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1

Chapter 23 - Statement of Costs Incurred and Claimed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11-15-2012 11-15-2012 23-1 CHAPTER 23 STATEMENT OF COSTS INCURRED AND CLAIMED 1. INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE. This chapter serves to provide the financial management requirements and responsibilities for preparing and reporting the Statement of Costs Incurred and Claimed. (a) Requirements and Applicability (1) The Statement of Costs Incurred and Claimed (SCIC), is prepared and certified by DOE's integrated contractors annually after they have submitted their financial statements and related information to their cognizant field elements (Attachment 23-1). This requirement applies to individual DOE contracts that include the contract clause at 48 CFR 970.5232-2 (alternate iii). The costs reported on this statement should be consistent with the contractors' financial statements. The SCIC form is

2

Docket No. ER12--000, Request to Recover Prudently-Incurred Costs Associated with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Secretary Bose: Pursuant to Section 205 of the Federal Power Act (FPA) 1 and Part 35 of the regulations of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 2 Public Service Electric and Gas Company (PSE&G) hereby submits for filing revised tariff sheets to the Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT) administered by PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (PJM) modifying PSE&G’s existing cost-of-service formula rate (Formula Rate) to permit the recovery of prudently incurred costs associated with the abandonment of the Branchburg-Roseland-Hudson 500 kilovolt (kV) project (BRH Project or the Project). PSE&G respectfully requests that the Commission permit the revised tariff sheets to become effective in sixty (60) days (i.e., September 17, 2012) with no suspension period or hearing. 1

Law Department; Honorable Kimberly; D. Bose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients, OAS-RA-13-28  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients OAS-RA-13-28 July 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 July 18, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients" BACKGROUND Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), the Department of Energy's (Department) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use and fossil fuel

4

Questioned, Unresolved, and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory during Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009, OAS-L-12-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Special Report Special Report Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory during Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009 OAS-L-12-04 April 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 19, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory during Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009" BACKGROUND Since June 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC, has operated the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) for the Department of

5

Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory During Fiscal Year 2012, OAS-L-13-02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory During Fiscal Year 2010 OAS-L-13-02 November 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 20, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "Questioned, Unresolved and Potentially Unallowable Costs Incurred by Los Alamos National Laboratory During Fiscal Year 2010" BACKGROUND Since June 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC, has operated the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) for the Department of Energy.

6

Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David (Dave) Warren David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Materials Research Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2009, M/S 8050 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8050 Phone: 865-574-9693 Fax: 865-574-0740 Email: WarrenCD@ORNL.GOV Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber 14 February 2011 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Questions for Today Materials How can the cost of carbon fiber suitable for higher performance applications (H 2 Storage) be developed? H 2 Storage requirements implies Aerospace grade fibers. Can we build off of work previously done for more modest structural applications? To accurately answer: We need to know the minimum performance and maximum cost requirements of the fiber not simply the properties of current fiber.

7

FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING: HIGHER CAPITAL COSTS AND REDUCED FLEXIBILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The paper discusses some main economic characteristics of fuel cell power production technology applied to shipping. Whenever competitive fuel cell systems enter the market, they are likely to have higher capital costs and lower operating costs than systems based on traditional combustion technology. Implications of the difference are investigated with respect to investment flexibility by the use of a real options model of ship investment, lay-up and scrapping decisions under freight rate uncertainty. A higher capital share of total expected costs can represent a significant opportunity cost in uncertain markets. The paper highlights the significance of accounting properly for value of flexibility prior to investment in new technology.

Sigbjørn Sødal

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieving Higher Performance Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Agenda * Imagine Homes - An Overview * 2010 Occupied Test House - Objectives - From Modeling through Monitoring * 2012 Occupied Test House - Objectives - What's Next * Closing Remarks Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Overview: * San Antonio, TX * 68 Homes in 2011 * $140k - $425k * 1,300 - 4,500 ft 2 Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Environment: * Hot-Humid * 2,996 CDD * 1,546 HDD * 31" Rainfall Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Imagine Homes History: * Established 2006 * Partnership with Beazer Homes * Builders Challenge * Building America

9

Incremental costs of higher efficiency can vary by appliance ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... consumers can also enter cost and performance attributes of specific models they are considering.

10

Incremental costs of higher efficiency can vary by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook ... Search EIA.gov. A-Z Index; ... consumers can also enter cost and performance attributes of specific models they are ...

11

A static cost analysis for a higher-order language.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? We develop a static complexity analysis for a higher-order functional language with structural list recursion. The complexity of an expression is a pair consisting… (more)

Danner, Norman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

inverters, offering less weight, higher efficiency, and lower-cost installations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 10 pounds per square foot of dead weight to the roof structural members, concentrated throughinverters, offering less weight, higher efficiency, and lower- cost installations. The electrical

Johnson, Eric E.

13

AvAilAble for licensing Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AvAilAble for licensing Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs. Benefits Higher-performance, more cost-effective batteries for PHEVs and HEVs. Reduced costs by lowering cost is easier, faster, and more cost-effective. Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries

Kemner, Ken

14

Lower Cost or Higher Quality? Product Enhancement Decisions When Consumers Are Strategic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firms developing new products must often make a trade-o ¤ between production costs and product quality: higher quality products are more valued by consumers, but also more costly to manufacture. We analyze the impact of activities that increase consumer value (quality improvement e¤orts) and activities that decrease production costs (cost reduction e¤orts) on the pro…t of a …rm. We demonstrate that when demand is deterministic, an increase in consumer value and a decrease in production cost of the same amount have an identical e¤ect on …rm pro…t. When demand is stochastic, however, the two strategies di¤er. In particular, if consumers are non-strategic, cost reduction is always more valuable to the …rm than quality improvement (of the same amount). On the other hand, if consumers are strategic (i.e., anticipate future price reductions and time their purchasing decisions), quality improvement may be more valuable to the …rm, in stark contrast to the non-strategic consumer case. Surprisingly, with strategic consumers, the …rm does not necessarily prefer the greatest degree of cost reduction or quality improvement possible, even if it is costless to achieve. We conclude that demand uncertainty and consumer purchasing behavior greatly in‡uence a …rm’s choice of a product enhancement strategy. 1

Sang-hyun Kim; Robert Swinney

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

16

Cost Sharing for the Economic Lot-Sizing Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost and production costs. In addition, in each period, the retailer incurs holding costs for storing serviceable product and returned product in inventory.

17

Higher-lift lower-cost absorption cycles. Phase 1, final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research was to determine if modified NaOH solutions could be used in absorption heat pumps (AHP) to provide higher heat-pumping lifts from low ambient temperatures than are now possible. The research consisted of performing screening experiments on a great number of modified alkali hydroxide solutions, in order to characterize and bound the properties of boiling-point elevation, solubility limit, and corrosivity as a function of composition. Two preferred compositions were selected for more-detailed characterization: the binary NaOH-KOH and the ternary NaOH-KOH-CsOH. Lifts as high as from 0 to 90C were shown to be possible, which will extend AHP applicability into several important new applications.

Erickson, D.C.; Davidson, W.F.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Minimum cost subset selection with two competing agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do not require qualified personnel, or when internal costs proportional to skills are incurred .... In conclusion, we tackle four different versions of the minimum cost ...

19

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Full Economic Costing:-Updated guidance notes for peer reviewers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the level of resources required to undertake the project and not their unit cost. In particular, peer are as follows: 1) Directly Incurred costs: These are costs which are specific to a project and will be charged to the project on the basis of actual costs incurred. They must be supported by an audit record, which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - IG Testimony - UCLANL Cost Incurred- Long9 delivered.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN GREGORY H. FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY Thursday, May 1, 2003 1 Mr. Chairman and Members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) reviews of management practices at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory). In February of this year, I testified before this Subcommittee regarding our Special Inquiry report on Operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (DOE/IG-0584, January 2003). That report noted a series of actions taken by Laboratory officials, which obscured serious property and

22

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have created opportunities for the use of crops and crop residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels Higher energy costs over the past few years have Potential for Pennsylvania Crops as Biofuels 2 Soybeans Soybean acreage is on the increase in Pennsylvania For more information about using Pennsylvania crops as biofuels, contact: GREG ROTH PROFESSOR OF AGRONOMY

Lee, Dongwon

23

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III that we sub- sume supply technologies in different groups. To be more precise, we distinguish 16 supply technology groups (nuclear, three lignite, four hard coal, two combined cycle gas turbine, three open cycle gas turbine, two oil... shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

24

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REQUEST FOR INDIRECT COST WAIVER I. Project Director: Department: Project Title: Project Sponsor without fully recovering the institutional indirect costs which will be incurred in conducting the project COSTS 1. FULL: OF I. A. C. 2. PARTIAL: OF H. B. K. TOTAL PROJECT COSTS L. INDIRECT COSTS TO BE WAIVED, J

Krovi, Venkat

25

An economic model of software quality costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As of today there is very little knowledge is available about the economics of software quality. The costs incurred and benefits of implementing different quality practices over the software development life cycle are not well understood. There are some ... Keywords: TQM, quality cost model, software quality

Amel Kolašinac; Ljubomir Lazic; Dženan Avdic

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Sample Invoice Cost Share UT-B Contracts Div August 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SHIPPED VIA CUSTOMER NUMBER TERMS NET DAYS COST ELEMENT DESCRIPTION CURRENT COSTS CUMULATIVE COSTS DIRECT for the Department of Energy COMMENTS OR SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: SUBCONTRACT NUMBER BILLING PERIOD Begin/End Date AMOUNT PREVIOUSLY PAID TOTAL COST INCURRED COMPANY COST SHARE * SELLERS COST SHARE * TOTAL INVOICED *If

27

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Specifications to Improve Power Quality Immunity in Electronic Systems for Industrial Applications: Suggestions for Higher Quality a nd Lower Cost Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the work described in this report is to provide suggestions for a specification language that will allow end-users to integrate successfully electronic industrial equipment with the existing electrical systems. Cost effective solutions to improve system reliability and performance are specifically addressed. The intention is to eliminate disruptions induced by power quality-related problems and incompatibilities between process equipment and the electrical environment. Most of these technique...

2000-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

29

FeatherWeight: low-cost optical arbitration with QoS support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanophotonic signaling technology enables efficient global communication and low-diameter networks such as crossbars that are often optically arbitrated. However, existing optical arbitration schemes incur costly overheads (e.g., waveguides, laser ... Keywords: arbitration, interconnection networks, nanophotonics

Yan Pan; John Kim; Gokhan Memik

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Public release of optimization of metallization scheme for thin emitter wrap-through solar cells for higher efficiency, reduced precious metal costs, and reduced stress.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Back-contact crystalline-silicon photovoltaic solar cells and modules offer a number of advantages, including the elimination of grid shadowing losses, reduced cost through use of thinner silicon substrates, simpler module assembly, and improved aesthetics. While the existing edge tab method for interconnecting and stringing edge-connected back contact cells is acceptably straightforward and reliable, there are further gains to be exploited when you have both contact polarities on one side of the cell. In this work, we produce 'busbarless' emitter wrap-through solar cells that use 41% of the gridline silver (Ag) metallization mass compared to the edge tab design. Further, series resistance power losses are reduced by extraction of current from more places on the cell rear, leading to a fill factor improvement of about 6% (relative) on the module level. Series resistance and current-generation losses associated with large rear bondpads and busbars are eliminated. Use of thin silicon (Si) wafers is enabled because of the reduced Ag metallization mass and by interconnection with conductive adhesives leading to reduced bow. The busbarless cell design interconnected with conductive adhesives passes typical International Electrotechnical Commission damp heat and thermal cycling test.

Ruby, Douglas Scott; Murphy, Brian (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Meakin, David (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Jason (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Hacke, Peter (Advent Solar, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and...

32

WHAT FUTURE FOR UK HIGHER EDUCATION?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009) “Students ask if higher education is really worth itrising social costs of higher education are not matched bystandards? ” Times Higher Education 17 July. Alderman, G.

Roger Brown

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life or life-cycle cost of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select an ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optimization of Transmission Line Design Using Life-Cycle Costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When an overhead line is designed, all costs incurred during the expected life of the line should be considered. The total cost during the life, or life-cycle cost, of a transmission line is a combination of the initial capital cost, operation and maintenance (O&M) cost, cost of electrical losses over its entire life, and dependability-associated costs. The option that has the lowest life-cycle cost is selected as the optimized design. A tool is required by utility engineers to help them readily select a...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

This Guide is designed to provide assistance to the community regarding the direct charging of costs to sponsored projects while maintaining compliance with the Federal cost principles (2 CFR Part 220, OMB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

charging of costs to sponsored projects while maintaining compliance with the Federal cost principles (2. Typical costs charged directly to a sponsored project include: 1. compensation of employees incurred for the sponsored project. Costs of materials from stock/services rendered by specialized

36

Information erasure without an energy cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landauer argued that the process of erasing the information stored in a memory device incurs an energy cost in the form of a minimum amount of mechanical work. We find, however, that this energy cost can be reduced to zero by paying a cost in angular momentum or any other conserved quantity. Erasing the memory of Maxwell's demon in this way implies that work can be extracted from a single thermal reservoir at a cost of angular momentum and an increase in total entropy. The implications of this for the second law of thermodynamics are assessed.

Joan A. Vaccaro; Stephen M. Barnett

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education » Education » Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "The partnership between LANL and regional colleges creates opportunities for students like me to attain challenging and rewarding careers." - Sherry Salas Bachicha Higher Education Resources for Undergraduates, Graduates & Postdocs Opportunities LANL Foundation Scholarships LANL Post Doc Program Programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf)

38

An economic and legal perspective on electric utility transition costs  

SciTech Connect

The issue of possibly unrecoverable cost incurred by a utility, or `stranded costs,` has emerged as a major obstacle to developing a competitive generation market. Stranded or transition costs are defined as costs incurred by a utility to serve its customers that were being recovered in rates but are no longer due to availability of lower-priced alternative suppliers. The idea of `stranded cost,` and more importantly arguments for its recovery, is a concept with little basis in economic theory, legal precedence, or precedence in other deregulated industries. The main argument recovery is that the ``regulatory compact`` requires it. This is based on the misconception that the regulator compact is simply: the utility incurs costs on behalf of its customers because of the ``obligation to serve`` so, therefore, customers are obligated to pay. This is a mischaracterization of what the compact was and how it developed. Another argument is that recovery is required for economic efficiency. This presumes, however, a very narrow definition of efficiency based on preventing ``uneconomic`` bypass of the utility and that utilities minimize costs. A broader definition of efficiency and the likelihood of cost inefficiencies in the industry suggest that the cost imposed on customers from inhibiting competition could exceed the gains from preventing uneconomic bypass. Both these issues are examined in this paper.

Rose, K.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Analysis of electricity production costs from the geopressured geothermal resource  

SciTech Connect

The economics of the geopressured geothermal resource along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico is assessed. Geopressured waters are nearly under twice the normal hydrostatic pressure and believed to be saturated with methane. The costs of generating electricity from this resource are estimated based on the description and conceptual development plans provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Methane content and selling prices are the most important factors affecting the commercial potential of geopressured resources--so it is important that electrical generation be viewed as a by-product of methane production. On the same incremental cost basis, the cost of electricity generated from the geohydraulic energy is potentially competitive with conventional energy sources. This would require development of a small commercial high pressure, hydraulic turbine to extract geohydraulic energy at the wellhead in plants of about 3 MW capacity. Price/quantity relationships are developed for electricity generation from geopressured resources for each of three development plans proposed by USGS. Studies, based on field constructed plants, indicated an optimum power plant size in the range of 20 to 60 MWe, depending on water temperature. However, if standardized thermal conversion power plants could be factory produced in the 6 MWe range competitively with larger field constructed plants, then the optimum plant size might be reduced to single wellhead units.Wellhead units would completely eliminate fluid transmission costs, but would probably incur higher costs for heat rejection, power plant operation, and electrical transmission. The upper cost target for competitive wellhead plants would be on the order of $800/kW in 1975 dollars.

