large-Scale Photovoltaic Deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use is often cited as an important issue for renewable energy technologies. In this paper we examine the relationship between land-use requirements for large-scale photovoltaic (PV) deployment in the U.S. and PV-array configuration. We estimate the per capita land requirements for solar PV and find that array configuration is a stronger driver of energy density than regional variations in solar insolation. When deployed horizontally, the PV land area needed to meet 100% of an average U.S. citizen's electricity demand is about 100 m{sup 2}. This requirement roughly doubles to about 200 m{sup 2} when using 1-axis tracking arrays. By comparing these total land-use requirements with other current per capita land uses, we find that land-use requirements of solar photovoltaics are modest, especially when considering the availability of zero impact 'land' on rooftops. Additional work is need to examine the tradeoffs between array spacing, self-shading losses, and land use, along with possible techniques to mitigate land-use impacts of large-scale PV deployment.

  18. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian, E-mail: cumt_chenlongqian@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  19. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  20. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  1. The impact of land use change on migrant birds in the Sahel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, William M.; Small, Robert D. S.; Vickery, Juliet A.

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -1967 but below it between 1968-1985. In fact, the early 1970s were a period of rainfall failure and famine in the Sahel, and coincided with population declines in many of the migrant bird populations wintering in these drought-affect d dryland habitats... and grazing reserves have been subject to more intensive use (both legal and illegal). The extent of Sahelian wetlands has been reduced by the construction of dams for hydro power and irrigation. The spatial patterns of land use change and the associated...

  2. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  3. GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to allocate Kansas High Plains Irrigated Agriculture Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Peiwen

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    GIS-Based Cellular Automaton Model to Allocate Irrigated Agriculture Land Use Peiwen Chiu Kansas State University GIS Day 2013 November 20, 2013 University of Kansas High Plains/Ogallala Aquifer 8 States 186,000 mi2 480,000 km2 http... of Acreage From the Model Iterations What’s Next This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (grant GEO0909515) and the United States Department of Agriculture/Agricultural Research Service (Ogallala Aquifer Initiative). Any findings...

  4. Memorial University of Newfoundland Indirect Costs Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Memorial University of Newfoundland Indirect Costs Report 2012-13 The grant provided through the Government of Canada Indirect Costs Program (ICP) is essential to Memorial's research success. Funding and impact can be found in the following section. Total 2013 Indirect Costs Grant: $4,318,814 Management

  5. Indirect exporters Fergal McCann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Indirect exporters Fergal McCann Paris School of Economics Université Paris 1 November 2010 G;Indirect Exporters Fergal McCann Universit´e Paris 1, Paris School of Economics. November 3, 2010 Abstract Indirect Exporters are defined as firms exporting through a trade inter- mediary. Despite numerous recent

  6. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    service valuation model to each of the land use classes over the discreet time periods. Hydrologic peak flow models using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method were developed and applied to each watershed for each discreet time period...

  7. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  8. Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

  9. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

  10. Federal Indirect Costs Program Definition of the indirect costs of research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    Federal Indirect Costs Program Definition of the indirect costs of research Concordia University defines "Indirect Costs" as costs which cannot be associated specifically with a particular research program or other activity. Indirect costs include the provision and maintenance of physical space

  11. Impact of land use change on the local climate over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, J.; Lu, S.; Li, S.; Miller, N.L.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational data show that the remotely sensed leaf area index (LAI) has a significant downward trend over the east Tibetan Plateau (TP), while a warming trend is found in the same area. Further analysis indicates that this warming trend mainly results from the nighttime warming. The Single-Column Atmosphere Model (SCAM) version 3.1 developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is used to investigate the role of land use change in the TP local climate system and isolate the contribution of land use change to the warming. Two sets of SCAM simulations were performed at the Xinghai station that is located near the center of the TP Sanjiang (three rivers) Nature Reserve where the downward LAI trend is largest. These simulations were forced with the high and low LAIs. The modeling results indicate that, when the LAI changes from high to low, the daytime temperature has a slight decrease, while the nighttime temperature increases significantly, which is consistent with the observations. The modeling results further show that the lower surface roughness length plays a significant role in affecting the nighttime temperature increase.

  12. A new GIS toolbox for integrating massive heterogeneous GIS data for land use change analysis A new GIS toolbox for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    to the driving forces influencing the usage of agricultural land, while land use must suit the natural conditions.laggner@ti.bund.de Abstract Agricultural land use in Germany and related im- pacts on the environment and the use of natural and land use changes are re- lated to environmental impacts like groundwater pollution, greenhouse gas

  13. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , whereas upper half experienced decreasing trends. A similar spatial pattern was not observed for rainfall. Winter season observed maximum number of trends. Wavelet analysis on hydrologic variables, suggested presence of multi-scale temporal variability...

  14. Measuring Land-Use Regulations and Their Effects in the Housing Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    41(2) (February): 389–421. Quigley, John M. , and Larry180. Cambridge, MA: Blackwell. Quigley, John M. , and StevenReview 95(2): 323–329. Quigley, John M. , and Larry A.

  15. Measuring Land-Use Regulations and Their Effects in the Housing Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    February): 389–421. Quigley, John M. , and Larry Rosenthal.MA: Blackwell. Quigley, John M. , and Steven Raphael.95(2): 323–329. Quigley, John M. , and Larry A. Rosenthal.

  16. The effects of climate change and extreme weather events on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    in June 2009 ranked Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Albania as the"most vulnerable to climate change"of 28 countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The present policy brief examines Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan and Kyrgyzstan are especially vulnerable to the risks of climate change. Their widely degraded landscapes

  17. Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Eliza

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

  18. Designed by Zoning: Evaluating the Spatial Effects of Land Use Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Charles Reuben

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    leads way in Smart Growth: Greenbelt Alliance gives city topWhen each case city passed its Smart Growth plan, itsgrids, and a city successfully achieving Smart Growth should

  19. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

  20. Scientific Analysis Is Essential to Assess Biofuel Policy Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land-use change (LUC) estimated by economic models has sparked intense international debate. Models estimate how much LUC might be induced under prescribed scenarios and rely on assumptions to generate LUC values. It is critical to test and validate underlying assumptions with empirical evidence. Furthermore, this modeling approach cannot answer if any specific indirect effects are actually caused by biofuel policy. The best way to resolve questions of causation is via scientific methods. Kim and Dale attempt to address the question of if, rather than how much, market-induced land-use change is currently detectable based on the analysis of historic evidence, and in doing so, explore some modeling assumptions behind the drivers of change. Given that there is no accepted approach to estimate the global effects of biofuel policy on land-use change, it is critical to assess the actual effects of policies through careful analysis and interpretation of empirical data. Decision makers need a valid scientific basis for policy decisions on energy choices.

  1. ON THE INDIRECT EFFECT OF BIOFUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilberman, D; Barrows, G; Hochman, G; Rajagopal, D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and H. de Gorter. 2011. Biofuel Policies and Carbon Leakage.Environmental Impact of Biofuel Policies. Energy Policy.sions and Uncertainty for Biofuel Policies. Energy Policy.

  2. 7, 78437905, 2007 Indirect effect of soot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ), Institut f¨ur Physik der Atmosph¨are (IPA), Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany 2 Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523, USA 4 Ruprecht-Karls-Universit¨at Heidelberg), Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC), NY, USA * now at: Deutsches Patent- und Markenamt, M

  3. Study of Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure of All-Polymer. . ~0s ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY ofAerosol

  4. Land-use planning for phosphate mining and resource areas: the central Florida case. A workshop synopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFevers, J. R.; Toner, W. J.; Guernsey, J. L.; Rifkin, E.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 19-20, 1978, a workshop was conducted in Bartow, Florida, on the topic of land-use and reclamation planning in the local phosphate mining region. More than 100 participants attended the workshop representing the phosphate mining industry, environmental groups, research organizations, planning agencies, news media, and governmental regulatory agencies. Various aspects of the environmental and land-use impacts of phosphate mining, together with the state-of-the-art of mitigating adverse impacts, were discussed. The participants were required to work cooperatively to develop a series of alternative land-use plans for a selected mining site that was the focus of a half-day field trip. Overall, the participants developed a number of rational land-use and reclamation plans for the site that were considered acceptable by the majority of the group. There was general agreement that the most valuable aspect of the workshop was the opportunity for individuals with such diverse interests to work cooperatively on a common problem and develop acceptable solutions.

  5. Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II the requirement of the Seveso II directive and an analysis of the use of LUP as part of a risk management policy management policy combining several tools. To describe the risk management policy implemented in France

  6. The habitat use and selection of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in a land use landscape in Kenya, Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    in Kenya, Africa Ashley Coe Ashley Coe (Corresponding author) Montana State University Bozeman, MT Email) to examine how land use and cover types affect the distribution of African elephants in Kenya (2, Kenya had approximately 23,353 ­ 31,636 individuals (Blanc 2007); mainly, savannah African elephants

  7. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  8. 4, 75617614, 2004 Indirect aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . While the cloud albedo enhance- ment (Twomey effect) of warm clouds received most attention so far, they can15 scatter, absorb and emit thermal radiation. Thirdly aerosol particles act as cloud con properties influenced by20 aerosols (e.g. semi-direct effect, suppression of convection). Clouds themselves

  9. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  10. Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of indirect...

  11. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  12. Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Nir

    types. Transfer apparently facilitates the learning of this type of information from the input1 Accelerated Learning without Semantic Similarity: Indirect Objects ANAT NINIO* Abstract The hypothesis was tested that transfer and facilitation of learning in early syntactic development does not rely

  13. Synthetic fuel production by indirect coal liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and dimethyl ether) by indirect coal liquefaction (ICL). Gasification of coal pro- duces a synthesis gas by coal gasification. The principal con- stituents of ``syngas'' are carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which modern coal gasification facilities in operation to make hydrogen for ammonia production. Also

  14. EA-1936: Proposed Changes to Parcel ED-1 Land Uses, Utility Infrastructure, and Natural Area Management Responsibility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed modifications to the allowable land uses, utility infrastructure, and Natural Area management responsibility for Parcel ED-1. The purpose of the modifications is to enhance the development potential of the Horizon Center business/industrial park, while ensuring protection of the adjacent Natural Area. The area addressed by the proposed action was evaluated for various industrial/business uses in the Environmental Assessment Addendum for the Proposed Title Transfer of Parcel ED-1, DOE/EA-1113-A.

  15. Acquiring Land Use Rights in Today's China: A Snapshot from on the Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of land reclamation, noting that reclaimedand that reclamation of marginally fertile land may havereclamation process as "turning mud into agri- cultural land."

  16. Observational estimates of radiative forcing due to land use change in southwest Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    this warming. Positive feedback effects, such as an increase in atmospheric water vapor, result in increased surface temper- atures, while negative feedback effects, such as increases in low-level cloudiness compared to native vegetation, especially during the time period between harvest and planting. Estimates

  17. Diesel Truck Traffic in Low-Income and Minority Communities Adjacent to Ports: Environmental Justice Implications of Near-Roadway Land Use Conflicts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Douglas; Krudysz, Margaret; Winer, Arthur

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Includes Fleet of 400 Low-Emission Trucks. Long Beach Press-truck-related land use conflicts and current planning and emissionemissions standards and will travel only on nonresidential truck

  18. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications ofecosystem service values and (2) to show how the valuationecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation

  19. Kriging direct and indirect estimates of sulfate deposition: A comparison. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reams, G.A.; Huso, M.M.P.; Vong, R.J.; McCollum, J.M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to logistical and cost constraints, acidic deposition is rarely measured at forest research or sampling locations. A crucial first step to assessing the effects of acid rain on forests is an accurate estimate of acidic deposition at forest sample sites. The authors examine two methods (direct and indirect) for estimating sulfate deposition at atmospherically unmonitored forest sites. The direct method only uses directly measured deposition data, while the indirect method additionally incorporates precipitation measurements from a spatially denser network of monitoring sites. Sulfate deposition values were estimated by point kriging using both the direct and indirect methods. By using the supplemental data from the precipitation monitoring network, estimates of sulfate deposition improved substantially, particularly at sites that are relatively isolated to the acid deposition monitoring network. Cross-validated procedures indicate that by using the indirect method, a reduction of approximately 20 to 25 percent in the predicted error sum of squares occurred.

  20. Local Land Use Controls and Demographic Outcomes in a Booming Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction: The Enactment and JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . EffectsUS Bureau of the Census. JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . Figure 1.represents 100 people. JOHN M . QUIGLEY ET AL . Figure 7.

  1. Land-use change trajectories up to 2050: insights from a global agro-economic model comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, Christoph; van Meijl, Hans; Kyle, G. Page; Nelson, Gerald C.; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Gurgel, Angelo; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; Popp, Alexander; Sands, Ronald; Tabeau, Andrzej; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; von Lampe, Martin; Wise, Marshall A.; Blanc, Elodie; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Kavallari, Aikaterini; Valin, Hugo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in agricultural land use have important implications for environmental services. Previous studies of agricultural land-use futures have been published indicating large uncertainty due to different model assumptions and methodologies. In this article we present a first comprehensive comparison of global agro-economic models that have harmonized drivers of population, GDP, and biophysical yields. The comparison allows us to ask two research questions: (1) How much cropland will be used under different socioeconomic and climate change scenarios? (2) How can differences in model results be explained? The comparison includes four partial and six general equilibrium models that differ in how they model land supply and amount of potentially available land. We analyze results of two different socioeconomic scenarios and three climate scenarios (one with constant climate). Most models (7 out of 10) project an increase of cropland of 10–25% by 2050 compared to 2005 (under constant climate), but one model projects a decrease. Pasture land expands in some models, which increase the treat on natural vegetation further. Across all models most of the cropland expansion takes place in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. In general, the strongest differences in model results are related to differences in the costs of land expansion, the endogenous productivity responses, and the assumptions about potential cropland.

  2. Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

  3. Indirect Comprehensive Review Board (ICRB). Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) used a systems engineering approach to take the first step toward defining a requirements baseline for all indirect work at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The intent of this effort was to define the requirements for indirect work, identify the activities necessary to meet the requirements, and to produce defensible cost estimates for the work. The result of this effort is a scrubbed-down, defensible budget for all indirect work in FY 1997. Buying power for each dollar of direct work was increased by $.02. Recommendations are identified for improvements to this process in FY 1998. The purpose of this report is twofold. First is to report the final results of the 1996 ICRB process, and second is to document the process used such that incremental improvements may be made in future years. Objectives, processes, and approaches are described to provide a trail for future boards. Appendices contain copies of board composition, documentation of the process, as well as the actual training materials.

