National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for incremental lifetime cancer

  1. Two-Year and Lifetime Cost-Effectiveness of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohler, Racquel E. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheets, Nathan C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Wheeler, Stephanie B. [Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Nutting, Chris [Royal Marsden Hospital, London, United Kindom (United Kingdom); Hall, Emma [Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit, Division of Clinical Studies, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Chera, Bhishamjit S., E-mail: bchera@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina Hospitals, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the cost-effectiveness of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of head-and neck-cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: We used a Markov model to simulate radiation therapy-induced xerostomia and dysphagia in a hypothetical cohort of 65-year-old HNC patients. Model input parameters were derived from PARSPORT (CRUK/03/005) patient-level trial data and quality-of-life and Medicare cost data from published literature. We calculated average incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) from the US health care perspective as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and compared our ICERs with current cost-effectiveness standards whereby treatment comparators less than $50,000 per QALY gained are considered cost-effective. Results: In the first 2 years after initial treatment, IMRT is not cost-effective compared with 3D-CRT, given an average ICER of $101,100 per QALY gained. However, over 15 years (remaining lifetime on the basis of average life expectancy of a 65-year-old), IMRT is more cost-effective at $34,523 per QALY gained. Conclusion: Although HNC patients receiving IMRT will likely experience reduced xerostomia and dysphagia symptoms, the small quality-of-life benefit associated with IMRT is not cost-effective in the short term but may be cost-effective over a patient's lifetime, assuming benefits persist over time and patients are healthy and likely to live for a sustained period. Additional data quantifying the long-term benefits of IMRT, however, are needed.

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) System for Imaging of Oral Cancer and Precancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Shuna

    2014-10-10

    of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Javier A. Jo Co-Chair of Commettee, Kristen C. Maitland Committee Members, Brian E. Applegate Jim Ji Head of Department, Gerard L. Coté December 2014 Major Subject... of multispectral FLIM for oral cancer and precancer detection. iv DEDICATION To my parents and my husband v ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I want to first thank my advisor Dr. Javier Jo, who has given me the chance to study and work in such a good...

  3. Automatic Incremental Routing Using Multiple Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Rumi; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    J. J. Garcia-Luna-Aceves, “Automatic Routing Using MultipleAutomatic Incremental Routing Using Multiple Roots RumiWe present Multi-root Automatic Incremental Rout- ing (

  4. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowd, Daniel

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  5. Incremental Mechanism Design Vincent Conitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incremental Mechanism Design Vincent Conitzer Duke University Department of Computer Science@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Mechanism design has traditionally focused almost exclusively on the design of truthful mechanisms bounded agents may not be able to find the best manipulation, and 3. when designing mechanisms

  6. Analyzing Characteristics of Incremental Lifecycle by using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    of incremental life cycle Set relationship between process and project environment Build and calibrate simulation Productivity Development process Hybrid simulation #12;2006-10-02 7/18 Related work(1/3) Spiral life cycle of increments -Arrive time -Amount Input Simulation model for incremental life cycle Capture character

  7. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J. [327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); 1011 Richardson Building, Photon Migration Laboratories, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); 327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

  8. Lifetimes of noisy repellors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Faisst; B. Eckhardt

    2003-08-27

    We study the effects of additive noise on the lifetimes of chaotic repellors. Using first order perturbation theory we argue that noise will increase the lifetime if the escape holes lie in regions where the unperturbed density is higher than in the immediate vicinity and that it decreases if the density is lower. Numerical experiments support the qualitative conclusions also beyond perturbation theory.

  9. The Neutron Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Wietfeldt

    2014-11-13

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron, and antineutrino is the prototype semileptonic weak decay and the simplest example of nuclear beta decay. The nucleon vector and axial vector weak coupling constants G_V and G_A determine the neutron lifetime as well as the strengths of weak interaction processes involving free neutrons and protons that are important in astrophysics, cosmology, solar physics and neutrino detection. In combination with a neutron decay angular correlation measurement, the neutron lifetime can be used to determine the first element of the CKM matrix Vud. Unfortunately the two main experimental methods for measuring the neutron lifetime currently disagree by almost 4 sigma. I will present a brief review of the status of the neutron lifetime and prospects for the future.

  10. ADAPTON: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    ADAPTON: Composable, Demand- Driven Incremental Computation Abstract Many researchers have proposed important drawbacks. First, recomputation is oblivious to specific demands on the program output; that is ic , a core calculus that applies a demand-driven semantics to incremental computa- tion, tracking

  11. INCREMENTAL HORIZONTAL FRAGMENTATION OF DATABASE CLASS OBJECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezeife, Christie

    INCREMENTAL HORIZONTAL FRAGMENTATION OF DATABASE CLASS OBJECTS C.I. Ezeife School of Computer-orientd databases, Incremental horizontal fragmentation, Distribution Abstract: Horizontal fragments of a class in an object-oriented database system contain subsets of the class extent or instance objects. These fragments

  12. SINA: Scalable Incremental Processing of Continuous Queries in Spatiotemporal Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiserslautern, Universität

    SINA: Scalable Incremental Processing of Continuous Queries in Spatiotemporal Databases Mohamed F F. Mokbel, Xiaopeng Xiong, Walid G. Aref ()SINA: Scalable Incremental Processing of Continuous, Xiaopeng Xiong, Walid G. Aref ()SINA: Scalable Incremental Processing of Continuous Queries

  13. On Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    . Quantitative verification is an automated method to establish quantitative properties of a system model, non- probabilistic verification, which, in addition to exhaustive exploration of a system modelOn Incremental Quantitative Verification for Probabilistic Systems Marta Kwiatkowska, David Parker

  14. Exergy analysis of incremental sheet forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, M. A.

    Research in the last 15 years has led to die-less incremental forming processes that are close to realization in an industrial setup. Whereas many studies have been carried out with the intention of investigating technical ...

  15. INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FOR PASSIVE DIRECT GAIN HEATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    May 27-30, 1981 INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FOR12048 May 1981 INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FORfor increases in the building cooling load resulting from

  16. Adapton: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    Adapton: Composable, Demand-Driven Incremental Computation CS-TR-5027 -- July 12, 2013 Matthew A demands on the program output; that is, if a program input changes, all depen- dencies will be recomputed. To address these problems, we present cdd ic , a core calculus that applies a demand-driven seman- tics

  17. INCREMENTAL LEARNING OF ULTRASONIC WELD INSPECTION SIGNALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    the classification performance of the algorithm on ultrasonic signals obtained from nuclear submarine hulls], in tubings and pipings of nuclear power plants [2,3], in artificial heart valves, etc. Currently used ASC applications warrant incremental learning algorithms. For example, in nuclear power plants, data are collected

  18. The Mechanics of Incremental Sheet Forming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    The Mechanics of Incremental Sheet Forming Kathryn Jackson Pembroke College February 2008, the deformation mechanics is not fully understood. This thesis presents new insights into the mechanics of ISF forces measured in ISF. The mechanics of ISF of sheet metals is researched. Through-thickness deformation

  19. Incremental Power Grid Verification ECE Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Incremental Power Grid Verification Abhishek ECE Department University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada f.najm@utoronto.ca ABSTRACT Verification of the on-die power grid is a key step in the design General Terms Performance, Algorithms, Verification Keywords Power Grid, voltage drop 1. INTRODUCTION

  20. Measurement of charm meson lifetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, L.

    1999-06-01

    We report measurements of the D-0, D-,(+) and D-s(+) meson lifetimes using 3.7 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected near the Y(4S) resonance with the CLEO detector. The measured lifetimes of the D-0, D+, and D-s(+) mesons are 408.5 +/- 4.1(-3.4)(+3.5...

  1. Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Root biomass and biomass increment in a beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) stand in North ­ This study is part of a larger project aimed at quantifying the biomass and biomass increment been developed to estimate the biomass and biomass increment of coarse, small and fine roots of trees

  2. The Lifetime of Grand Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Merrifield; R. J. Rand; S. E. Meidt

    2005-11-02

    The lifetime of the structure in grand design spiral galaxies is observationally ill-determined, but is essentially set by how accurately the pattern's rotation can be characterized by a single angular pattern speed. This paper derives a generalized version of the Tremaine-Weinberg method for observationally determining pattern speeds, in which the pattern speed is allowed to vary arbitrarily with radius. The departures of the derived pattern speed from a constant then provides a simple metric of the lifetime of the spiral structure. Application of this method to CO observations of NGC 1068 reveal that the pattern speed of the spiral structure in this galaxy varies rapidly with radius, and that the lifetime of the spiral structure is correspondingly very short. If this result turns out to be common in grand-design spiral galaxies, then these features will have to be viewed as highly transient phenomena.

  3. Toward a Model for Incremental Grounding in Spoken Dialogue Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    natural conversation between humans and computers. By analyzing the user's utterance while it is still at examples of incremental grounding behavior in spoken conversa- tions between human interlocutors implementation within a working spoken dialogue system. 2 Incremental Grounding Behavior in Human Dialogue

  4. Mining Transliterations from Web Query Results: An Incremental Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We study an adaptive learning framework for phonetic similarity modeling (PSM) that supports strategy for the framework based on Bayesian theory for PSM adaptation. The idea of incremental learning reality. In this way, the learning process refines the PSM incrementally while constructing

  5. Utility maximization in models with conditionally independent increments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallsen, Jan

    Utility maximization in models with conditionally independent increments Jan Kallsen Johannes Muhle-Karbe Abstract We consider the problem of maximizing expected utility from terminal wealth in models for power utility under the assumption that the increments of the asset price are independent conditionally

  6. Incremental Clicks Impact Of Mobile Search Advertising Shaun Lysen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Incremental Clicks Impact Of Mobile Search Advertising Shaun Lysen Google Inc. Abstract In this research, we examine how the number of mobile organic clicks changes when advertisers significantly change to mobile search advertising. A metastudy of 327 advertisers re- veals that 88% of ad clicks are incremental

  7. INCREMENTAL COOLING LOAD DETERMINATION FOR PASSIVE DIRECT GAIN HEATING SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    an increment of 1 ft to a passive building in each of the 25Passive and Hybrid Division, of the Office of Solar Applica- tions for Buildings,building thermal dynamics including features of particular interest, such as passive

  8. Is emotional intelligence worthwhile?: Assessing incremental validity and adverse impact 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Dana Lanay

    2009-05-15

    several contributions: (a) a summary of theoretical links between EI and job performance, (b) meta-analytic incremental validity estimation for two different conceptualizations of emotional intelligence – labeled ability EI and mixed EI – over and above...

  9. Determination of age in forensic dentistry from cemental incremental lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Eliane Marques Duarte de

    1987-01-01

    ) John E. Martin (Member) H. Del Var Petersen (Member) Gerald R. Bratton (Head of Department) December lg87 ABSTNACT Determination of Age in Forensic Dentistry from Cemental Incremental Lines. (December 1987) Eliane Marques Duarte de Sousa, D. D...DETERMINATION OF AGE IN FORENSIC DENTISTRY FROM CEMENTAL INCREMENTAL LINES Thes' s by ELIANE MARJUES DLARTE DF SOUSA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A?M Univer ity ' n r. srt' al f"lf' llment of the requirements for the degree...