Bloomster, C.H.; Knutsen, C.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of Cost Uncertainties for Large Technology Projects: A Methodology and an Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large projects, especially those planned and managed by government agencies, often incur substantial cost overruns. The tolerance, particularly on the part of members of Congress, for these cost overruns has decreased, thus increasing the need for accurate, ... Keywords: Decision analysis: risk. Government

Robin L. Dillon; Richard John; Detlof von Winterfeldt

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fast Algorithms for Specially Structured Minimum Cost Flow Problems with Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the classical minimum cost flow problem is to send units of a good that reside at one or more points in a network (sources or supply nodes) with arc capacities to one or more other points in the network (sinks or demand nodes), incurring ... Keywords: analysis of algorithms, applications, computational complexity, flow algorithms, minimum cost flow problem, networks

Balachandran Vaidyanathan; Ravindra K. Ahuja

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparison of indirect cost multipliers for vehicle manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

In the process of manufacturing and selling vehicles, a manufacturer incurs certain costs. Among these costs are those incurred directly as a part of manufacturing operations and those incurred indirectly in the processes of manufacturing and selling. The indirect costs may be production-related, such as R and D and engineering; business-related, such as corporate staff salaries and pensions; or retail-sales-related, such as dealer support and marketing. These indirect costs are recovered by allocating them to each vehicle. Under a stable, high-volume production process, the allocation of these indirect costs can be approximated as multipliers (or factors) applied to the direct cost of manufacturing. A manufacturer usually allocates indirect costs to finished vehicles according to a corporation-specific pricing strategy. Because the volumes of sales and production vary widely by model within a corporation, the internal corporate percent allocation of various accounting categories (such as profit or corporate overheat) can vary widely among individual models. Approaches also vary across corporations. For these purposes, an average value is constructed, by means of a generic representative method, for vehicle models produced at high volume. To accomplish this, staff at Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) Center for Transportation Research analyzed the conventional vehicle cost structure and developed indirect cost multipliers for passenger vehicles. This memorandum summarizes the results of an effort to compare and put on a common basis the cost multipliers used in ANL's electric and hybrid electric vehicle cost estimation procedures with those resulting from two other methodologies. One of the two compared methodologies is derived from a 1996 presentation by Dr. Chris Borroni-Bird of Chrysler Corporation, the other is by Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. (EEA), as described in a 1995 report by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), Congress of the United States. The cost multipliers are used for scaling the component costs to retail prices.

Vyas, A.; Santini, D.; Cuenca, R.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation of I-80 Long-Life Corridor Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the expenditures for these projects, costs were divided into2 illustrates the Project Cost Breakdown of the Actual Bid18 percent higher than Project Cost Breakdown Original Bid

Santero, Nicholas J; Nokes, William; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Survey quantifies cost of organic milk production in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this survey, production costs for California organicsuch as higher production and feed costs, lowered veterinarya comprehensive dairy cost production survey, which involves

Butler, Leslie J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

How to Evaluate the Costs and Benefits of Participating in Coordinated Transportation Services; A Coordination Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Manual focuses on the coordination of transportation resources by social service and community transportation providers. The Manual is designed to assist such providers to understand the potential benefits of coordination, to compare current cost and service patterns to those offered by other providers " to understand the costs incurred when participating in various coordination options, and to compute prices to charge to other agepcies when selling transportation services. The Manual has three messages: 1) in many coordination options there are trade-offs that can or must be made between cost and service variables; 2) in order to participate in coordination programs, agencies must understand all costs which they will continue to incur as well as those that will be experienced for the first time; 3) coordination can be a complex and complicated process which requires serlOUS attention to organizational, administrative and financial

P. Rlorming Organilo. Ion Nomo

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 4 For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated. The annual costs of commute trip reduction programs can vary greatly by worksite. This section outlines types of costs that might be incurred by an agency as well as savings and other benefits of commute trip reduction to an agency, its employees, and the communities surrounding its major worksites. It includes: Employer costs and benefits Employee costs and benefits

49

Cost Comparison of Collaborative and IPD-like Project Delivery Methods Versus Competitive Non-collaborative Project Delivery Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaborative project delivery methods are believed to contribute to faster completions times, lower overall project costs and higher quality. Contracts are expected to influence the degree of collaboration on a given project since they allow or restrict certain lines of communication in the decision making process. Various delivery systems rank differently on the spectrum of collaboration. Because collaborative project delivery methods require owners and AEC stakeholders to meet frequently early in the delivery process, they are thought to add additional upfront costs to the project. The purpose of this study is to test if collaborative project delivery methods impart enough value so that the upfront cost incurred at the beginning of project is eventually surpassed by realized savings. Ideally, the extreme forms of project delivery methods, that is, Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Design-Bid-Build (DBB), should be compared to test the effects of collaboration on benefits to the owner. Due to difficulty in obtaining data on IPD and similarly scaled DBB projects, for this study, their close cousins, CM-at-Risk (CMR) and Competitive Sealed Proposal (CSP) were compared. The study engaged statistical comparison of cost of change orders and overall project cost performance of 17 CMR and 13 CSP projects of similar scales by same owner. Project cost performance observed under CMR projects was found significantly more than those under CSP. This study is expected to help boost confidence in the benefits of collaborative project delivery methods. It is likely that the results will encourage acceptance of IPD for public projects. Owners who were previously discouraged by the increased upfront cost of collaborative projects may also find interest in the results of this study.

Kulkarni, Aditi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project No. 02 103 Innovative Low Cost Approaches to Automating QA/QC of Fuel Particle Production Using On Line Nondestructive Methods for Higher Reliability Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

This Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project was tasked with exploring, adapting, developing and demonstrating innovative nondestructive test methods to automate nuclear coated particle fuel inspection so as to provide the United States (US) with necessary improved and economical Quality Assurance and Control (QA/QC) that is needed for the fuels for several reactor concepts being proposed for both near term deployment [DOE NE & NERAC, 2001] and Generation IV nuclear systems. Replacing present day QA/QC methods, done manually and in many cases destructively, with higher speed automated nondestructive methods will make fuel production for advanced reactors economically feasible. For successful deployment of next generation reactors that employ particle fuels, or fuels in the form of pebbles based on particles, extremely large numbers of fuel particles will require inspection at throughput rates that do not significantly impact the proposed manufacturing processes. The focus of the project is nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies that can be automated for production speeds and make either: (I) On Process Measurements or (II) In Line Measurements. The inspection technologies selected will enable particle “quality” qualification as a particle or group of particles passes a sensor. A multiple attribute dependent signature will be measured and used for qualification or process control decisions. A primary task for achieving this objective is to establish standard signatures for both good/acceptable particles and the most problematic types of defects using several nondestructive methods.

Ahmed, Salahuddin; Batishko, Charles R.; Flake, Matthew; Good, Morris S.; Mathews, Royce; Morra, Marino; Panetta, Paul D.; Pardini, Allan F.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Tucker, Brian J.; Weier, Dennis R.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Gray, Joseph N.; Saurwein, John J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lowden, Richard A.; Miller, James H.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given company’s cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

53

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution; Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Achieving Results with Renewable Energy in the Federal Government (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front

54

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

55

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large cooling systems typically represent substantial capital investments and incur high operating energy costs. Cooling loads tend to peak during times of year and times of day when high ambient temperatures create a maximum demand for power, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand is reduced, time-of day energy costs can be minimized, and real-time variations in power value can be used to the advantage of the energy consumer.

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Reducing emissions from the electricity sector: the costs and benefits nationwide and for the Empire State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using four models, this study looks at EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) as originally proposed, which differs in only small ways from the final rule issued in March 2005, coupled with several approaches to reducing emissions of mercury including one that differs in only small ways from the final rule also issued in March 2005. This study analyzes what costs and benefits each would incur to New York State and to the nation at large. Benefits to the nation and to New York State significantly outweigh the costs associated with reductions in SO{sub 2}, NOx and mercury, and all policies show dramatic net benefits. The manner in which mercury emissions are regulated will have important implications for the cost of the regulation and for emission levels for SO{sub 2} and NOx and where those emissions are located. Contrary to EPA's findings, CAIR as originally proposed by itself would not keep summer emissions of NOx from electricity generators in the SIP region below the current SIP seasonal NOx cap. In the final CAIR, EPA added a seasonal NOx cap to address seasonal ozone problems. The CAIR with the seasonal NOx cap produces higher net benefits. The effect of the different policies on the mix of fuels used to supply electricity is fairly modest under scenarios similar to the EPA's final rules. A maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach, compared to a trading approach as the way to achieve tighter mercury targets (beyond EPA's proposal), would preserve the role of coal in electricity generation. The evaluation of scenarios with tighter mercury emission controls shows that the net benefits of a maximum achievable control technology (MACT) approach exceed the net benefits of a cap and trade approach. 39 refs., 10 figs., 30 figs., 5 apps.

Karen Palmer; Dallas Butraw; Jhih-Shyang Shih

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Decommissioning of Risø's nuclear facilities. Descriptions and cost assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. ISBN 87-550-2844-6; 87-550-2846-2 (Internet)

Edited Kurt Lauridsen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SF6432-CR (02-01-12) Cost Reimbursement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2/01/12 2/01/12 Page 1 of 24 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-CR (02/01/12) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR COST-REIMBURSEMENT CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED AS BEING CHANGED, SUPPLEMENTED, OR AMENDED IN WRITING ISSUED BY THE SANDIA CONTRACTING REPRESENTATIVE. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) ALLOWABLE COSTS AND FEE APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS BANKRUPTCY CLAIM OF COSTS INCURRED DEFINITIONS DISPUTES EXCESS FREIGHT CHARGES

59

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity di¤erences at the …rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of …rms with di¤erent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale …rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing …rms. We …nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across …rm productivity. The evidence we …nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for …rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Fariñas; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heliostat production evaluation and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of ths study is to provide a factory cost for the production of heliostats in terms of 1979 dollars. Factory cost is defined as the sum of all direct labor, direct material and burden expenses that are incurred in the manufacture of a heliostat, and its packaging for shipment. Transportation, installation, taxes other than plant real taxes, profit, selling expenses, and all other profit and loss items are not included. Two production volumes are considered, 25,000 heliostat units per year and 250,000 heliostat units per year. The study concluded that the factory cost to manufacture heliostats is $95.99/m/sup 2/ at 25,000 units per year and $67.95/m/sup 2/ at 250,000 units per year. The Policy Analysis Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute estimates that this implies an installed price of $122.12/m/sup 2/ at the 25,000 unit per year volume.

None

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Heliostat production evaluation and cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to provide a factory cost for the production of heliostats in terms of 1979 dollars. Factory cost is defined as the sum of all direct labor, direct material and burden expenses that are incurred in the manufacture of a heliostat, and its packaging for shipment. Transportation, installation, taxes other than plant real taxes, profit, selling expenses, and all other profit and loss items are not included. Two production volumes are considered, 25,000 heliostat units per year and 250,000 heliostat units per year. The study concluded that the factory cost to manufacture heliostats is $95.99/m/sup 2/ at 25,000 units per year and $67.95/m/sup 2/ at 250,000 units per year. The Policy Analysis Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute estimates that this implies an installed price of $122.12/m/sup 2/ at the 25,000 unit-per-year volume.

Britt, J. F.; Shulte, C. W.; Davey, H. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Back-end costs of alternative nuclear fuel cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its charter, the Alternate Fuel Cycle Evaluation Program (AFCEP) was directed to evaluate the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle in support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The principal conclusion from this study is that the costs for recycling a broad range of reactor fuels will not have a large impact on total fuel cycle costs. For the once-through fuel cycle, the costs of fresh fuel fabrication, irradiated fuel storage, and associated transportation is about 1.2 to 1.3 mills/kWh. For the recycle of uranium and plutonium into thermal reactors, the back-cycle costs (i.e., the costs of irradiated fuel storage, transportation, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste disposal) will be from 3 to 3.5 mills/kWh. The costs for the recycle of uranium and plutonium into fast breeder reactors will be from 4.5 to 5 mills/kWh. Using a radioactive spikant or a denatured /sup 233/U-Th cycle will increase power costs for both recycle cases by about 1 mill/kWh. None of these costs substantially influence the total cost of nuclear power, which is in the range of 4 cents/kWh. The fuel cycle costs used in this study do not include costs incurred prior to fuel fabrication; that is, the cost of the uranium or thorium, the costs for enrichment, or credit for fissile materials in the discharged fuel, which is not recycled with the system.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

64

Costs of Land Subsidence Due to Groundwater Withdrawal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years the area around Houston and Baytown, Texas, has been affected to an increasing degree by land subsidence. Sinking of the land surface has reached critical proportions in many areas, and subsidence of as much as eight feet has occurred. The severity of this phenomenon has been aggravated by the proximity of much of the affected area to bay waters, and tidal flooding has resulted in significant damages and property loss. Subsidence has been linked by engineers to the decline of subsurface water levels due to heavy ground water withdrawals in the area. An alternative source for water demands has been introduced, although price differentials have slowed its acceptance. Major objectives of this study included estimation of historical costs attributable to subsidence, projecting estimated costs, and examining the economics of the two alternatives for water supply. A study area of 300 square miles was identified and sampling of residences, businesses, and public officials was carried out. The cost data resulting from those samples formed the basis for economic analysis. Historical costs and property losses that were attributable to subsidence were estimated to be $60.7 million and $48.9 million, respectively, or $109.6 million total. Of the $109.6 million, $53.2 million were incurred in 1973, principally due to a six foot tide. Probability of the occurrence of a six foot tide in any one year is 20 percent. Given five additional feet of subsidence in the study area the occurrence of a six foot tide was projected to cause an estimated $63,5 million in costs and losses, $10.3 million more than were incurred in 1973. Estimated annual subsidence-related costs and losses of $14.6 million for the study area, based on 1969 to 1973 data, were used to evaluate total costs associated with supplying water needs from two alternative sources, A break-even analysis indicated that to minimize total water costs, pumping only that quantity of water that would result in no subsidence could be economically justified; i,e,, water needs or demand above that rate would need to be purchased from an alternative source. This implied that when pumping is continued to the point that subsidence occurs, the cost of pumping plus associated subsidence- related costs and losses exceed water costs from an alternative source, per unit of water.

Warren, J. P.; Jones, L. L.; Griffin, W. L.; Lacewell, R. D.

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

67

Cost effectiveness of park-and-ride lots in the Puget Sound region area. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A cost-effectiveness evaluation and a cost-benefit analysis was performed on a park-and-ride system consisting of 26 park-and-ride lots in the Seattle metropolitan area. Costs and benefits of the system were examined with respect to the user, the community at large, and the public agencies responsible for providing for the community's transportation needs. Using survey and other data as input, a model was developed to calculate the total incurred trip costs of both the park-and-ride trip and the corresponding trip not involving the park-and-ride lot. General results indicated that the park-and-ride system in the Seattle area is cost effective.

Rutherford, G.S.; Wellander, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Audit of health benefit costs at the Department`s Management and Operating Contractors  

SciTech Connect

The audit disclosed that the Department and certain of its contractors had initiated several positive actions to contain health benefit costs: improving data collection, increasing training, reviewing changes to health plans, improving the language in one contract, increasing the employees, share of health costs at one contractor, and initiating self-insurance at another contractor. Despite these actions, further improvements are needed in the administration of the contractor employee health benefit plans. It was found that the Department did not have the policies and procedures necessary to ensure that the health benefit costs met the tests for reasonableness. The audit of $95 million in health benefit costs incurred at six Management and Operating contractors showed that $15.4 million of these costs were excessive compared to national norms.

1994-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Survey of life-cycle costs of glass-paper HEPA filters  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted a survey of the major users of glass-paper HEPA filters in the DOE complex to ascertain the life cycle costs of these filters. Purchase price of the filters is only a minor portion of the costs; the major expenditures are incurred during the removal and disposal of contaminated filters. Through personal interviews, site visits and completion of questionnaires, we have determined the costs associated with the use of HEPA filters in the DOE complex. The total approximate life-cycle cost for a standard (2 in. {times} 2 in. {times} 1 in.) glass-paper HEPA filter is $3,000 for one considered low-level waste (LLW), $11,780 for transuranic (TRU) and $15,000 for high-level waste (HLW). The weighted-average cost for a standard HEPA filter in the complex is $4,753.

Moore, P.; Bergman, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gilbert, H. [Gilbert (Humphrey), McLean, VA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Higher powers in gravitation  

SciTech Connect

We consider the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies of theories of gravity that generalize the Einstein-Hilbert action by replacing the Ricci scalar R with some function f(R). The general asymptotic behavior of these cosmologies is found, at both early and late times, and the effects of adding higher and lower powers of R to the Einstein-Hilbert action is investigated. The assumption that the highest powers of R should dominate the Universe's early history, and that the lowest powers should dominate its future is found to be inaccurate. The behavior of the general solution is complicated, and while it can be the case that single powers of R dominate the dynamics at late times, it can be either the higher or lower powers that do so. It is also shown that it is often the lowest powers of R that dominate at early times, when approach to a bounce or a Tolman solution are generic possibilities. Various examples are considered, and both vacuum and perfect fluid solutions are investigated.