  4. Unintended Consequences of Transportation Carbon Policies: Land-Use, Emissions, and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothman, Daniel

    Abstract Renewable fuel standards, low carbon fuel standards, and ethanol subsidies are popular policies to incentivize ethanol production and reduce emissions from transportation. Compared to carbon trading standard (LCFS) and ethanol subsidies have similar effects while costs under an equivalent cap and trade

  5. Land use change and soil nutrient transformations in the Los Haitises region of the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    . Potential denitrification, microbial biomass C and N, and microbial respiration gK1 dry soil were mineralization, net nitrification, microbial biomass C, and microbial respiration were all significantly greater activity and C storage through its effect on SOM quality and quantity. While agriculture can significantly

  6. Ecological catastrophes: threshold responses to climate, soil, and land use drivers of the Dust Bowl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on effects of abandoned agricultural land in a relatively small area centered on the panhandle of Oklahoma LTER and Jornada Experimental Range, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Las Cruces, NM, (3) Plant a multi-year drought. Combined with spatially-extensive cultivation and overgrazing, the drought led

  7. Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a Solar PV System at the San Jos Convention Center Indirect Benefits (Increased Roof Life and HVAC Savings) from a...

  8. Development of engineering geologic performance standards for land-use regulation in Sabine Pass, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaught, Richmond Murphy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on geologic features (such as chenier ridges), the effects of storm surge on chenier ridges, altered by borrow mining, was modeled physically (wave tank) and mathematically (computer model). Comparison of the physical and mathe- matical models shows... Pass, Texas, an area in the beginning stages of comprehensive urban planning. Sabine Pass is located along the chenier strandplain/coastal system at the Texas-Louisiana border. Processes affecting the chenier ridges and marsh at Sabine Pass...

  9. HEALTHIER WISCONSIN PARNTERSHIP PROGRAM Direct, Indirect and Unallowable Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEALTHIER WISCONSIN PARNTERSHIP PROGRAM Direct, Indirect and Unallowable Costs Direct and Indirect Costs The decision of whether a cost is direct or indirect is based on the ability to specifically identify the cost with the project, rather than on the nature of the goods and services. Failure to mention

  10. Savannah River Site Land Use Plan - May, 2013 i SRNS-RP-2013-00162

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomeland andEffects andFundedUniversityEnergy

  11. Feedstock blending studies with laboratory indirectly heated gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, A.E.S.; Mullin, J.P.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the further development of indirectly heated gasifiers intended to provide fuels for advanced gas turbines, several indirectly heated laboratory gasifiers were constructed. During many comparative tests, advantages and problems with each system were observed. The most useful systems make use of laboratory tube furnaces in conjunction with temperature, time and pressure or volume yield measuring systems and a gas chromatograph with a thermal conductivity detector. In this paper, high temperature pyrolysis results obtained with the latest system are presented. Contrasting feedstocks suitable for commercial systems separately or in blends are used. Yield versus time measurements are used to determine relevant rate constants and outputs. Since the rate constants are mainly reflective of heat transfer effects, cylindrical dowel sticks of varying radii were volatilized. The data set leads to an analytic heat transfer model that considers the hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin components of the dowels. Also developed from the dowel experiments is an approximate procedure for estimating the proportionate releases of CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2} for any type of biomass whose component proportions are known.

  12. Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

  13. Inter-regional comparison of land-use effects on stream MELODY J. BERNOT*, DANIEL J. SOBOTA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall Jr., Robert O.

    , JENNIFER L. TANK , LINDA R. ASHKENAS , LEE W. COOPER§ § , CLIFFORD N. DAHM­ ­ , STANLEY V. GREGORY , NANCY B. GRIMM***, STEPHEN K. HAMILTON , SHERRI L. JOHNSON , WILLIAM H. MCDOWELL§ § § , JUDITH L. MEYER

  14. POLICY ON INDIRECT COSTS RECOVERY FROM RESEARCH FUNDING AGENCIES NOT ACCREDITED BY SIRU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    POLICY ON INDIRECT COSTS RECOVERY FROM RESEARCH FUNDING AGENCIES NOT ACCREDITED BY SIRU Effective of this policy is to appropriately recognize and recover the costs incurred by the University in supporting research grant activity. DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this policy: Direct costs means costs that can

  15. Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    : although effective weed management and enhancement of soil quality are necessary components of sustainable275 18 Direct and Indirect Impacts of Weed Management Practices on Soil Quality Richard G. Smith, crop yield, and agricultural sustainability (Kar- len et al., 2001), the impact that weed management

  16. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  17. The Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steve

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research projects like the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign, or ISDAC, increase our knowledge of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud physics.

  18. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 3, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    governed by eco- nomic development and air pollution regulations [3]. Variations in incident solar, SEPTEMBER 2010 219 Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Changes on Land Surface Radiation and Energy Budgets Abstract--Land surface radiation and energy budgets are critical to address a variety

  19. Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Examining the Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: Migration and Land Use In explaining variability in tropical deforestation, scholars have focused almost exclusively on in situ (or "on causes of deforestation in the humid tropics with a case study from Guatemala. To investigate the first

  20. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

  1. 2012-13 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs of Research Program provides Canadian universities with annual funding to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    2012-13 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs of Research Program provides Canadian universities with annual funding to help pay for a portion of the hidden or "indirect" costs

  2. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  3. The ECA indirectly heated Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlqvist, S.G.; Darche, M.; Ducroux, P.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the beginning of the 1980s the ECA Company designed and manufactured the first French Stirling engine, partially funded by the French government. The ECA engine has several design features of special interest: indirect heating by sodium heat pipes, cylinder block with four double-acting cylinders in line with a single crankshaft, four identical and demountable heat exchanger modules, piston rod seals with recuperation of leakage losses by means of four integrated rod pumps and with hermetic gas and oil seals using four roll socks, and power control by means of three gas valves and a 3.5-MPa helium bottle. The ECA engine ran for the first time and at the first attempt at the end of June 1982 and rapidly delivered a power of 5 kW at reduced pressure. Further testing of this 4-by 113-cm3 engine is under way to obtain a nominal power of 12 kW and an efficiency of 36% (heat to shaft power) with a very simplified design.

  4. INDIRECT COSTS OF RESEARCH University Policy No: FM5400

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 INDIRECT COSTS OF RESEARCH University Policy No: FM5400 Classification: Financial Management recoveries towards the indirect costs associated with externally funded Research conducted at the University Costs of Research include, but are not limited to those costs associated with: the operation

  5. Indirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search for Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

  6. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  7. Indirect L to T point optical transition in bismuth nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, A. J.

    An indirect electronic transition from the L point valence band to the T point valence band has been previously observed in Bi nanowires oriented along the [011? 2] crystalline direction (used by Black et al. and by Reppert ...

  8. Direct/Indirect Costs - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs. g4301-1chp7.pdf -- PDF Document, 41 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: ID: DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 7...

  9. Final Report, DOE grant DE-FG02-99ER45780, "Indirect Excitons in Coupled Quantum Wells"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoke, david W. [University of Pittsburgh

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The is the final technical report for this project, which was funded by the DOE from 1999 to 2012. The project focused on experimental studies of spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells, with the aim of understanding the quantum physics of these particles, including such effects as pattern formation due to electron-hole charge separation, the Mott plasma-insulator transition, luminescence up-conversion through field-assisted tunneling, luminescence line shifts due to many-body renormalization and magnetic field effects on tunneling, and proposed effects such as Bose-Einstein condensation of indirect excitons and phase separation of bright and dark indirect excitons. Significant results are summarized here and the relation to other work is discussed.

  10. Theoretical and testing performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyun [Department of Building Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect evaporative chiller is a device used to produce chilled water at a temperature between the wet bulb temperature and dew point of the outdoor air, which can be used in building HVAC systems. This article presents a theoretical analysis and practical performance of an innovative indirect evaporative chiller. First, the process of the indirect evaporative chiller is introduced; then, the matching characteristics of the process are presented and analyzed. It can be shown that the process that produces cold water by using dry air is a nearly-reversible process, so the ideal produced chilled water temperature of the indirect evaporative chiller can be set close to the dew point temperature of the chiller's inlet air. After the indirect evaporative chiller was designed, simulations were done to analyze the output water temperature, the cooling efficiency relative to the inlet dew point temperature, and the COP that the chiller can performance. The first installation of the indirect evaporative chiller of this kind has been run for 5 years in a building in the city of Shihezi. The tested output water temperature of the chiller is around 14-20 C, which is just in between of the outdoor wet bulb temperature and dew point. The tested COP{sub r,s} of the developed indirect evaporative chiller reaches 9.1. Compared with ordinary air conditioning systems, the indirect evaporative chiller can save more than 40% in energy consumption due to the fact that the only energy consumed is from pumps and fans. An added bonus is that the indirect evaporative chiller uses no CFCs that pollute to the aerosphere. The tested internal parameters, such as the water-air flow rate ratio and heat transfer area for each heat transfer process inside the chiller, were analyzed and compared with designed values. The tested indoor air conditions, with a room temperature of 23-27 C and relative humidity of 50-70%, proved that the developed practical indirect evaporative chiller successfully satisfy the indoor air conditioning load for the demo building. The indirect evaporative chiller has a potentially wide application in dry regions, especially for large scale commercial buildings. Finally, this paper presented the geographic regions suitable for the technology worldwide. (author)

  11. Green Data Center Cooling: Achieving 90% Reduction: Airside Economization and Unique Indirect Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weerts, B. A.; Gallaher, D.; Weaver, R.; Van Geet, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center's constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant change is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling system. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. This project's geographic location allowed maximizing the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling, but these strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the U.S.

  12. Interpretable conditions for identifying direct and indirect effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    are more appealing to data analysts. Unfortunately, these interpretations are laden with two other sources assignment is essentially random after adjusting for observed pretreatment covariates and that the assignment pretreatment

  13. Ungulate herbivory: Indirect effects cascade into the treetops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Andrew J.

    loams. The ungulate herbivore exclu- sion, that is, all grazing mammals 15 kg, included a nine of large-bodied consumers, but grazing is also known to stimulate growth (12). The research ``gold'' comes

  14. A New Assessment of the Aerosol First Indirect Effect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1A Month to RememberEIA'sNew

  15. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  17. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when tar- geting stream restoration efforts and land-use2001), while urban stream restoration can signi?- cantlyAJ (2008) Effects of stream restoration on denitri- ?cation

  18. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE89 002669 RFandEndLand Use

  19. Indirect-direct band gap transition through electric tuning in bilayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Si, M. S., E-mail: sims@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Y. H.; Gao, X. P. [Key laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730 000 (China)] [Key laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730 000 (China); Sung, Dongchul; Hong, Suklyun [Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143 747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Graphene Research Institute, Sejong University, Seoul 143 747 (Korea, Republic of); He, Junjie [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411 105 (China)] [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411 105 (China)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the electronic properties of bilayer MoS{sub 2} exposed to an external electric field by using first-principles calculations. It is found that a larger interlayer distance, referring to that by standard density functional theory (DFT) with respect to that by DFT with empirical dispersion corrections, makes indirect-direct band gap transition possible by electric control. We show that external electric field effectively manipulates the valence band contrast between the K- and ?-valleys by forming built-in electric dipole fields, which realizes an indirect-direct transition before a semiconductor-metal transition happens. Our results provide a novel efficient access to tune the electronic properties of two-dimensional layered materials.

  20. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen, E-mail: Colleen_Gunning@health.qld.gov.a [Health Promotion Service (Mackay), Tropical Population Health Services (Australia); Harris, Patrick [CHETRE-UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, University of New South Wales (Australia); Mallett, John [Regional Planner, Department of Communities (Australia)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  1. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  2. Solar Physics (2004) 224: 34 C Springer 2005 The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Solar Physics (2004) 224: 3­4 C Springer 2005 PREFACE The topical issue of "Space Climate: Direct and Indirect Observations of Long-Term Solar Activity" is based on contributions presented at the First of solar activity, and their effects in the near-Earth environment and technoculture. As an analogy

  3. CAS Indirect Cost Recovery Practices "Facilities and Administration" (F&A) Costs or, "Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR)," are costs incurred by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    CAS Indirect Cost Recovery Practices "Facilities and Administration" (F&A) Costs or, "Indirect Cost Recovery (ICR)," are costs incurred by the University for common or joint projects and cannot be specifically attributed to an individual project. Some examples of indirect costs include accounting staff

  4. Facilities and Administration (Indirect) Costs Rates Facilities and Administrative (indirect) costs rates are the result of negotiations with the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Facilities and Administration (Indirect) Costs Rates Facilities and Administrative (indirect) costs (Indirect Costs) Source of Funds Applicable To F&A Rate DHHS Federally Negotiated Rates: Federal, Non or a different rate has been approved by the Director of OSP. *MTDC Base: Modified total direct costs consist

  5. 2011-12 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs of Research Program provides Canadian universities with annual funding to help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    2011-12 Report on the Indirect Costs of Research Program Since 2003 the Federal Indirect Costs or "indirect" costs of research. Examples of such costs include lighting and heating for research space, salaries for staff that provide technical or administrative research support, training costs for workplace

  6. Efficient Mining of Indirect Associations Using HI-Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Aijun

    Efficient Mining of Indirect Associations Using HI-Mine Qian Wan and Aijun An Department. Discovering association rules is one of the important tasks in data mining. While most of the existing algorithms are developed for efficient mining of frequent patterns, it has been noted recently that some

  7. Indirect control and power in mutual control Dominik Karos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Indirect control and power in mutual control structures Dominik Karos Hans Peters This version of the paper, we axiomatically develop a class of power indices for invariant mutual control structures. We accumulates his Shapley-Shubik power index assignments from controlling other players, diminished by the sum

  8. Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering Carlos that is difficult to measure directly (e.g., lifetime of a pavement, efficiency of an engine, etc). To estimate y computation time. As an example of this methodology, we give pavement lifetime estimates. This work

  9. LEGAL REALISM IN ACTION: INDIRECT COPYRIGHT LIABILITY'S CONTINUING TORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 LEGAL REALISM IN ACTION: INDIRECT COPYRIGHT LIABILITY'S CONTINUING TORT FRAMEWORK AND SONY'S DE standard, derived in Sony Corp. of America v. Universal City Studios, Inc. from patent law and reasserted for distributors of dual-use technologies. Yet, when one looks to cases decided since Sony, subsequent legislative

  10. DNA Deformation Energy as an Indirect Recognition Mechanism in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Richard H.

    DNA Deformation Energy as an Indirect Recognition Mechanism in Protein-DNA Interactions Kimberly A. Senear Abstract--Proteins that bind to specific locations in genomic DNA control many basic cellular. Deformation energy, which models the energy required to bend DNA from its native shape to its shape when bound

  11. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of chemical and physical environ- ments represented by these studies suggests that the mech- anisms and precursors contributing to SOA formation are diverse. In light of these discrepancies, previous estimates of the global source of SOA (12–40 Tg C a#2... and results are averaged to estimate the effect of interannual climate variability. 2.2. Anthropogenic Emissions [17] Emissions of both gas and aerosol phase species for the years 2000 and 2100 are taken from Horowitz [2006]. Present-day (2000) fossil fuel...