  10. Solutions 1 Part B Statistical Lifetime-Models Oxford HT 2015 I B.1 Lifetime distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkel, Matthias

    withdrawal from service; lifetime of a lightbulb before burn-out; time a new employee spends at a firm before

  11. Drogue and Transmitter Lifetime Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors still "max out" and the GDP is waiting on strain gauge drifters to be deployed for evaluation. #12Drogue and Transmitter Lifetime Evaluation Presented by: Erik Valdes Drifter Data Assembly Center lifetime Evaluation All manufacturers except Pacific Gyre have changed to tether strain by early 2010

  12. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide David Archer,1 Michael Eby,2 Victor Brovkin,3 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial

  13. Incremental Machine Descriptions for GCC Sameera Deshpande Uday P. Khedker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khedker, Uday

    Incremental Machine Descriptions for GCC Sameera Deshpande Uday P. Khedker Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay {sameera,uday}@cse.iitb.ac.in Abstract The mechanism of providing machine descriptions a GCC port exists. However, this mechanism is quite ad hoc and the machine descriptions are dif- ficult

  14. Incremental Testing of ObjectOriented Class Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGregor, John D.

    Incremental Testing of Object­Oriented Class Structures Mary Jean Harrold and John D. Mc­designed, thoroughly­tested classes that can be confidently reused for many applications, few class testing techniques have been devel­ oped. In this paper, we present a class testing technique that exploits

  15. Incremental Testing of Object-Oriented Class Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGregor, John D.

    Incremental Testing of Object-Oriented Class Structures Mary Jean Harrold and John D. Mc-designed, thoroughly-tested classes that can be confidently reused for many applications, few class testing techniques have been devel- oped. In this paper, we present a class testing technique that exploits

  16. Incremental Biomedical Ontology Change Management through Learning Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haarslev, Volker

    Incremental Biomedical Ontology Change Management through Learning Agents Arash Shaban change management methodologies is the over-reliance on human factors. Despite the advantages of human ontologies. This frame- work aims to assist and guide ontology engineers through the change manage- ment

  17. Negative Correlation in Incremental Learning L. Minku, H. Inoue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    network of the ensemble to learn new data is taken and the test error is high. When all the neural developed until now, the training procedure needs all training data simultaneously to perform learning classes that may be introduced with new data. There are several algorithms proposed to perform incremental

  18. Adaptive Probabilistic Visual Tracking with Incremental Subspace Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    Adaptive Probabilistic Visual Tracking with Incremental Subspace Update David Ross1 , Jongwoo Lim2 of the objects being tracked are invariant to internal appearance change or external variation such as lighting at the outset. In this paper, we present an adaptive probabilistic tracking algorithm that updates the models

  19. Aprendizaje Incremental en Sistemas Multi-Agente BDI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra Hernández, Alejandro

    Aprendizaje Incremental en Sistemas Multi-Agente BDI Gustavo Ortiz Hern´andez Director de Tesis: Alejandro Guerra Hern´andez Tesis presentada para obtener el grado de Maestro en Inteligencia Artificial innumerable material de apoyo brindado, sin el cual no hubiera sido posible esta tesis. A la Dra. Cora Beatriz

  20. INTERFACE CONTROL AND INCREMENTAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE PIC ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Alexander L.

    INTERFACE CONTROL AND INCREMENTAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE PIC ENVIRONMENT Alexander L. Wolf, Lori A University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01663 ABSTRACT The PIC environment is designed to provide component of the PIC environment and demonstrates how it contributes to precise interface control

  1. Incremental Partitioning-Based Vectorless Power Grid Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Incremental Partitioning-Based Vectorless Power Grid Verification Dionysios Kouroussis Department performance of a chip, design verification of the power grid is of critical importance. This paper builds the efficient verification of local power grid sections or blocks, enabling incremen- tal design analysis

  2. An Incremental and Nonbinary CSP Solver: The Hyperpolyhedron Search Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Francesca

    An Incremental and Non­binary CSP Solver: The Hyperpolyhedron Search Algorithm Miguel A. Salido and scheduling can be expressed in a natural way as a Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP). It is well known that a non­binary CSP can be transformed into an equivalent binary CSP using some of the actual techniques

  3. Incremental Web Search: Tracking Changes in the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    Incremental Web Search: Tracking Changes in the Web by Ziyang Wang A dissertation submitted amount of new information is posted on the Web every day. Large-scale web search engines often update our solutions of searching new information from the web by tracking the changes of web documents

  4. Incremental Web Search: Tracking Changes in the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohri, Mehryar

    Incremental Web Search: Tracking Changes in the Web by Ziyang Wang A dissertation submitted #12; Abstract A large amount of new information is posted on the Web every day. Large­scale web search. In this thesis, we present our solutions of searching new information from the web by tracking the changes of web

  5. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  6. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen

    2010-05-28

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  7. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of Electrocatalyst Degradation...

  8. Kidney cancer is one of the most common cancers occurring in 1-2% of individuals in their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    Kidney cancer is one of the most common cancers occurring in 1-2% of individuals in their lifetime. The current incidence in the United States is approximately 60,000-cases/ year. While many cancers were believed to occur sporadically, it's now understood approximately 5-8% of kidney cancers have a genetic

  9. Electrical-assisted double side incremental forming and processes thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, John; Cao, Jian

    2014-06-03

    A process for forming a sheet metal component using an electric current passing through the component is provided. The process can include providing a double side incremental forming machine, the machine operable to perform a plurality of double side incremental deformations on the sheet metal component and also apply an electric direct current to the sheet metal component during at least part of the forming. The direct current can be applied before or after the forming has started and/or be terminated before or after the forming has stopped. The direct current can be applied to any portion of the sheet metal. The electrical assistance can reduce the magnitude of force required to produce a given amount of deformation, increase the amount of deformation exhibited before failure and/or reduce any springback typically exhibited by the sheet metal component.

  10. Touschek Lifetime Calculations for NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash,B.; Kramer, S.

    2009-05-04

    The Touschek effect limits the lifetime for NSLS-II. The basic mechanism is Coulomb scattering resulting in a longitudinal momentum outside the momentum aperture. The momentum aperture results from a combination of the initial betatron oscillations after the scatter and the non-linear properties determining the resultant stability. We find that higher order multipole errors may reduce the momentum aperture, particularly for scattered particles with energy loss. The resultant drop in Touschek lifetime is minimized, however, due to less scattering in the dispersive regions. We describe these mechanisms, and present calculations for NSLS-II using a realistic lattice model including damping wigglers and engineering tolerances.

  11. Measurement of the Omega0(c) lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iori, M.; Ayan, A.S.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Balatz, M.Y.; Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, L.J.; /Ball State U. /Bogazici U. /Carnegie Mellon U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Fermilab /Serpukhov, IHEP /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Moscow, ITEP /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. /Moscow State U. /St. Petersburg, INP

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a precise measurement of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime. The data were taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment using 600 GeV/c {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The measurement has been made using 83 {+-} 19 reconstructed {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in the {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decay modes. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is measured to be 65 {+-} 13(stat) {+-} 9(sys) fs.

  12. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  13. Lifetime Ruin Minimization: Should Retirees Hedge Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Huaxiong

    - conomic inflation rate for the population. For example in the U.S. the Consumer Price Index (CPI) has happy, in the appendix we also solve the model by maximizing utility of lifetime consumption. Either way industry is shifting its attention from wealth accumulation to generating a sustainable retirement income

  14. APPLICATIONS RIE-induced carrier lifetime degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental impact [11,12]. However, RIE generates defects in the near-surface region of the semiconductor [13 in the fabrication of some types of solar cells to achieve a highly directional etch. However, cells fabricated using. Characterisation of the carrier lifetime in solar cells was conducted using the quasi steady state photoconductance

  15. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  16. Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Photovoltaic Lifetime & Degradation Science Statistical Pathway Development: Acrylic Degradation, USA ABSTRACT In order to optimize and extend the life of photovoltaics (PV) modules, scientific photovoltaics. The statisti- cally significant relationships were investigated using lifetime and degradation

  17. Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Degradation Pathway Models for Photovoltaics Module Lifetime Performance Nicholas R. Wheeler, Laura data from Underwriter Labs, featuring measurements taken on 18 identical photovoltaic (PV) modules in modules and their effects on module performance over lifetime. Index Terms--photovoltaics, statistical

  18. Battery Lifetime-Aware Automotive Climate Control for Electric Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    Battery Lifetime-Aware Automotive Climate Control for Electric Vehicles Korosh Vatanparvar) optimization involves stringent con- straints on driving range and battery lifetime. Sophisticated embedded systems and huge number of computing resources have enabled re- searchers to implement advanced Battery

  19. Neutrinos and cosmology: a lifetime relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  20. Capturing Value in a Global Innovation Network: A Comparison of Radical and Incremental Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L; Linden, Greg

    2007-01-01

    innovation Radical product innovation (Utterback, 1990) hasredefine a product category Incremental innovation - EarlyRadical innovation Opportunity - New product category - New

  1. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; McKee, S; Rugina, R

    2009-02-18

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, significantly reduces checkpoint sizes and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  2. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; Rugina, R; McKee, S A

    2008-01-21

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, reduces checkpoint sizes by as much as 80% and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  3. Lifetime Analysis at High Intensity Colliders Applied to the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvachua, B; Bruce, R; Burkart, F; Redaelli, S; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The beam lifetime is one of the main parameters to define the performance of a collider. In a super-conducting machine like the LHC, the lifetime determines the intensity reach for a given collimation cleaning. The beam lifetime can be calculated from the direct measurement of beam current. However, due to the noise in the beam current signal only an average lifetime over several seconds can be calculated. We propose here an alternative method, which uses the signal of the beam loss monitors in the vicinity of the primary collimators to get the instantaneous beam lifetime at the collimators. In this paper we compare the lifetime from the two methods and investigate the minimum lifetime over the LHC cycle for all the physics fills in 2011 and 2012. These data provide a reference for estimates of performance reach from collimator cleaning.