Clifton, Timothy [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

73

Science Taking Higher  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 1997 4, 1997 Number 7 f Science Taking Higher Profile in Capital continued on page 8 INSIDE 2 Computers and Accelerators 4 Inventions 6 Sloan Digital Sky Survey upon the Clinton Administration and the 105th Congress to increase the nation's investment in scientific research and education. This awareness of science issues emanating from the nation's capital has heartened many of those toiling in the country's laboratories and universities; however, researchers interviewed for this article also said they are closely observing how the rhetoric translates into increased funding as the appropriations process plays out. "I see these [initiatives] as demonstrations of the underlying support of basic science in the community and in Congress," said Jeffrey Photo courtesy

74

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The cost of agriculturally based greenhouse gas offsets in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The broad objective of this thesis involves investigation of the role agriculture might play in a society wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction effort. Specifically, the breakeven price for carbon emission offsets is calculated for agriculturally based emission reducing practices. The practices investigated in the Texas High Plains involve reduced tillage use, reduced fallow use, reduced crop fertilization, cropland conversion to grassland, feedlot enteric fermentation management and digester based dairy manure handling. Costs of emission reductions were calculated at the producer level. The calculated offset prices are classified into four cost categories. They are: negative cost, low cost (less than $20 per ton of carbon saved), moderate cost ($20 through $100 per ton of carbon saved), and high cost (over $100 for tons of carbon saved). Negative cost implies that farmers could make money and reduce emissions by moving to alternative practices even without any carbon payments. Alternatives in the positive cost categories need compensation to induce farmers to switch to practices that sequester more carbon. All fallow dryland crop practices, dryland and irrigated cotton zero tillage, dryland and irrigated wheat zero tillage, irrigated corn zero tillage, cotton irrigated nitrogen use reduction under minimum tillage and dryland pasture for all systems, and anaerobic lagoon complete mix and plug flow systems fall in the negative cost category. Dryland and irrigated wheat under minimum tillage are found to be in the low cost category. Cotton dryland under minimum tillage and cotton irrigated with nitrogen use reduction under zero tillage fell into the moderate cost class. Both corn and cotton irrigated minimum tillage are found to be in the high cost category. This study only considers the producer foregone net income less fixed costs as the only cost incurred in switching to an alternative sequestering practice. More costs such as learning and risk should probably be included. This limitation along with other constraints such as use of short run budget data, lack of availability and reliability of local budgets, overlooking any market effects, and lack of treatment of costs incurred in selling carbon offsets to buyers are limitations and portend future work.

Chandrasena, Rajapakshage Inoka Ilmi

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

77

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

78

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other...

79

Assessment of Indoor Air Quality Benefits and Energy Costs of Mechanical Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating, given the higher cost per KWh for electricity, aaverage cost of electrical energy per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is

Logue, J.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

low unit transmission costs, there were still numerous studies with high transmission voltages that had much higher unit costs than studies with transmission lines

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

82

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

83

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

84

DEVELOPMENT OF A PRODUCTION COST ESTIMATION FRAMEWORK TO SUPPORT PRODUCT FAMILY DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main task of a product family designer is to decide the right components/design variables to share among products to maintain economies of scale with minimum sacrifice in the performance of each product in the family. The decisions are usually based on several criteria, but production cost is of primary concern. Estimating the production cost of a family of products involves both estimating the production cost of each product in the family and the costs incurred by common and variant components/design variables in the family. To estimate these costs consistently and accurately, we propose a production cost estimation framework to support product family design based on Activity-Based Costing (ABC) that consists of three stages: (1) allocation, (2) estimation, and (3) analysis. In the allocation stage, the production activities and resources needed to produce the entire products in a family are identified and classified with an activity table, a resource table, and a production flow. To help allocate product data for production, a product family structure is represented by a hierarchical classification of products that form the product family. In the estimation stage, production costs are estimated with cost estimation methods selected based on the type of information available. In the analysis stage,

Jaeil Park; Timothy W. Simpson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

86

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

87

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Higher Education Tuition Assistance And  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tables 1. Summary Statistics for W.Va. Public Higher Education Graduates Receiving PROMISE and HEGP .................................................................................................1 Summary Data For PROMISE Scholarship And West Virginia Higher Education Grant Recipients................................................................................................................13 Appendix I: Detailed Description Of Employment Data .........................................14

Mohaghegh, Shahab

89

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

HIGHER EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT The Evolving Role of Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher, especially university level, education has a distinctly important role in the education system and in the knowledge acquisition system in general. However, the deteriorating state of higher education in Arab countries, particularly in quality, has become one of the hallmarks of underdevelopment by contemporary criteria. If such deterioration were to continue, it is feared that higher education would become a mechanism for perpetuating the backwardness of Arab countries in the 21 st century.

Nader Fergany

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Effect of Transaction Costs on Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation for Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change and its mitigation is rapidly becoming an item of social concern. Climate change mitigation involves reduction of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations through emissions reduction and or sequestration enhancement (collectively called offsets). Many have asked how agriculture and forestry can participate in mitigation efforts. Given that over 80 percent of greenhouse gas emissions arise from the energy sector, the role of agriculture and forestry depends critically on the costs of the offsets they can achieve in comparison with offset costs elsewhere in the economy. A number of researchers have examined the relative offset costs but have generally looked only at producer level costs. However there are also costs incurred when implementing, selling and conveying offset credits to a buyer. Also when commodities are involved like bioenergy feedstocks, the costs of readying these for use in implementing an offset strategy need to be reflected. This generally involves the broadly defined category of transaction costs. This dissertation examines the possible effects of transactions costs and storage costs for bioenergy commodities and how they affect the agriculture and forestry portfolio of mitigation strategies across a range of carbon dioxide equivalent prices. The model is used to simulate the effects with and without transactions and storage costs. Using an agriculture and forestry sector model called FASOMGHG, the dissertation finds that consideration of transactions and storage costs reduces the agricultural contribution total mitigation and changes the desirable portfolio of alternatives. In terms of the portfolio, transactions costs inclusion diminishes the desirability of soil sequestration and forest management while increasing the bioenergy and afforestation role. Storage costs diminish the bioenergy role and favor forest and sequestration items. The results of this study illustrate that transactions and storage costs are important considerations in policy and market design when addressing the reduction of greenhouse gas concentrations in climate change related decision making.

Kim, Seong Woo

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

93

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

96

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

97

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

98

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

99

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

100

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

West Virginia Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Work Participation And Annualized Wages Of West Virginia Public Higher Education Graduates From This report analyzes the West Virginia industry of employment (and wages) of graduates from state public .................................................................................................1 Results By Industry And Summary Degree

Mohaghegh, Shahab

105

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution  

SciTech Connect

A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Heating Water with Solar Energy Costs Less at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A large solar thermal system installed at the Phoenix Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) in 1998 heats water for the prison and costs less than buying electricity to heat that water. This renewable energy system provides 70% of the facility's annual hot water needs. The Federal Bureau of Prisons did not incur the up-front cost of this system because it was financed through an Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). The ESPC payments are 10% less than the energy savings so that the prison saves an average of$6,700 per year, providing an immediate payback. The solar hot water system produces up to 50,000 gallons of hot water daily, enough to meet the needs of 1,250 inmates and staff who use the kitchen, shower, and laundry facilities.

Not Available

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

109

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy · Evolution of Texture in ...

115

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

116

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

118

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

119

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

120

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Higher Yields Can Be Achieved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: While the current forecast is showing higher distillate production than last year, there is room for yet more volume through refiners switching to higher yields than those being forecast. This will only happen if economic incentives evolve to encourage this change. Current high spreads indicate those incentives may occur. This graph shows the distillate yield pattern over the last few years. Generally yields rise in the fall to build stocks for winter distillate use. On average, the yield increase during the fourth quarter is about 2% higher than the yield average of the lowest yield months of June, July and August. (Recognize that a 1% change in yield is about a 150 MB/D change in distillate production, which is about 4% of winter demand.) During the fall of 1996, the winter season began with very low

122

Complex higher order derivative theories  

SciTech Connect

In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, Mexico 04510 DF (Mexico)

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

Reid, RL

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Site restoration: Estimation of attributable costs from plutonium-dispersal accidents  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear weapons accident is an extremely unlikely event due to the extensive care taken in operations. However, under some hypothetical accident conditions, plutonium might be dispersed to the environment. This would result in costs being incurred by the government to remediate the site and compensate for losses. This study is a multi-disciplinary evaluation of the potential scope of the post-accident response that includes technical factors, current and proposed legal requirements and constraints, as well as social/political factors that could influence decision making. The study provides parameters that can be used to assess economic costs for accidents postulated to occur in urban areas, Midwest farmland, Western rangeland, and forest. Per-area remediation costs have been estimated, using industry-standard methods, for both expedited and extended remediation. Expedited remediation costs have been evaluated for highways, airports, and urban areas. Extended remediation costs have been evaluated for all land uses except highways and airports. The inclusion of cost estimates in risk assessments, together with the conventional estimation of doses and health effects, allows a fuller understanding of the post-accident environment. The insights obtained can be used to minimize economic risks by evaluation of operational and design alternatives, and through development of improved capabilities for accident response.

Chanin, D.I.; Murfin, W.B. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume III: Energy Extraction and Utilization Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the benefit/cost relationship for 44 research and development (R and D) projects being funded by the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE), Department of Energy (DOE) as a part of its Energy Extraction and Conversion Technology program. The benefits were computed in terms of the savings resulting from the reduction in the cost of electricity projected to be generated at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000, due to technological improvements brought about by successful R and D. The costs of various projects were estimated by referring to the actual expenditures already incurred and the projected future budgets for these projects. In certain cases, the expected future expenditures had to be estimated on the basis of the work which would need to be done to carry a project to the commercialization stage.

Dhillon, Harpal S.; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Pfundstein, Richard T.; Entingh, Daniel J.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders · Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and ...

127

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

130

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

131

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

132

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

RE-IMAGINING CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Re-Imagining California Higher Education * October 2010 Johnfamed Master Plan for Higher Education, arguably the singlethe future of a system of higher education in the annals of

John Aubrey Douglass

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Essays on the Economics of Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Does Higher Education Cause Political Participation? 3.1on enrolling into higher education and college. Using 2measures of higher education on the instrument . . . . . .

SOLIS VIVALLOS, ALEX

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Class, Race, and Higher Education in America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many more questions for higher education, but at the leastthey overcome. But higher education in America has already1989), Review of Higher Education Policy In California,

Trow, Martin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cost and Reliability Improvement for CIGS-Based PV on Flexible Substrate, Phase II: 26 September 2007 - 25 September 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Global Solar's CIGS manufacturing cost has decreased by increased automation, higher materials utilization, and greater capacity with higher rates in all tools.

Wiedeman, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Life cycle cost and risk estimation of environmental management options  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation process is demonstrated in this paper through comparative analysis of two alternative scenarios identified for the management of the alpha-contaminated fixed low-level waste currently stored at INEL. These two scenarios, the Base Case and the Delay Case, are realistic and based on actual data, but are not intended to exactly match actual plans currently being developed at INEL. Life cycle cost estimates were developed for both scenarios using the System Cost Model; resulting costs are presented and compared. Life cycle costs are shown as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Although there are some short-term cost savings for the Delay Case, cumulative life cycle costs eventually become much higher than costs for the Base Case over the same period of time, due mainly to the storage and repackaging necessary to accommodate the longer Delay Case schedule. Life cycle risk estimates were prepared using a new risk analysis method adapted to the System Cost Model architecture for automated, systematic cost/risk applications. Relative risk summaries are presented for both scenarios as a function of time and also aggregated by pretreatment, treatment, storage, and disposal activities. Relative risk of the Delay Case is shown to be higher than that of the Base Case. Finally, risk and cost results are combined to show how the collective information can be used to help identify opportunities for risk or cost reduction and highlight areas where risk reduction can be achieved most economically.

Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

140

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

144

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

145

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

146

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have a much higher cost per kWh produced than baseload coal,life to 30 years on the cost per kWh is fairly small due tocosts through non-energy payments, which are incorporated as a constant per-kWh

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Service Provider Competition: Delay Cost Structure, Segmentation, and Cost Advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model competition between two providers who serve delay-sensitive customers. We compare a generalized delay cost structure, where a customer's delay cost depends on her service valuation, with the traditional additive delay cost structure, where the ... Keywords: delay cost structure, service competition, value-based market segmentation

Maxim Afanasyev; Haim Mendelson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

153

Carbonate fuel cell monolith design for high power density and low cost  

SciTech Connect

Objective is higher power density operation and cost reduction. This is accomplished by the design of a bipolar plate where the separate corrugated current collectors are eliminated; cost reduction was also derived through higher power density and reduced material usage. The higher volumetric power density operation was achieved through lower cell resistance, increased active component surface area, and reduced cell height.

Allen, J.; Doyon, J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Current Transformations in Norwegian Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Thatcher's higher education reforms in the early 1980'Idea and American Higher Education: 1850 to the 1960 MasterIN NORWEGIAN HIGHER EDUCATION 1 March 2002 Kim Gunnar

Helsvig, Kim Gunnar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Low-cost load research for electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) developed two pragmatic approaches to meet most load-research objectives at a substantially lower cost than would be incurred with traditional techniques. GVEA serves three customer classes, with most of its load in the Fairbanks area. GVEA's new approaches simulate load curves for individual customer classes to the degree necessary to meet most load-research objectives for the utility, including applications to cost-of-service analysis, rate design, demand-side management, and load forecasting. These approaches make class load-shape information available to utilities that cannot otherwise afford to develop such data. Although the two approaches were developed for a small utility, they are likely to work at least as well for medium and large utilities. The first approach simulates class curves by combining load data from system feeders with information on customer mix and energy usage. GVEA's supervisory control and data acquisition system gives hourly data on feeder loads, and its billing database provides the number of customers and kilowatt-hour usage by customer class on each feeder. The second approach enhances load-research results by redefining target parameters. Data from several like-hours are used to calculate substitutes for the parameters traditionally defined from single-hour data points. The precision of peak responsibility estimates, for example, can be improved if several of the highest hourly demands in a given time period are used rather than the single highest hourly demand. Arguably, use of several highest hourly demands can also improve the reliability of the allocation of responsibility.

Gray, D.A.; Butcher, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

costs | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Varnish cache server costs Dataset Summary Description This dataset represents a historical repository of all the numerical data from the smartgrid.gov website condensed into spreadsheets to enable analysis of the data. Below are a couple of things worth noting: Source Smartgrid.gov Date Released March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Date Updated March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Keywords AMI costs distribution smart grid transmission Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 4Q12 (xlsx, 112.1 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 3Q12 (xlsx, 107.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 2Q12 (xlsx, 111.9 KiB)

159

Cost Study Manual | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual Update 62912. Memo regarding Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Newsletter-June 1999 Build...

160

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

monitoring (Bywaters et al. 2005) Enhanced drivetrain reliability and reduced drivetrain costs Manufacturing Efficiency Higher production volumes, increased automation (Cohen et...

163

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation using cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

How Responsive is Higher Education? The Linkages between Higher Education and the Labor Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establishment (at the higher education level). Our analysisEconomic Value of Higher Education in Developed Economies: AWeiss. 2008. “From Higher Education to Work: Patterns of

Bardhan, Ashok Deo; Hicks, Daniel; Jaffee, Dwight M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cost effective multimedia courseware development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia technology offers considerable potential for education though the costs of production of courseware are prohibitive especially in a rapidly changing discipline such as computer science. This paper proposes a cost-effective technique which ...

C. J. Pilgrim; Y. K. Leung; D. D. Grant

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Overview and Low Cost Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... The major reason that there is not more widespread use of titanium and its alloys is the high cost. Developments in reducing the cost of titanium ...

170

Cost and Impacts of Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Policies RESULTS 2010-2025 and long-run impacts 2010-2025 GovernmentIndustry Costs Hydrogen production, infrastructure & cost HyTrans merges the early transition...

171

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

doi:10.1155/2011/926812 Research Article Energetic Cost of Ichthyophonus Infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Johanna J. Vollenweider et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) inalab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean). Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat) never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herring, the energetic cost of infection was a 30% reduction in total energy content relative to controls 52 days post infection. Following food deprivation (lean condition), infection caused an initial delay in the compensatory response of herring. Thirty-one days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 32 % reduction in total energy content relative to controls. Body composition of infected herring subsequently recovered to some degree, though infected herring never attained the same energy content as their continuously fed counterparts. Fifty-two days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 6 % reduction in total energy content relative to controls. The greatest impacts of infection occurred in colder temperatures, suggesting Ichthyophonusinduced

Johanna J. Vollenweider; Jake L. Gregg; Ron A. Heintz; Paul K. Hershberger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

3800 Green Series Cost Elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stoller - Legacy ManagementSustainable Acquisition (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Series Cost Elements01/30/2012 (Rev. 4)

176

Empirical Methods of Cost Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

177

Bifacial Efficiency at Monofacial Cost  

solar cells; photovoltaics; PV; bifacial efficiency; Monofacial Cost, Bifacial Cells; bifacial Modules; industry growth forum; gamma solar Created ...