  12. Archaeology in the Kilauea East Rift Zone: Part 1, Land-use model and research design, Kapoho, Kamaili and Kilauea Geothermal Subzones, Puna District, Hawaii Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtchard, G.C.; Moblo, P. [International Archaeological Research Inst., Inc., Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Puna Geothermal Resource Subzones (GRS) project area encompasses approximately 22,000 acres centered on the Kilauea East Rift Zone in Puna District, Hawaii Island. The area is divided into three subzones proposed for geothermal power development -- Kilauea Middle East Rift, Kamaili and Kapoho GRS. Throughout the time of human occupation, eruptive episodes along the rift have maintained a dynamic landscape. Periodic volcanic events, for example, have changed the coastline configuration, altered patterns of agriculturally suitable sediments, and created an assortment of periodically active, periodically quiescent, volcanic hazards. Because of the active character of the rift zone, then, the area`s occupants have always been obliged to organize their use of the landscape to accommodate a dynamic mosaic of lava flow types and ages. While the specific configuration of settlements and agricultural areas necessarily changed in response to volcanic events, it is possible to anticipate general patterns in the manner in which populations used the landscape through time. This research design offers a model that predicts the spatial results of long-term land-use patterns and relates them to the character of the archaeological record of that use. In essence, the environmental/land-use model developed here predicts that highest population levels, and hence the greatest abundance and complexity of identifiable prehistoric remains, tended to cluster near the coast at places that maximized access to productive fisheries and agricultural soils. With the possible exception of a few inland settlements, the density of archaeological remains expected to decrease with distance from the coastline. The pattern is generally supported in the regions existing ethnohistoric and archaeological record.

  13. Causation Entropy Identifies Indirect Influences, Dominance of Neighbors and Anticipatory Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Sun; Erik M. Bollt

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inference of causality is central in nonlinear time series analysis and science in general. A popular approach to infer causality between two processes is to measure the information flow between them in terms of transfer entropy. Using dynamics of coupled oscillator networks, we show that although transfer entropy can successfully detect information flow in two processes, it often results in erroneous identification of network connections under the presence of indirect interactions, dominance of neighbors, or anticipatory couplings. Such effects are found to be profound for time-dependent networks. To overcome these limitations, we develop a measure called causation entropy and show that its application can lead to reliable identification of true couplings.

  14. Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermani, Paolo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

  15. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

  16. Reactor Materials Program process water piping indirect failure frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.L.

    1989-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Following completion of the probabilistic analyses, the LOCA Definition Project has been subject to various external reviews, and as a result the need for several revisions has arisen. This report updates and summarizes the indirect failure frequency analysis for the process water piping. In this report, a conservatism of the earlier analysis is removed, supporting lower failure frequency estimates. The analysis results are also reinterpreted in light of subsequent review comments.

  17. SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya K. Datye

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

  18. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Parsons, Edward L. (Morgantown, WV)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.

  19. Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L.

    1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes. 1 fig.

  20. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds . Abstract:...

  1. High Precision Control of Indirect Drive Systems Based on End-effector Sensor Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Cheng-Huei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Block diagram of a single-joint indirect drive train witha Figure 4.4: Block diagram of a single-joint indirect driveBlock diagram of the control system given in Section 3.6. Single-Joint

  2. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  3. Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Indirect Combustion Noise: Experimental Investigation of the Vortex Sound Generation in a Choked-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 2315 #12;Combustion noise in gas turbines consists of direct noise related to the unsteady combustion process itself and indirect noise. As known, indirect noise is produced when entropy

  4. Indirect Evidence and the Poverty of the Stimulus: The Case of Anaphoric One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regier, Terry

    Indirect Evidence and the Poverty of the Stimulus: The Case of Anaphoric One Stephani Foraker learn a standard poverty-of-stimulus example, anaphoric one, from realistic input by relying on indirect constraints. Keywords: Language acquisition; Poverty of the stimulus; Indirect evidence; Bayesian learning

  5. LAND USE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    ....................................................................8 SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES AND GREEN BUILDING Green Building Design Studio.........................................................................................................................9 Green Building Materials and Construction Methods: Design Tools for Non-Design Professionals LEED Building Certification Overview of Environmental

  6. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  7. Indirect Excitonics | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP »summerlectures [ICO] NameIndirect Excitonics

  8. Estimates of the Global Indirect Energy-Use Emission Impacts of USA Biofuel Policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the indirect energy-use emission implications of increases in the use of biofuels in the USA between 2001 and 2010 as mandates within a dynamic global computable general equilibrium model. The study incorporates explicit markets for biofuels, petroleum and other fossil fuels, and accounts for interactions among all sectors of an 18-region global economy. It considers bilateral trade, as well as the dynamics of capital allocation and investment. Simulation results show that the biofuel mandates in the USA generate an overall reduction in global energy use and emissions over the simulation period from 2001 to 2030. Consequently, the indirect energy-use emission change or emission leakage under the mandate is negative. That is, global emission reductions are larger than the direct emission savings from replacing petroleum with biofuels under the USA RFS2 over the last decade. Under our principal scenario this enhanced the direct emission reduction from biofuels by about 66%. The global change in lifecycle energy-use emissions for this scenario was estimated to be about 93 million tons of CO2e in 2010, 45 million tons of CO2e in 2020, and an increase of 5 million tons of CO2e in 2030, relative to the baseline scenario. Sensitivity results of six alternative scenarios provided additional insights into the pattern of the regional and global effects of biofuel mandates on energy-use emissions.

  9. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    the soil evaporation tended to decrease. Thus during the period of 1964–1979 the green water or ET increased by 0.95%, but the blue water or runoff decreased by 8.71% in the Laohahe Catchment....

  10. An Indirect Search for WIMPs with Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Habig; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A potential source of high energy neutrinos is the annihilation of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) collecting in gravitational potential wells such as the centers of the Earth, the Sun, or the Galaxy. A search for such a WIMP annihilation signal using the Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) detector is presented. Super-K observes 1.1 upward through-going muons per day. These events are caused by high energy (typical E_nu ~ 100 GeV) nu_mu interactions in the rock under the detector, and are generally consistent with the expected flux from atmospheric neutrinos. No enhancement of the neutrino signal due to WIMP annihilation is seen, so upper limits on the possible flux of WIMPS are set. These limits are compared to those from other such indirect searches, and a model-independent method is used to compare the Super-K results with direct-detection WIMP experiments.

  11. An indirect transmission measurement-based spectrum estimation method for computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of an x-ray spectrum can greatly influence imaging and related tasks. In practice, due to the pile-up effect of the detector, it's difficult to directly measure the spectrum of a CT scanner using an energy resolved detector. An alternative solution is to estimate the spectrum using transmission measurements with a step phantom or other CT phantom. In this work, we present a new spectrum estimation method based on indirect transmission measurement and model spectra mixture approach. The estimated x-ray spectrum was expressed as weighted summation of a set of model spectra, which can significantly reduce the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the spectrum estimation problem. Next, an estimated projection can be calculated with the assumed spectrum. By iteratively updating the unknown weights, we minimized the difference between the estimated projection data and the raw projection data. The final spectrum was calculated with these calibrated weights and the model spectra. Both simulation and experim...

  12. Diagnosing residual motion via the x-ray self emission from indirectly driven inertial confinement implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pak, A., E-mail: pak5@llnl.gov; Field, J. E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Knauer, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In an indirectly driven implosion, non-radial translational motion of the compressed fusion capsule is a signature of residual kinetic energy not coupled into the compressional heating of the target. A reduction in compression reduces the peak pressure and nuclear performance of the implosion. Measuring and reducing the residual motion of the implosion is therefore necessary to improve performance and isolate other effects that degrade performance. Using the gated x-ray diagnostic, the x-ray Bremsstrahlung emission from the compressed capsule is spatially and temporally resolved at x-ray energies of >8.7 keV, allowing for measurements of the residual velocity. Here details of the x-ray velocity measurement and fitting routine will be discussed and measurements will be compared to the velocities inferred from the neutron time of flight detectors.

  13. Legacy Effects in Material Flux: Structural Catchment Changes Predate Long-Term Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, Daniel J.

    Legacy effects of past land use and disturbance are increasingly recognized, yet consistent definitions of and criteria for defining them do not exist. To address this gap in biological- and ecosystem-assessment frameworks, ...

  14. Direct and indirect detection of dissipative dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Andrey Katz; Jessie Shelton

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the constraints from direct detection and solar capture on dark matter scenarios with a subdominant dissipative component. This dissipative dark matter component in general has both a symmetric and asymmetric relic abundance. Dissipative dynamics allow this subdominant dark matter component to cool, resulting in its partial or total collapse into a smaller volume inside the halo (e.g., a dark disk) as well as a reduced thermal velocity dispersion compared to that of normal cold dark matter. We first show that these features considerably relax the limits from direct detection experiments on the couplings between standard model (SM) particles and dissipative dark matter. On the other hand, indirect detection of the annihilation of the symmetric dissipative dark matter component inside the Sun sets stringent and robust constraints on the properties of the dissipative dark matter. In particular, IceCube observations force dissipative dark matter particles with mass above 50 GeV to either have a small coupling to the SM or a low local density in the solar system, or to have a nearly asymmetric relic abundance. Possible helioseismology signals associated with purely asymmetric dissipative dark matter are discussed, with no present constraints.

  15. Policy Name: Indirect Costs of Research Originating/Responsible Department: Vice-President (Research and International)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Policy Name: Indirect Costs of Research Originating/Responsible Department: Vice: Associate Vice-President (Research Planning and Operations Policy: Indirect costs of research are real costs that benefit and support research. These costs must be included in budget requests to external sponsors

  16. THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE (INDIRECT) COSTS POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE (INDIRECT) COSTS POLICY Facilities and Administrative (Indirect) costs are real costs that provide reimbursement for actual or contract. The costs result from shared services such as libraries, plant operation and maintenance, utility

  17. Lazy learning indirect control for discrete-time non-linear systems Gianluca Bontempi, Mauro Birattari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Gianluca

    Lazy learning indirect control for discrete-time non-linear systems Gianluca Bontempi, Mauro propose a hybrid architecture for the indirect control of non linear discrete time plants from of the resulting controller in a simplified case. Experimental results in the control of some non linear benchmarks

  18. Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete: ­ Cored Sample (Cylindrical) Indirect tensile testing (IDT) (Strength/Creep) ­ AASHTO T-322 Damage under and Flattened IDT · 1000-sec creep tests on three replicates · 0, -10, and -20 deg. C · Displacement

  19. Indirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino on behalf of the ANTARES Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    significant high energy neutrino fluxes. Indirect search for Dark Matter looking at such neutrino fluxes for the Cherenkov light induced by high energy muons during their travel in the sea water throughout the detectorIndirect Search of Dark Matter with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope V. Bertin1 on behalf

  20. Conferences Lost Password

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Session topic:large-scale land cover initiatives The effective reduction of global carbon emissions from biofuel production is highly dependent on the direct and indirect land use & land cover (LULC) change

  1. A New Indirect Adaptive Control Scheme for Time-Varying Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ioannou, Petros

    A New Indirect Adaptive Control Scheme for Time-Varying Plants Absrmcr of the indirectadaptiveschemewhicharemoreappropriatefortime-varying plants that for successful estimation. the oyerall plant is notrestrictedto var?slowl)withtime. The new estimatorandcontrol

  2. Fast prototyping and Indirect Adaptive GPC temperature control of a class of passive HVAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fast prototyping and Indirect Adaptive GPC temperature control of a class of passive HVAC TAWEGOUM (temperature, moisture) is a dominating factor, on the one hand to deal with the market quantitative

  3. The development of an indirect fluorescent antibody test for Trypanosoma vivax in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platt, Kenneth Bradley

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TEST FOR TRYPANOSOMA VIVAX IN COLOMBIA A Thesis KENNETH BRADLEY PLATT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A Es M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTEB OF SCIENCE May 1974 Ma]or Sub]ect: Veterinary Miorobiology THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDIRECT FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TEST FOR TRYPANOSOMA VIVAX IN COLOMBIA A Thesis by KENNETH BRADLEY PLATT Approved as to style end content by: Co-Cha rman...

  4. Optimized beryllium target design for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simakov, Andrei N., E-mail: simakov@lanl.gov; Wilson, Douglas C.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Kline, John L.; Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Clark, Daniel S.; Milovich, Jose L.; Salmonson, Jay D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, Beryllium (Be) ablators offer a number of important advantages as compared with other ablator materials, e.g., plastic and high density carbon. In particular, the low opacity and relatively high density of Be lead to higher rocket efficiencies giving a higher fuel implosion velocity for a given X-ray drive; and to higher ablation velocities providing more ablative stabilization and reducing the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities on the implosion performance. Be ablator advantages provide a larger target design optimization space and can significantly improve the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] ignition margin. Herein, we summarize the Be advantages, briefly review NIF Be target history, and present a modern, optimized, low adiabat, Revision 6 NIF Be target design. This design takes advantage of knowledge gained from recent NIF experiments, including more realistic levels of laser-plasma energy backscatter, degraded hohlraum-capsule coupling, and the presence of cross-beam energy transfer.

  5. Indirect ultraviolet photodesorption from CO:N2 binary ices - an efficient grain-gas process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Poderoso, Hugo A M; Michaut, Xavier; Philippe, Laurent; Jeseck, Pascal; Öberg, Karin I; Linnartz, Harold; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UV ice photodesorption is an important non-thermal desorption pathway in many interstellar environments that has been invoked to explain observations of cold molecules in disks, clouds and cloud cores. Systematic laboratory studies of the photodesorption rates, between 7 and 14 eV, from CO:N2 binary ices, have been performed at the DESIRS vacuum UV beamline of the synchrotron facility SOLEIL. The photodesorption spectral analysis demonstrates that the photodesorption process is indirect, i.e. the desorption is induced by a photon absorption in sub-surface molecular layers, while only surface molecules are actually desorbing. The photodesorption spectra of CO and N2 in binary ices therefore depend on the absorption spectra of the dominant species in the subsurface ice layer, which implies that the photodesorption efficiency and energy dependence are dramatically different for mixed and layered ices compared to pure ices. In particular, a thin (1-2 ML) N2 ice layer on top of CO will effectively quench CO photod...

  6. ASPEN simulation of the SNG production process in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bistline, J E; Shafer, T B

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthetic natural gas (SNG) production process (methanation, CO-shift, and hydrogen removal) in an indirect coal-liquefaction plant was simulated using the Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN). The simulation of the methanation unit agreed to within 12% of Fluor's design for converting carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. A parametric study examined the effect of four important operating parameters on product composition, process thermal efficiency, and outlet temperature from the second methanation reactor. The molar split of gas feed to the CO-shift unit before methanation was varied from 0.2 to 0.6; variations of molar recycle ratio (0.01 - 0.67), molar steam-to-feed ratio (0.04 - 0.19), and feed temperature (478 - 533 K, 400-500/sup 0/F) to the first methanation reactor were also studied. A 50%-lower split improved thermal efficiency by 6%, but the mole % hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the product SNG required to meet pipeline-quality standards and temperature constraints were not met. Increasing the steam-to-feed ratio from 0.04 to 0.19 improved product quality but decreased thermal efficiency by 8%. By decreasing the feed temperature from 533 to 477 K (500 to 400/sup 0/F), product specifications and temperature constraints were met with no effect on thermal efficiency. However, it may be impractical to operate the reactor at 477 K (400/sup 0/F) because the kinetics are too slow. Increasing the recycle ratio from 0.4 to 0.67 had no effect on thermal efficiency, and temperature constraints and product specifications were met. The SNG production process should be optimized at recycle ratios above 0.67.