  4. Incremental Program Testing Using Program Dependence Graphs SAMUEL BATES SUSAN HORWITZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horwitz, Susan B.

    data adequacy is a widely accepted concept for pro­ viding some confidence that a particular test suiteIncremental Program Testing Using Program Dependence Graphs SAMUEL BATES SUSAN HORWITZ samuel as the basis for incremental program testing when using test data adequacy criteria. Test data adequacy

  5. Incremental Integration Tools for Chemical Engineering: An Industrial Application of Triple Graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westfechtel, Bernhard

    Incremental Integration Tools for Chemical Engineering: An Industrial Application of Triple Graph problems in a specific domain, namely design processes in chemical engineering. Here, different design and tools for chemical engineering design. In IMPROVE, we realized a framework for building incremental

  6. The Incremental Reach and Cost Efficiency of Online Video Ads over TV Ads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    The Incremental Reach and Cost Efficiency of Online Video Ads over TV Ads Yuxue Jin, Sheethal number of brand marketers are including video ads in their advertising campaigns. These advertisers would like to know the incremental reach and cost efficiency of their video and display ads compared

  7. Impact Of Ranking Of Organic Search Results On The Incrementality Of Search Ads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Impact Of Ranking Of Organic Search Results On The Incrementality Of Search Ads David X. Chan Results On The Incrementality Of Search Ads Abstract 1 Introduction 2 Methodology 3 MetaAnalysis Results 4 that on average 89% of the visits to the advertiser's site from search ad

  8. An Incremental Parallel Particle Swarm Approach for Classification Rule Discovery from Dynamic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, WonSook

    , we propose a novel incremental parallel Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) approach for classification to extract the rules from data chunks, we introduce an incremental PSO algorithm in which the previously knowledge. To support the parallelism, we assign a PSO thread for each data chunk. As soon as all the PSO

  9. Transparent Incremental State Saving in Time Warp Parallel Discrete Event Robert Rnngren, Michael Liljenstam Johan Montagnat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transparent Incremental State Saving in Time Warp Parallel Discrete Event Simulation Robert is the state saving mechanism. It should not only allow efficient state saving, but also support efficient is transparent to the user. In this paper we present a method to implement a transparent incremental state saving

  10. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  11. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N. (Stanford, CA); Harb, Charles C. (Palo Alto, CA); Paldus, Barbara A. (Mountain View, CA); Spence, Thomas G. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  12. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N. (Stanford, CA); Harb, Charles C. (Palo Alto, CA); Paldus, Barbara A. (Mountain View, CA); Spence, Thomas G. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  13. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION...

  14. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation Neubauer, J. 25 ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY; LITHIUM-ION; STATIONARY ENERGY STORAGE; BLAST; BATTERY DEGRADATION;...

  15. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 59, NO. 4, APRIL 2011 1465 Analysis of Spatial and Incremental LMS Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayed, Ali

    and Incremental LMS Processing for Distributed Estimation Federico S. Cattivelli, Student Member, IEEE, and Ali H- plementations are distributed and network-based; they are spatial LMS and incremental LMS. In both algorithms study deal with centralized implementations of spatial and incremental LMS. In these latter cases, all

  16. An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the Steady State Forces in Single Incremental Sheet Forming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Mahesh

    2012-10-19

    Incremental sheet forming process is a relatively new method of forming which is increasingly being used in the industry. Complex shapes can be manufactured using this method and the forming operation doesn't require any ...

  17. A phased approach to distribution network optimization given incremental supply chain change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riechel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the question of how to optimize a distribution network when the supply chain has undergone an incremental change. A case study is presented for Company A, a major global biotechnology company that ...

  18. Street as structure : an approach to the incremental development of Fort Point Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Darleen D

    1980-01-01

    This work seeks to create an approach to the incremental development of a warehouse district in the City of Boston. The focus of the thesis is on the generation of rules and an implementation process that will organize the ...

  19. A Few Days of A Robot's Life in the Human's World: Toward Incremental Individual Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aryananda, Lijin

    2007-04-03

    This thesis presents an integrated framework and implementation for Mertz, an expressive robotic creature for exploring the task of face recognition through natural interaction in an incremental and unsupervised fashion. ...

  20. A few days of a robot's life in the human's world : toward incremental individual recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aryananda, Lijin, 1975-

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents an integrated framework and implementation for Mertz, an expressive robotic creature for exploring the task of face recognition through natural interaction in an incremental and unsupervised fashion. ...

  1. Local Search for Incremental Satis ability Jos'e Gutierrez and Amol Dattatraya Mali,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mali, Amol D.

    Local Search for Incremental Satis#12;ability Jos'e Gutierrez and Amol Dattatraya Mali, Dept: 1-414-229-2769 jose@uwm.edu, mali@miller.cs.uwm.edu Content Areas: Propositional Satis#12;ability

  2. Lifetime Prediction for Supercapacitor-powered Wireless Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    with a prediction of future incoming energy, e.g., obtained from a solar cell. II. RELATED WORK Several approachesLifetime Prediction for Supercapacitor-powered Wireless Sensor Nodes Christian Renner, J research direction for wireless sensor networks. It depends on accurate models for lifetime prediction

  3. Exploiting Sensor Spatial Redundancy to Improve Network Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    issues. Indeed, recharging or replacing the nodes' battery may be inconvenient, or even impossible- erage. While monitoring the area of interest, sensors gather information (i.e., images), and send battery lifetime should be maximized to maximize network lifetime, a fairly intuitive approach

  4. Lifetime Benefits through Load Balancing in Homogeneous Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haenggi, Martin

    , battery depletion is emulated so that it becomes possible to actually measure the load balancingLifetime Benefits through Load Balancing in Homogeneous Sensor Networks Daniele Puccinelli network. The use of load balancing schemes can be expected to provide significant lifetime benefits

  5. Astroparticle physics, 2013 Problem 3: Lifetime of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Martin Karl Wilhelm

    "the mean lifetime of electrons as function of their energy. The typical matter density in interstellar space is 1 hydrogen atom per cubic centimeter. b) Consider the energy dependence of the lifetime the energy-loss rate of relativistic electrons for bremsstrahlung a) Energy losses imply that high-energy

  6. Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Serebrov; V. E. Varlamov; A. G. Kharitonov; A. K. Fomin; Yu. N. Pokotilovski; P. Geltenbort; I. A. Krasnoschekova; M. S. Lasakov; R. R. Taldaev; A. V. Vassiljev; O. M. Zherebtsov

    2009-02-02

    Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before:the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron beta decay. The neutron lifetime obtained,878.5+/-0.7stat+/-0.3sys s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

  7. Lifetime of topological quantum memories in thermal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbas Al-Shimary; James R. Wootton; Jiannis K. Pachos

    2012-09-13

    Here we investigate the effect lattice geometry has on the lifetime of two-dimensional topological quantum memories. Initially, we introduce various lattice patterns and show how the error-tolerance against bit-flips and phase-flips depends on the structure of the underlying lattice. Subsequently, we investigate the dependence of the lifetime of the quantum memory on the structure of the underlying lattice when it is subject to a finite temperature. Importantly, we provide a simple effective formula for the lifetime of the memory in terms of the average degree of the lattice. Finally, we propose optimal geometries for the Josephson junction implementation of topological quantum memories.

  8. Lifetime of the phonons in the PLT ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barba-Ortega, J. Joya, M. R.; Londoño, F. A.

    2014-11-05

    The lifetimes at higher temperatures on lanthanum-modified lead titanate (PLT) are mainly due to the anharmonic decay of optical phonons into low-energy phonons. The temperature-independent contributions from inherent crystal defects and from boundary scattering become comparable to the phonon scattering contribution at lower temperatures. The thermal interaction is large at higher temperatures which decreases the phonon mean free path, and so the decay lifetime decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. This leads to the increased line width at higher temperatures. We made an estimate of the lifetimes for different concentrations and temperatures in PLT.

  9. The Lifetime of a beautiful and charming meson: B_c lifetime measured using the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; /Indiana U.

    2008-09-01

    Using approximately 1.3 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 detector between 2002 and 2006, the lifetime of the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} meson is studied in the B{sub c}{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{mu}{sup {+-}} + X final state. Using an unbinned likelihood simultaneous fit to J/{psi} + {mu} invariant mass and lifetime distributions, a signal of 810 {+-} 80(stat.) candidates is estimated and a lifetime measurement made of: {tau}(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}) = 0.448{sub -0.036}{sup +0.038}(stat) {+-} 0.032(sys) ps.

  10. Measurement of the lifetimes of B meson mass eigenstates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anikeev, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of the average lifetime measurements in ..., ..., and ... decays, as well as the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of ... and ... decays. The time-dependent angular ...

  11. A New World Average Value for the Neutron Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin

    2010-05-27

    The analysis of the data on measurements of the neutron lifetime is presented. A new most accurate result of the measurement of neutron lifetime [Phys. Lett. B 605 (2005) 72] 878.5 +/- 0.8 s differs from the world average value [Phys. Lett. B 667 (2008) 1] 885.7 +/- 0.8 s by 6.5 standard deviations. In this connection the analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of experiments [Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15] and [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 (1989) 593] is carried out. Systematic errors of about -6 s are found in each of the experiments. The summary table for the neutron lifetime measurements after corrections and additions is given. A new world average value for the neutron lifetime 879.9 +/- 0.9 s is presented.

  12. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    gas emissions over the full fuel cycle and vehicle lifetime.are estimated over the full fuel cycle and entire vehicleoperation and maintenance, full fuel-cycle air-pollutant and

  13. Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Needleman, Daniel

    CHAPTER 29 Quantitative Characterization of Filament Dynamics by Single-Molecule Lifetime University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 Abstract I. Introduction to Cytoskeletal Filament Dynamics II III. Theoretical Foundations A. Equivalence to the First-Passage Time Problem B. Models of Filament

  14. Excess carrier lifetimes in Ge layers on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, R., E-mail: richard.geiger@psi.ch, E-mail: hans.sigg@psi.ch; Sigg, H., E-mail: richard.geiger@psi.ch, E-mail: hans.sigg@psi.ch [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Frigerio, J.; Chrastina, D.; Isella, G. [L-NESS, Dipartimento di Fisica del Politecnico di Milano, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Süess, M. J. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials Science, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Scientific Center for Optical and Electron Microscopy (SCOPEM), ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Spolenak, R. [Laboratory for Nanometallurgy, Department of Materials Science, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Faist, J. [Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-10

    The excess charge carrier lifetimes in Ge layers grown on Si or germanium-on-insulator are measured by synchrotron based pump-probe transmission spectroscopy. We observe that the lifetimes do not strongly depend on growth parameters and annealing procedure, but on the doping profile. The defect layer at the Ge/Si interface is found to be the main non-radiative recombination channel. Therefore, the longest lifetimes in Ge/Si (2.6?ns) are achieved in sufficiently thick Ge layers with a built-in field, which repels electrons from the Ge/Si interface. Longer lifetimes (5.3?ns) are obtained in overgrown germanium-on-insulator due to the absence of the defective interface.

  15. Kenneth J. Turner. Incremental Requirements Specification with LOTOS. Requirements Engineering Journal, 2:132-151, Springer-Verlag, London, UK,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Ken

    Kenneth J. Turner. Incremental Requirements Specification with LOTOS. Requirements Engineering with LOTOS Kenneth J. Turner Department of Computing Science and Mathematics University of Stirling, Stirling

  16. Policy Flash 2015-02- INCREMENTALLY FUNDING FIXED-PRICE ACTIONS Revised

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Flash is to inform you of a revision to Acquisition Letter AL2015-01, titled Incrementally Funding Fixed-Price Actions. The revision appears in the “What Guidance is included in this AL?” section under its “Approval” subsection. The revised language appears in italics. The revision grants authority to a Head of Contracting Activity to approve incremental funding of fixed-price actions for actions within his/her approval authority. The resulting Acquisition Letter is Acquisition Letter AL2015-01R. It replaces Acquisition Letter AL2015-01

  17. Incremental stress and microstructural response of granular soils under undrained axisymmetric deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Incremental stress and microstructural response of granular soils under undrained axisymmetric deformation N. Kumar, S. Luding & V. Magnanimo MultiScale Mechanics, CTW, MESA+ University of Twente, Enschede different deformation paths (history) affect the actual mechanical state of the system. Here, we study

  18. AN OPEN-CIRCUIT-VOLTAGE MODEL OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES FOR EFFECTIVE INCREMENTAL CAPACITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    AN OPEN-CIRCUIT-VOLTAGE MODEL OF LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES FOR EFFECTIVE INCREMENTAL CAPACITY ANALYSIS electrochemical properties and aging status. INTRODUCTION With the widespread use of lithium-ion batteries the com- plex battery physical behavior during the lithium-ion intercalac- tion/deintercalation process

  19. An Incremental Refining Spatial Join Algorithm for Estimating Query Results in GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leutenegger, Scott T.