178

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS 1 California Institute of Technology Issuing Authority: Office is that portion of the total cost of an externally funded project that is not funded by the sponsor. Depending as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Tai, Yu-Chong

179

Higher Power Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Higher Power Energy LLC Higher Power Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Higher Power Energy, LLC Place Flower Mound, Texas Zip 78028 Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Higher Power Energy is focused on the development and management of renewable wind energy across North America. References Higher Power Energy, LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Higher Power Energy, LLC is a company located in Flower Mound, Texas . References ↑ "Higher Power Energy, LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Higher_Power_Energy_LLC&oldid=346535" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

180

A Program for Optimizing SRF Linac Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Every well-designed machine goes through the process of cost optimization several times during its design, production and operation. The initial optimizations are done during the early proposal stage of the project when none of the systems have been engineered. When a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac is implemented as part of the design, it is often a difficult decision as to the frequency and gradient that will be used. Frequently, such choices are made based on existing designs, which invariably necessitate moderate to substantial modifications so that they can be used in the new accelerator. Thus the fallacy of using existing designs is that they will frequently provide a higher cost machine or a machine with sub-optimal beam physics parameters. This paper describes preliminary results of a new software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, the associated cryogenic facility, and controls, where operations includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. It derives from collaborative work done with staff from Accelerator Science and Technology Centre, Daresbury, UK [1] several years ago while they were in the process of developing a conceptual design for the New Light Source project. The initial goal was to convert a spread sheet format to a graphical interface to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand the tradeoffs.

Powers, Thomas J. [JLAB

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Feedstocks with Reduced Acetylation for Higher Product ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Feedstocks with Reduced Acetylation for Higher Product Yields and Improved Properties Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

182

Higher order invariants, cohomology, and automorphic forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general structure theorem on higher order invariants is proven. For an arithmetic group, the structure of the corresponding Hecke module is determined. It is shown that the module does not contain any irreducible submodule. This explains the fact that L-functions of higher order forms have no Euler-product. Higher order cohomology is introduced, classical results of Borel are generalized and a higher order version of Borel's conjecture is stated.

Deitmar, Anton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Higher-order symbolic execution via contracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to automated reasoning about higher-order programs by extending symbolic execution to use behavioral contracts as symbolic values, thus enabling symbolic approximation of higher-order behavior. Our approach is based on the idea ... Keywords: higher-order contracts, reduction semantics, symbolic execution

Sam Tobin-Hochstadt; David Van Horn

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Designing ontologies for higher level fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of higher level fusion is to produce contextual understanding of the states of the environment and prediction of their impact in relation to specific goals of decision makers. One of the main challenges of designing higher level fusion processes ... Keywords: Basic formal ontology (BFO), Higher level fusion, Mereotopology, Ontology, Postdisaster environment, Relations

Eric G. Little; Galina L. Rogova

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a â��bottom-upâ� costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with DFMA�® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target. In general, tank costs are the largest component of system cost, responsible for at least 30 percent of total system cost, in all but two of the 12 systems. Purchased BOP cost also drives system cost, accounting for 10 to 50 percent of total system cost across the various storage systems. Potential improvements in these cost drivers for all storage systems may come from new manufacturing processes and higher production volumes for BOP components. In addition, advances in the production of storage media may help drive down overall costs for the sodium alanate, SBH, LCH2, MOF, and AX-21 systems.

Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low-Cost Illumination-Grade LEDs  

SciTech Connect

Solid State Lighting is a cost-effective, energy-conserving technology serving a rapidly expand- ing multi-billion dollar market. This program was designed to accelerate this lighting revolution by reducing the manufacturing cost of Illumination-Grade LEDs. The technical strategy was to investigate growth substrate alternatives to standard planar sapphire, select the most effective and compatible option, and demonstrate a significant increase in Lumen/$ with a marketable LED. The most obvious alternate substrate, silicon, was extensively studied in the first two years of the program. The superior thermal and mechanical properties of Si were expected to improve wavelength uniformity and hence color yield in the manufacture of high-power illumination- grade LEDs. However, improvements in efficiency and epitaxy uniformity on standard c-plane sapphire diminished the advantages of switching to Si. Furthermore, the cost of sapphire decreased significantly and the cost of processing Si devices using our thin film process was higher than expected. We concluded that GaN on Si was a viable technology but not a practical option for Philips Lumileds. Therefore in 2012 and 2013, we sought and received amendments which broadened the scope to include other substrates and extended the time of execution. Proprietary engineered substrates, off-axis (non-c-plane) sapphire, and c-plane patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) were all investigated in the final 18 months of this program. Excellent epitaxy quality was achieved on all three candidates; however we eliminated engineered substrates and non-c-plane sapphire because of their higher combined cost of substrate, device fabrication and packaging. Ultimately, by fabricating a flip-chip (FC) LED based upon c-plane PSS we attained a 42% reduction in LED manufacturing cost relative to our LUXEON Rebel product (Q1-2012). Combined with a flux gain from 85 to 102 Lm, the LUXEON Q delivered a 210% increase in Lm/$ over this time period. The technology was commercialized in our LUXEON Q product in Sept., 2013. Also, the retention of the sapphire increased the robustness of the device, enabling sales of low-cost submount-free chips to lighting manufacturers. Thus, blue LED die sales were initiated in the form of a PSS-FC in February, 2013.

Epler, John

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

17.2 - Cost Participation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17.2 (June 2004) 17.2 (June 2004) 1 Cost Participation [Reference: FAR 35.003(b), DEAR 917.70] Overview This section discusses DOE treatment of cost participation by organizations performing research, development, and demonstration projects under DOE prime contracts. This section does not cover efforts and projects performed for DOE by other Federal agencies. Background Cost participation is a generic term denoting any situation where the Government does not fully reimburse the contractor for all allowable costs necessary to accomplish the project or effort under the contract. The term includes, but is not limited to: * Cost Sharing * Cost Matching * Cost Limitation, which may be direct or indirect * Participation in-kind

188

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Rural electric cooperatives and the cost structure of the electric power industry: A multiproduct analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since 1935, the federal government of the United States has administered a program designed to make electricity available to rural Americans. This dissertation traces the history of the rural electrification program, as well as its costs. While the Congress intended to simply provide help in building the capital structure of rural electric distribution systems, the program continues to flourish some 35 years after these systems first fully covered the countryside. Once the rural distribution systems were built, the government began to provide cooperatives with billions of dollars in subsidized loans for the generation of electric power. Although this program costs the taxpayers nearly $1 billion per year, no one has ever tested its efficacy. The coops' owner/members do not have the right to trade their individual ownership shares. The RECs do not fully exploit the scale and scope economies observed in the investor-owned sector of this industry. This dissertation compares the relative productive efficiencies of the RECs and the investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) in the United States. Using multiproduct translog cost functions, the estimated costs of cooperatives are compared to those of IOUs in providing identical output bundles. Three separate products are considered as outputs: (1) wholesale power; (2) power sold to large industrial customers; and (3) power sold to residential and commercial customers. It is estimated that, were the RECs forced to pay market prices for their inputs, their costs would exceed those incurred by the IOUs by about 24 percent. Several policy recommendations are made: (1) the RECs should be converted to stockholder-owned, tax-paying corporations; (2) the government should discontinue its subsidized loan program; (3) the government should sell its hydroelectric power at market prices, nullifying the current preference given to cooperatives and municipal distributors in the purchase of this currently underpriced power.

Berry, D.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Generalized structure of higher order nonclassicality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A generalized notion of higher order nonclassicality (in terms of higher order moments) is introduced. Under this generalized framework of higher order nonclassicality, conditions of higher order squeezing and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics are derived. A simpler form of the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing criterion is derived under this framework by using an operator ordering theorem introduced by us in [J. Phys. A. 33 (2000) 5607]. It is also generalized for multi-photon Bose operators of Brandt and Greenberg. Similarly, condition for higher order subpoissonian photon statistics is derived by normal ordering of higher powers of number operator. Further, with the help of simple density matrices, it is shown that the higher order antibunching (HOA) and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are not the manifestation of the same phenomenon and consequently it is incorrect to use the condition of HOA as a test of HOSPS. It is also shown that the HOA and HOSPS may exist even in absence of the corresponding lower order phenomenon. Binomial state, nonlinear first order excited squeezed state (NLESS) and nonlinear vacuum squeezed state (NLVSS) are used as examples of quantum state and it is shown that these states may show higher order nonclssical characteristics. It is observed that the Binomial state which is always antibunched, is not always higher order squeezed and NLVSS which shows higher order squeezing does not show HOSPS and HOA. The opposite is observed in NLESS and consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS are two independent signatures of higher order nonclassicality

Amit Verma; Anirban Pathak

2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

191

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Today in Energy - High airline jet fuel costs prompt cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... and idling time. ... Delta stated that it anticipates cost savings of $300 million per year as a result of this ...

197

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs? Costs involved in conducting sponsored projects costs and F&A costs together are the actual cost of a sponsored project. Direct costs are "those costs, indirect costs cannot be specifically attributed to an individual project. For example, it is difficult

198

Survey on Cooling Costs and Related Factors for Apartments in an Urban Area of Osaka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A questionnaire survey was carried out to assess cooling behaviors and cooling costs for 290 apartments in an urban area. 1) Cooling costs are strongly related to the number of air conditioners, the months of occupation, and the air conditioner usage frequency during sleep. Lifestyle and ecological interest do not decrease costs. 2) Target temperatures of air conditioning are strongly related to the air pollution outdoors, and to the frequency of window opening. Cooling temperatures are affected by the residents' constitution. 3) Both cooling temperature and air-conditioner use frequency are higher for residents worried more about dew, humidity, odors, and mold. 4) Air-conditioner use frequency is higher for residents who are annoyed by glances from outside and for those with a higher preference of outdoors. 5) South openings are related to the lower cooling costs and higher cooling temperatures, whereas west openings are related to higher cooling costs.

Umemiya, N.; Lin, X.; Inoue, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways—

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analysis of Cycling Costs in Western Wind and Solar Integration Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the impact of up to 30% penetration of variable renewable generation on the Western Electricity Coordinating Council system. Although start-up costs and higher operating costs because of part-load operation of thermal generators were included in the analysis, further investigation of additional costs associated with thermal unit cycling was deemed worthwhile. These additional cycling costs can be attributed to increases in capital as well as operations and maintenance costs because of wear and tear associated with increased unit cycling. This analysis examines the additional cycling costs of the thermal fleet by leveraging the results of WWSIS Phase 1 study.

Jordan, G.; Venkataraman, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Higher Spin Black Holes from CFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher spin gravity in three dimensions has explicit black holes solutions, carrying higher spin charge. We compute the free energy of a charged black hole from the holographic dual, a 2d CFT with extended conformal symmetry, and find exact agreement with the bulk thermodynamics. In the CFT, higher spin corrections to the free energy can be calculated at high temperature from correlation functions of W-algebra currents.

Gaberdiel, Matthias R; Jin, Kewang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Higher Spin Black Holes from CFT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher spin gravity in three dimensions has explicit black holes solutions, carrying higher spin charge. We compute the free energy of a charged black hole from the holographic dual, a 2d CFT with extended conformal symmetry, and find exact agreement with the bulk thermodynamics. In the CFT, higher spin corrections to the free energy can be calculated at high temperature from correlation functions of W-algebra currents.

Matthias R. Gaberdiel; Thomas Hartman; Kewang Jin

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE Connects with Higher Education Community  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EDUconnections is a year old project, and through it we celebrate our university partners, spotlighting a different higher education institution every month.

205

FCT Education: Competitions for Higher Education Students  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Educators Grades 5-12 Higher Education Energy Education Links Careers in Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells...

206

Measuring Imputed Costs in the Semiconductor Equipment Supply Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the order ful¯llment process of a customized capital equipment supplier. Prior to receiving a ¯rm purchase order from the customer, the supplier receives a series of shared forecasts, which are called `soft orders'. Facing a stochastic internal manufacturing lead-time, the supplier must decide at what time to begin the ful¯llment of the order. This decision requires a trade-o ® between starting too early, leading to potential holding or cancellation cost, and the cost of starting too late, leading to potential loss of goodwill. We collect detailed data of shared forecasts, actual purchase orders, production lead-times, and delivery dates for a supplier-buyer dyad in the semiconductor equipment supply chain. Under the assumption that the supplier acts rationally, optimally balancing the cancellation, holding, and delay costs, we are able to estimate the corresponding cost parameters based on the observed data. Our estimation results suggest that the cost of cancellation is four times higher and the holding cost is two times higher than the delay cost. In other words, the supplier is very conservative when commencing the order ful¯llment, which negates the e®ectiveness of the overall forecast sharing mechanism. 1 1

Morris A. Cohen; Teck H. Ho; Justin Z. Ren; Christian Terwiesch

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use. by Anthony Radich. Introduction. The idea of using vegetable oil for fuel has been around as long as the diesel engine.

209

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

211

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizon is divided into time periods. In these models, the whole production is not processed in a single period, and production and holding costs are introduced ...

212

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

213

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

214

Fuel-cycle costs for alternative fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the fuel cycle cost and fresh fuel requirements for a range of nuclear reactor systems including the present day LWR without fuel recycle, an LWR modified to obtain a higher fuel burnup, an LWR using recycle uranium and plutonium fuel, an LWR using a proliferation resistant /sup 233/U-Th cycle, a heavy water reactor, a couple of HTGRs, a GCFR, and several LMFBRs. These reactor systems were selected from a set of 26 developed for the NASAP study and represent a wide range of fuel cycle requirements.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

Glatzmaier, G.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Cost prediction for ray shooting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ray shooting problem arises in many different contexts. For example, solving it efficiently would remove a bottleneck when images are ray-traced in computer graphics. Unfortunately, theoretical solutions to the problem are not very practical, ... Keywords: average performance, cost model, cost prediction, octree, ray shooting, space decomposition

Boris Aronov; Hervé Brönnimann; Allen Y. Chang; Yi-Jen Chiang

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Audit Costs for the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct program costs for detailed audits of 13.5 million square feet of institutional building space in the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program were $0.047/SF. The building area was 63 percent simple (offices, schools, and universities) and 37 percent complex (medical buildings and power plants). Allowing for the influence of one large facility which received less-extensive treatment due to previous work, thorough audits were obtained for an average cost of $0.050/SF. Large medical buildings (greater than about 170,000 square feet) were audited for $0.050/SF or less, and program costs for survey audits of 17.2 million square feet were $0.0028/SF. The effect on audit costs of complexity of recommended modifications, amount of savings determined, amount of implementation costs, building size, and building complexity are discussed. Primary effects on audit costs are size and complexity of buildings. Program guidelines limited consideration of projects with greater than a four year payback.

Heffington, W. M.; Lum, S. K.; Bauer, V. A.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher average state electricity rates, which increase thethe average state retail electricity rate, meaning thatsensitivities on state retail electricity rates, O&M costs,

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Class, Race, and Higher Education in America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Century New England, St. Martin's Press, New York Fay, J.S.Higher Education in America Martin Trow Goldman School ofH.M. Laslett and Seymour Martin Lipset, eds (1974). provided

Trow, Martin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

From Higher Education To Work In West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Work Participation And Average Annualized Wages Of Graduates From West Virginia Public Higher .................................................................................................1 Results By Year And Residency ........................................................................................22 Appendix I: Detailed Description Of Employment Data .........................................29

Mohaghegh, Shahab

223

Firm Size And Higher Education Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tables 1. West Virginia Public Higher Education Graduate Work Participation By Area Of Concentration .................................................................................................1 Employment And Annualized Wages By West Virginia Firm Employment Size.....................................................18 Appendix I: Detailed Description Of Employment Data .........................................19

Mohaghegh, Shahab

224

From Higher Education To Work In West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Number Of Graduates By Area Of Concentration And Degree From W.Va. Public Higher Education .................................................................................................1 Results By Year, Experience, Residency, And Degree............................................4.....................................................34 Appendix I: Detailed Description Of Employment Data .........................................36

Mohaghegh, Shahab

225

Modelling higher-order dual nondeterminacy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate models for programming and specifying in which higher-order functions and nondeterminacy (both demonic and angelic) coexist. The models are built using predicate transformers, binary multirelations, state transformers, and free lattices ...