  7. Determination of moisture by an indirect conductivity method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgins, Charles Milton

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV. Experimental Procedure and Results A. General Procedure . ~ ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ ~ 7 . 10 B. Stirring Conditions C. Methyl Alcohol-Acetone Mixtures . D. Ethyl Alcohol-Acetone Mixtures E. Effect of Changing Alcohol-Acetone Ratio F. Application to Air... for the entire series was only 0. 27$. ~t'c 1 f ~Pl 6. d 9. Zt 1 1atereitang t C pe Fig. 6 with the 30. 040 curve in F1g. 9, as i. s done in Fig. 10. Ths two curves are almost identical except for a vertical displacement of 22 micromhos or a horisontal...

  8. Solar energy for wood drying using direct or indirect collection with supplemental heating: a computer analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tschernitz, J.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to judge solar drying on a more quantitative basis, the Forest Products Laboratory has developed a computer analysis for calculating the energy demands in the restricted cases of direct and indirect solar wood dryers using supplemental energy. Calculated energy balances are reported including percent fuel savings compared to the net energy used in conventional dryer operation. Six dryer sizes are considered. Seasonal variation of performance is noted for each of 12 months, in 96 locations throughout the United States. Also discussed is variation of cover thermal properties as these influence the effectiveness of operation. The report attempts to organize these economic elements so that the reader can make reasonable choices for any wood-drying requirements.

  9. Developing of New Facets of Indirect Modeling in the Geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owladeghaffari, Hamed; Sharifzadeh, Mostafa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we describe some applications of Self Organizing feature map Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (SONFIS) and Self Organizing feature map Rough Set (SORST) in analysis of permeability at a dam site and lost circulation in the drilling of three wells in Iran. Elicitation of the best rules on the information tables, exploration of the dominant structures on the behaviour of systems while they fall in to the balance of the second granulation level (rules) and highlighting of most effective attributes (parameters) on the selected systems, are some of the benefits of the proposed methods. In the other process, using complex networks (graphs) theory - as another method in not 1:1 modelling branch- mechanical behaviour of a rock joint has been investigated. Keywords: Information Granules; SONFIS; SORST; Complex Networks; Permeability; Lost Circulation; Mechanical Behavior of a Rock Joint

  10. Development of a New Technique to Assess Susceptibility to Predation Resulting from Sublethal Stresses (Indirect Mortality)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G.F.

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. We evaluated a new technique for assessing indirect mortality, based on a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). We compare this technique to the standard predator preference test. The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. We subjected striped shiners and fathead minnows to varying intensities of either turbulence (10-, 20- or 30-min) or 2-min exposures to a fish anesthetic (100 or 200 mg/L of tricaine methanesulfonate), and evaluated their subsequent behavior. Individual fish were given a startle stimulus and filmed with a high-speed video camera. Each fish was startled and filmed twice before being stressed, and then at 1-, 5-, 15-, and 30-min post-exposure. The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of maximum C-shape, time to completion of C-shape, and completeness of C-shape. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether stressed fish exhibited a startle response. For striped shiners, the number of fish not responding to the stimulus was significantly different from controls at 1-min post-exposure and for fathead minnows at 1- and 5-min post-exposure. The greatest effects occurred with exposure to the fish anesthetic; in fathead minnows all of the recorded measures were significantly different from controls at 1-min and 5-min post-exposure at the 100 mg/L dose. For striped shiners all recorded behavioral measures were significantly different from controls at 1-min at the 200 and 100 mg/L doses and for selected behavioral measures at 5-min. Turbulence also had significant effects on striped shiner startle responses following 20- and 30-min exposures for all behavioral measures at 1-min. The patterns suggest that any effects on startle response due to turbulence or low doses of anesthetic are short-lived, but can be evaluated using the escape behavior technique. The most useful indication of changes in escape behavior in these tests was the simple reaction/no reaction to the startle stimulus. The startle response occurred reliably among unstressed fish, and was frequently reduced or eliminated in fish exposed to turbulence or anesthesia. The other behavioral parameters observed were often altered by the sublethal stresses as well. A standard predator preference test was also conducted with largemouth bass as the predators and fathead minnows as prey. In this test design, groups of 10 unstressed fish (controls) and 10 stressed fish were put in a tank with a predator. The stressed fathead minnows were exposed to turbulence or fish anesthetic. The predator was allowed to eat half of the prey, and the data were evaluated to determine whether predators consumed greater proportions of stressed minnows than control minnows. The predation test indicated that exposure to MS-222 resulted in significant predation in fathead minnows, but exposure to turbulence did not. This pattern was the same as seen in fathead minnows using the startle response (escape behavior) test. For the sublethal stresses we applied, evaluation of changes in fish escape behavior yielded results comparable to traditional predator preference tests. Because t

  11. Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed under a protective inert blanket, and we are in the process of analyzing them, but preliminary work presented here shows very little oxide by XRD. However, the catalyst that was used in these runs at CAER was a different composition than that used in previous runs, so the protective effect of an inert blanket will need further study. Finally, we point out how the interference by the wax can make it difficult in some cases to analyze the phases in a Fe catalyst. Several approaches have been used to remove the interference from the wax and we come to the surprising conclusion that Fe may be present in a working slurry reactor despite the high CO/ H{sub 2} ratio. Further work is underway to corroborate this finding.

  12. INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

  13. Impacts of Indirect Blocks on Buffer Cache Energy Efficiency Jianhui Yue, Yifeng Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yifeng

    - ing small but frequently accessed indirected blocks over all memory chips reduce the energy saving new scheme can save memory energy up to 16.8% and 15.4% in the I/O-intensive server workloads TPC in fewer energy saving opportunities through memory chip powerdown and DMA overlapping. · This paper

  14. Inversion in indirect optimal control: constrained and unconstrained F. Chaplais and N. Petit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract-- This paper focuses on using non linear inversion in optimal control problems. This technique, we address the case of linear systems with a control affine cost to be minimized under inputInversion in indirect optimal control: constrained and unconstrained cases F. Chaplais and N. Petit

  15. indirect study, coal was oxidatively de-graded with sodium dichromate and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    indirect study, coal was oxidatively de- graded with sodium dichromate and the esterified products- vestigators concluded (17, p. 380) that "thiophene derivatives must be indige- nous to coal." The direct XANES conmpounds yielded spectra that bore little resemblance to the coal spec- trum. For example, simulations

  16. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

  17. Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

  18. Jasmonate-deficient plants have reduced direct and indirect defences against herbivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    REPORT Jasmonate-deficient plants have reduced direct and indirect defences against herbivores@botany.utoronto.ca Abstract Plants employ a variety of defence mechanisms, some of which act directly by having a negative defences in plants. We examined the performance of herbivores (direct defence) and the attraction

  19. The fate of technetium in reduced estuarine sediments: Combining direct and indirect analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    - mission electron microscopy and gamma camera imaging) and indirect (incubation experiments and chemical extractions) experimental techniques. When TcO4 À was incubated in sediment microcosms at micro-molar (10À6 days), >99% TcOÀ 4 was removed from solution in under 10 min in both micro- bially active and heat

  20. Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Indirect Adaptive Robust Control of Electro-Hydraulic Systems Driven by Single-Rod Hydraulic) of electro-hydraulic systems driven by single- rod hydraulic actuators. Unlike the tracking that the proposed IARC achieves good tracking performance and accurate parameter estimation. INTRODUCTION Electro-hydraulic

  1. Improving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    and institutional campuses can significantly contribute to energy conservation. The rollout of smart grids of occupants, and is a micro-grid test-bed for the DoE sponsored Los Angeles Smart Grid Demonstration ProjectImproving Energy Use Forecast for Campus Micro-grids using Indirect Indicators Saima Aman

  2. Indirect Evidence and the Poverty of the Stimulus: The Case of Anaphoric One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regier, Terry

    Indirect Evidence and the Poverty of the Stimulus: The Case of Anaphoric One Stephani Foraker this latter view by showing that a Bayesian model can learn a standard "poverty-of-stimulus" example knowledge may itself be acquired without linguistic constraints. Keywords: language acquisition; poverty

  3. Indirect rotor-position estimation techniques for switched reluctance motors -A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husain, Iqbal

    motor drives. The sensing schemes are broadly classified into non-intrusive and active probing methods. The methods of indirect position sensing can be broadly classified into two categories: (i) Non-intrusive and associated computations, and (ii) intrusive (or active probing) methods, where low-level, high

  4. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary conditions are likely to be very different because of the much more extensive ocean water during M-PACE. The uniformity of the surface conditions during ISDAC greatly simplifies the objective analysis (surface fluxes and precipitation are very weak), so that it can largely rely on the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis. The aerosol measurements can also be used as input to the cloud models and to evaluate the aerosol retrievals. By running the cloud models with and without solar absorption by the aerosols, we can determine the semidirect effect of the aerosol on the clouds.

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 53, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2006 41 A High-Performance Sensorless Indirect Stator Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and rotor winding resistance. Ls, Lr Stator and rotor self-inductance. M Mutual inductance. Np Number-Performance Sensorless Indirect Stator Flux Orientation Control of Induction Motor Drive Mohamed Boussak, Member, IEEE, and Kamel Jarray Abstract--A new method for the implementation of a sensorless indirect stator

  6. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  7. Mitigating climate change through land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    , offsetting the use of fossil fuels and reducing carbon emissions. Avoiding deforestation, increasing plant storage through afforestation or plant management, and substituting bioenergy for fossil fuels all use increasing deforestation by increasing demand for crop land, undermining the primary GHG emissions reduction

  8. Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hopkins University Press. Quigley and Swoboda Oates, W. E.Tax Journal, 50: 1–21. Quigley, J. M. and Raphael, S. (2005)Economic Review, 95: 323–328. Quigley, J. M. and Swoboda, A.

  9. Land Use Regulation with Durable Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Swoboda, Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manhattan so expensive? Regulation and the rise of housingmotive for restrictive regulation by local home owners.the impacts of these regulations vary across owner- occupied

  10. A Markov model of land use dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campillo, Fabien; Raherinirina, Angelo; Rakotozafy, Rivo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the Markov chain to modeling agricultural succession is well known. In most cases, the main problem is the inference of the model, i.e. the estimation of the transition matrix. In this work we present methods to estimate the transition matrix from historical observations. In addition to the estimator of maximum likelihood (MLE), we also consider the Bayes estimator associated with the Jeffreys prior. This Bayes estimator will be approximated by a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also propose a method based on the sojourn time to test the adequation of Markov chain model to the dataset.

  11. Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

  12. POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case of internalizing pollution externalities, Journaltension between industrial pollution and households has beenas a means of controlling pollution. Separating polluter and

  13. Purdue Land Use Update March 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and research (DEAD) · HB 1265 - Oil, gas, and coal bed methane property. (ALIVE) · SB 177 - Indiana Historic state parks and reservoirs (DEAD) IDEM is working to update the CAFO/CFO rules, in part because EPA has

  14. Residential agents and land use change modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Corentin M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanisation is driven by the complex interactions of many physical and human factors where human actions and decisions, individually and collectively, ultimately shape the patterns of urban landscapes. Agentbased modelling ...

  15. BIODIVERSITY Land use patterns skew sex ratios,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    history strategies (Hoehn et al., 2007; Cal- lens et al. 2007, Perry et al., 2005; Jiguet et al., 2007

  16. Land Use and the Chinatown Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ralph Henn, Chinatown in Hunters Point, S. F. Mag. (1970).had simply said that Hunters Point or any remote area was

  17. Land Use License | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:LakeIowa:LambdaNew York:Texas:LicenseLegal

  18. Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to: navigation,working-groupsIllinois:LakeIowa:LambdaNew

  19. Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell Testing

  20. csp land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel's picturecontest Home NickL's

  1. solar land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicyreviewland use Home

  2. EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byForms What'sAnnual2

  3. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTALnatural gas as aGCGCAM

  4. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermal energy toGettingGive Us

  5. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept |Energy MicroGrid |Land

  6. Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to: navigation, search Name:SGTJunction

  7. OpenEI Community - csp land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedrivingGivenGhost"overview/0

  8. OpenEI Community - pv land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0

  9. OpenEI Community - solar land use

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0Agency (DLA) RFP - Deadline -

  10. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNLLaizhouLand O Lakes Inc

  11. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

  12. Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct and indirect effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct exclusion cages to expose periphyton to recycled nutrients in the absence of direct grazing. In experiment 1 phosphorus and high body N:P. In experiment 1, we found that increasing catfish density led to lower biomass

  13. Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfiresImpurity Transport,12, 20103,University1_3355 Revisionand

  14. Surface-Based Remote Sensing of the Aerosol Indirect Effect at Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface SoilSurface

  15. Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization|Energy Informationmethods

  16. Quantifying the Aerosol Indirect Effect Using Ground-Based Remote Sensors and Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: ShalePutting!Quantifying Uncertainty

  17. Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers Subfolders inDiscoveryDispersion of Cloud Droplet

  18. An alternative route for efficient optical indirect-gap excitation in Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Shuhei; Fukatsu, Susumu, E-mail: cfkatz@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Yasutake, Yuhsuke [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We explored optical excitation pathways in the multivalley semiconductor Ge in an attempt to expedite selective electron injection into the indirect L-band-edge. An off-peak resonant excitation route was developed, which offers the pumping efficiency outperforming the phonon-assisted near-indirect-edge absorption by more than six orders of magnitude. The valley selectivity results from the intra-valley relaxation that separates electrons and holes in momentum space following excitation. Fortuitously, the widely used green laser, 532?nm, is found to be nearly ideally suited to the efficient L-valley-selective excitation in Ge. Such valley-specific pumping may help clarify the otherwise complicated electron dynamics involving intervalley processes.

  19. Configuration and performance of the indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural gas, indirect-fired fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) is introduced as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20--200 megawatt (MW) size range. The novel indirect-fired carbonate fuel cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFCFC) power plant system configures the ambient pressure carbonate fuel cell with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations from ASPEN simulations present material and energy balances with expected power output. The results indicate efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFCFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed carbonate fuel cell steam bottomed cycles, but with smaller and less expensive components.

  20. Horizontal Inequity and Vertical Redistribution with Indirect Taxes: the Greek Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplanoglou, G; Newbery, David

    should be treated equally, or whether wealth conveys greater security than work (or vice versa) and whether the pursuit of either is affected differently by the proposed income tax. The treatment of equals by indirect taxes has received much less... of alcohol would reduce drunk driving by 7-8% (more for women than men). Other estimates (surveyed in Cnossen, 2005) suggest that higher alcohol taxes would reduce rapes, assaults (particularly domestic violence) and murder, and reduce sickness...