    An Incremental Refining Spatial Join Algorithm for Estimating Query Results in GIS Wan D. Bae systems (GIS) must support large georeferenced data sets. Due to the size of these data sets finding ex this is the first work using this approach in GIS. We investigate different sampling method- ologies and evaluate

  20. Using Banyan Networks for Load-Balanced Switches with Incremental Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Shang

    Using Banyan Networks for Load-Balanced Switches with Incremental Update Ching-Min Lien, Cheng@ee.nthu.edu.tw; jcheng@ee.nthu.edu.tw; lds@cs.nthu.edu.tw; jtliao@gibbs.ee.nthu.edu.tw Abstract--Load-balanced switches have received a lot of atten- tion lately as they are much more scalable than other existing switch

  1. Incremental Utility Elicitation with the Minimax Regret Decision Criterion Tianhan Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutilier, Craig

    Incremental Utility Elicitation with the Minimax Regret Decision Criterion Tianhan Wang Department@cs.toronto.edu Abstract Utility elicitation is a critical function of any au- tomated decision aid, allowing decisions to be tai- lored to the preferences of a specific user. How- ever, the size and complexity of utility

  2. Incremental Clicks Impact Of Search Advertising David X. Chan, Yuan Yuan, Jim Koehler, Deepak Kumar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Incremental Clicks Impact Of Search Advertising David X. Chan, Yuan Yuan, Jim Koehler, Deepak Kumar the fraction of total clicks that can be attributed to search advertising. A meta-analysis of several hundred to the advertiser's site would not have occurred without the ad campaigns. 1 Introduction In recent years

  3. Negative correlation in incremental learning Fernanda Li Minku Hirotaka Inoue Xin Yao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    network of the ensemble to learn new data is taken and the test error is high. When all the neural all training data simultaneously to perform learning and no posterior learning is possible networks that compose an ensemble is a desirable feature to perform incremental learning, for some

  4. Residual Stress In Sheet Metal Parts Made By Incremental Forming Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Hideo; Motomura, Kazuo

    2007-05-17

    Incremental sheet metal forming, which uses a CNC forming stylus, is new flexible forming process not requiring the use of any expensive dies. We have applied the incremental forming process to dental prosthesis. This new process, however, posed difficult problems. After removing the outer portion of the incremental formed sheet metal part, the inner part is distorted. In this paper, the residual stress in the sheet metal part obtained by incremental forward stretch forming operations has been examined. Numerical simulations were conducted for solid elements. When small rigid ball slides on the metal sheet with a certain vertical feed, tension residual stress is produced in the upper layer of the sheet and compression stress in the lower. Then, the resultant moments throughout the sheet cause negative spring-back when the outer portion is removed. A systematic study of the behavior was conducted in this paper. Parameters considered included the tool radius and the vertical tool feed rate. The tip radius of forming stylus has a significant influence on the residual stress. The smaller radius of forming stylus, the larger bending force becomes. And new process with double forming styluses is examined to reduce the bending force.

  5. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort Polk, Louisiana. Final executive summary, increment `f`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-06-01

    Executive Order 12003, dated 19 July 1977, initiated the U.S. Army`s energy conservation effort. Specifically, the Executive Order led to the development of the Army Facilities Energy Plan which directs Army Staff and Major Army Commands to develop detailed implementation plans for energy conservation. As a result of these directives, the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted for an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The EEAP included Increments `A`, `B`, `E`, and `G`. To accomplish the intent of Increment `P`, namely, providing low cost/no cost energy savings recommendations in the form of specific, practical instructions for use by the Facility Engineer, the following general steps were taken: (1) Consider treasures identified in Detailed Scope of Work. (2) identify other potential Low Cost/No Cost energy Conservation Measures (ECM) through discussions with Fort Polk personnel and field surveys by Graham Associates engineers. (3) Review Increments `A`, `B`, and `G` for ECM`s within the Facility Engineer`s funding authority; $200,000 for alteration projects and $1,000,000 for maintenance and repair type work. (4) Evaluate ECM`s using relevant data for other Increments of the ESAP, and develop new data where appropriate.

  6. The Incremental Evolution of Gaits for Hexapod Robots Gary B. Parker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    The Incremental Evolution of Gaits for Hexapod Robots Gary B. Parker Computer Science Connecticut College New London, CT 06320 parker@conncoll.edu Abstract Gait control programs for hexapod robots. In this paper, we describe an application of this method to learn gaits for an actual hexapod robot. A cyclic

  7. Toward a State Landscape Policy: Incremental Planning and Management in Vermont1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toward a State Landscape Policy: Incremental Planning and Management in Vermont1 Mark B. Lapping 2, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405. Abstract: The issue of landscape management and enhancement has been of deep concern to Vermonters for many decades. This concern, which has been institutionalized

  8. LABORATORY TESTING OF STRESS-INDUCED BRITTLE FRACTURE DAMAGE THROUGH INCREMENTAL LOADING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    LABORATORY TESTING OF STRESS-INDUCED BRITTLE FRACTURE DAMAGE THROUGH INCREMENTAL LOADING Erik-induced brittle fracture damage as a function of the applied load. Strain gauge and acoustic emission measurements of brittle fracture development and to quantify the corresponding permanent strain damage. This paper reports

  9. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime: Applications in Design and Health Management (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.; Jun, M.; Pesaran, A.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation discusses models for battery reliability and lifetime and the Battery Ownership Model.

  10. Ultralong minority-carrier lifetime epitaxial GaAs by photon recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.; Dunlavy, D.J.; Keyes, B. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado 80401 (US)); Vernon, S.M.; Dixon, T.M.; Tobin, S.P. (Spire Corporation, Bedford, Massachusetts 01730); Miller, K.L.; Hayes, R.E. (Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80303)

    1989-09-11

    The minority-carrier lifetime has been measured by time-resolved photoluminescence in epitaxial films of GaAs grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The measured lifetimes in thicker devices are 4 to 6 times the theoretical or radiative lifetime. These long lifetimes are the result of photon recycling or self-generation of the self-absorbed radiation.

  11. TOUSCHEK LIFETIME CALCULATIONS AND SIMULATIONS FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.; BENGTSSON, J.; NASH, B.

    2007-06-25

    The beam lifetime in most medium energy synchrotron radiation sources is limited by the Touschek effect, which describes the momentum transfer from the transverse into the longitudinal direction due to binary collisions between electrons. While an analytical formula exists to calculate the resulting lifetime, the actual momentum acceptance necessary to perform this calculation can only be determined by tracking. This is especially the case in the presence of small vertical apertures at insertion devices. In this case, nonlinear betatron coupling leads to beam losses at these vertical aperture restrictions. In addition, a realistic model of the storage ring is necessary for calculation of equilibrium beam sizes (particularly in the vertical direction) which are important for a self-consistent lifetime calculation.

  12. Radiative lifetimes of metastable states of negative ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, Pontus; Fritioff, Karin; Sandstroem, Joakim; Collins, Gerard; Hanstorp, Dag; Ellmann, Anna; Schef, Peter; Lundin, Peter; Mannervik, Sven; Royen, Peder; Froese Fischer, K. Charlotte; Oesterdahl, Fabian; Rostohar, Danijela; Pegg, David J.; Gibson, N. D.; Danared, Haakan; Kaellberg, Anders

    2006-03-15

    We present a technique for measuring the radiative lifetimes of metastable states of negative ions that involves the use of a heavy-ion storage ring. The method has been applied to investigate the radiative decay of the np{sup 3} {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} levels of Te{sup -}(n=5) and Se{sup -}(n=4) and the 3p{sup 3} {sup 2}D state of Si{sup -} for which the J=3/2 and 5/2 levels were unresolved. All of these states are metastable and decay primarily by emission of E2 and M1 radiation. Multi Configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of rates for the transitions in Te{sup -} and Se{sup -} yielded lifetimes of 0.45 s and 4.7 s, respectively. The measured values agree well with these predicted values. In the case of the {sup 2}D state of Si{sup -}, however, our measurement was only able to set a lower limit on the lifetime. The upper limit of the lifetime that can be measured with our apparatus is set by how long the ions can be stored in the ring, a limit determined by the rate of collisional detachment. Our lower limit of 1 min for the lifetime of the {sup 2}D state is consistent with both the calculated lifetimes of 162 s for the {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} level and 27.3 h for the {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} level reported by O'Malley and Beck and 14.5 h and 12.5 h, respectively, from our Breit-Pauli calculations.

  13. Effect of Superalloy Substrate and Bond Coating on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Several different single-crystal superalloys were coated with different bond coatings to study the effect of composition on the cyclic oxidation lifetime of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coating deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition from a commercial source. Three different superalloys were coated with a 7 {micro}m Pt layer that was diffused into the surface prior to YSZ deposition. One of the superalloys, N5, was coated with a low activity, Pt-modified aluminide coating and Pt-diffusion coatings with 3 and 7 {micro}m of Pt. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure in 1 h cycles at 1150 C to assess average coating lifetime. The 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating on N5 had an average YSZ coating lifetime >50% higher than a Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5. Without a YSZ coating, the Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5 showed the typical surface deformation during cycling, however, the deformation was greatly reduced when constrained by the YSZ coating. The 3 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating had a similar average lifetime as the Pt-modified aluminide coating but a much wider scatter. The Pt diffusion bond coating on superalloy X4 containing Ti exhibited the shortest YSZ coating lifetime, this alloy-coating combination also showed the worst alumina scale adhesion without a YSZ coating. The third generation superalloy N6 exhibited the longest coating lifetime with a 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating.