Joseph M. Morris; Malcolm Tyrrell

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Refinement of higher-order logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A refinement calculus provides a method for transforming specifications to executable code, maintaining the correctness of the code with respect to its specification. In this paper we extend the refinement calculus for logic programs to include higher-order ...

Robert Colvin; Ian Hayes; David Hemer; Paul Strooper

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Higher price expectations are spurring optimism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports on some encouraging developments for industry in the '80s despite one of the most sever price downturns in the history of the business. The 1970s were characterized by a boom solely led by price increases. The 1990:0090s should see some price growth and profitability caused by efficiency. Technologies such as 3-D seismic and horizontal drilling will allow the U.S. and other high cost areas to once again expand activity in the oil patch. While the 1980s can be viewed as one of industry's most trying times, many advances in technology funded during boom years came and are coming to fruition. Finding, developing and producing reserves at the lowest possible cost will be the theme of the '90s if the U.S. oil and gas business and other high cost countries are to stay in the game. Advancements in drilling and completion technology for horizontal wells is an excellent case in point. Multiple developments in MWD, logging, tubing-conveyed or drill sting-conveyed systems, underbalanced drilling techniques, moving equipment around tight angles, and many other developments have made horizontal drilling the in subject of today. Formations like the Austin Chalk in Texas may finally be economic despite failures of vertical wells, even in the boom times. While no panacea, horizontal drilling has the potential for improving per well productivities in many environments.

Crouse, P.C. (Philip C. Crouse and Associates, Inc., Dallas, TX (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rotating Black Holes in Higher Dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The properties of higher-dimensional black holes can differ significantly from those of black holes in four dimensions, since neither the uniqueness theorem, nor the staticity theorem or the topological censorship theorem generalize to higher dimensions. We first discuss black holes of Einstein-Maxwell theory and Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with spherical horizon topology. Here new types of stationary black holes are encountered. We then discuss nonuniform black strings and present evidence for a horizon topology changing transition.

Burkhard Kleihaus; Jutta Kunz; Francisco Navarro-Lerida

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Improved Combustion Health Monitoring Techniques - Longer Life, Higher Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Health Combustion Health Monitoring Techniques Longer Life, Higher Availability Georgia Tech Jerry Seitzman SR102 * Modern Dry Low Emissions combustors have low emissions, but at a cost - significantly lower availability and reliability than "conventional" systems * The input data to the combustor monitor is pressure fluctuations, same as in currently available systems, but from this project the system analyzes the data differently, accounting for changes such as ambient temperature and doing analyses that show trends which indicate when planned maintenance should be performed to avoid an unplanned shut down. * Technology Transfer: Worked with 3 GT manufacturers. Method licensed to turbine monitoring company and installed at a number of power plants in the United States.

230

Cost | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

231

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imization of the sum of the position costs of all the jobs, which will be denoted by. ??fi in the ?-field of the ..... http://www-poleia.lip6.fr/~sourd/project/position. 5 ...

232

Engineering Cost Analysis - Chapter 17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of these is that costs over the life of the project must be estimated based on some forecast, and forecasts have proven to be highly variable and frequently inaccurate. The...

233

Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC HPWH(2) HPWH(3) HPWH Standard 0.62 EF WH unless high natural gas costs (>1.50therm), in which case recommendations consistent with new...

234

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Report on Audit of Architect and Engineering Costs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In September 1990 the Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued the Department-wide Audit of Architect and Engineering Design Costs (DOE/IG-0289) which concluded that the Department`s A/E costs averaged more than twice that of private industry. The primary cause of the higher costs was the lack of Departmental A/E cost standards that would provide measurement criteria for controlling costs. Consistent with our prior Department-wide audit, the purpose of this audit was to determine whether A/E services performed at the Laboratory were economical. Specifically, we determined whether the costs for A/E services at the Laboratory were comparable to the cost standards for A/E services in industry and the State; and, whether A/E costs were reasonable.

1996-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

The effect of lighting system components on lighting quality, energy use, and life-cycle cost  

SciTech Connect

A computational method was developed to examine the effect of lamp, ballast, and fixture selection on the quality and quantity of illumination, energy consumption, and life-cycle cost of lighting systems. Applying this analysis to lighting layouts using different lamp/ballast/fixture combinations suggested that combinations with higher lumen outputs reduced the uniformity of the illuminance distribution at the workplace but did not reduce visibility levels. The use of higher lumen output lamp/ballast/fixture systems and higher efficiency components tended to reduce life-cycle costs as long as the premium cost of the components was not too high.

Rubinstein, F.; Clark, T.; Siminovitch, M.; Verderber, R.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

PETRO: Higher Productivity Crops for Biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: The 10 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s PETRO Project, short for “Plants Engineered to Replace Oil,” aim to develop non-food crops that directly produce transportation fuel. These crops can help supply the transportation sector with agriculturally derived fuels that are cost-competitive with petroleum and do not affect U.S. food supply. PETRO aims to redirect the processes for energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture in plants toward fuel production. This would create dedicated energy crops that serve as a domestic alternative to petroleum-based fuels and deliver more energy per acre with less processing prior to the pump.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Pros, cons of techniques used to calculate oil, gas finding costs  

SciTech Connect

A major problem facing the U.S. petroleum industry is the higher average finding costs that now exist within the U.S. compared with the average finding costs outside the U.S. It has been argued that federal lands and offshore areas need to be open for drilling in order to reduce average finding costs in the U.S. This article analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of conventional techniques for determining finding costs. Our goal is a finding costs measure that is a reliable indicator of future profitability.

Gaddis, D.; Brock, H.; Boynton, C. (Inst. of Petroleum Accounting, Denton, TX (US))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Estimating production and cost for clamshell mechanical dredges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clamshell dredges are used around the United States for both navigational and environmental dredging projects. Clamshell dredges are extremely mobile and can excavate sediment over a wide range of depths. The object of this thesis is to develop a methodology for production and cost estimation for clamshell dredge projects. There are current methods of predicting clamshell dredge production which rely on production curves and constant cycle times. This thesis calculates production estimation by predicting cycle time which is the time required to complete one dredge cycle. By varying the cycle time according to site characteristics production can be predicted. A second important component to predicting clamshell dredge production is bucket fill factor. This is the percent of the bucket that will fill with sediment depending on the type of soil being excavated. Using cycle time as the basis for production calculation a spreadsheet has been created to simplify the calculation of production and project cost. The production calculation also factors in soil type and region of the United States. The spreadsheet is capable of operating with basic site characteristics, or with details about the dredge, bucket size, and region. Once the production is calculated the project cost can be determined. First the project length is found by dividing the total amount of sediment that is to be excavated by the production rate. Once the project length is calculated the remainder of the project cost can be found. The methods discussed in this thesis were used to calculate project cost for 5 different projects. The results were then compared to estimates by the government and the actual cost of the project. The government estimates were an average of 39% higher than the actual project cost. The method discussed in this thesis was only 6% higher than the actual cost.

Adair, Robert Fletcher

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A higher limit approach to homology theories.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lot of well-known functors such as group homology, cyclic homology of algebras can be described as limits of certain simply defined functors over categories of presentations. In this paper, we develop technique for the description of the higher limits over categories of presentations and show that certain homological functors can be described in this way. In particular, we give a description of Hochschild homology and the derived functors of tensor, symmetric and exterior powers in the sense of Dold and Puppe as higher limits.

Sergei O. Ivanov; Roman Mikhailov

243

QSO hosts and companions at higher redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review presents the current state of work on QSO hosts and companions at redshifts above 1. This includes the properties of QSO host galaxies, such as size, scale length, and luminosity, and morphology, as they appear to change with redshift and radio activity. This leads to a view of how the properties of galaxies that host QSOs change with cosmic time. I also review studies of the galaxy companions to QSOs at higher redshifts, and studies of the emission line gas in and around higher redshift QSOs. These topics should see great progress in the next decade.

J. B. Hutchings

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Research Administration committed cost sharing, and in-kind/matching requirements associated with sponsored projects. Definitions Cost Sharing A portion of total sponsored project costs not funded by the sponsor. Mandatory Cost

245

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation Check-Off List December 2011 The explanations checked below best describe the reasons for why the cost transfers are being made. Costs as to how to allocate the cost, temporarily assigned the cost to an existing account that acted

He, Chuan

246

FACILITY AND ADMINISTRATIVE (INDIRECT) COSTS September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2015. Definitions: Direct Costs: Costs that can be specifically identified with a particular project(s) Cost: A broad category of costs that are common to all research projects. "Facilities" is defined one F&A cost rate. If 50% or more of a project is performed off-campus (exclusive of any subcontract

Albertini, David

247

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Higher Order Differential Attack of Camellia (II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Camellia is a 128-bit block cipher, proposed by NTT and Mitsubishi in 2000. It has been shown that 10 round variant without FL function under a 256-bit secret key is attackable by Higher Order Differential Attack and even if FL function is included, ...

Yasuo Hatano; Hiroki Sekine; Toshinobu Kaneko

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

General quantum key distribution in higher dimension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a general quantum key distribution protocol in higher dimension. In this protocol, quantum states in arbitrary g+1 (1?g?d) out of all d+1 mutually unbiased bases in a d-dimensional system can be used for the key ...

Shi, Han-Duo

250

Complexity of the higher order matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the standard encoding of Boolean values in simply typed lambda calculus to develop a method of translating SAT problems for various logics into higher order matching. We obtain this way already known NP-hardness bounds for the order two and three ...

Tomasz Wierzbicki

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

252

Cost objective PLM and CE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during the progression of the project of product development.

Nicolas Perry; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

253

FY 1996 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Cost savings are an integral part of Hanford site operations. Congressional actions towards establishing a balanced budget have resulted in reductions to funding for all federal agencies, including the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission. In September 1994 the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) approved the FY 1995 multi-year baseline that included a cost estimate of $1.9 billion for FY 1996. However, Congress only appropriated $1.3 billion for that year. The shortfall of $600 million resulted in a significant challenge to accomplish the required workscope. Therefore, RL initiated an aggressive cost savings program to eliminate the shortfall by deleting workscope that was unnecessary and performing the remaining workscope more efficiently. RL initiated baseline planning actions (including deletions, deferrals, transfers, and additions) during the FY 1996 multi-year baseline development process to match workscope and anticipated funding and identified $205 million of workscope deletions. CFR (Contract Finance and Review Division) then reviewed over 200 cost baseline change requests during FY 1996 and documented an additional $95 million of FY 1996 cost savings. This included $73 million of workscope deletions and $22 million of efficiencies. Total savings as a result of FY 1996 initiatives, including baseline planning actions and current year initiatives, were $300 million.

Andrews-Smith, K.L.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through 2009 Released: September 28, 2010 Next Release: Discontinued Excel Spreadsheet Model - 1994-2009 XLS (1,178 KB) Overview Oil and gas well equipment and operating costs, including coal bed methane costs, stopped their upward trend from the 1990s and fell sharply in 2009. The extremely high oil and gas prices during the first half of 2008 followed by an unprecedented drop to very low prices by the end of the year had a major impact on equipment demand. Operating costs tumbled also because fuel costs were reduced and well servicing rates fell in most areas. The exceptions were in California where electric rates continued to increase, causing a one (1) percent increase in annual operating costs for leases producing from 12,000 feet. Operating cost for coal bed methane wells in the Appalachian and Powder River areas increased because electric rates continued to climb. Due to the timing of the data collection, the cost reported here could be higher than the actual annual average for 2008. However, some production costs (labor and equipment) are not as volatile as drilling, pipe, and other well completion costs, so the effect of the oil and gas prices on collected data may be lessened. Annual average electric rates and natural gas prices are used, which also helps to dampen cost variances.

255

Maintenance cost studies of present aircraft subsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes two detailed studies of actual maintenance costs for present transport aircraft. The first part describes maintenance costs for jet transport aircraft broken down into subsystem costs according to an ...

Pearlman, Chaim Herman Shalom

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Benefit-cost in a Benevolent Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is a well-de?ned cost function C( y) for publicthe private values bene?t-cost test, but is potentiallythe private values bene?t-cost test, Lemma 4 implies y-

Bergstrom, Ted

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

260

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

264

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Scharff, Robert P. (Louisville, KY); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Higher Education: Who Benefits? WHAT IS THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little argument exists about the societal and personal value of education. The more complicated question is who benefits from, and therefore who pays for, higher education. Both the community and the individual benefit from education; this complicates the funding equation as to how much society and the individual should pay. If students had to pay the full price of education, too few would be able or willing to pay because the immediate personal

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A Power Capping Controller for Multicore Processors N. Almoosa, W. Song, Y. Wardi and S. Yalamanchili  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is over- provisioned with a lower average performance per square foot. Similarly, the packaging cost of a multicore processor is determined by the target peak power dissipation. Higher package costs incurred by high peak power dissipation targets increases the cost of the processor even though peak loads may

Lee, Hsien-Hsin "Sean"

269

Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Pricing of automotive coiled spring steel...3 kg (20 tons) per car � Total $40.75 (a) 1989 prices...

270

Entanglement cost in practical scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the one-shot entanglement cost of an arbitrary bipartite state, that is the minimum number of singlets needed by two distant parties to create a single copy of the state up to a finite accuracy, using local operations and classical communication only. This analysis, in contrast to the traditional one, pertains to scenarios of practical relevance, in which resources are finite and transformations can only be achieved approximately. Moreover, it unveils a fundamental relation between two well-known entanglement measures, namely, the Schmidt number and the entanglement of formation. Using this relation, we are able to recover the usual expression of the entanglement cost as a special case.

Francesco Buscemi; Nilanjana Datta

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

271

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities… (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embolization of the Internal Iliac Artery: Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different ... cost -effectiveness of coils versus the Amplatzer Vascular. Plug (AVP) for occlusion ...

274

WEB RESOURCE: COST Action 531 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... This site offers progress reports, meeting information and other resources produced by the COST Action 531, a special initiative of COST, ...

275

Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration 30.1DOE'sOversightofCertainContractorDefinedPensionPlansandItsEffect...

276

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

277

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

278

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production costs ... is to propose a minimum cost production plan to satisfy the demand ...

279

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

280

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Costs Drop for Photovoltaic Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2009 ... The cost reduction over time was largest for smaller PV systems, such as those used to power individual households. Also, installed costs show ...

282

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

284

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

285

Low Cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices  

Impact: Low-cost solution for solar energy (Expand to lighting, batteries, etc) Low-cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices . Title: Slide 1 Author: Donna ...

286

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of importsDG Quantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceQuantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil Importsworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of imports

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTING THE SUN SHINE ON SOLAR COSTS: AN EMPIRICALLetting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Chapter 3 Appendices 1 Appendix 3A: Levelized Cost of Electricity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs of coal, capital, and labor in Table 3A.1, natural gas with CCS becomes economic at the prices of higher than 100$/ tCO2 for a range $2­6$/MMBtu natural gas prices. At the higher natural gas prices, coal-Cost Generation Technology Zones for Coal and Natural Gas with and without CCS for Different Natural Gas Prices

Reuter, Martin

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

291

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Trust, Markets and Accountability in Higher Education: A Comparative Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that European and American higher education are currentlyfor Studies in Higher Education UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA,AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION: A COMPARATIVE

Trow, Martin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Carnegie Commission and Council on Higher Education: A Retrospective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND COUNCIL ON HIGHER EDUCATION: A RETROSPECTIVE * Novemberfor Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley Copyright 2005Carnegie Commission on Higher Education under the auspices

Douglass, John Aubrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Recent Racial Incidents in Higher Education: A Contemporary Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Racial Incidents in Higher Education 1987b. "King Wants1988. "Hispanics Higher Education's Missing People." Change12-65. Chronicle of Higher Education. 1987. "Racial Brawl

Farrell, Walter C. Jr.; Jones, Cloyzelle K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

AFTER BROWNE: The New Competitive Regime for English Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Proposals for Higher Education Funding and StudentAn Analysis Oxford: Higher Education Policy Institute.and Medow, J. (2010) Global Higher Education Rankings 2010:

Roger Brown

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

An Emerging View on Accountability in American Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accountability in Higher Education: Lessons from the PastStates and Public Higher Education Policy: Affordability,and Privatization in Public Higher Education. ” Washington,

Leveille, David E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

International Trends in Higher Education and the Indian Scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Higher Education, Spring. CSHE Research &Dynamics of Private Higher Education in the United States:and Public Policy. ” Higher Education Policy 3(2): 9-12.