  1. Development of subcontractor indirect cost and other direct cost at the DOE Fernald Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossman, R.L. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) took great strides in the development of cost estimates at Fernald. There have been many opportunities to improve on how the policies and procedures pertaining to cost estimates were to be implemented. As FERMCO took over the existing Fernald facility, the Project Controls Division began to format the estimating procedures and tools to do business at Fernald. The Estimating Department looked at the problems that pre-existed at the site. One of the key problems that FERMCO encountered was how to summarized the direct and indirect accounts of each subcontracted estimate. Direct costs were broken down by prime and sub-prime accounts. This presented a level of detail that had not been experienced at the site before; it also created many issues concerning accounts and definitions to be applied to ``all other accounts associated with a project.`` Existing subcontract indirect cost accounts were reviewed from existing historical estimates. It was found that some were very detailed and some were not. The Estimating Department was given the task of standardizing the accounts and percentages for each of the subcontractor indirect costs. Then, as the project progressed, the percentages could be revised with actual estimates, subcontract comparisons, or with level of effort (LOE) accounts, which would represent qualified people assigned a task for the completion of each project. The approach is to assign particular employees to perform a specific task within a project from start to finish, and then to reassign the individual(s) to a new project (if it was available) integrating the expertise available with the skills required by the other operable units.

  2. A high-efficiency indirect lighting system utilizing the solar 1000 sulfur lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Gould, C.; Page, E.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-lumen light sources represent unique challenges and opportunities for the design of practical and efficient interior lighting systems. High-output sources require a means of large-scale distribution and avoidance of high-luminance glare while providing efficient delivery. An indirect lighting system has been developed for use with a 1,000 Watt sulfur lamp that efficiently utilizes the high-output source to provide quality interior lighting. This paper briefly describes the design and initial testing of this new system.

  3. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  4. Indirect searches for dark matter with the Fermi large area telescopestar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Albert, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is overwhelming evidence that non-baryonic dark matter constitutes ~ 27% of the energy density of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are promising dark matter candidates that may produce ? rays via annihilation or decay detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). A detection of WIMPs would also indicate the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model. We present recent results from the two cleanest indirect WIMP searches by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration: searches for ?-ray spectral lines and ?-ray emission associated with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies.

  5. Indirect Searches for Dark Matter with the Fermi Large Area Telescope1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Albert, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is overwhelming evidence that non-baryonic dark matter constitutes ~ 27% of the energy density of the Universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are promising dark matter candidates that may produce ? rays via annihilation or decay detectable by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). A detection of WIMPs would also indicate the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model. We present recent results from the two cleanest indirect WIMP searches by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration: searches for ?-ray spectral lines and ?-ray emission associated with Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies.

  6. Fuzzy logic enhanced speed control of an indirect field-oriented induction machine drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heber, B.; Xu, L.; Tang, Y. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field orientation control (FOC) of induction machines has permitted fast transient response by decoupled torque and flux control. However, field orientation detuning caused by parameter variations is a major difficulty for indirect FOC methods. Traditional probability density function (PID) controllers have trouble meeting a wide range of speed tracking performance even when proper field orientation is achieved. PID controller performance is severely degraded when detuning occurs. This paper presents a fuzzy logic design approach that can meet the speed tracking requirements even when detuning occurs. Computer simulations and experimental results obtained via a general-purpose digital signal processor (DSP) system are presented.

  7. Indirect measurement of diluents in a multi-component natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Owen, Thomas E.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of indirectly measuring the diluent (nitrogen and carbon dioxide) concentrations in a natural gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. A set of reference gas mixtures with known molecular weights and diluent concentrations is used to calculate the constant values. For the gas in question, if the speed of sound in the gas is measured at three states, the three resulting expressions of molecular weight can be solved for the nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the gas mixture.

  8. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

  9. Optimized analysis method for indirect dark matter searches with imaging air Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksi?, J.; Martinez, M. [Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rico, J., E-mail: jelena@ifae.es, E-mail: jrico@ifae.es, E-mail: martinez@ifae.es [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a dedicated analysis approach for indirect Dark Matter searches with Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes. By using the full likelihood analysis, we take complete advantage of the distinct features expected in the gamma ray spectrum of Dark Matter origin, achieving better sensitivity with respect to the standard analysis chains. We describe the method and characterize its general performance. We also compare its sensitivity with that of the current standards for several Dark Matter annihilation models, obtaining gains of up to factors of order of 10. We compute the improved limits that can be reached using this new approach, taking as an example existing estimates for several benchmark models as well as the recent results from VERITAS on observations of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Segue 1. Furthermore, we estimate the sensitivity of Cherenkov Telescopes for monochromatic line signals. Predictions are made on improvement that can be achieved for MAGIC and CTA. Lastly, we discuss how this method can be applied in a global, sensitivity-optimized indirect Dark Matter search that combines the results of all Cherenkov observatories of the present generation.

  10. Indirect conversion of coal to methanol and gasoline: product price vs product slate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wham, R.M.; McCracken, D.J.; Forrester, R.C. III

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts process analysis and engineering evaluation studies for the Department of Energy to provide, on a consistent basis, technical and economic assessments of processes and systems for coal conversion and utilization. Such assessments permit better understanding of the relative technical and economic potential of these processes. The objective of the work described here was to provide an assessment of the technical feasibility, economic competitiveness, and environmental acceptability of selected indirect coal liquefaction processes on a uniform, consistent, and impartial basis. Particular emphasis is placed on production of methanol as a principal product or methanol production for conversion to gasoline. Potential uses for the methanol are combustion in peaking-type turbines or blending with gasoline to yield motor fuel. Conversion of methanol to gasoline is accomplished through the use of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Under the guidance of ORNL, Fluor Engineers and Constructors, Houston Division, prepared four conceptual process designs for indirect conversion of a Western subbituminous coal to either methanol or gasoline. The conceptual designs are based on the use of consistent technology for the core of the plant (gasification through methanol synthesis) with additional processing as necessary for production of different liquid products of interest. The bases for the conceptual designs are given. The case designations are: methanol production for turbine-grade fuel; methanol production for gasoline blending; gasoline production with coproduction of SNG; and gasoline production maximized.

  11. Synchronization in hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmoy Banerjee; Debabrata Biswas

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper explores the synchronization scenario of hyperchaotic time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly via a common environment. We show that depending upon the coupling parameters a hyperchaotic time-delayed system can show in-phase or complete synchronization, and also inverse-phase or anti-synchronization. This paper reports the first experimental confirmation of synchronization of hyperchaos in time-delayed electronic oscillators coupled indirectly through a common environment. We confirm the occurrence of in-phase and inverse-phase synchronization phenomena in the coupled system through the dynamical measures like generalized autocorrelation function, correlation of probability of recurrence, and the concept of localized sets computed directly from the experimental time-series data. We also present a linear stability analysis of the coupled system. The experimental and analytical results are further supported by the detailed numerical analysis of the coupled system. Apart from the above mentioned measures, we numerically compute another quantitative measure, namely, Lyapunov exponent spectrum of the coupled system that confirms the transition from the in-phase (inverse-phase) synchronized state to the complete (anti-) synchronized state with the increasing coupling strength.

  12. Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . This would require a 10-fold increase in biomass supply, . . . how much land? Future Biofuel Production Flexibility Program for Bioenergy Producers Section 9011: Biomass Crop Assistance Program Section 9012: Forest of fuel a year; 30% would be about 95 billion gallons, which would require 1 billion tons of biomass

  13. Predicting landfalling hurricane numbers from sea surface temperature: a theoretical comparison of direct and indirect methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nzerem, K; Laepple, T; Nzerem, Kechi; Jewson, Stephen; Laepple, Thomas

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two ways that one might convert a prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) into a prediction of landfalling hurricane numbers. First, one might regress historical numbers of landfalling hurricanes onto historical SSTs, and use the fitted regression relation to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers given predicted SSTs. We call this the direct approach. Second, one might regress \\emph{basin} hurricane numbers onto historical SSTs, estimate the proportion of basin hurricanes that make landfall, and use the fitted regression relation and estimated proportion to predict future landfalling hurricane numbers. We call this the \\emph{indirect} approach. Which of these two methods is likely to work better? We answer this question in the context of a simple abstract model.

  14. Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

  15. Synchronized states in chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Resmi; G. Ambika; R. E. Amritkar

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider synchronization of chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a common environmnet where the environment has an intrinsic dynmics of its own modulated via feedback from the systems. We find that a rich vareity of synchronization behavior, such as in-phase, anti-phase,complete and anti- synchronization is possible. We present an approximate stability analysis for the different synchronization behaviors. The transitions to different states of synchronous behaviour are analyzed in the parameter plane of coupling strengths by numerical studies for specific cases such as Rossler and Lorenz systems and are characterized using various indices such as correlation, average phase difference and Lyapunov exponents. The threshold condition obtained from numerical analysis is found to agree with that from the stability analysis.

  16. Indirect evaporative cooler using membrane-contained, liquid desiccant for dehumidification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kozubal, Eric Joseph; Slayzak, Steven Joseph

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirect evaporative cooler for cooling inlet supply air from a first temperature to a second, lower temperature using a stream of liquid coolant and a stream of exhaust or purge air. The cooler includes a first flow channel for inlet supply air and a second flow channel adjacent the first for exhaust air. The first and second flow channels are defined in part by sheets of a membrane permeable to water vapor such that mass is transferred as a vapor through the membrane from the inlet supply air to a contained liquid desiccant for dehumidification and also to the exhaust air as heat is transferred from the inlet supply air to the liquid coolant. A separation wall divides the liquid desiccant and the coolant but allows heat to be transferred from the supply air to the coolant which releases water vapor to the counter or cross flowing exhaust air.

  17. Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavalle, J; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Bussons-Gordo, J; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Giraud, E; Jacholkowska, A; Lott, B; M"unz, F; Manseri, H; Nuss, E; Piron, Frédéric; Reposeur, T; Smith, D A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

  18. Indirect Search for Dark Matter in M31 with the CELESTE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lavalle; H. Manseri; A. Jacholkowska; E. Brion; R. Britto; P. Bruel; J. Bussons-Gordo; D. Dumora; E. Durand; E. Giraud; B. Lott; F. Münz; E. Nuss; F. Piron; T. Reposeur; D. A. Smith

    2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    If dark matter is made of neutralinos, annihilation of such Majorana particles should produce high energy cosmic rays, especially in galaxy halo high density regions like galaxy centres. M31 (Andromeda) is our nearest neighbour spiral galaxy, and both its high mass and its low distance make it a source of interest for the indirect search for dark matter through gamma-ray detection. The ground based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope CELESTE observed M31 from 2001 to 2003, in the mostly unexplored energy range 50-500 GeV. These observations provide an upper limit on the flux above 50 GeV around $10^{-10}\\rm{cm}^{-2}\\rm{s}^{-1}$ in the frame of supersymmetric dark matter, and more generally on any gamma emission from M31.

  19. A comparison of direct and indirect methods of determining tensile strength of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, James Timon

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -sectional area of the cylinder. Typical failures and close-up of broken aggregate are shown in Figures 12 and 13 respectively, TABLE II RESULTS OP STRENGTH TESTS - BATCH DESIGN "A" greet Tensi1e T. Indi~et ' HochiLus oS Cespress9. ve . . &358. M5 A~v... ~ 2 ' ~8z Av ~ 8 1 ~~8 z8g 263 --? 308 F8~8 1 2e 1800 75 1200 0 %7 Av ~ TABLE III RESULTS OP STHt"NGTH TESTS BATCH DESIGlTT "B" Age oi' Test Avgas A. rect Tensile +3 Indirect Tens e 4. 07 62 282 28 261 2 286 2865 3617 3533...

  20. Engineering direct-indirect band gap transition in wurtzite GaAs nanowires through size and uniaxial strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copple, Andrew; Peng, Xihong; 10.1063/1.4718026

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic structures of wurtzite GaAs nanowires in the [0001] direction were studied using first-principles calculations. It was found that the band gap of GaAs nanowires experience a direct-to-indirect transition when the diameter of the nanowires is smaller than ~28 {\\AA}. For those thin GaAs nanowires with an indirect band gap, it was found that the gap can be tuned to be direct if a moderate external uniaxial strain is applied. Both tensile and compressive strain can trigger the indirect-to-direct gap transition. The critical strains for the gap-transition are determined by the energy crossover of two states in conduction bands.

  1. In Wino Veritas? Indirect Searches Shed Light on Neutralino Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JiJi Fan; Matthew Reece

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Indirect detection constraints on gamma rays (both continuum and lines) have set strong constraints on wino dark matter. By combining results from Fermi-LAT and HESS, we show that: light nonthermal wino dark matter is strongly excluded; thermal wino dark matter is allowed only if the Milky Way dark matter distribution has a significant (>~0.4 kpc) core; and for plausible NFW and Einasto distributions the entire range of wino masses from 100 GeV up to 3 TeV can be excluded. The case of light, nonthermal wino dark matter is particularly interesting in scenarios with decaying moduli that reheat the universe to a low temperature. Typically such models have been discussed for low reheating temperatures, not far above the BBN bound of a few MeV. We show that constraints on the allowed wino relic density push such models to higher reheating temperatures and hence heavier moduli. Even for a flattened halo model consisting of an NFW profile with constant-density core inside 1 kpc and a density near the sun of 0.3 GeV/cm^3, for 150 GeV winos current data constrains the reheat temperature to be above 1.4 GeV. As a result, for models in which the wino mass is a loop factor below the gravitino mass, the data favor moduli that are more than an order of magnitude heavier than the gravitino. We discuss some of the sobering implications of this result for the status of supersymmetry. We also comment on other neutralino dark matter scenarios, in particular the case of mixed bino/higgsino dark matter. We show that in this case, direct and indirect searches are complementary to each other and could potentially cover most of the parameter space.