  14. CA-TSL: Energy Adaptation for Targeted System Lifetime in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    are severely energy-constrained, and energy usage is one of the most common causes of failure. Although much work has focused on policies to reduce and regulate energy usage in fixed and dense networks lifetime in an intermittently connected system by adapting node energy usage to an estimated desired energy

  15. Precision measurement of the Lambda_b baryon lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; S. Amerio; Y. Amhis; L. Anderlini; J. Anderson; R. Andreassen; J. E. Andrews; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; M. Baalouch; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; C. Baesso; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; F. Bedeschi; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; A. Berezhnoy; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; E. Bowen; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; G. Busetto; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; D. Campora Perez; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; H. Carranza-Mejia; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; L. Castillo Garcia; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; R. Cenci; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; P. Chen; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; S. Coquereau; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; D. C. Craik; S. Cunliffe; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; A. Davis; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; W. De Silva; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; L. Del Buono; N. Déléage; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; A. Di Canto; H. Dijkstra; M. Dogaru; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; P. Durante; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; S. Eisenhardt; U. Eitschberger; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; I. El Rifai; Ch. Elsasser; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; D. Ferguson; V. Fernandez Albor; F. Ferreira Rodrigues; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; M. Fiore; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; E. Furfaro; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J. Garofoli; P. Garosi; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; E. Gersabeck; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; L. Giubega; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; P. Gorbounov; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; P. Griffith; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; S. Hall; B. Hamilton; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; S. T. Harnew; J. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; T. Head; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; D. Hill; M. Hoballah; C. Hombach; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; N. Hussain; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; M. Idzik; P. Ilten; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; E. Jans; P. Jaton; A. Jawahery; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; C. Joram; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; W. Kanso; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; I. R. Kenyon; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; O. Kochebina; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; S. Leo; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; B. Leverington; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; S. Lohn; I. Longstaff; J. H. Lopes; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; D. Lucchesi; J. Luisier; H. Luo; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; S. Malde; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; J. Maratas; U. Marconi; P. Marino; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; D. Martins Tostes; A. Massafferri; R. Matev; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; E. Maurice; A. Mazurov; B. Mc Skelly; J. McCarthy; A. McNab; R. McNulty; B. Meadows; F. Meier; M. Meissner; M. Merk; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; A. Mordà; M. J. Morello; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan

    2013-07-31

    The ratio of the \\Lambda b baryon lifetime to that of the B0 meson is measured using 1.0/fb of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The \\Lambda b baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode \\Lambda b -> J/\\psi pK-, while the B0 meson decay used is the well known B0 -> J/\\psi pi+K- mode, where the pi+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K*0(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976 +/- 0.012 +/- 0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B0 meson lifetime, the \\Lambda b lifetime is found to be 1.482 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.012 ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  16. Maximizing Static Network Lifetime of Wireless Broadcast Adhoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    of the important applications of wireless static adhoc net- works includes wireless sensor networks. The technology- cast routing over wireless static adhoc network where host mobility is not involved. We define the lifetime of a network as the dura- tion of time until the first node failure due to battery depletion. We

  17. Online Prediction of Battery Lifetime for Embedded and Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    Online Prediction of Battery Lifetime for Embedded and Mobile Devices Ye Wen, Rich Wolski, and compare it to two similar battery prediction technologies: ACPI and Smart Battery. We employ twenty is a critical resource for battery-powered embedded systems and mobile devices. As such, battery life must

  18. General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    General Network Lifetime and Cost Models for Evaluating Sensor Network Deployment Strategies Zhao Cheng, Mark Perillo, and Wendi B. Heinzelman, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--In multihop wireless sensor to energy imbalance among sensors often appear. Sensors closer to a data sink are usually required

  19. AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under a variety of load sequences. Repeated block loading for the development of refined design tools. Present at two or more load levels as well as a modified standard design tools for estimating lifetimes

  20. The millennial atmospheric lifetime of anthropogenic CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    /ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, rangingThe millennial atmospheric lifetime of anthropogenic CO2 David Archer & Victor Brovkin Received: 19

  1. Environmental Aspects of Thin Film Module Production and Product Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, Keren

    Impact #12;3 Thin-Film PV -The Triangle of SuccessThin-Film PV -The Triangle of Success Low Cost of Thin Film Module Production and Product Lifetime Vasilis Fthenakis PV Environmental Research Center@bnl.gov web: www.pv.bnl.gov www.clca.columbia.edu #12;2 PV Sustainability CriteriaPV Sustainability Criteria

  2. Fission life-time calculation using a complex absorbing potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Scamps; Kouichi Hagino

    2015-12-28

    A comparison between the semi-classical approximation and the full quantum calculation with a complex absorbing potential is made with a model of the fission of 258Fm. The potential barrier is obtained with the constrained Skyrme HF+BCS theory. The life-time obtained by the two calculations agree with each other the difference being only by 25%.

  3. Link Lifetimes and Randomized Neighbor Selection in DHTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Zhongmei

    }@cs.tamu.edu Abstract--Several models of user churn, resilience, and link lifetime have recently appeared of the failed zone in the DHT space. To understand neighbor churn in such networks, this paper proposes a simple peer-to-peer (P2P) networks under user churn has recently attracted significant attention and has

  4. LUMINESCENCE LIFETIME INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTI-DYE ANALYSIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadfan, Adam

    2011-08-08

    . These probes, or dyes, were platinum octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP) and palladium (II)- 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorphenyl)-porphyrin (PdTFPP). When oxygen has been purged from the dyes, the lifetimes of the dyes are approximately 90 ?s for Pt...

  5. Pre-Stressed Viscoelastic Composites: Effective Incremental Moduli and Band-Gap Tuning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, William J. [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-30

    We study viscoelastic wave propagation along pre-stressed nonlinear elastic composite bars. In the pre-stressed state we derive explicit forms for the effective incremental storage and loss moduli with dependence on the pre-stress. We also derive a dispersion relation for the effective wavenumber in the case of arbitrary frequency, hence permitting a study of viscoelastic band-gap tuning via pre-stress.

  6. The inclusion of damage effects in an incremental finite element analysis of composite plates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilpatrick, Mark Christopher

    1984-01-01

    , boron, carbon, graphite) supported in polymeric matrices and later ln light weight metal matrices. (mme- diatelyo the analysis of fiber composites began. Analyses of Fiber composites are approached from the micro- or macro-mechanics view- point... for ihe degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering THE INCLUSION OF DAMAGE EFFECTS IN AN INCREMENTAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE PLATES A Thesis by MARK CHRISTOPHER KILPATRICK Approved as to style...

  7. Lifetime-dependent Battery Usage Optimization for Grid-Connected Residential Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    utility energy prices. Our approach enables us determine the true operational cost and lifetimeLifetime-dependent Battery Usage Optimization for Grid-Connected Residential Systems Jagannathan Venkatesh# , Shengbo Chen* , Peerapol Tinnakornsrisuphap*, Tajana Simunic Rosing# # University of California

  8. Investigations of Game of Life cellular automata rules on Penrose Tilings: lifetime and ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepney, Susan

    Investigations of Game of Life cellular automata rules on Penrose Tilings: lifetime and ash; section 6 reports the statistics of lifetimes, ash densities, and growth of the region of activity. 2

  9. ISOTOPE, ELECTRIC FIELD, AND VIBRATIONAL STATE DEPENDENCE OF SINGLE ROTATIONAL LEVEL LIFETIMES OF S1 FORMALDEHYDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisshaar, James C.

    2012-01-01

    LEVEL LIFETIMES OF s 1 FORMALDEHYDE James C. Weisshaar andLEVEL LIFETIMES OF S SI FORMALDEHYDE James C. Weisshaara anda long history of s formaldehyde life- 1 • 2 Discrepancies

  10. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  11. Lifetime statistics of quantum chaos studied by a multiscale analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Falco, A.; Krauss, T. F. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Fratalocchi, A. [PRIMALIGHT, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-04-30

    In a series of pump and probe experiments, we study the lifetime statistics of a quantum chaotic resonator when the number of open channels is greater than one. Our design embeds a stadium billiard into a two dimensional photonic crystal realized on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. We calculate resonances through a multiscale procedure that combines energy landscape analysis and wavelet transforms. Experimental data is found to follow the universal predictions arising from random matrix theory with an excellent level of agreement.

  12. DISSERTATION IMPACT OF LIFETIME VARIATIONS AND SECONDARY BARRIERS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Te Solar-cell Performance The thin-film CdTe solar cell (generally n-CdS/p-CdTe) is one of the leading, where the best CdTe cells are about 250 mV below the best GaAs cells when an appropriate adjustmentDISSERTATION IMPACT OF LIFETIME VARIATIONS AND SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CdTe SOLAR-CELL PERFORMANCE

  13. Argon metastable dynamics and lifetimes in a direct current microdischarge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovi?, Ilija; Kuschel, Thomas; Schröter, Sandra; Böke, Marc

    2014-09-21

    In this paper we study the properties of a pulsed dc microdischarge with the continuous flow of argon. Argon metastable lifetimes are measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and are compared with calculated values which yield information about excitation and de-excitation processes. By increasing the gas flow-rate about 5 times from 10 to 50 sccm, the Ar{sup m} lifetime increases from 1 to 5 ?s due to the reduction of metastable quenching with gas impurities. Optical emission spectroscopy reveals nitrogen and water molecules as the main gas impurities. The estimated N? density [N?]=0.1% is too low to explain the measured metastable lifetimes. Water impurity was found to be the main de-excitation source of argon metastable atoms due to high quenching coefficients. The water impurity level of [H?O]=0.15% to 1% is sufficient to bring calculated metastable lifetimes in line with experiments. The maximum value of water content in the discharge compared to the argon atoms is estimated to approximately 6%, due to the large surface to volume ratio of the microdischarge. The current pulse releases the water molecules from the electrode surface and they are either re-adsorbed in the time between 0.4 ms for [H?O]=1% and 2.6 ms for [H?O]=0.15% or pumped out of the discharge with the speed equal to the gas flow-rate. Depending on its partial pressure, the water impurity re-adsorption time is of the order of magnitude or less then the argon gas residence time.

  14. He II Proximity Effect and the Lifetime of Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khrykin, I S; McQuinn, M; Worseck, G

    2015-01-01

    The lifetime of quasars is fundamental for understanding the growth of supermassive black holes, and is an important ingredient in models of the reionization of the intergalactic medium. However, despite various attempts to determine quasar lifetimes, current estimates from a variety of methods are uncertain by orders of magnitude. This work combines cosmological hydrodynamical simulations and 1D radiative transfer to investigate the structure and evolution of the He II Ly$\\alpha$ proximity zones around quasars at $z \\simeq 3-4$. We show that the time evolution in the proximity zone can be described by a simple analytical model for the approach of the He II fraction $x_{\\rm HeII}\\left( t \\right)$ to ionization equilibrium, and use this picture to illustrate how the transmission profile depends on the quasar lifetime, quasar UV luminosity, and the ionization state of helium in the ambient IGM (i.e. the average He II fraction, or equivalently the metagalactic He II ionizing background). A significant degeneracy...