Gupta, Asha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

European Responses to Global Competitiveness in Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptations of European Higher Education Systems in theDiversity in Higher Education. Jossey-Bass Publishers,2005). The European Higher Education and Research Landscape

Marijk van der Wende

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

From Mass Higher Education to Universal Access: The American Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition from Elite to Mass Higher Education”, op. cit.impact of mass on elite higher education, see Trow, M. , “Elite Higher Education: An Endangered Species? ”, Minerva,

Trow, Martin A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Disruptive Dialogue Project: Crafting Critical Space in Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faculty work: Higher education’s strategic imperative. Sanfor the Study of Higher Education, Anaheim, CA. *Carducci,the public agenda for higher education. Symposium presented

Carducci, Rozana; Kuntz, Aaron M.; Gildersleeve, Ryan Evely; Pasque, Penny A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Full Cost of Intercity Travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation," National Resources Defense San Francisco, October Emile Quinet, Monograph the Council, "The Social Cost

Levinson, David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

304

2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

06/21/13 2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey Certificate $ 11,574 **NOTE: Total flight costs are based on averages and are subject to change. Also, the ATC

Delene, David J.

305

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

306

An analysis of the costs of running a station car fleet  

SciTech Connect

Station cars are electric vehicles available at transit stations which may be used for transportation between the transit station and home, work, and/or for errands. This transportation service would be provided by the local transit agency. This report discusses an economic model of the costs of running a station car fleet. While some of these costs are highly uncertain, this analysis is a first look at the required user fees for full cost recovery. The model considers the capital costs of the vehicles and the required infrastructure; the annual fixed vehicle costs for insurance, registration, etc.; the mileage-based costs; and the annual non-vehicle costs for administration, infrastructure maintenance, etc. The model also includes various factors such as the fleet size, the annual mileage, the number of transit stations that would have facilities for station cars, and the number of users. The model specifically examines the cost of using of electric vehicles; however, for comparison, the cost of using a fleet of gasoline-powered vehicles also is calculated. This report examines the sensitivity of the model to the various factors. A principal conclusion from the analysis is that the largest cost contributor is the initial vehicle purchase price. For a given initial purchase price, the factor driving the user fee required for full cost recovery is the number of different daily users of a vehicle. The model also compares the annual cost of transportation using station cars and mass transit to the annual cost of solo commuting. If a station car is used by more than one person a day, and this use replaces the ownership of a conventional vehicle, the annual cost of transportation may be similar. However, for the base case assumptions, the station car user fee required for full cost recovery is higher than the cost of solo commuting.

Zurn, R.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

308

Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transparent Cost Database Transparent Cost Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transparent Cost Database Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Transportation Topics: Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/TCDB/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-transparent-cost-databa Language: English The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

309

Costs in the Norwegian Payment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate social and private cost for the use and production of payment services in Norway for 2007. The calculations include banks’, merchants ’ and households ’ cost for cash, cards and giro payments. The social cost is calculated to be 0.49 % of GDP, or NOK 11.16 billion. Costs are also calculated on a per-service basis. The results are compared with data from earlier cost surveys by Norges Bank. The unit costs of the most popular services have decreased over the years. Efficiency and productivity of banks ’ payment service operations has improved. We also make comparisons between frameworks, methodologies, and results from cost surveys in five European countries.

Olaf Gresvik; Harald Haare; Norges Bank; Sigbjørn Atle Berg; Gunnvald Grønvik; Asbjørn Enge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional variation in energy and capital costs. Although we estimate substantial reductions in H{sub 2} costs over time, our cost estimates are generally higher than the cost goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) hydrogen program. The result of our analysis, in particular, demonstrates that there may be substantial variation in H{sub 2} costs between regions: as much as $2.04/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE) by the time FCVs make up one-half of all light-vehicle sales in the GYOW scenario (2035-2040) and $1.85/GGE by 2050 (excluding Alaska). Given the assumptions we have made, our analysis also shows that there could be as much as a $4.82/GGE difference in H{sub 2} cost between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas by 2050 (national average). Our national average cost estimate by 2050 is $3.68/GGE, but the average H{sub 2} cost in metropolitan areas in that year is $2.55/GGE and that in non-metropolitan areas is $7.37/GGE. For these estimates, we assume that the use of natural gas to produce H{sub 2} is phased out. This phase-out reflects the desire of DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (OHFCIT) to eliminate reliance on natural gas for H{sub 2} production. We conducted a sensitivity run in which we allowed natural gas to continue to be used through 2050 for distributed production of H{sub 2} to see what effect changing that assumption had on costs. In effect, natural gas is used for 66% of all distributed production of H{sub 2} in this run. The national average cost is reduced to $3.10/GGE, and the cost in non-metropolitan areas is reduced from $7.37/GGE to $4.90, thereby reducing the difference between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas to $2.35/GGE. Although the cost difference is reduced, it is still substantial. Regional differences are similarly reduced, but they also remain substantial. We also conducted a sensitivity run in which we cut in half our estimate of the cost of distributed production of H{sub 2} from electrolysis (our highest-cost production method). In this run, our national average cost estimate is reduced even further, to

Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrogen demand, production, and cost by region to 2050.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of potential hydrogen (H{sub 2}) demand, production, and cost by region to 2050. The analysis was conducted to (1) address the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) request for regional H{sub 2} cost estimates that will be input to its energy modeling system and (2) identify key regional issues associated with the use of H{sub 2} that need further study. Hydrogen costs may vary substantially by region. Many feedstocks may be used to produce H{sub 2}, and the use of these feedstocks is likely to vary by region. For the same feedstock, regional variation exists in capital and energy costs. Furthermore, delivery costs are likely to vary by region: some regions are more rural than others, and so delivery costs will be higher. However, to date, efforts to comprehensively and consistently estimate future H{sub 2} costs have not yet assessed regional variation in these costs. To develop the regional cost estimates and identify regional issues requiring further study, we developed a H{sub 2} demand scenario (called 'Go Your Own Way' [GYOW]) that reflects fuel cell vehicle (FCV) market success to 2050 and allocated H{sub 2} demand by region and within regions by metropolitan versus non-metropolitan areas. Because we lacked regional resource supply curves to develop our H{sub 2} production estimates, we instead developed regional H{sub 2} production estimates by feedstock by (1) evaluating region-specific resource availability for centralized production of H{sub 2} and (2) estimating the amount of FCV travel in the nonmetropolitan areas of each region that might need to be served by distributed production of H{sub 2}. Using a comprehensive H{sub 2} cost analysis developed by SFA Pacific, Inc., as a starting point, we then developed cost estimates for each H{sub 2} production and delivery method by region and over time (SFA Pacific, Inc. 2002). We assumed technological improvements over time to 2050 and regional variation in energy and capital costs. Although we estimate substantial reductions in H{sub 2} costs over time, our cost estimates are generally higher than the cost goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) hydrogen program. The result of our analysis, in particular, demonstrates that there may be substantial variation in H{sub 2} costs between regions: as much as $2.04/gallon gasoline equivalent (GGE) by the time FCVs make up one-half of all light-vehicle sales in the GYOW scenario (2035-2040) and $1.85/GGE by 2050 (excluding Alaska). Given the assumptions we have made, our analysis also shows that there could be as much as a $4.82/GGE difference in H{sub 2} cost between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas by 2050 (national average). Our national average cost estimate by 2050 is $3.68/GGE, but the average H{sub 2} cost in metropolitan areas in that year is $2.55/GGE and that in non-metropolitan areas is $7.37/GGE. For these estimates, we assume that the use of natural gas to produce H{sub 2} is phased out. This phase-out reflects the desire of DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (OHFCIT) to eliminate reliance on natural gas for H{sub 2} production. We conducted a sensitivity run in which we allowed natural gas to continue to be used through 2050 for distributed production of H{sub 2} to see what effect changing that assumption had on costs. In effect, natural gas is used for 66% of all distributed production of H{sub 2} in this run. The national average cost is reduced to $3.10/GGE, and the cost in non-metropolitan areas is reduced from $7.37/GGE to $4.90, thereby reducing the difference between metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas to $2.35/GGE. Although the cost difference is reduced, it is still substantial. Regional differences are similarly reduced, but they also remain substantial. We also conducted a sensitivity run in which we cut in half our estimate of the cost of distributed production of H{sub 2} from electrolysis (our highest-cost production method). In this run, our national average cost es

Singh, M.; Moore, J.; Shadis, W.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. Past Incubator awardee, Innovalight, is creating high-efficiency, low-cost

313

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. Grid operators typically cycle power plants to accommodate fluctuations in

314

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West Energy Department Report Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 - 10:08am Addthis A new report released today by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examines the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of coal and gas plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling.

315

Daylighting in schools: Energy costs reduced, student performance improved  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordinarily, architectural-engineering firms are only indirectly concerned with psychological and physical benefits to the occupants of the buildings they design. However, a firm in North Carolina, Innovative Design, is not ordinary. Their use of daylighting in schools yields considerable economic benefits: energy costs reduced up to 64%, cooling and electrical equipment costs reduced, long-term mechanical and lighting equipment maintenance costs reduced. But equally impressive are the benefits of daylighting on student performance. Students in schools using daylighting have higher achievement scores in reading and math tests. Further, as shown in a related study, because of additional vitamin D received by students via daylighting, they will have less dental decay--and grow taller. In the two performance reports which follow, authors Nicklas and Bailey analyze specific win-win benefits of daylighting. Their findings are startling.

Nicklas, M.H.; Bailey, G.B. [Innovative Design, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Small-scale costs of hydrogen derived from ammonia. [As ammonia  

SciTech Connect

A systems study was made to assess the economic prospects for using purchased industrial ammonia as a hydrogen distribution and storage medium for users requiring 33 to 330 million std ft/sup 3/ per year (MSCFY) of hydrogen (or 0.1 to 1.0 MSCFD) at a plant capacity factor of 0.9. Projected costs to the end user were determined for the dissociated ammonia product (75 vol % hydrogen, 25 vol % nitrogen), and for ultra-high-purity hydrogen (99.999%) obtained by separation of the nitrogen. Costs were also projected for hydrogen produced by steam-reforming of natural gas, for electrolytic hydrogen, and for purchased (merchant) liquid hydrogen. The costs of ammonia and its hydrogen, and liquid hydrogen made by ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), are also listed for comparison. The latter costs from a recent study were updated to include more realistic (higher) hydrogen purification costs. All of the costs, expressed as 1980 $/MBTU in 1990, were obtained for two sets of forecast energy prices on the basis that advanced technology electrolyzers and OTEC products would be available in 1990. Results of the analysis showed that merchant liquid hydrogen was substantially higher in cost than all of the other options. Although hydrogen derived from industrial ammonia was significantly higher in cost than electrolytic hydrogen or hydrogen derived from OTEC ammonia, it can be produced using state-of-the-art technology. Possible reductions in the total cost of obtaining hydrogen via ammonia could make it lower in cost than electrolytic hydrogen. Hydrogen produced from natural gas was lowest in cost, among the land-based sources, for plant sizes exceeding 100 MSCFY. Other comparisons are provided, including the cost of ammonia made from coal. The criteria and methodology applied in the study are described. Uses of the product hydrogen are suggested along with recommendations for future work.

Strickland, G.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

HIGHER EDUCATION FACILITIES MANAGEMENT: READY FOR INTERNATIONALIZATION?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The last ten years has seen dramatic growth in Facilities Management (FM) activities worldwide, including Malaysia. Facilities Management is responsible for coordinating all efforts related to planning, designing and managing physical structure and it equipment, furniture and fixtures to improve the organization’s ability to compete successfully in a fast changing world. The facilities of a Higher Education Institution (HEI) like Universiti Teknologi Malaysia are one of its most valuable assets and must be manage properly in order to meet the need of the Institution’s end-user (Local and International students). This research provides essential concept on the application of facility management in general and specific emphasis on Higher Education facilities like library, class rooms, transportation services, catering services among others. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess whether the facilities provided in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) meet the International students’ requirement and recommend measure necessary to meet the shortfalls of these requirements. 210 questionnaires were administered to seven colleges and quantitative analysis technique was used in the analysis of the result. The finding shows 70% of the respondents (male and female) are satisfied and comfortable with the academic facilities which include (Library, class rooms) however, 30% were not. Similarly, 65% of the respondents said the transportation service (bus) on campus is inefficient. Finding also shows that 55% and 85% of the respondents complained on road signage and catering services. On college facilities, between 58% and 70% of the respondents are satisfied with the college facilities (rooms, desk, bed, sport facilities, parking space). Results indicate that 70% of the respondents complained of the chair provided in their rooms (not to ergonomic standards). Overall result shows that 65% of the respondents are satisfied with the campus facilities while 35% are not satisfied.

Aizuddin, N.; Yahya, M.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Greening academia: Developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England - the University of Southampton (UoS) - is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions - both nationally and internationally - can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around Pounds 125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken - recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach - provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

Zhang, N. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D., E-mail: idw@soton.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kemp, S. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Smith, N.F. [Estates and Facilities Management, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

320

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

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321

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

322

Entanglement Cost of Nonlocal Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For certain joint measurements on a pair of spatially separated particles, we ask how much entanglement is needed to carry out the measurement exactly. For a class of orthogonal measurements on two qubits with partially entangled eigenstates, we present upper and lower bounds on the entanglement cost. The upper bound is based on a recent result by D. Berry [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032349 (2007)]. The lower bound, based on the entanglement production capacity of the measurement, implies that for almost all measurements in the class we consider, the entanglement required to perform the measurement is strictly greater than the average entanglement of its eigenstates. On the other hand, we show that for any complete measurement in d x d dimensions that is invariant under all local Pauli operations, the cost of the measurement is exactly equal to the average entanglement of the states associated with the outcomes.

Somshubhro Bandyopadhyay; Gilles Brassard; Shelby Kimmel; William K. Wootters

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

323

Towards an Internationalisation of Higher Education Network for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEETING Reports Report on implementation of the project (IR ) (each 12 months): · Financial and the cost in respect of another Community project; Ineligible cost #12;KICK- OFF MEETING Staff Costs · Administrative and technical reports) · Taking charge of the day-to-day administrative and technical running of the project #12

324

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis More Documents & Publications Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Policy Flash...

325

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

Low Cost Emergency VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The barriers to commercialization of the Capacitor Bank Group Shorting (CAPS) concept were investigated in this study. Also, the application of mechanically switched CAPS systems was examined from the technical and cost points of view. In addition, a semiconductor (thyristor) switched or controlled CAPS arrangement was studied. Although only three utilities were surveyed in the market assessment part of the study, it was concluded that if there is a need for additional shunt compensation systems or a nee...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transmission Valuation and Cost Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides information on the status of the electric power industry regarding the economic valuation of transmission projects. Such valuations became critical with the introduction of economic transmission projects in the context of competitive electricity markets. Economic valuation is also becoming increasingly important for traditional reliability upgrades, because of the need for consistency in cost allocations between the two types of upgrades. The year 2005 has brought significa...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

328

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

330

THE SOCIAL-COST CALCULATOR (SCC): DOCUMENTATION OF METHODS AND DATA, AND CASE STUDY OF SACRAMENTO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchithe refining of crude oil to produce motor fuel; and thebe incurred if motor vehicles did not use oil, and 2) is in

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Social-Cost Calculator (SCC): Documentation of Methods and Data, and Case Study of Sacramento  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Use of Persian-Gulf Oil for Motor Vehicles (M. Delucchithe refining of crude oil to produce motor fuel; and thebe incurred if motor vehicles did not use oil, and 2) is in

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Preliminary estimates of cost savings for defense high level waste vitrification options  

SciTech Connect

The potential for realizing cost savings in the disposal of defense high-level waste through process and design modificatins has been considered. Proposed modifications range from simple changes in the canister design to development of an advanced melter capable of processing glass with a higher waste loading. Preliminary calculations estimate the total disposal cost (not including capital or operating costs) for defense high-level waste to be about $7.9 billion dollars for the reference conditions described in this paper, while projected savings resulting from the proposed process and design changes could reduce the disposal cost of defense high-level waste by up to $5.2 billion.

Merrill, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » July 2013 Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) efficiently separates higher octane components from the low value ones, offering great potential for significant cost reduction in gasoline production. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

335

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

336

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

337

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management: Office Overview Scoping and NEPA/MEPAScoping and NEPA/MEPA Scoping and Cost EstimatesScoping and Cost Estimates Project Define a Project so we canOffice Focus: Better Define a Project so we can have a more accurate cost

Minnesota, University of

338

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL FOR High-resolution modeling of the western North American power system demonstrates low-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

&M) costs incurred yearly by all active power plants 3. variable costs incurred). The capital cost of each project is locked in at the first year of construction. Construction costs for power plants are tallied yearly, discounted

Kammen, Daniel M.