  2. How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes and Different Coastal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    How Hurricane Attributes Determine the Extent of Environmental Effects: Multiple Hurricanes Program, 1926 Victoria Avenue, Fort Myers, Florida 33901 ABSTRACT: The most recent spate of hurricanes characteristics of hurricanes interact with human land use to lead to various types and degrees of environmental

  3. Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30 1 to integrate information and data on climate change and its impacts in a similar way for a number of sectors (climate, hydrology, ecosystems, agriculture, land use) among others through a web portal and integrated

  4. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  5. Integrated Direct/Indirect Adaptive Robust Precision Control of Linear Motor Drive Systems with Accurate Parameter Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Integrated Direct/Indirect Adaptive Robust Precision Control of Linear Motor Drive Systems The focus of the paper is on the synthesis of nonlinear adaptive robust controllers for precision linear control of linear motor drive systems but with an improved estimation model, in which accurate parameter

  6. Probabilistic evaluation of main coolant pipe break indirectly induced by earthquakes: Savannah River Project L and P Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, S.A.; Wesley, D.A.; Awadalla, N.G.; Kennedy, R.P. (Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA); Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA); Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A probabilistic evaluation of seismically-induced indirect pipe break for the Savannah River Project (SRP) L- and P-Reactor main coolant (process water) piping has been conducted. Seismically-induced indirect pipe break can result primarily from: (1) failure of the anchorage of one or more of the components to which the pipe is anchored; or (2) failure of the pipe due to collapse of the structure. The potential for both types of seismically-induced indirect failures was identified during a seismic walkdown of the main coolant piping. This work involved: (1) identifying components or structures whose failure could result in pipe failure; (2) developing seismic capacities or fragilities of these components; (3) combining component fragilities to develop plant damage state fragilities; and (4) convolving the plant seismic fragilities with a probabilistic seismic hazard estimate for the site in order to obtain estimates of seismic risk in terms of annual probability of seismic-induced indirect pipe break. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  8. Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

  9. Indirect fracture delineation in a carbonate reservoir: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The Hanifa Reservoir is approximately 100 m thick and consists of fine-grained, muddy limestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. Since discovery of the Hanifa oil pool in 1947, pressure fluctuations have indicated communication with the overlying Arab-D Reservoir. Welltest permeability measurements are approximately 40 times higher than core permeability measurements of the Hanifa. This divergence of Hanifa permeability measurements combined with the indicated Arab-D communication suggests the presence of a natural fracture network. Direct observations of Hanifa cores reveal common, sub-vertical fractures with average apertures <200 microns. With limited core coverage and no oriented cores, a new technique was needed to delineate the areas affected by fractures. A technique combining indirect fracture indicators was devised for Abqaiq field and can be applied to other, similar fields. The actual flow system of the Abqaiq Hanifa is a complex interaction between matrix porosity/permeability and fracture permeability or enhanced permeability. Future development plans allow for low matrix permeability access to much of the Hanifa storage space and high fracture permeability both within the Hanifa and connecting to the Arab-D Reservoir.

  10. Engineering a 70-percent efficient, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C.; Micheli, P.L.; Parsons, E.L. Jr.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors introduce the natural gas, indirect-fired fuel-cell bottomed turbine cycle (NG-IFFC) as a novel power plant system for the distributed power and on-site markets in the 20 to 200 megawatt (MW) size range. The NG-IFFC system is a new METC-patented system. This power-plant system links the ambient pressure, carbonate fuel cell in tandem with a gas turbine, air compressor, combustor, and ceramic heat exchanger. Performance calculations based on Advanced System for Process Engineering (ASPEN) simulations show material and energy balances with expected power output. Early results indicated efficiencies and heat rates for the NG-IFFC are comparable to conventionally bottomed, carbonate fuel-cell steam-bottomed cycles. More recent calculations extended the in-tandem concept to produce near-stoichiometric usage of the oxygen. This is made possible by reforming the anode stream to completion and using all hydrogen fuel in what will need to be a special combustor. The performance increases dramatically to 70%.

  11. The development of a 20-inch indirect fired fluidized bed gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanigan, V.J.; Sitton, O.C.; Huang, W.E

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the design, fabrication and operation of a 20'' I.D. fluidized bed gasifier producing medium Btu gas. The reactor is indirectly heated using 30 x 1-inch U-tubes inserted in the inert bed. The U-tubes are heated using flue gases produced from a propane burner system located at the bottom of the reactor. The feed material was dry wood chips fed into the bed with a 6in. auger. The reactor was fed both into the bed and at the top of the bed. The fluidizing medium was superheated steam which was superheated to 1000/degree/F. The gas produced from the reactor was passed through a cyclone for char removal and routed to the flare for combustion and disposal. The parameters measured during the experimental runs were wood feed rate, steam flow rate, steam temperatures, bed temperatures, free board temperatures, product gas temperatures, bed differential pressures, char production, gas production, gas analyses, and tar production. The parameters measured in the laboratory were moisture contents (wood and char), ash contents (wood and char), and tar content. 9 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Regional-Scale Assessment of Nitrous Oxide Emissions within the US Corn Belt: The Impact of Precipitation and Agricultural Drainage on Indirect Emissions Tim Griffis1, Xuhui Lee2, John Baker3, Peter, but mitigation strategies have been limited by the large uncertainties in both direct and indirect emission

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of effluent standards and limitations for the metal finishing industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of the metal finishing industry. The analysis considers the cost-effectiveness of the final metal finishing regulations for direct and indirect dischargers.

  14. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  15. CAMEA ESS - The Continuous Angle Multi-Energy Analysis Indirect Geometry Spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, P G; Markó, M; Bertelsen, M; Larsen, J; Christensen, N B; Lefmann, K; Jacobsen, J; Niedermayer, Ch; Juranyi, F; Ronnow, H M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CAMEA ESS neutron spectrometer is designed to achieve a high detection efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane, and to maximize the use of the long pulse European Spallation Source. It is an indirect geometry time-of-flight spectrometer that uses crystal analysers to determine the final energy of neutrons scattered from the sample. Unlike other indirect gemeotry spectrometers CAMEA will use ten concentric arcs of analysers to analyse scattered neutrons at ten different final energies, which can be increased to 30 final energies by use of prismatic analysis. In this report we will outline the CAMEA instrument concept, the large performance gain, and the potential scientific advancements that can be made with this instrument.

  16. Nitrogen availability and indirect measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from aerobic and anaerobic biowaste digestates applied to agricultural soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigby, H.; Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Nitrogen release in digestate-amended soil depends on the digestate type. • Overall N release is modulated by digestate mineral and mineralisable N contents. • Microbial immobilisation does not influence overall release of digestate N in soil. • Digestate physical properties and soil type interact to affect overall N recovery. • High labile C inputs in digestate may promote denitrification in fine-textured soil. - Abstract: Recycling biowaste digestates on agricultural land diverts biodegradable waste from landfill disposal and represents a sustainable source of nutrients and organic matter (OM) to improve soil for crop production. However, the dynamics of nitrogen (N) release from these organic N sources must be determined to optimise their fertiliser value and management. This laboratory incubation experiment examined the effects of digestate type (aerobic and anaerobic), waste type (industrial, agricultural and municipal solid waste or sewage sludge) and soil type (sandy loam, sandy silt loam and silty clay) on N availability in digestate-amended soils and also quantified the extent and significance of the immobilisation of N within the soil microbial biomass, as a possible regulatory mechanism of N release. The digestate types examined included: dewatered, anaerobically digested biosolids (DMAD); dewatered, anaerobic mesophilic digestate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (DMADMSW); liquid, anaerobic co-digestate of food and animal slurry (LcoMAD) and liquid, thermophilic aerobic digestate of food waste (LTAD). Ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) was included as a reference treatment for mineral N. After 48 days, the final, maximum net recoveries of mineral N relative to the total N (TN) addition in the different digestates and unamended control treatments were in the decreasing order: LcoMAD, 68%; LTAD, 37%, DMAD, 20%; and DMADMSW, 11%. A transient increase in microbial biomass N (MBN) was observed with LTAD application, indicating greater microbial activity in amended soil and reflecting the lower stability of this OM source, compared to the other, anaerobic digestate types, which showed no consistent effects on MBN compared to the control. Thus, the overall net release of digestate N in different soil types was not regulated by N transfer into the soil microbial biomass, but was determined primarily by digestate properties and the capacity of the soil type to process and turnover digestate N. In contrast to the sandy soil types, where nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations increased during incubation, there was an absence of NO{sub 3}{sup -} accumulation in the silty clay soil amended with LTAD and DMADMSW. This provided indirect evidence for denitrification activity and the gaseous loss of N, and the associated increased risk of greenhouse gas emissions under certain conditions of labile C supply and/or digestate physical structure in fine-textured soil types. The significance and influence of the interaction between soil type and digestate stability and physical properties on denitrification processes in digestate-amended soils require urgent investigation to ensure management practices are appropriate to minimise greenhouse gas emissions from land applied biowastes.

  17. Indirect effects of Argentine ant and honeydew-producing insect mutualisms on California red scale in a citrus agroecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kizner, Michelle Cara

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for food, ants protect Hemiptera from their parasites andand honeydew-producing Hemiptera. In this study, the aboveof honeydew-producing Hemiptera. Within our study site,

  18. BEYOND BUDGET RATIONALITIES: THE SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF PERFORMANCE BUDGETING AND ITS INDIRECT EFFECTS ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE WITHIN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nye, Robert Kennedy

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance based budgeting reform in its latest stage continues to evolve after resurgence in popularity resulting from the Clinton Administration's National Performance Review and the international new public management (NPM) movement. Performance...

  19. Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

  20. Measurement of indirect CP-violating asymmetries in $D^0\\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0\\to ?^+?^-$ decays at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; T. Bae; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; F. Bedeschi; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; L. Brigliadori; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; P. Butti; A. Buzatu; A. Calamba; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; F. Canelli; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; A. Clark; C. Clarke; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; M. Cremonesi; D. Cruz; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; N. d'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; L. Demortier; L. Marchese; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. Di Canto; B. Di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; M. Dorigo; A. Driutti; K. Ebina; R. Edgar; A. Elagin; R. Erbacher; S. Errede; B. Esham; S. Farrington; J. P. Fernández Ramos; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; H. Frisch; Y. Funakoshi; C. Galloni; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González López; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; E. Gramellini; C. Grosso-Pilcher; R. C. Group; J. Guimaraes da Costa; S. R. Hahn; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; T. Harrington-Taber; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; A. Hocker; Z. Hong; W. Hopkins; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; U. Husemann; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; S. Jindariani; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; M. Kambeitz; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; A. Kasmi; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; K. Knoepfel; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; K. Lannon; G. Latino; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; A. Limosani; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; H. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; A. Loginov; A. Lucà; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; P. Maestro; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; P. Marino; K. Matera; M. E. Mattson; A. Mazzacane; P. Mazzanti; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; T. Nigmanov; L. Nodulman; S. Y. Noh; O. Norniella; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; P. Palni; V. Papadimitriou; W. Parker; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; T. J. Phillips; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; S. Poprocki; K. Potamianos; F. Prokoshin; A. Pranko; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; I. Redondo Fernández; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodriguez; S. Rolli; M. Ronzani; R. Roser; J. L. Rosner; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; K. Sato; V. Saveliev; A. Savoy-Navarro; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; T. Schwarz; L. Scodellaro; F. Scuri; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; A. Semenov; F. Sforza; S. Z. Shalhout; T. Shears; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; I. Shreyber-Tecker; A. Simonenko; K. Sliwa; J. R. Smith; F. D. Snider; V. Sorin; H. Song; M. Stancari; R. St. Denis; D. Stentz; J. Strologas; Y. Sudo; A. Sukhanov; I. Suslov; K. Takemasa; Y. Takeuchi; J. Tang; M. Tecchio; P. K. Teng; J. Thom; E. Thomson; V. Thukral; D. Toback; S. Tokar; K. Tollefson; T. Tomura; D. Tonelli; S. Torre; D. Torretta; P. Totaro; M. Trovato; F. Ukegawa; S. Uozumi; F. Vázquez; G. Velev; C. Vellidis; C. Vernieri; M. Vidal; R. Vilar; J. Vizán; M. Vogel; G. Volpi; P. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. M. Wang; D. Waters; W. C. Wester III; D. Whiteson; A. B. Wicklund; S. Wilbur; H. H. Williams; J. S. Wilson; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; P. Wittich; S. Wolbers; H. Wolfe; T. Wright; X. Wu; Z. Wu; K. Yamamoto; D. Yamato; T. Yang; U. K. Yang; Y. C. Yang; W. -M. Yao; G. P. Yeh; K. Yi; J. Yoh; K. Yorita; T. Yoshida; G. B. Yu; I. Yu; A. M. Zanetti; Y. Zeng; C. Zhou; S. Zucchelli

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the indirect CP-violating asymmetries ($A_{\\Gamma}$) between effective lifetimes of anticharm and charm mesons reconstructed in $D^0\\to K^+ K^-$ and $D^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays. We use the full data set of proton-antiproton collisions collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab experiment and corresponding to $9.7$~fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The strong-interaction decay $D^{*+}\\to D^0\\pi^+$ is used to identify the meson at production as $D^0$ or $\\overline{D}^0$. We statistically subtract $D^0$ and $\\overline{D}^0$ mesons originating from $b$-hadron decays and measure the yield asymmetry between anticharm and charm decays as a function of decay time. We measure $A_\\Gamma (K^+K^-) = (-0.19 \\pm 0.15 (stat) \\pm 0.04 (syst))\\%$ and $A_\\Gamma (\\pi^+\\pi^-)= (-0.01 \\pm 0.18 (stat) \\pm 0.03 (syst))\\%$. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of CP symmetry and their combination yields $A_\\Gamma = (-0.12 \\pm 0.12)\\%$.

  1. Techno-Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhijit Dutta; Michael Talmadge; Jesse Hensley; Matt Worley; Doug Dudgeon; David Barton; Peter Groenendijk; Daniela Ferrari; Brien Stears; Erin Searcy; Christopher Wright; J. Richard Hess

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This techno-economic study investigates the production of ethanol and a higher alcohols coproduct by conversion of lignocelluosic biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas-to-liquids synthesis over a precommercial heterogeneous catalyst. The design specifies a processing capacity of 2,205 dry U.S. tons (2,000 dry metric tonnes) of woody biomass per day and incorporates 2012 research targets from NREL and other sources for technologies that will facilitate the future commercial production of cost-competitive ethanol. Major processes include indirect steam gasification, syngas cleanup, and catalytic synthesis of mixed alcohols, and ancillary processes include feed handling and drying, alcohol separation, steam and power generation, cooling water, and other operations support utilities. The design and analysis is based on research at NREL, other national laboratories, and The Dow Chemical Company, and it incorporates commercial technologies, process modeling using Aspen Plus software, equipment cost estimation, and discounted cash flow analysis. The design considers the economics of ethanol production assuming successful achievement of internal research targets and nth-plant costs and financing. The design yields 83.8 gallons of ethanol and 10.1 gallons of higher-molecular-weight alcohols per U.S. ton of biomass feedstock. A rigorous sensitivity analysis captures uncertainties in costs and plant performance.

  2. Technical and economic assessment of producing hydrogen by reforming syngas from the Battelle indirectly heated biomass gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Industrial Technologies Div.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing hydrogen from biomass by means of indirectly heated gasification and steam reforming was studied. A detailed process model was developed in ASPEN Plus{trademark} to perform material and energy balances. The results of this simulation were used to size and cost major pieces of equipment from which the determination of the necessary selling price of hydrogen was made. A sensitivity analysis was conducted on the process to study hydrogen price as a function of biomass feedstock cost and hydrogen production efficiency. The gasification system used for this study was the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) indirectly heated gasifier. The heat necessary for the endothermic gasification reactions is supplied by circulating sand from a char combustor to the gasification vessel. Hydrogen production was accomplished by steam reforming the product synthesis gas (syngas) in a process based on that used for natural gas reforming. Three process configurations were studied. Scheme 1 is the full reforming process, with a primary reformer similar to a process furnace, followed by a high temperature shift reactor and a low temperature shift reactor. Scheme 2 uses only the primary reformer, and Scheme 3 uses the primary reformer and the high temperature shift reactor. A pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system is used in all three schemes to produce a hydrogen product pure enough to be used in fuel cells. Steam is produced through detailed heat integration and is intended to be sold as a by-product.