  15. Restrictions on the lifetime of sterile neutrinos from primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruchayskiy, Oleg [Physics Department, Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ivashko, Artem, E-mail: oleg.ruchayskiy@epfl.ch, E-mail: ivashko@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    We analyze the influence of sterile neutrinos with the masses in the MeV range on the primordial abundances of Helium-4 and Deuterium. We solve explicitly the Boltzmann equations for all particle species, taking into account neutrino flavour oscillations and demonstrate that the abundances are sensitive mostly to the sterile neutrino lifetime and only weakly to the way the active-sterile mixing is distributed between flavours. The decay of these particles also perturbs the spectra of (decoupled) neutrinos and heats photons, changing the ratio of neutrino to photon energy density, that can be interpreted as extra neutrino species at the recombination epoch. We derive upper bounds on the lifetime of sterile neutrinos based on both astrophysical and cosmological measurements of Helium-4 and Deuterium. We also demonstrate that the recent results of Izotov and Thuan [1], who find 2? higher than predicted by the standard primordial nucleosynthesis value of Helium-4 abundance, are consistent with the presence in the plasma of sterile neutrinos with the lifetime 0.01–2 seconds.

  16. NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT USING UCN STORAGE IN AN `ACCORDION-LIKE' TRAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steyerl, Albert

    NEUTRON LIFETIME EXPERIMENT USING UCN STORAGE IN AN `ACCORDION-LIKE' TRAP BY ASHISH M. DESAI determination of the neutron lifetime has an impact on particle physics and cosmology. We report progress towards a measurement of the neutron lifetime using an accordion-like storage trap. Ultracold neutrons

  17. How to Fit simply Soil Mechanics Behaviour with Incremental Modelling and to Describe Drained Cyclic Behaviours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-07-04

    It has been proposed recently a new incremental modelling to describe the mechanics of soil. It is based on two parameters called the pseudo Young modulus E=1/Co and the pseudo Poisson coefficient n, which both evolve during compression. Evolution of n is known since it shall fit the Rowe's law of dilatancy, but Co has to be evaluated from experiment. In this paper we proposed a way to evaluate the Co variation from other mechanical modelling. The way cyclic behaviour of drained sample can be modelled is also described.

  18. Energy engineering analysis program, Fort Polk, Louisiana. Pre-final executive summary, increment `f`

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1987-11-01

    Executive Order 12003, dated 19 July 1977, initiated the U.S. Army`s energy conservation effort. Specifically, the Executive Order led to the development of the Army Facilities Energy Plan which directs Army Staff and Major Army Commands to develop detailed implementation plans for energy conservation. As a result of these directives, the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted for an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The EEAP included Increments `A`, `B`, `E`, and `O`.

  19. Supervised Machine Learning Algorithms for Early Detection of Oral Epithelial Cancer Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joohyung

    2014-08-06

    fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Jim Ji Co-Chair of Committee, Javier Jo Committee Members, Raffaella Righetti Sebastian Hoyos Head of Department, Chanan Singh August 2014 Major...

  20. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  1. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  2. Phenomenology of Light Gauginos: I. Motivation, Masses, Lifetimes and Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1995-08-14

    I explore an economical variant on supersymmetric standard models which may be indicated on cosmological grounds and is shown to have no SUSY-CP problem. Demanding radiative electroweak symmetry breaking suggests that the Higgs is light; other scalar masses may be ~ 100-200 GeV or less. In this case the gluino and photino, while massless at tree level, have 1-loop masses m(gluino) ~ 100 - 600 MeV and m(photino) ~ 100 - 1000 MeV. New hadrons with mass ~ 1 - 3 GeV are predicted and their lifetimes estimated. Existing experimental limits are discussed.

  3. Cosmological neutrino mass detection: The Best probe of neutrino lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Future cosmological data may be sensitive to the effects of a finite sum of neutrino masses even as small as {approx}0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a cosmological detection of neutrino mass at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on neutrino secret interactions with (quasi-)massless particles as in majoron models. On the other hand, neutrino decay may provide a way-out to explain a discrepancy {approx}< 0.1 eV between cosmic neutrino bounds and Lab data.

  4. Origin of the Anomalous Long Lifetime of 14C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, David Jarvis [ORNL; Nam, Hai Ah [ORNL; Maris, Pieter [Iowa State University; Vary, J. P. [Iowa State University; Navratil, Petr [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ormand, W. Erich [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2011-01-01

    We report the microscopic origins of the anomalously suppressed beta decay of 14C to 14N using the ab initio no-core shell model with the Hamiltonian from the chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon force terms. The three-nucleon force induces unexpectedly large cancellations within the p shell between contributions to beta decay, which reduce the traditionally large contributions from the nucleon-nucleon interactions by an order of magnitude, leading to the long lifetime of 14C.

  5. Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool (BLAST) Documentation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractor ofvarDOEBattery Lifetime Analysis and

  6. Analysis of Senate Bill 961: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2010-01-01

    endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, andagents No Epithelial ovarian cancer, Hodgkins lymphomacancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine sarcoma

  7. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    BREAST CANCER SUPPORT RESOURCES Smilow Cancer Hospital · Early Stage Breast Cancer Support Group · Advanced Stage Cancer Support Group · IMPACT ­ Young Cancer Survivors' Group Contact: Angela Khairallah, LCSW at 203-200-2360 Reach to Recovery ­ American Cancer Society 1-800-227-2345 www.cancer.org Sisters

  8. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearly for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample. 17 figs.

  9. On the Shoulders of Giants: Incremental Influence Maximization in Evolving Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Jingying; Shao, Lisong; Huang, Chenlin; Xiao, Liquan

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the most influential individuals can provide invaluable help in developing and deploying effective viral marketing strategies. Previous studies mainly focus on designing efficient algorithms or heuristics to find top-K influential nodes on a given static social network. While, as a matter of fact, real-world social networks keep evolving over time and a recalculation upon the changed network inevitably leads to a long running time, significantly affecting the efficiency. In this paper, we observe from real-world traces that the evolution of social network follows the preferential attachment rule and the influential nodes are mainly selected from high-degree nodes. Such observations shed light on the design of IncInf, an incremental approach that can efficiently locate the top-K influential individuals in evolving social networks based on previous information instead of calculation from scratch. In particular, IncInf quantitatively analyzes the influence spread changes of nodes by localizing the im...

  10. Predicting Small Group Accretion in Social Networks: A topology based incremental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Ankit; Singhal, Kartik; Kuang, Rui; Srivastava, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Small Group evolution has been of central importance in social sciences and also in the industry for understanding dynamics of team formation. While most of research works studying groups deal at a macro level with evolution of arbitrary size communities, in this paper we restrict ourselves to studying evolution of small group (size $\\leq20$) which is governed by contrasting sociological phenomenon. Given a previous history of group collaboration between a set of actors, we address the problem of predicting likely future group collaborations. Unfortunately, predicting groups requires choosing from $n \\choose r$ possibilities (where $r$ is group size and $n$ is total number of actors), which becomes computationally intractable as group size increases. However, our statistical analysis of a real world dataset has shown that two processes: an external actor joining an existing group (incremental accretion (IA)) or collaborating with a subset of actors of an exiting group (subgroup accretion (SA)), are largely re...

  11. Measurements of aperture and beam lifetime using movable beam scrapers in Indus-2 electron storage ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Karnewar, A. K.; Holikatti, A. C.; Yadav, S.; Puntambekar, T. A.; Singh, G.; Singh, P.

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, the measurements of vertical and horizontal aperture which are available for stable beam motion in Indus-2 at beam energy 2.5 GeV using movable beam scrapers are presented. These beam scrapers are installed in one of the long straight sections in the ring. With the movement of beam scrapers towards the beam centre, the beam lifetime is measured. The beam lifetime data obtained from the movement of vertical and horizontal beam scrapers are analyzed. The contribution of beam loss due to beam-gas scattering (vacuum lifetime) and electron-electron scattering within a beam bunch (Touschek lifetime) is separated from the measured beam lifetime at different positions of the beam scrapers. Vertical and horizontal beam sizes at scrapers location are estimated from the scraper movement towards the beam centre in quantum lifetime limit and their values closely agree with measured value obtained using X-ray diagnostic beamline.

  12. Proton lifetime bounds from chirally symmetric lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; P. Boyle; P. Cooney; L. Del Debbio; R. Kenway; C. M. Maynard; A. Soni; R. Tweedie

    2008-06-05

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs). The calculation is performed at a fixed lattice spacing a^{-1}=1.73(3) GeV using 2+1 flavors of domain wall fermions on lattices of size 16^3\\times32 and 24^3\\times64 with a fifth dimension of length 16. We use the indirect method which relies on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where we need to estimate the low energy constants, \\alpha = -0.0112(25) GeV^3 and \\beta = 0.0120(26) GeV^3. We relate these low energy constants to the proton decay matrix elements using leading order chiral perturbation theory. These can then be combined with experimental bounds on the proton lifetime to bound parameters of individual GUTs.

  13. Measurements of ultracold neutron lifetimes in solid deuterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Morris; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; A. Saunders; S. J. Seestrom; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; M. Utsuro; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

    2001-09-28

    We present the first measurements of the survival time of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in solid deuterium SD2. This critical parameter provides a fundamental limitation to the effectiveness of superthermal UCN sources that utilize solid ortho-deuterium as the source material. Superthermal UCN sources offer orders of magnitude improvement in the available densities of UCNs, and are of great importance to fundamental particle-physics experiments such as searches for a static electric dipole moment and lifetime measurements of the free neutron. These measurements are performed utilizing a SD2 source coupled to a spallation source of neutrons, providing a demonstration of UCN production in this geometry and permitting systematic studies of the influence of thermal up-scatter and contamination with para-deuterium on the UCN survival time.

  14. Lifetime measurements of nuclei in few-electron ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faestermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this review lifetime measurements of ions with at most two electrons are summarized. Such highly ionized systems have been studied - until now - only in the Experimental Storage Ring of the GSI in Darmstadt. Emphasis is put on decays via the weak interaction. The first observations of beta-decay into bound atomic states are described as well as its time mirrored counterpart, the electron-capture decay. In the latter case the decays of hydrogen- and helium-like ions are compared with a surprising result. Further on, the observation of sinusoidal modulations of the decay rate in two-body decays is summarized. As a possible cause an interference due to the emission of neutrinos with different rest mass is discussed.

  15. Atomistic Fracture and Nano-Macro Transition for Strength and Lifetime Statistics of Quasibrittle Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    and lifetime distributions of quasibrittle structures. The theory is derived from the fracture mechanics materials, which include concrete, fiber composites, rocks, stiff cohesive soils, tough ceramics, rigid

  16. On-board state of health monitoring of lithium-ion batteries using incremental capacity analysis with support vector regressionq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    On-board state of health monitoring of lithium-ion batteries using incremental capacity analysis 2013 Accepted 5 February 2013 Available online 11 February 2013 Keywords: Electric vehicles Lithium-ion and life cycle. In this paper, we focus on the identification of Li-ion battery capacity fading

  17. Incremental Analysis of Power Grids using Backward Random Walks Baktash Boghrati and Sachin S. Sapatnekar, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    intensive task. In this work, we first introduce an accurate modeling methodology for power grids thatA Incremental Analysis of Power Grids using Backward Random Walks Baktash Boghrati and Sachin S. Sapatnekar, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Power grid design and analysis is a critical part

  18. A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sancho, Javier

    A Double-Deletion Method to Quantifying Incremental Binding Energies in Proteins from Experiment: Example of a Destabilizing Hydrogen Bonding Pair Luis A. Campos,*y Santiago Cuesta-Lo´pez,*z Jon Lo of a specific hydrogen bond in apoflavodoxin to protein stability is investigated by combining theory

  19. New methods for predicting lifetimes. Part 2 -- The Wear-out approach for predicting the remaining lifetime of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GILLEN,KENNETH T.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.