340

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

342

Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect

For thirty years, dependence on oil has been a significant problem for the United States. Oil dependence is not simply a matter of how much oil we import. It is a syndrome, a combination of the vulnerability of the U.S. economy to higher oil prices and oil price shocks and a concentration of world oil supplies in a small group of oil producing states that are willing and able to use their market power to influence world oil prices. Although there are vitally important political and military dimensions to the oil dependence problem, this report focuses on its direct economic costs. These costs are the transfer of wealth from the United States to oil producing countries, the loss of economic potential due to oil prices elevated above competitive market levels, and disruption costs caused by sudden and large oil price movements. Several enhancements have been made to methods used in past studies to estimate these costs, and estimates of key parameters have been updated based on the most recent literature. It is estimated that oil dependence has cost the U.S. economy $3.6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars) since 1970, with the bulk of the losses occurring between 1979 and 1986. However, if oil prices in 2005 average $35-$45/bbl, as recently predicted by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, oil dependence costs in 2005 will be in the range of $150-$250 billion. Costs are relatively evenly divided between the three components. A sensitivity analysis reflecting uncertainty about all the key parameters required to estimate oil dependence costs suggests that a reasonable range of uncertainty for the total costs of U.S. oil dependence over the past 30 years is $2-$6 trillion (constant 2000 dollars). Reckoned in terms of present value using a discount rate of 4.5%, the costs of U.S. oil dependence since 1970 are $8 trillion, with a reasonable range of uncertainty of $5 to $13 trillion.

Greene, D.L.

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Direct Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Country-specific direct cost of corrosion for the year 2004...Basque region 1988 Pesetas, 75 100.00 0.75 1.9977 1.5 Czechoslovakia 1998 Koruna, 31.816 (f) 29.8600 1.0655 1.1006 1.17 Netherlands 1969 Guilders, 0.51441 3.6340 0.1416 8.2103 1.16 Sweden 1967 Kroner, 1 5.0000 0.2000 3.0284 0.61 Finland 1965 Markka, 0.175 (g) 3.2110 0.0545 2.0995 0.11 Global...

344

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

FY 1995 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 challenged us to dramatically reduce costs at Hanford. We began the year with an 8 percent reduction in our Environmental Management budget but at the same time were tasked with accomplishing additional workscope. This resulted in a Productivity Challenge whereby we took on more work at the beginning of the year than we had funding to complete. During the year, the Productivity Challenge actually grew to 23 percent because of recissions, Congressional budget reductions, and DOE Headquarters actions. We successfully met our FY 1995 Productivity Challenge through an aggressive cost reduction program that identified and eliminated unnecessary workscope and found ways to be more efficient. We reduced the size of the workforce, cut overhead expenses, eliminated paperwork, cancelled construction of new facilities, and reengineered our processes. We are proving we can get the job done better and for less money at Hanford. DOE`s drive to do it ``better, faster, cheaper`` has led us to look for more and larger partnerships with the private sector. The biggest will be privatization of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System, which will turn liquid tank waste into glass logs for eventual disposal. We will also save millions of dollars and avoid the cost of replacing aging steam plants by contracting Hanford`s energy needs to a private company. Other privatization successes include the Hanford Mail Service, a spinoff of advanced technical training, low level mixed waste thermal treatment, and transfer of the Hanford Museums of Science and history to a private non-profit organization. Despite the rough roads and uncertainty we faced in FY 1995, less than 3 percent of our work fell behind schedule, while the work that was performed was completed with an 8.6 percent cost under-run. We not only met the FY 1995 productivity challenge, we also met our FY 1995-1998 savings commitments and accelerated some critical cleanup milestones. The challenges continue. Budgets remain on the decline, even while the expectations increase. Yet we are confident in our ability to keep our commitments and goals by identifying new efficiencies in the Hanford cleanup program. We will also pursue new contracting arrangements that will allow us to foster greater competition and use more commercial practices while maintaining our commitment to the safety and health of the public, our workers, and the environment.

Andrews-Smith, K.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Global Indirect Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Indirect cost of corrosion for the USA (1998 basis)...76.64 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Mining 27.86 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Petroleum refining 32.22 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical 111.04 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Pulp and paper 148.05 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Agricultural 126.28 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Food processing 123.66 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Electronics â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Home appliances 25.25 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Subtotal 671.00 Production loss 2.5â??5.5 26.84...

347

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

348

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of activity-based costing in a manufacturing company: a comparison with traditional costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based Costing (ABC) represents an alternative paradigm to traditional cost accounting system and has received extensive attention during the past decade. Rather than distorting the cost information by using traditional overhead allocation methods, ...

Gonca Tuncel; Derya Eren Akyol; Gunhan Mirac Bayhan; Utku Koker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... applicable as variable costs of production. Excluded from forward costs are prior expenditures, if any, incurred for property acquisition, exploration, ...

351

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A. Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Determining the cost of a facility as complex as the neutrino source presented here is a very difficult task within the short time period...

356

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

357

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Average-case active learning with costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the expected cost of a greedy active learning algorithm. Our analysis extends previous work to a more general setting in which different queries have different costs. Moreover, queries may have more than two possible responses and the distribution ...

Andrew Guillory; Jeff Bilmes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with req'd IDC) Principal Investigator's Justification for Indirect

Eustice, Ryan

360

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 8, Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTOVOLTAIC COST TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA Ryan Wiser Lawrencein the United States: California. We find that: (1) solarof PV system costs in California. Through mid-November 2005,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

An algorithm for minimization of quantum cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new algorithm for minimization of quantum cost of quantum circuits has been designed. The quantum cost of different quantum circuits of particular interest (eg. circuits for EPR, quantum teleportation, shor code and different quantum arithmetic operations) are computed by using the proposed algorithm. The quantum costs obtained using the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing results and it is found that the algorithm has produced minimum quantum cost in all cases.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

TIBER-II cost models and estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a series of viewgraphs dealing with cost associated with construction of a thermonuclear power plant. (JDH)

Thomson, S.L.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

365

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Dataset Summary Description The calculator provides information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives you a chance to make your own assumptions and calculate your own cost estimates. This interactive web-based tool allows users to estimate the cost of illness due to specific foodborne pathogens. The updated ERS cost estimate for Shiga-toxin producing E. coli O157 (STEC O157) was added to the Calculator in spring, 2008. Calculator users can now review and change the assumptions behind the ERS cost estimates for either STEC O157 or Salmonella. The assumptions that can be modified include the annual number of cases, the distribution of cases by severity, the use or costs of medical care, the amount or value of time lost from work, the costs of premature death, and the disutility costs for nonfatal cases. Users can also update the cost estimate for inflation for any year from 1997 to 2007.

366

How Much Does That Incinerator Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosecurity on poultry farms includes proper disposal of dead carcasses. In many cases, that means using an incinerator. Calculating the cost of an incinerator means considering long and short-term expenses and the cost of fuel. This publication explains how to select the right size incinerator and calculate all associated costs.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Nash, Catherine; Harman, Wyatte; Padia, Reema

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Grant transfer of payroll and other direct costs associated with sponsored projects. Purpose of the Policy are responsible for ensuring that transfers of costs to sponsored projects which represent corrections of errors

369

2012 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 ­ 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree programs with a total of seven academic majors. Each has its own flight course requirements, which affect the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey of Flight

Delene, David J.

370

Costing the Target May 17, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide it with the right information! ­ Broken down into 3 project phases with associated costs and man-power. · Costing workshop on 25th May at CERN ­ Plan is to discuss Project Breakdown Structures (PBSs, to document how costs are derived. · Project has 3 phases · Industrialisation · Procurement · Reception (i

McDonald, Kirk

371

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Update on the Cost of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update the cost of nuclear power as calculated in the MIT (2003) Future of Nuclear Power study. Our main focus is on the changing cost of construction of new plants. The MIT (2003) study provided useful data on the cost ...

Parsons, John E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

PROJECT COST $53,108,617  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT COST $53,108,617 CONSTRUCTION COST $42,730,152 FURNISHING & EQUIPMENT $1,671.580 TOTAL SPRING 2001 Review of Documents and Cost Estimate Reconciliation APRIL 20, 2001 Formal Ground Breaking of the Campus Intramural and Recreation Advisory Committee SPRING/SUMMER1998 Campus Needs Assessment Process

Bittner, Eric R.

375

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Integration of Process and Cost Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For information on the symposium, refer to the November Meetings Calendar, beginning ... The managers of materials enterprises are market and cost driven. ... The fact that matter and thermal energy must be conserved (i.e., they cannot be .... sheet to a cost analysis and obtain information on the projected production costs.

378

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Production costs and supply of biomass by U.S. Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biofuels Feedstock Development Program has attempted to estimate the cost of producing dedicated energy crops for several regions of the United States. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation. A full economic cost accounting approach is used. This means that not only are out-of-pocket cash expenses (e.g. fertilizers, chemicals, seeds, fuel, repairs) estimated, but fixed costs (e.g., overhead, taxes) and the costs of owned resources (e.g., producer`s own labor, equipment depreciation, land values) are also estimated as part of the cost of producing dedicated energy crops. The costs are estimated as enterprise budgets which means that costs of producing energy crops are estimated as separate entities, and not estimated in context of the entire farm management structure. Competitiveness of energy crops with conventional crops vary by region. Breakeven prices are regional averages. Breakeven prices for poplar are higher than for switchgrass in all regions, in large part due to the higher cost of producing poplars.

Walsh, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO) National Conference National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO) National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning and Industry A...

382

Support for Cost Analyses on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Hartwell Ave 5 Hartwell Ave Lexington, MA 02421 Support for Cost Analyses on Solar-Driven High Temperature Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles Final Report to: Department of Energy Order DE-DT0000951 Report prepared by TIAX LLC Reference D0535 February 22, 2011 Matt Kromer (Principal Investigator) Kurt Roth Rosalind Takata Paul Chin Copyright 2011, TIAX LLC Notice: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

383

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title, Location Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: 2010 LCLS Undulator 2 is envisioned to be a 0.2 - 2keV FEL x-ray source, capable of delivering x-rays to End Station A (ESA), located in the existing Research Yard at SLAC. It will also be configurable as a non- FEL hard x-ray source capable of delivering a chirped x-ray pulse for single-shot broad-spectrum measurements. The project would entail reconstruction of the electron beam transport to End Station A, construction and installation of a new undulator in the tunnel upstream of ESA and beam dump, and construction and installation of x-ray transport, optics, and diagnostics in ESA. It also includes the construction of an annex to End Station A , providing hutches for experiment stations.

384

COST AND QUALITY TABLES 95  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Tables 5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) will no longer be pub- lished by the EIA. The tables presented in this docu- ment are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should be directed to: Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division

385

Software Cost Estimation and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report, provided that the source of such material is fully acknowledged. Additional copies are available free of charge from: Publication Office Institute for Information Technology National Research Council of Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0R6 Copyright 1994 par Conseil national de recherches du Canada Il est permis de citer de courts extraits et de reproduire des figures ou tableaux du présent rapport, à condition d'en identifier clairement la source. Des exemplaires supplémentaires peuvent être obtenus gratuitement à l'addresse suivante: Bureau des publications Institut de technologie de l'information Conseil national de recherches du Canada Ottawa (Ontario) Canada K1A 0R6 Software Cost Estimation 1 Table of Contents

M. R. Vigder; A.W. Kark

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coking Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Import Costs for Selected Countries Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 48.67 46.59 49.25 78.98 108.68 126.85 120.51 163.26 NA France 52.47 60.26 62.05 75.46 109.69 133.48 124.63 212.51 NA Germany 51.30 59.53 64.00 74.74 113.48 135.72 133.45 182.72 NA Italy 55.48 57.67 60.39 77.24 103.02 112.05 118.05 118.97 NA Japan 41.13 42.14 41.73 61.40 88.80 93.10 88.43 184.13 NA Netherlands 55.37 55.55 63.00 78.99 104.06 125.70 125.84 187.06 NA Spain 52.32 57.10 60.44 79.30 116.50 134.81 124.87 211.23 NA United Kingdom 53.14 56.81 57.34 77.73 116.05 128.51 120.24 187.79 NA 1To convert U.S. dollars per metric ton to U.S. dollars per short ton

387

Steam Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 46.96 39.34 39.76 66.29 70.83 70.95 82.81 150.58 NA Denmark 40.78 31.65 50.27 56.29 61.84 59.15 75.20 113.34 NA Finland 40.83 37.08 39.99 58.45 62.80 67.65 72.64 134.21 NA France 45.36 42.59 42.63 64.08 75.23 72.92 84.49 135.53 NA Germany 41.46 36.80 39.00 61.22 72.48 70.12 81.49 138.84 NA Ireland3 45.25 47.88 50.08 80.90 74.91 101.78 125.15 143.08 NA Italy 44.83 41.25 42.45 63.54 73.20 69.16 86.00 143.68 NA Japan 37.95 36.95 34.93 51.48 62.73 63.33 70.92 125.42 NA Netherlands 40.09 35.81 37.27 55.09 68.86 68.57 79.12 133.50 NA

388

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Focus Area: Ethanol Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.ecn.nl/units/ps/models-and-tools/biotrans/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/biotrans-cost-optimization-model,http Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation BIOTRANS optimizes the biofuel supply chain allocation by finding the least-cost configuration of resources and trade to meet a specified biofuel demand in the European transportation sector. The user can constrain the optimization by inputting a number of economic and technological assumptions for a specific target year. References Retrieved from

389

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Low-cost inertial measurement unit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

Deyle, Travis Jay

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Facilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU F&A costs at NIU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project, instructional or public service activity. Such costs include utilities, buildings and facilities accrue only as projects dollars are expended. As a result, F&A costs are collected and allocatedFacilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU #12;F&A costs at NIU What are Facilities

Karonis, Nicholas T.

395

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher first costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches.

397

Prerequisite requirements for higher graphite temperature limits and/or nitrogen atmosphere at all reactors  

SciTech Connect

The graphite temperature limits specified in the process standards-are being closely approached or have limited power levels at B, D, DR, and reactors. An increase of approximately 50--100 C in graphite temperature limits at these reactors would permit year-around operation on bulk outlet temperature limits. There has been considerable recent interest in extending to all reactors the use of nitrogen as a reactor gas constituent. With present graphite temperature limits, significant benefit from nitrogen usage will not be obtained during the winter months at reactors which are graphite temperature limited with approximately 100 per cent helium. However, during the summer months when bulk outlet temperature limitations result in graphite temperatures considerably below the maximum permissible graphite temperatures, the substitution of nitrogen for carbon dioxide could be of value. Under these circumstances, both a reduction in helium usage and a reduction in enrichment costs could result. With an increase in permissible graphite temperature limits, year-around benefit from reduced helium usage and reduced enrichment costs would be possible. To meet the Pu-240 specification with higher graphite temperatures however, would require a reduction in current goal discharge exposures with resulting increased fuel and burnout costs. Additionally, the incentives for higher graphite temperatures are very sensitive to both the mode of operation and to the assumed product worth. An economic study by the Process Analysis Unit discussing in detail the factors influencing the incentive for higher graphite temperature will be published in the near future. At a meeting among the staff several weeks ago, the prerequisite requirements for permitting higher graphite temperatures and/or nitrogen usage at all reactors were discussed. It is the purpose of this letter to briefly outline the prerequisite steps considered necessary to achieve these goals.

Graves, S.M.

1962-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

398

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters Estimating Costs and Efficiency of Storage, Demand, and Heat Pump Water Heaters June 14, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. A water heater's energy efficiency is determined by the energy factor (EF), which is based on the amount of hot water produced per unit of fuel consumed over a typical day. The higher the energy factor, the more efficient the water heater. What does this mean for me? Estimate the annual operating costs and compare several water heaters to determine whether it is worth investing in a more efficient

400

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies ’ stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of today’s changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costs—for example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfalls—all recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electric Cable Reel Rubber-Tired Gantry Cranes: Costs and Benefits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Port equipment manufacturers have responded to the increased focus on air quality control by creating a variety of cleaner equipment and making more electric equipment available to ports. Included in this equipment is the rubber-tired gantry (RTG) crane, which was historically available only with a diesel engine. Electric cable reel RTG cranes, relatively new to the U.S. market, may reduce port crane operating costs due to their lower energy costs, higher energy efficiencies, and longer equipment life. E...