  3. Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11ComputationalEdNERSC:Effect of0/2002Effects of

  4. California Energy Commission California Leadership on Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commission New Partners for Smart GrowthNew Partners for Smart Growth Washington, DCWashington, DC February 8 for residences and 2030 for commercial buildings. CPUC and CEC Big, Bold Initiatives ·Will invest over $15 Transportation to Buildings vs. Buildings Transportation Energy Usage for Average Office Building in CA: 127 KBTU

  5. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  6. LAND USE AND ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM SHALE DEVELOPMENT IN

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    formation is the largest and underlies parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. Horizontal fracturing allows wells to drain a larger area than conventional...

  7. LAND USE CHANGE IN BRAZIL: INTEGRATING ECOLOGY, ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. Hydropower) Transport (e.g. roads) Agricultural Expansion Cultivation (e.g Smallholders) Cattle Ranching

  8. Arnold Schwarzenegger A REVIEW OF LAND USE/LAND COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research (PIER) Program Guido Franco, Contract Manager Kelly Birkinshaw, Program Area Team Lead Energy areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grant Program · Energy) is sponsored by the PIER program and coordinated by its Energy-Related Environmental Research area. The Center

  9. Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noun, R.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

  10. Relationship of land-use patterns to quail habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grevstad, Gerald Oscar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cedar Elm Misc, 1, 503 220 80 201 2, 004 128. 2 28. 0 12. 5 31. 3 200. 0 Table 5. Important forb and grass species found in the understory vegetation of unit-2. Data are the mean of 25 samples by 0. 09m quadrate and 10-point frames... Elm Misc. 835 792 171 343 73. 0 69. 1 21. 1 36. 8 Total 685 300. 0 2, 141 200. 0 Table 17. Important forb and grass species found in the understory vegetation of unit-6. Data are the mean of 25 samples by 0. 09mr quadrate and 10-point...

  11. Simulating land use change in China from a global perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    markets and turbulence in global energy markets can affect food prices and supply costs. Therefore excludes new plantation, the main resource of new forest in China. Application of a simple business

  12. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    around the cluster of points representing cities in KS Use the ?Previous Extent? button to return to the last zoom ? Click on Identify tool , then on a city to get tabular information such as city name 10. What other kinds of information does the table...

  13. Land Use Influences on Trip Chaining in Portland, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Michael J.; McNally, Michael G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accomodating Environment) Medium Pedestrian AccomodatingAccomodating Environment) Medium Pedestrian Accomodating

  14. Land Use Influences on Trip Chaining in Portland, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwald, Michael J.; McNally, Michael G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reference Group: Low Pedestrian Accomodating Environment)Medium Pedestrian Accomodating Environment Coefficient -05 Z High Pedestrian Accomodating Environment Coefficient -

  15. MSU at Work in Africa: Land Use, Strategic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and processing of mineral resources, and the local housing construction industry are grossly untapped areas of Africa, excessive extraction of resources, including oil, coal, and natural gas, has resulted Raleigh Barlowe, land by itself creates little value; however, when combined with human, financial

  16. Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upgrading programmes in Argentina: the cases of Promeba andand Bermu´dez, G. (2011) Argentina’s housing market in theREGULATION AND PRICE IN ARGENTINA Libertun de Duren, N. (

  17. Land use and macroclimate in Presidio County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellermeier, Duane Carl

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    frost but not contnnous freezing condition. . . The nu!, ber of days 0 tne !?uximum exceeds $0 F are useful not only to cl matologists 'ou+ are of' value to utility companies in dc Lermininp en estimate of power n, eded. foz cooling. This information...: /~5' ;& ~ C 5rs z! F~ ((ncinmar of Coromittce) r Z cv UPa@- & "ead ot Oc(. ;=-, "'bmenb) Ta iid I'o, ;1 "iil I'ice rooi iii at!. ' in Prn 1 '. d& o Cour I y, . '. x" s. ( I i!u1ary, '- 70) Puuane C!is J I 1 e-?ni. ' iir, D. A. , ' syne Stone 0! I...

  18. extension.ucdavis.edu/landuse Land Use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomases, Becca

    Writing for Planners, Engineers and Policymakers n Bicycle Planning and Design n Green Building DesignAiNABilitY ANd grEEN BUildiNg Free Information Session: Green Building, Sustainability and Renewable Energy.........14 Green Building Design Studio

  19. Land Use Change Detection of Lowland Savanna in Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna ecosystems cover one fifth of the earth’s usable land and are home to billions of people and species. The ecosystem is threatened by human activities to a large extent, for instance, by grazing livestock, agriculture and fire management...

  20. The impact of biofuel mandates on land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Suhail, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector in the United States and European Union is attributed mainly to the binding mandates, Renewable Fuel Standard in the US and European Directive on the Promotion of ...

  1. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  2. Local Land-Use Controls and Aging-Friendliness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. 2001. “Aging and Smart Growth: Building Aging-Sensitivebuilding such product exclusively, or predominantly, because it creates homogenous-age zones, defeats smart-

  3. Bioenergy and land-use competition in Northeast Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Larson Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA] for a review.) (For reference, total annual commercial energy consumption is roughly 400 EJ/yr, and total area It is often claimed that dedicated energy plantations may be established on degraded lands so as to prevent

  4. Potential Land Use Implications of a Global Biofuels Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurgel, Angelo C.

    In this paper we investigate the potential production and implications of a global biofuels industry. We

  5. Vermont Land Use and Development, Act 250 (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Act 250 program provides a public, quasi-judicial process for reviewing and managing the environmental consequences of major developments in Vermont. The program is implemented through 9...

  6. Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting Meeting 2010-2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water free. 5. Construction Progress Update - M. Caron Energy Efficiency with Ameresco - Michel Caron basement was too dark, a row of overhead lights were not installed. B&G are looking into solving

  7. Bishop's University Sustainable Development & Land Use Committee Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    September 22nd , 2011 from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. in Hamilton #300 Present: Drew Leyburne (Chair), Michel Caron appreciation to Lynn Hyde's work as the recording secretary for the committee for the past years. He suggested 26th . At present, Ameresco is working on all the mechanical rooms on campus. The geothermal heating

  8. Climate change and land use in Florida: Interdependencies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    a comprehensive greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, which the Florida Department of Environmental Protection will develop over the next year. In addition to a GHG inventory and mitigation tools, a state climate action to increasingly dominate urban climate. · Florida ranks sixth in the US for total GHG emissions. The agricultural

  9. Guidelines for Low Emission Land use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergy InformationGrupo Urbas(EC-LEDS)Low Emission

  10. Land Use Regulations, Compliance and Land Markets in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P; Ronconi, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy that enables incremental housing development in Argentina anddecades. Argentina does not have a national urban policy,ARGENTINA way housing is actually accessed by most lower-income households, as housing policy

  11. Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use Mitigation Project Database | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) |Agawam, Massachusetts:Energy Information

  12. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington: Energy(B2G)BunkerE-Forms

  13. California Land Use Planning Information Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management86Use Planning

  14. File:01LandUseOverview.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County,GlassIDALandUseConsiderations.pdf

  15. Resource Assessment and Land Use Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr. Julia PhillipsResource Assessment and

  16. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to:Brunei:HillBureau ofInformation

  17. Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWindcapital GmbH Jump to:MRV

  18. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Planning Webpage | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda County,90DEC Water

  19. Alaska Department of Natural Resources Land Use Plans | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seiki G60Alameda County,90DEC WaterInformation

  20. Hawaii State Land Use Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI ReferenceNoise FormsHistoric PreservationUse

  1. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlan GeothermalEnergyArizonaPlanning <

  2. ORS 197 - Comprehensive Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn, Colorado:CablesOECD-AOPC LLC Jump83.484

  3. Oregon Land Use Compatibility Statement for Onsite Wastewater Treatment

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:Energy Information Fees for Underground Injection||

  4. Oregon Land Use Compatibility Statements Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:Energy Information Fees for Underground Injection||Statements

  5. INL Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in HallLeo282 AprilLet'smNALINL

  6. Title 50 CFR 29 Land Use Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformation 61 Drilling1969 |of TanksHabitat |Federal29

  7. Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNLLaizhouLand O Lakes Incsource

  8. Montana - Land Use License Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast Asia |New York:NewMonsey,MajorLands

  9. About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | Guidelines for Land Use

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973 1 Introduction In the design This page hasProposals at

  10. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia: EnergyOnlineMontana

  11. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevadaTexas < RAPID‎ |UtahUse <

  12. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Use/Federal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia:ColoradoNevadaTexas < RAPID‎ |UtahUse

  13. Geothermal/Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration < Geothermal Jump to: navigation,

  14. High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

  15. PHOTOCATALYTIC GENERATION OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN AND OXYHEMOGLOBIN IN WHOLE BLOOD BASED ON THE INDIRECT INTERACTION OF UV LIGHT WITH A SEMICONDUCTING TITANIUM DIOXIDE THIN FILM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Richard J.; Carleton, Linda M.; Dasse, Kurt A.; Martin, Peter M.; Williford, Rick E.; Monzyk, Bruce F.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most current artificial lung technologies require the delivery of oxygen to the blood via permeable hollow fibers, depending on membrane diffusivity and differential partial pressure to drive gas exchange. We have identified an alternative approach in which dissolved oxygen (DO) is generated directly from the water content of blood through the indirect interaction of UV light with a semi-conducting titanium dioxide thin film. This reaction is promoted by photon absorption and displacement of electrons from the photoactive film, and yields a cascading displacement of electron “holes” to the aqueous interface resulting in the oxidation of water molecules to form DO. Anatase TiO2 (photocatalyst) and ITO (electrically conductive and light transparent) coatings were deposited onto quartz flow-cell plates by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The crystal structure of the films was evaluated by grazing incidence X-Ray Diffraction (GIXRD), which confirmed that the primary crystal phase of the TiO2 thin film was anatase with a probable rutile secondary phase. Surface topology and roughness were determined by atomic force microscopy, demonstrating a stochastically uniform array of nanocrystallites. UV illumination of the titanium dioxide thin film through the quartz/ITO surface resulted in the rapid increase of DO and oxyhemoglobin in adjacent flowing blood on the opposite TiO2 surface at a rate of 1.28 x 10-5 mmol O2/sec. The rate of oxyhemoglobin generation was linearly proportional to residence time adjacent to the photoactive surface in a flow-through test cell under steady-state conditions. Preliminary biocompatibility for the proposed photocatalytic effect on whole blood demonstrated no increase in the rate of hemolysis or generation of toxic byproducts of photo-oxidation. These results demonstrate the feasibility and safety of employing optoelectronic mechanisms to promote oxygenation of hemoglobin in whole blood, and provide substantiation for the use of this technology as a mechanism for artificial respiratory support.

  16. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Robert M., E-mail: rm.young@ngc.com; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Electronic Systems, P.O. Box 1521, Baltimore, Maryland 21203 (United States)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500?ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4?W.

  17. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  18. Evaluation of the thermodynamic process of indirect injection diesel engines by the First and Second Law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Zhou, L.; Pan, K.; Jiang, D. [Xi`an Jiaotong Univ. (China); Chae, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer losses in the swirl chamber, throttling losses at the connecting passage and combustion delay in the main chamber are considered as the three factors influencing the thermal efficiency of IDI diesel engines. This paper suggests a thermodynamic model, in which three idealized diesel engines including no passage throttling engine, adiabatic diesel engine for swirl chamber and DI diesel engine are assumed to isolate heat transfer losses, throttling losses and combustion delay in IDI diesel engines. The Second Law analysis is carried out by the thermodynamic state parameters calculated by the cycle simulation of engines based on the First Law. The effects of heat transfer losses in the swirl chamber, throttling losses at the connecting passage and combustion delay in the main chamber on the irreversibilities and availability losses during the engine cycle are analyzed in detail. The relative influences among the three losses are also investigated. The results of First Law analysis indicate that heat transfer losses in the swirl chamber at low load conditions and combustion delay in the main chamber at full load conditions are the main factors impairing the fuel economy of IDI diesel engines. However, the results of further analysis of the Second Law indicate that passage throttling is a key factor affecting the fuel economy of IDI diesel engines at full load conditions. On the basis of thermodynamic analysis, a modified design of connecting passage is made on a single cylinder IDI diesel engine.The modified connecting passage has different inclination angles at both sides of the passage, and reduces throttling losses at the connecting passage, shortens combustion delay and combustion period in the main chamber, and hence reduces the engine fuel consumption and smoke emission.

  19. Effects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in quantifying the effects of cloud on radiation budget and aerosol indirect effects on global scaleEffects of spatial and temporal variations in aerosol properties on mean cloud albedo Jian Wang1 effect on mean cloud albedo, was investigated using data collected at Pt. Reyes, California, during

  20. Indirect NMR detection of 235U in gaseous uranium hexafluoride National Center for Physics, P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest, Romania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dans le UF6 gazeux. L'examen de la raie d'absorption du 19F appartenant au UF6 gazeux isotopiquement in indirect detection of the 235U nucleus in gaseous UF6 is discussed. The 19F absorption spectra linewidths in gaseous UF6 was investigated as a function of 235U enrichment, revealing a dependence on the isotope

  1. A Note on the Logic of PMI Development for FNSF or Demo There is only indirect interaction between Plasma-Material-Interface (PMI) issues and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Note on the Logic of PMI Development for FNSF or Demo Abstract · There is only indirect interaction between Plasma-Material-Interface (PMI) issues and Neutron-Material Interaction (NMI) issues interaction between PMI issues and plasma performance. As a result while tests of advanced PMI concepts

  2. Shortwave Radiative Impacts from Aerosol Effects on Marine Shallow Cumuli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    is because of the cloud radiation Bony & Dufresne, 2005 #12;ultimately we'll want global (satellite indirect effects, 1) what is the relative radiative importance of cloud microphysical versus macrophysical effects matter to the fluxes for small&thicker clouds) 3D ICA #12;what is the relative radiative

  3. Process Design and Economics for Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol: Thermochemical Pathway by Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Talmadge, M.; Hensley, J.; Worley, M.; Dudgeon, D.; Barton, D.; Groendijk, P.; Ferrari, D.; Stears, B.; Searcy, E. M.; Wright, C. T.; Hess, J. R.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This design report describes an up-to-date benchmark thermochemical conversion process that incorporates the latest research from NREL and other sources. Building on a design report published in 2007, NREL and its subcontractor Harris Group Inc. performed a complete review of the process design and economic model for a biomass-to-ethanol process via indirect gasification. The conceptual design presented herein considers the economics of ethanol production, assuming the achievement of internal research targets for 2012 and nth-plant costs and financing. The design features a processing capacity of 2,205 U.S. tons (2,000 metric tonnes) of dry biomass per day and an ethanol yield of 83.8 gallons per dry U.S. ton of feedstock. The ethanol selling price corresponding to this design is $2.05 per gallon in 2007 dollars, assuming a 30-year plant life and 40% equity financing with a 10% internal rate of return and the remaining 60% debt financed at 8% interest. This ethanol selling price corresponds to a gasoline equivalent price of $3.11 per gallon based on the relative volumetric energy contents of ethanol and gasoline.