    2000-04-20

    The so-called Palmgren-Miner concept that degradation is cumulative, and that failure is therefore considered to be the direct result of the accumulation of damage with time, has been known for decades. Cumulative damage models based on this concept have been derived and used mainly for fatigue life predictions for metals and composite materials. The authors review the principles underlying such models and suggest ways in which they may be best applied to polymeric materials in temperature environments. The authors first consider cases where polymer degradation data can be rigorously time-temperature superposed over a given temperature range. For a step change in temperature after damage has occurred at an initial temperature in this range, they show that the remaining lifetime at the second temperature should be linearly related to the aging time prior to the step. This predicted linearity implies that it may be possible to estimate the remaining lifetime of polymeric materials aging under application ambient conditions by completing the aging at an accelerated temperature. They refer to this generic temperature-step method as the Wear-out approach. They then outline the expectations for Wear-out experiments when time-temperature superposition is invalid, specifically describing the two cases where so-called interaction effects are absent and are present. Finally, they present some preliminary results outlining the application of the Wear-out approach to polymers. In analyzing the experimental Wear-out results, they introduce a procedure that they refer to as time-damage superposition. This procedure not only utilizes all of the experimental data instead of a single point from each data set, but also allows them to determine the importance of any interaction effects.

  20. Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Catherine P.

    1 Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based Interference crucial design objectives for a number of multihop wireless network applica- tions. As these two this tradeoff between the network throughput and lifetime, for the case of fixed wireless networks where link

  1. SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS Edoardo Regini, Daeseob Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 {eregini, dalim, tajana}@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Maximizing battery lifetime. This is because in heavy traffic conditions, the chance of nodes to successfully transmit a packet decreases

  2. NEWS REPORT William L. Ogren was honored with a Lifetime Achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    is a brief description of the 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award received by William (Bill) L. Ogren from; William Lucas, University of California at Davis; Harald Paulsen, Johannes Gutenberg University MainzNEWS REPORT William L. Ogren was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Rebeiz Foundation

  3. Ris-R-1515(EN) Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1515(EN) Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries Henrik Bindner, Tom Cronin, Per Lundsager Baring-Gould Title: Lifetime Modelling of Lead Acid Batteries Department: VEA, VES Risø-R-1515 April 2005 storage in batteries are an important part of many renewable based energy systems. Not only do batteries

  4. SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    SO2 emissions and lifetimes: Estimates from inverse modeling using in situ and global, spacebased 18 March 2011. [1] Topdown constraints on global sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions are inferred through of GEOSChem for inversion of SO2 columns to emissions. The seasonal mean SO2 lifetime calculated with the GEOS

  5. Minimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Minimizing Energy and Maximizing Network Lifetime Multicasting in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Weifa Abstract-- Most mobile nodes in a wireless ad hoc network are powered by energy limited batteries, the limited battery lifetime imposes a constraint on the network performance. Therefore, energy efficiency

  6. Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy autofocusing, z-axis calibration, image sensors, fluorescence lifetime imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Prof. dr ir A. van den Bos, Technische Universiteit Delft Prof. dr H.J. Tanke, Rijksuniversiteit Leiden of ideas and concepts that other people have set out for you. Now it is your turn. You get to design lifetime calculation 124 Dual-lifetime estimators 127 Materials and methods 130 Calibration of the FLIM

  7. Vibrational Lifetimes and Spectral Shifts in Supercritical Fluids as a Function of Density: Experiments and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    (CO2) as a function of density from low density (well below the critical density) to high densityVibrational Lifetimes and Spectral Shifts in Supercritical Fluids as a Function of Density Vibrational lifetime and spectral shift data for the asymmetric CO stretching mode of W(CO)6 in supercritical

  8. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  9. Incremental online object learning in a vehicular radar-vision fusion framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Zhengping; Weng, Juyang; Luciw, Matthew; Zeng, Shuqing

    2010-10-19

    In this paper, we propose an object learning system that incorporates sensory information from an automotive radar system and a video camera. The radar system provides a coarse attention for the focus of visual analysis on relatively small areas within the image plane. The attended visual areas are coded and learned by a 3-layer neural network utilizing what is called in-place learning, where every neuron is responsible for the learning of its own signal processing characteristics within its connected network environment, through inhibitory and excitatory connections with other neurons. The modeled bottom-up, lateral, and top-down connections in the network enable sensory sparse coding, unsupervised learning and supervised learning to occur concurrently. The presented work is applied to learn two types of encountered objects in multiple outdoor driving settings. Cross validation results show the overall recognition accuracy above 95% for the radar-attended window images. In comparison with the uncoded representation and purely unsupervised learning (without top-down connection), the proposed network improves the recognition rate by 15.93% and 6.35% respectively. The proposed system is also compared with other learning algorithms favorably. The result indicates that our learning system is the only one to fit all the challenging criteria for the development of an incremental and online object learning system.

  10. Impact of incremental changes in meteorology on thermal compliance and power system operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, B.A.; Alavian, V.; Bender, M.D.

    1992-02-01

    The sensitivity of the TVA reservoir and power supply systems to extreme meteorology was evaluated using a series of mathematical models to simulate the relationship between incremental changes in meteorology, associated changes in water temperature, and power plant generation. Single variable analysis techniques were applied at selected TVA facilities for representative average and extreme weather conditions. In the analysis, base case simulations were first conducted for each representative year using observed meteorology (i.e., the no change condition). The impacts of changes in meteorology were subsequently analyzed by uniformly constant at their respective base case values. Project results are generally presented in terms of deviations from base case conditions for each representative year. Based on an analysis of natural flow and air temperature patterns at Chickamauga Dam, 1974 was selected to represent extreme cold-wet conditions; 1965 as reflecting average conditions; and 1986 as an example of an extremely hot-dry year. The extreme years (i.e., 1974 and 1986) were used to illustrate sensitivities beyond historical conditions; while the average year provided a basis for comparison. Observed reservoir conditions, such as inflows, dam releases, and reservoir elevations for each representative year, were used in the analysis and were assumed to remain constant in all simulations. Therefore, the Lake Improvement Plan (which was implemented in 1991) and its consequent effects on reservoir operations were not incorporated in the assessment. In the model simulations, computed water temperatures were based on vertically well-mixed conditions in the reservoirs.

  11. Lifetime measurements in {sup 63}Co and {sup 65}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijon, A.; Clement, E.; France, G. de; Van Isacker, P.; Rejmund, M.; Schmitt, C.; Goergen, A.; Obertelli, A.; Korten, W.; Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Pissulla, Th.; Rother, W.; Zell, K. O.; Gadea, A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.

    2011-06-15

    Lifetimes of the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} states in {sup 63}Co and the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 65}Co were measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift and the differential decay curve methods. The nuclei were populated by multinucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. {gamma} rays were measured with the EXOGAM Ge array and the recoiling fragments were fully identified using the large-acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The E2 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} states to the 7/2{sup -} ground state could be extracted in {sup 63}Co as well as an upper limit for the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -}{yields}7/2{sub 1}{sup -} B(E2) value in {sup 65}Co. The experimental results were compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the pf and pfg{sub 9/2} model spaces, allowing us to draw conclusions on the single-particle or collective nature of the various states.

  12. Accelerated stress rupture lifetime assessment for fiber composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groves, S.E.; DeTeresa, S.J.; Sanchez, R.J.; Zocher, M.A.; Christensen, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    Objective was to develop a theoretical and experimental framework for predicting stress rupture lifetime for fiber polymer composites based on short-term accelerated testing. Originally a 3-year project, it was terminated after the first year, which included stress rupture experiments and viscoelastic material characterization. In principle, higher temperature, stress, and saturated environmental conditions are used to accelerate stress rupture. Two types of specimens were to be subjected to long-term and accelerated static tensile loading at various temperatures, loads in order to quantify both fiber and matrix dominated failures. Also, we were to apply state-of-the-art analytical and experimental characterization techniques developed under a previous DOE/DP CRADA for capturing and tracking incipient degradation mechanisms associated with mechanical performance. Focus was increase our confidence to design, analyze, and build long-term composite structures such as flywheels and hydrogen gas storage vessels; other applications include advanced conventional weapons, infrastructures, marine and offshore systems, and stockpile stewardship and surveillance. Capabilities developed under this project, though not completed or verified, are being applied to NIF, AVLIS, and SSMP programs.

  13. Analysis of Assembly Bill 1000: Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, andagents No Epithelial ovarian cancer, melanoma, multiplein advanced, inoperable ovarian cancer; used as palliative

  14. On the low carrier lifetime edge zone in multicrystalline silicon ingots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Tingting; Yu, Xuegong; Wang, Lei; Gu, Xin; Yang, Deren, E-mail: mseyang@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-01-07

    We have demonstrated the cause of low minority carrier lifetime corresponding to the edge zone of casting multicrystalline silicon ingots and its influence on the performance of solar cells. It is found that the concentration of substitutional carbon, interstitial oxygen, and dislocation density have no direct correlation with the low minority carrier lifetime in the edge zone. However, the distribution of interstitial iron exactly coincides with the minority carrier lifetime, indicating that iron contamination is mainly responsible for the lifetime degradation. After phosphorus diffusion gettering process, the low carrier lifetime region became narrower, and the concentration of interstitial iron is reduced by almost one order of magnitude. However, the carrier lifetime in the edge zone cannot be raised to average level. After celling process, the internal quantum efficiency map of the edge zone has a lower response to the long wavelength light, in accordance with the minority carrier lifetime distribution in this region. Therefore, the solar cells based on edge zones exhibit slightly lower efficiency than those conventional ones.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  16. New Tool Quantitatively Maps Minority-Carrier Lifetime of Multicrystalline Silicon Bricks (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    NREL's new imaging tool could provide manufacturers with insight on their processes. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have used capabilities within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) to generate quantitative minority-carrier lifetime maps of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) bricks. This feat has been accomplished by using the PDIL's photoluminescence (PL) imaging system in conjunction with transient lifetime measurements obtained using a custom NREL-designed resonance-coupled photoconductive decay (RCPCD) system. PL imaging can obtain rapid high-resolution images that provide a qualitative assessment of the material lifetime-with the lifetime proportional to the pixel intensity. In contrast, the RCPCD technique provides a fast quantitative measure of the lifetime with a lower resolution and penetrates millimeters into the mc-Si brick, providing information on bulk lifetimes and material quality. This technique contrasts with commercially available minority-carrier lifetime mapping systems that use microwave conductivity measurements. Such measurements are dominated by surface recombination and lack information on the material quality within the bulk of the brick. By combining these two complementary techniques, we obtain high-resolution lifetime maps at very fast data acquisition times-attributes necessary for a production-based diagnostic tool. These bulk lifetime measurements provide manufacturers with invaluable feedback on their silicon ingot casting processes. NREL has been applying the PL images of lifetime in mc-Si bricks in collaboration with a U.S. photovoltaic industry partner through Recovery Act Funded Project ARRA T24. NREL developed a new tool to quantitatively map minority-carrier lifetime of multicrystalline silicon bricks by using photoluminescence imaging in conjunction with resonance-coupled photoconductive decay measurements. Researchers are not hindered by surface recombination and can look deeper into the material to map bulk lifetimes. The tool is being applied to silicon bricks in a project collaborating with a U.S. photovoltaic industry partner. Photovoltaic manufacturers can use the NREL tool to obtain valuable feedback on their silicon ingot casting processes.