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

UPGRADING THE CEBAF INJECTOR WITH A NEW BOOSTER, HIGHER VOLTAGE GUN, AND HIGHER FINAL ENERGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator at Jefferson Lab will be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV in the next few years. To meet the requirement of the new machine and to take the opportunity to improve the beam quality, the CEBAF injector will be upgraded with a higher voltage gun, a new booster, and a new accelerating RF module. The CEBAF injector creates and accelerates three beams at different currents simultaneously. The beams are interleaved, each at one third of the RF frequency, traveling through the same beam line. The higher voltage gun will lower the space charge effects. The new booster with optimized beam dynamics will complete the bunching process and provide initial acceleration matched to the new gun voltage. Using our latest SRF design, the new booster has significantly lower x/y coupling effects that should improve our beam setup and operation for the highly sensitive parity experiments scheduled for the CEBAF's future. Finally, the new accelerating RF module will roughly double the injector final energy to match the rest of the 12 GeV accelerator. In this paper we will provide more detail about this upgrade.

Reza Kazimi, Arne Freyberger, Alicia Hofler, Andrew Hutton, Fay Hannon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thermodynamic cost of acquiring information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connections between information theory and thermodynamics have proven to be very useful to establish bounding limits for physical processes. Ideas such as Landauer's erasure principle and information assisted work extraction have greatly contributed not only to enlarge our understanding about the fundamental limits imposed by nature, but also to enlighten the path for practical implementations of information processing devices. The intricate information-thermodynamics relation also entails a fundamental limit on parameter estimation, establishing a thermodynamic cost for information acquisition. More specifically, we show that the amount of information that can be encoded in a physical system (and consequently extracted) by means of any process is limited by the dissipated work during the implementation of the process. This includes a thermodynamic trade-off for information acquisition. Likewise, any information acquisition process is ultimately limited by the second law of thermodynamics. Such a trade-off may find applications in several areas of knowledge, since parameter estimation lies in the building basis of all natural sciences and several technological applications, such as metrology.

Kaonan Micadei; Roberto M. Serra; Lucas C. Celeri

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

406

Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

407

Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Tennessee Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Tennessee homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Tennessee homeowners will save $1,809 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,102 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

408

Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Colorado Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Colorado homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Colorado homeowners will save $1,528 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,435 under the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

409

Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Kansas Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Kansas homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Kansas homeowners will save $2,556 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,828 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

410

Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Missouri homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Missouri homeowners will save $2,229 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $7,826 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

411

Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Arizona Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Arizona homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Arizona homeowners will save $3,245 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,550 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

412

North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC North Dakota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for North Dakota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, North Dakota homeowners will save $2,353 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $8,719 under the 2012 IECC. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed

413

Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC Mississippi Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Mississippi homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Mississippi homeowners will save $2,022 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $5,400 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and

414

Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM 2 2009 AND 2012 IECC AS COMPARED TO THE 2006 IECC The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Louisiana homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Louisiana homeowners will save $1,663 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $4,107 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows

415

Integrated gasification-combined-cycle power plants - Performance and cost estimates  

SciTech Connect

Several studies of Integrated Gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power plants have indicated that these plants have the potential for providing performance and cost improvements over conventional coal-fired steam power plants with flue gas desulfurization. Generally, IGCC power plants have a higher energy-conversion efficiency, require less water, conform with existing environmental standards at lower cost, and are expected to convert coal to electricity at lower costs than coal-fired steam plants. This study compares estimated costs and performance of various IGCC plant design configurations. A second-law analysis identifies the real energy waste in each design configuration. In addition, a thermoeconomic analysis reveals the potential for reducing the cost of electricity generated by an IGCC power plant.

Tsatsaronis, G.; Tawfik, T.; Lin, L. (Tennessee State Univ., Nashville (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Personal Nonmonetary Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. byTransportation Crashes,” in Measuring the Full Social Costs

Delucchi, Mark A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs of intercity transportation: a review andthe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation,in full social cost-benefit analyses of transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Cost model for a small glass manufacturing enterprise.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cost model developed is for small, glass-manufacturing enterprises to help themdetermine their product costs. It estimates the direct cost in glass manufacturing such as… (more)

Gopisetti, Swetha.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or design of improved production cost models. to assess thelearning which lowers production costs, and resourcewhich increases production costs. Each of these modules are

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extra-heavy oil and shale have zero Resource- Cost), whileof the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, andof the oil transition: modeling capacity, costs, and

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European External Cost Estimates,” Transportation Researchin the external-cost estimates reviewed here. Althoughtruck shipment in 1991 (low-cost estimate from Table 1-A5 of

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Activity-based Cost Estimates with Feature-Based2004). “Effective Cost Estimate and Construction Processesof new designs. These cost estimates are inflated by the

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Underestimating Costs in Public Works Projects: Error or Lie?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1964). Errors in project cost estimates. Indian Eco- nomicSystematic errors in cost estimates for public investmentprojects compare in cost estimate experience? (Reprint No.

Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette Skamris; Buhl, Søren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Estimating the Cost of Large Superconducting Thin Solenoid Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for making a preliminary cost estimate of proposed one of afor making a budgetary cost estimate of relatively lightbut in other cases, the cost estimates are wildly different

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential and costs for rapid wind energy deployment inincremental costs of achieving 20% wind energy are projectedwind energy and that allow the model to incorporate the costs

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis More Documents & Publications Acquisition Letter 2009-03 Acquisition...

427

AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Vehicle Cost Calculator[1] Logo: Vehicle Cost Calculator Calculate the total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Overview This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate

429

A. Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Determining the cost of a facility as complex as the neutrino source presented here is a very difficult task within the short time period of six months. Three factors contribute to the uncertainty significantly: 1. The number of subsystems in the facility, which are described throughout the report, is comparatively large. All of the subsystems contribute a considerable amount of complexity and cost that have to be addressed by specific expertise in order to find a technical solution and a reasonable cost estimate. The variety of technologies is large and many of them have to be pushed to the edge or beyond and therefore has to be addressed with an appropriate R&D program. Cost savings from mass production will not be

430

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

431

CLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per square foot from FPM. Pro-rate by percentage of time that the office is used for the project x;CLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing Preparedby:M.Kuznia8/1/11 Page2 Use of an office: determine square footageCLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing Preparedby:M.Kuznia8/1/11 Page1 I. Definitions A. Cost

Baskaran, Mark

432

EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cost modelling using automobile warranty data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis sets out to model, from the manufacturer's point of view, the warranty cost of a repairable product. The product can be a complex… (more)

Summit, Raymond

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Certificate of Current Cost and Pricing Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) This is to certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the cost or pricing data (as defined in section 15.401 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and required under FAR subsection 15.403-4) submitted, either actually or by specific identification in writing, to the Contracting Officer or to the Contracting Officer's representative in support of * are accurate, complete, and current as of **. This certification includes the cost or pricing data supporting any advance agreements and forward pricing rate agreements between the offeror and the Government that are

437

NETL: News Release - Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental and cost profiles in comparison to other energy sources. The development of shale gas and other unconventional natural gas wells requires the use of technologies that...

438

Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, New York, 1981. MIL-HDBK-881, Handbook Work BreakdownWBS level-3 cost elements [MIL- HDBK-881, 1998]. In general,

Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the benefits and costs of microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the benefits that Microgrids can provide to a variety of stakeholders and considers their costs. A flexible framework is proposed in which… (more)

Weyrich Morris, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

On Traveling Salesman Games with Asymmetric Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1, 2012 ... We construct a stable cost allocation with budget balance guarantee equal ... and a previously unknown connection to linear production games.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Low Cost Powder Metal Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driving down processing costs on military and commercial aerospace ... studies using production alloys to turbine disk property results will be presented.

442

Middle East Production Costs - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Persian Gulf Oil Production Capacity and Development Cost Forecast (without additional development to replace production) Based on Low-Case Weighted Average

443

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost inpu t assumptions, the Utah Wind Working Group may wish to consider pursuing two other poss ible sources of revenue: renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Lower Cost, Nanoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separator ...  

Although the polyolefin polymer material often used for lithium battery separators costs approximately $1.30/kg, the difficult process used to make it ...

446

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Materials. Storage Respondents submitted additional needs for R&D in the area of hydrogen storage: Advanced metal alloys in order to lower the cost of hydrogen...

447

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

SciTech Connect

This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov...

450

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Selected bibliography: cost...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin...

451

OpenEI - Unit Cost Natural Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005...

452

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

454

Cost of a Ride: The Effects of Densities on Fixed-Guideway Transit Ridership and Capital Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail transit capital cost study update final. Washington,2005). Managing Capital Costs of Major Federally Fundedin US rail transit project cost overrun. Transportation

Guerra, Erick; Cervero, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Cost of Bearing a Sword: Locomotor Costs and Compensations in Relation to a Sexually Selected Trait in Xiphophorus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating performance costs of sexually selected traits.result in a locomotor cost. References Allen, B. J. &Levinton, J. S. (2006). Costs of bearing a sexually selected

Oufiero, Christopher E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

457

Mechanical Properties of a New Higher-Temperature Multiphase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

(fee), high temperature form of cobalt to a network along the (111) planes of plates of ... iron to reduce the mix cost as much as possible. A large number of independent ..... decrease in energy to failure was observed .... 1980 (

458

Development of a Low-Cost Rotary Steerable Drilling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project had the goal to develop and commercialize a low-cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures to reduce operating costs by a minimum of 50% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50% over the currently offered systems. The LCRSS system developed under this project does reduce operating costs by 55% and lost-in-hole charges by at least 50%. The developed product is not commercializable in its current form. The overall objective was to develop and commercialize a low cost rotary steerable system (LCRSS) capable of operating downhole at conventional pressures and temperatures (20,000 psi/150 C) while reducing the operating costs by 50% and the lost-in-hole charges by 50% over the currently available systems. The proposed reduction in costs were to be realized through the significant reduction in tool complexity, a corresponding increase in tool reliability as expressed in the mean-time between failure (MTBF), and a reduction in the time and costs required to service tools after each field operation. Ultimately, the LCRSS system was to be capable of drilling 7 7/8 in. to 9 5/8 in. borehole diameters. The project was divided into three Phases, of which Phases I & II were previously completed and reported on, and are part of the case file. Therefore, the previously reported information is not repeated herein. Phase III included the fabrication of two field ready prototypes that were to be subjected to a series of drilling tests at GTI Catoosa, DOE RMOTC, and at customer partnering wells, if possible, as appropriate in the timing of the field test objectives to fully exercise all elements of the LCRSS. These tests were conducted in an iterative process based on a performance/reliability improvement cycle with the goal of demonstrating the system met all aspects required for commercial viability. These tests were conducted to achieve continuous runs of 100+ hours with well trajectories that fully exercised the tool's build/turn/drop/hold target capabilities and its higher end ratings for bit weight, torque and rotary speed. The tool teardowns were rigorously analyzed at the conclusion of each field run to assess component wear rates and to fully document any detrimental behavior(s) observed.

Roney Nazarian

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

A higher-order extension for imperative synchronous languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents the very first effective design of higher-order modules in the synchronous programming language Esterel. Higher-order modules, together with the robust separate compilation scheme that implements it, allow us to address a yet unexplored ...

Eric Vecchié; Jean-Pierre Talpin; Sébastien Boisgérault

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Designing to Target Cost. ” 12th Annual Conference of thethe Hurdle of First Cost: Action Research in TargetD.T. (1987). “A Future for Cost Modelling: Building Cost

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "incur higher costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electric Vehicles: Performances, Life Cycle Costs, Emissions, and Recharging Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table3 to the incre- no oil costs, and that Na/S batteries,costs, of vehicle’s Oil costs, percent ofgasoline vehicle’stires are (M&R) costs (we exclude fires and oil) than ICEVs,

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change, and noise. Oil-use costs comprise the cost of theexcept as indicated) Oil-use cost SPR Low Best High BY ROCdirect economic costs of oil dependence – including wealth

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Low-Cost Installation of Concentrating Photovoltaic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-Cost Installation of Concentrating Photovoltaic Renewable Energy Research Renewable Energy Research http://www.energy.ca.gov/research/renewabl e/index.html August 2011 The Issue Several factors inhibit the potential growth of the California photovoltaic market: high installation costs, expenses

464

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

466

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen using a steam methane reformer (SMR). The SMR is1.7 kg/h $99,000 Steam methane reformer 100 kg/day 4.2 kg/hyes yes yes a. Steam methane reformer cost, compressor cost,

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Estimating and understanding DOE waste management costs`  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines costs associated with cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities, with particular emphasis on the waste management program. Life-cycle waste management costs have been compiled and reported in the DOE Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Waste management costs are a critical issue for DOE because of the current budget constraints. The DOE sites are struggling to accomplish their environmental management objectives given funding scenarios that are well below anticipated waste management costs. Through the BEMR process, DOE has compiled complex-wide cleanup cost estimates and has begun analysis of these costs with respect to alternative waste management scenarios and policy strategies. From this analysis, DOE is attempting to identify the major cost drivers and prioritize environmental management activities to achieve maximum utilization of existing funding. This paper provides an overview of the methodology DOE has used to estimate and analyze some waste management costs, including the key data requirements and uncertainties.

Kang, J.S. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Sherick, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Decommissioning Experiences and Lessons Learned: Decommissioning Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the United States (US) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued revised decommissioning regulations that provided a dose-based site release limit and detailed supporting regulatory guidance. This report summarizes the decommissioning cost experiences at US nuclear plants, including information about radwaste volumes and the cost of radwaste disposal based on the current regulatory situation in the US.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

470

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Automotive System Cost Modeling Tool (ASCM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technology vehicles (i.e., diesel, hybrid, and fuel cell) developed for improved fuel economy remains either be done through Argonne National laboratory's hybrid vehicle cost model algorithm (adapted the Tool Can Help Answer · What is the life cycle cost of today's midsize hybrid vehicle? · How does

472

Comparing cost prediction models by resampling techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accurate software cost prediction is a research topic that has attracted much of the interest of the software engineering community during the latest decades. A large part of the research efforts involves the development of statistical models based ... Keywords: Accuracy measure, Bootstrap, Confidence interval, Permutation test, Software cost estimation

Nikolaos Mittas; Lefteris Angelis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Price of electricity tracks cost of living  

SciTech Connect

The retail price of electricity and the consumer price index are rising at about the same rate: 241.5 and 242.6, respectively, based on a 1967 index of 100. Increases in fossil fuel costs, wages, and the cost of borrowed funds have contributed to these changes. Details of the annual percentage changes are summarized in five tables. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

SciTech Connect

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

475

Cost of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.

Greene, D.L.; Tishchishyna, N.I.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

477

Cost-Based Sampling of Individual Instances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical domains, misclassification costs can differ greatly and may be represented by class ratios, however, most learning algorithms struggle with skewed class distributions. The difficulty is attributed to designing classifiers to maximize ... Keywords: Class Imbalance, Cost-Based Learning, Sampling

William Klement; Peter Flach; Nathalie Japkowicz; Stan Matwin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

High Performance Metallic Materials for Cost Sensitive Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost Effective Synthesis, Processing and Applications of Light-Weight. Metallic Materials . ... Prospects for Cost Reduction of Titanium Via Electrolysis .

479

Low Cost Titanium Powder Development for Additive Manufacturing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Cost Affordable Titanium IV. Presentation Title, Low Cost Titanium Powder ...

480

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Mandatory Photovoltaic System Cost Analysis Eligibility Utility Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Information...

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481

LOW COST BIOHEATING OIL APPLICATION.  

SciTech Connect

The report describes primarily the results of combustion tests carried out with a soy methyl ester (SME) that can be considered as a biofuel that does not quite meet the ASTM D 6751-02 specifications for biodiesel. The tests were performed in a residential boiler and a commercial boiler. Blends of the SME in distillate fuel (home heating fuel or equivalently, ASTM No.2 fuel oil) were tested in both the boilers. Similar tests had been conducted in a previous project with ASTM biodiesel blends and hence provided a comparison. Blends of the SME in ASTM No.6 oil (residual oil) were also tested in the commercial boiler using a different burner. Physical properties of the blends (in both the petroleum based fuels) were also measured. It was found that the SME blends in the distillate burned, not surprisingly, similarly to biodiesel blends. Reductions in NOx with blending of the SME were the most significant finding as before with biodiesel blends. The blends in No.6 oil also showed reductions in NOx in the commercial boiler combustion tests, though levels with No.6 blends are higher than with No.2 blends as expected. A significant conclusion from the physical property tests was that even the blending of 10% SME with the No.6 oil caused a significant reduction in viscosity, which suggests a potential direction of application of such blends.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billi