  4. arid land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

  5. amphibians rana spp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    individuals in aquatic and ter- restrial environments (Werner 1986). Agricultur- al cultivation (i.e., arable 79409, USA Abstract: Agricultural land use may indirectly affect the...

  6. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Doncker, R.W.A.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other. 3 figs.

  7. Indirect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Multi-Component Gas By Measuring The Speed Of Sound At Two States Of The Gas.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the speed of sound in the gas is measured at two states and diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, two equations for molecular weight can be equated and solved for the nitrogen concentration in the gas mixture.

  8. High speed flux feedback for tuning a universal field oriented controller capable of operating in direct and indirect field orientation modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Doncker, Rik W. A. A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct (d) and quadrature (q) components of flux, as sensed by flux sensors or determined from voltage and current measurements in a direct field orientation scheme, are processed rapidly and accurately to provide flux amplitude and angular position values for use by the vector rotator of a universal field-oriented (UFO) controller. Flux amplitude (linear or squared) is provided as feedback to tune the UFO controller for operation in direct and indirect field orientation modes and enables smooth transitions from one mode to the other.

  9. Genetic-Algorithm Discovery of a Direct-Gap and Optically Allowed Superstructure from Indirect-Gap Si and Ge Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    d'Avezac, M.; Luo, J. W.; Chanier, T.; Zunger, A.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining two indirect-gap materials - with different electronic and optical gaps - to create a direct gap material represents an ongoing theoretical challenge with potentially rewarding practical implications, such as optoelectronics integration on a single wafer. We provide an unexpected solution to this classic problem, by spatially melding two indirect-gap materials (Si and Ge) into one strongly dipole-allowed direct-gap material. We leverage a combination of genetic algorithms with a pseudopotential Hamiltonian to search through the astronomic number of variants of Si{sub n}/Ge{sub m}/.../Si{sub p}/Ge{sub q} superstructures grown on (001) Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. The search reveals a robust configurational motif - SiGe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}SiGe{sub n} on (001) Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} substrate (x {le} 0.4) presenting a direct and dipole-allowed gap resulting from an enhanced {Gamma}-X coupling at the band edges.

  10. Constraining the influence of natural variability to improve estimates of global aerosol indirect effects in a nudged version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J; Pritchard, Michael S; Ghan, Steven J; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C. J; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the northern hemisphere Pacific Ocean and along the westernacross the northern Pacific Ocean, coincident with regionsthe Northern Hemisphere Pacific Ocean and off the northwest

  11. Constraining the influence of natural variability to improve estimates of global aerosol indirect effects in a nudged version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J; Pritchard, Michael S; Ghan, Steven J; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C. J; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by direct emission inventories; sea salt and dust enter the32 ] Direct emission inventories represent the only sourcesemissions from prescribed inventories and parameterized

  12. Failed Recruitment of Southern Toads (Bufo terrestris) in a Trace Element-Contaminated Breeding Habitat: Direct and Indirect Effects That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    of disposing of coal ash in open aquatic basins may result in sink habitats for some amphibian populations study in which embry- onic southern toads (Bufo terrestris) were held in a site polluted with coal ash

  13. Regulation and the High Cost of Housing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. Tsuriel. “Land Use Regulations and New Construc- tion. ”local government land use regulation. Cam- “The Effects offrequently the target of regulation. REFERENCES Glickfeld,

  14. Indirect and direct optical transitions in In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/GaP quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stracke, G., E-mail: gernot.stracke@tu-berlin.de; Sala, E. M.; Schliwa, A.; Strittmatter, A.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstrasse 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Selve, S. [Zentraleinrichtung Elektronenmikroskopie, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Niermann, T. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of self-assembled In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As quantum dots on GaP(001) surfaces linking growth parameters with structural, optical, and electronic properties. Quantum dot densities from 5.0 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup ?2} to 1.5 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup ?2} are achieved. A ripening process during a growth interruption after In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As deposition is used to vary the quantum dot size. The main focus of this work lies on the nature of optical transitions which can be switched from low-efficient indirect to high-efficient direct ones through improved strain relief of the quantum dots by different cap layers.

  15. Uncertainties in Estimating the Indirect Production of $B_c$ and Its Excited States Via Top Quark Decays at CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Gang Wu

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Main theoretical uncertainties in estimating the indirect production of $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium ($B^-_c$ meson and its excited states) via top quark decays, $t\\to (b\\bar{c})+c+W^{+}$, are studied within the non-relativistic QCD framework. It is found that the dimensionless reduced decay width for a particular $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium state, $\\bar\\Gamma_{n}=\\Gamma_{n} /\\Gamma_{t\\to W^{+}+b}$, is very sensitive to the $c$-quark mass, while the uncertainties from the $b$-quark and $t$-quark masses are small, where $n$ stands for the eight $(b\\bar{c})$-quarkonium states up to ${\\cal O}(v^4)$: $|(b\\bar{c})(^1S_0)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^3S_1)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^1P_1)_1>$, $|(b\\bar{c})(^3P_J)_1>$ (with $J=(1,2,3)$), $|(b\\bar{c})(^1S_0)_{8}g>$ and $|(b\\bar{c})(^3S_1)_{8}g>$ respectively. About $10^8$ $t\\bar{t}$-pairs shall be produced per year at CERN LHC, if adopting the assumption that all the higher Fock states decay to the ground state with 100% probability, then we shall have $(1.038^{+1.353}_{-0.782})\\times 10^5$ $B^-_c $ events per year. So the indirect production provides another important way to study the properties of $B^-_c$ meson in comparison to that of the direct hadronic production at CERN LHC.

  16. Regional climate effects of irrigation and urbanization in thewestern united states: a model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, M.A.; Kueppers, L.M.; Sloan, L.C.; Cavan, D.C.; Jin, J.; Kanamaru, H.; Miller, N.L.; Tyree, M.; Du, H.; Weare, B.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the western United States, more than 30,500 square miles has been converted to irrigated agriculture and urban areas. This study compares the climate responses of four regional climate models (RCMs) to these past land-use changes. The RCMs used two contrasting land cover distributions: potential natural vegetation, and modern land cover that includes agriculture and urban areas. Three of the RCMs represented irrigation by supplementing soil moisture, producing large decreases in August mean (-2.5 F to -5.6 F) and maximum (-5.2 F to -10.1 F) 2-meter temperatures where natural vegetation was converted to irrigated agriculture. Conversion to irrigated agriculture also resulted in large increases in relative humidity (9 percent 36 percent absolute change). Only one of the RCMs produced increases in summer minimum temperature. Converting natural vegetation to urban land cover produced modest but discernable climate effects in all models, with the magnitude of the effects dependent upon the preexisting vegetation type. Overall, the RCM results indicate that land use change impacts are most pronounced during the summer months, when surface heating is strongest and differences in surface moisture between irrigated land and natural vegetation are largest. The irrigation effect on summer maximum temperatures is comparable in magnitude (but opposite in sign) to predicted future temperature change due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations.

  17. Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Second semi-annual progress report, January 5, 1996--July 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, work was continued on understanding the attrition of precipitated iron catalysts and work initiated on synthesizing catalysts containing silica binders. Use of a sedigraph particle size analyzer with an ultrasonic probe provides a simple method to test the strength of catalyst agglomerates, allowing the strength comparison of silica and hematite catalysts (the former is considerably stronger). Study of Fe/silica interactions was continued. Addition of a colloidal silica precursor to calcined Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst had no detrimental effect on reducibility of the hematite to {alpha}-Fe. XRD and electron microscopy will be used to analyze the crystal structure and types of C present in samples from long Fischer-Tropsch runs.

  18. Ecological Effects of Micropterus Introductions: the Dark Side of Black Bass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Micropterus salmoides and smallmouth bass M. dolomieu are two widely introduced species of fish prized various direct and indirect effects of bass occurrence in reducing diversity of small-bodied fish species the negative impacts that bass may have on aquatic ecosystems. Introduction Recreational fishing represents

  19. The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within an Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooke, Steven J.

    The Effect of Shoreline Recreational Angling Activities on Aquatic and Riparian Habitat Within activity may negatively impact littoral and riparian habitats independent of any direct or indirect influences of fish harvest or fishing mortality through mechanisms such as disturbance (e.g., trampling

  20. The Effect of Graded Levels of Dietary Starch on Cecal Environment in Horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Kristen L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    an indirect measure of fermented hexose, methane, and carbon dioxide. Diet did not influence dry matter intake (DMI), however it did have an effect on starch intake (P < 0.0001) and caused a linear increase in starch consumption as the amount of offered starch...

  1. Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. First semi-annual progress report, July 5, 1995--January 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datye, A.K.

    1996-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to study factors controlling attrition resistance of slurry phase Fe catalysts, synthesize novel precipitated catalysts that overcome some of the limitations of current generation catalysts, and study catalyst-binder interactions using model catalysts. A study of Fe/silica (binder) interactions has been started. Study of effects of Cu on reducibility of Fe catalysts showed that small amounts of Cu can facilitate reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {alpha}-Fe. Work with Nancy Jackson (Sandia) on carbon deposits in Fe F-T catalysts showed good correlation between peak temperature in TPR and the carbon as seen by TEM. Analyses of samples from Dr. Burtron Davis (U. KY) by XRD and TEM showed that the active catalyst contains small crystallites of iron carbide while the deactivated catalyst had significant transformation into large magnetite crystals. It is felt that improper passivation of these catalysts can lead to mis-identification of the phase in working F-T catalysts.

  2. Indirect Assessment: Sport management candidates are required to complete a graduating senior survey, which is based on the program's learning outcomes. The results of this survey are analyzed by program faculty and used to make curricular changes as nece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaithambi, Asai

    Indirect Assessment: Sport management candidates are required to complete a graduating senior survey, which is based on the program's learning outcomes. The results of this survey are analyzed by program faculty and used to make curricular changes as necessary. Direct Assessment: Sport Management

  3. Effectiveness of conditional punishment for the evolution of public cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective actions, from city marathons to labor strikes, are often mass-driven and subject to the snowball effect. Motivated by this, we study evolutionary advantages of conditional punishment in the spatial public goods game. Unlike unconditional punishers who always impose the same fines on defectors, conditional punishers do so proportionally with the number of other punishers in the group. Phase diagrams in dependence on the punishment fine and cost reveal that the two types of punishers cannot coexist. Spontaneous coarsening of the two strategies leads to an indirect territorial competition with the defectors, which is won by unconditional punishers only if the sanctioning is inexpensive. Otherwise conditional punishers are the victors of the indirect competition, indicating that under more realistic conditions they are indeed the more effective strategy. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions as well as tricritical points characterize the complex evolutionary dynamics, which is due to mult...

  4. INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey that integrates demography with market-based factors such as transportation costs and accessibility. In essence and Resource Use in the Amazon (SBR-95-11965)," and also by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental

  6. Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere fromCarbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990Land-Use Changes: 1850 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0 Prepared by the Carbon. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological

  7. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  8. An Indirect Search for WIMPs in the Sun using 3109.6 days of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, T; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Hazama, S; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos3, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Cravens, J P; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S; Martens, K; Vagins, M; Watanabe, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Labarga, L; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Jung, C K; McGrew, C; Lopez, G; Yanagisawa, C; Tamura, N; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Sakuda, M; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Yokosawa, Y; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of an indirect search for high energy neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun using upward-going muon (upmu) events at Super-Kamiokande. Datasets from SKI-SKIII (3109.6 days) were used for the analysis. We looked for an excess of neutrino signal from the Sun as compared with the expected atmospheric neutrino background in three upmu categories: stopping, non-showering, and showering. No significant excess was observed. The 90% C.L. upper limits of upward-going muon flux induced by WIMPs of 100 GeV/c$^2$ were 6.4$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ and 4.0$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ for the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively. These limits correspond to upper limits of 4.5$\\times10^{-39}$ cm$^{-2}$ and 2.7$\\times10^{-40}$ cm$^{-2}$ for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections in the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively.

  9. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  10. Direct, Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    during creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public evaluations and input from independent, variances and non-compliance of permit conditions after the EIS is completed prevents public comment on the natural and human environment from mining in the Peace River Watershed. Environmental Impacts from

  11. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Biorefinery for the Direct Production of Synthetic Fuel from Waste Carbonaceous Feedstocks

  12. Biomass Indirect Liquefaction Workshop Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood to green gasoline using Carbona gasification and Topsoe TIGAS processes - DOE Project DE-EE0002874

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF SUBSIDENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viets, V.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth Movements Resultlng from Brown Coal Open Cut Mining”,and underlie thick brown coal seams. Land Uses: AgricultureSubsidence Related to Brown Coal Open Cut Operations Latrobe

  14. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  15. Ge/SiGe Quantum Confined Stark Effect Modulators on Silicon James S. Harris, Yu-Hsuan Kuo, and David A. B. Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    Ge/SiGe Quantum Confined Stark Effect Modulators on Silicon James S. Harris, Yu-Hsuan Kuo bandwidth have been demonstrated [4]. 2. Quantum well design Ge is an indirect band gap material, but it has. In order to have good quantum confinement, SiGe barriers are used since Si and Ge have a very high direct

  16. 300. Schwartz, D., B. Fischhoff, T. Krishnamurti, and F. Sowell, The Hawthorne Effect and Energy Awareness. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2014. 61: 81-95. 297. Glier, J.C. and E.S. Rubin, Assessment of solid sorbents as a competitive post. Zhai, H. and E.S. Rubin, Comparative performance and cost assessments of coal and natural gas.M.L. Azevedo, Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for U.S. households with input­output analysis

  17. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    due to biofuel policies. Biofuels, 2(2):119–121, 2011. C.Lapan and G.C. Moschini. Biofuels policies and welfare: Isgas emissions from biofuels: Indirect land use change are

  18. Introduction to special section on Impacts of Land Use Change on Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    agriculture consumes up to 90% of the world's fresh water supplies [Shiklomanov, 2000], with estimated amounts populations but also due to policy shifts that are creating markets for biofuel and agricultural carbon of ground- water resources is a growing problem throughout the world [Konikow and Kendy, 2005], yet

  19. Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redo, Daniel J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corredor Bioceanico is a major transportation project connecting the agricultural heartlands of South America to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The final link is in southeastern Bolivia - an underdeveloped area that ...

  20. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    by discussions with Brigid Barry, David Bowden, Lauren Coad, Nigel Collar, Paul Donald, Rob Ewers, Vicky Jones, Val Kapos, Eric Keys, Deborah Lawrence, Tasso Leventis, Ken Norris, Debbie Pain, Hugo Rainey, B. L. Turner and Juliet Vickery. Thanks to John... in a wildlife protected area, although I ended up working only in forest reserves. I thank Moses Sam and Phil Marshall for interesting discussions, and Kofi Affum-Baffo, Francis Agurgo, Edward Obiaw and Oheneba Amponsah Agyemang of the Resource...