  17. Advanced Models and Controls for Prediction and Extension of Battery Lifetime (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-02-01

    Predictive models of capacity and power fade must consider a multiplicity of degradation modes experienced by Li-ion batteries in the automotive environment. Lacking accurate models and tests, lifetime uncertainty must presently be absorbed by overdesign and excess warranty costs. To reduce these costs and extend life, degradation models are under development that predict lifetime more accurately and with less test data. The lifetime models provide engineering feedback for cell, pack and system designs and are being incorporated into real-time control strategies.

  18. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-01-02

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  19. Calculation of the extinction cross section and lifetime of a gold nanoparticle using FDTD simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radhakrishnan, Archana, E-mail: anju.archana@gmail.com [B.Tech, Engineering Physics, National Institute Of Technology, Calicut (India); Murugesan, Dr V., E-mail: murugesh@serc.iisc.in [Assistant Professor, Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2014-10-15

    The electromagnetic theory of light explains the behavior of light in most of the domains quite accurately. The problem arises when the exact solution of the Maxwell's equation is not present, in case of objects with arbitrary geometry. To find the extinction cross-section and lifetime of the gold nanoparticle, the software FDTD solutions 8.6 by Lumerical is employed. The extinction cross-sections and lifetimes of Gold nanospheres of different sizes and arrangements are studied using pulse lengths of the order of femtoseconds. The decay constant and other properties are compared. Further, the lifetimes are calculated using frequency and time domain calculations.

  20. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuhiro Yamada; Youhei Yamaji; Masatoshi Imada

    2015-02-25

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

  1. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence - Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly two orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers stable high population in the dark exciton.

  2. Generation and Recombination Carrier Lifetimes in 4H SiC Epitaxial Wafers , M. J. Loboda1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    Generation and Recombination Carrier Lifetimes in 4H SiC Epitaxial Wafers G. Chung1) , M. J. Loboda comparative studies of recombination and carrier lifetimes in SiC. For the first time, both generation-wafer structures. The ratio of the generation to recombination lifetime is much different in SiC compared to Si

  3. Sacrificial high-temperature phosphorus diffusion gettering for lifetime improvement of multicrystalline silicon wafers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Stephanie Morgan

    2014-01-01

    Iron is among the most deleterious lifetime-limiting impurities in crystalline silicon solar cells. In as-grown material, iron is present in precipitates and in point defects. To achieve conversion efficiencies in excess ...

  4. Effective lifetimes exceeding 300 ?s in gettered p-type epitaxial kerfless silicon for photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, D. M.

    We evaluate defect concentrations and investigate the lifetime potential of p-type single-crystal kerfless silicon produced via epitaxy for photovoltaics. In gettered material, low interstitial iron concentrations (as low ...

  5. Volume163,number 4,5 CHEMICALPHYSICSLETTERS 17November 1989 EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIATIVE LIFETIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE RADIATIVE LIFETIME OF NO+(X%+, v=l, 2 AND 3) C.-H. KUO, C.G. BEGGS, P.R. KEMPER, M.T. BOWERS ' Department

  6. Norwegian National Program for Lifetime Commissioning and Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakovic, V.; Djuric, N.; Holst, J.; Frydenlund, F.

    2006-01-01

    The project “Life-Time Commissioning for Energy Efficient Operation of Buildings” is actually a network of industrial companies, private and public entities, and R&D organizations. The overall objective of the project is to contribute...

  7. Measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A measurement of the ?[superscript 0 over subscript b] lifetime and mass in the decay channel ?[superscript 0 over subscript b]?J/?(?[superscript +]?[superscript -])?[superscript 0](p?[superscript -]) is presented. The ...

  8. The Application of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy to Quantitatively Map Mixing and Temperature in Microfluidic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Emmelyn M

    2008-01-01

    The technique of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been employed to quantitatively and spatially map the fluid composition and temperature within microfluidic systems. A molecular probe with a ...

  9. Lifetime measurements of high-lying short lived states in {sup 69}As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejska-Minda, M.; Bednarczyk, P.; Fornal, B.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Krzysiek, M.; Maj, A.; Meczynski, W.; Myalski, S.; Styczen, J.; Zieblinski, M.; Angelis, G. de; Huyuk, T.; Michelagnoli, C.; Sahin, E.; Aydin, S.; Farnea, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Lifetimes of high-spin states in {sup 69}As have been measured using Doppler shift attenuation technique with the GASP and RFD setup. The determined transition probabilities indicate large deformation associated with some rotational bands in this nucleus.

  10. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D., E-mail: salthouse@ecs.umass.edu [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J. [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States) [Center for Personalized Health Monitoring, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 ?M. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  11. An experimental study of spatial effects on mean neutron lifetime measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooke, William Bruce

    1966-01-01

    and Reactor Stability Analysis", USAEC Report ANL-6205, Argonne National Laboratory, May, 1960 Qazi, M. N. , "An Oscillator Measurement of the Prompt Neutron Lifetime in the Pennsylvania State University Reactor, ' Unpublished Masters Thesis, Pennsylvania... OF SCIENCE May, 1966 Major Subject Nuclear Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SPATIAL EFFECTS ON MEAN NEUTRON LIFETIME MEASUREMENT A Thesis By William Bruce Hooks Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommx tee ea o epar men e er e er e er...

  12. Ratio of D/sup 0/ and D/sup +/ lifetimes from their semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    The conventional expectation for the decays of D mesons assumes that the charm quark decays in the presence of light, spectator quarks and thus the lifetimes of both charged and uncharged states are equal. In this article, evidence is presented from DELCO (at SPEAR) that the D lifetimes are quite different for neutral and charged mesons, and the results which have also become available from other experiments are reviewed.

  13. New evaluation of neutron lifetime from UCN storage experiments and beam experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin

    2011-04-21

    The analysis of experiments on measuring neutron lifetime has been made. The latest most accurate result of measuring neutron lifetime [Phys. Lett. B 605, 72 (2005)] 878.5 \\pm 0.8 s differs from the world average value [Phys. Lett. B 667, 1 (2008)] 885.7 \\pm 0.8 s by 6.5 standard deviations. In view of this both the analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation of experiments [Phys. Lett. B 483, 15 (2000)] and [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 593 (1989)] have been performed. Systematic errors about -6 s have been found in both experiments. The table of results of neutron lifetime measurements is given after corrections and additions have been made. A new world average value of neutron lifetime makes up 880.0 \\pm 0.9 s. Here is also presented a separate analysis of experiments on measuring neutron lifetime with UCN and experiments on the beams. The average neutron lifetime for experiments with UCN is equal to 879.3(0.6) s, while for experiments on the beams it is equal to 889.1(2.9) s. The present difference of average values for both groups is (3.3 sigma) and needs consideration. The contribution of beam experiments into the world average value is not high, therefore it does not influence the above analysis. However, it is an independent problem to be solved. It seems desirable that the precision of beam experiments should be enhanced.

  14. Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Josephine Ford Cancer Center Cancer Research Programs presented to WSU SOM PAD January 10, 2012 presented by Sandra A. Rempel, Ph.D. Associate Director of Research, JFCC #12;JFCC Cancer Research Programs Cancer Epidemiology, Prevention and Control Program Members: Gwen Alexander, Andrea Cassidy

  15. Impact of Minority Carrier Lifetime on the Performance of Strained Ge Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhdeo, David S; Birendra,; Dutt,; Nam, Donguk

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the impact of the defect-limited carrier lifetime on the performance of germanium (Ge) light sources, specifically LEDs and lasers. For Ge LEDs, we show that improving the material quality can offer even greater enhancements than techniques such as tensile strain, the leading approach for enhancing Ge light emission. Even for Ge that is so heavily strained that it becomes a direct bandgap semiconductor, the ~1 ns defect-limited carrier lifetime of typical epitaxial Ge limits the LED internal quantum efficiency to less than 10%. In contrast, if the epitaxial Ge carrier lifetime can be increased to its bulk value, internal quantum efficiencies exceeding 90% become possible. For Ge lasers, we show that the defect-limited lifetime becomes increasing important as tensile strain is introduced, and that this defect-limited lifetime must be improved if the full benefits of strain are to be realized. We conversely show that improving the material quality supersedes much of the utility of n...

  16. Alignments Of Black Holes With Their Warped Accretion Disks And Episodic Lifetimes Of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Rong Li; Jian-Min Wang; Cheng Cheng; Jie Qiu

    2015-03-02

    Warped accretion disks have attracted intensive attention because of their critical role on shaping the spin of supermassive massive black holes (SMBHs) through the Bardeen-Petterson effect, a general relativistic effect that leads to final alignments or anti-alignments between black holes and warped accretion disks. We study such alignment processes by explicitly taking into account the finite sizes of accretion disks and the episodic lifetimes of AGNs that delineate the duration of gas fueling onto accretion disks. We employ an approximate global model to simulate the evolution of accretion disks, allowing to determine the gravitomagnetic torque that drives the alignments in a quite simple way. We then track down the evolutionary paths for mass and spin of black holes both in a single activity episode and over a series of episodes. Given with randomly and isotropically oriented gas fueling over episodes, we calculate the spin evolution with different episodic lifetimes and find that it is quite sensitive to the lifetimes. We therefore propose that spin distribution of SMBHs can place constraints on the episodic lifetimes of AGNs and vice versa. Applications of our results on the observed spin distributions of SMBHs and the observed episodic lifetimes of AGNs are discussed, although both the measurements at present are yet ambiguous to draw a firm conclusion. Our prescription can be easily incorporated into semi-analytic models for black hole growth and spin evolution.

  17. Robust Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Allocation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch.; Wu, Ruomin

    2012-01-01

    We consider the maximum lifetime routing problem in wireless sensor networks in two settings: (a) when nodes’ initial energy is given and (b) when it is subject to optimization. The optimal solution and objective value provide optimal flows and the corresponding predicted lifetime, respectively. We stipulate that there is uncertainty in various network parameters (available energy and energy depletion rates). In setting (a) we show that for specific, yet typical, network topologies, the actual network lifetime will reach the predicted value with a probability that converges to zero as the number of nodes grows large. In setting (b) the samemore »result holds for all topologies. We develop a series of robust problem formulations, ranging from pessimistic to optimistic. A set of parameters enable the tuning of the conservatism of the formulation to obtain network flows with a desirably high probability that the corresponding lifetime prediction is achieved. We establish a number of properties for the robust network flows and energy allocations and provide numerical results to highlight the tradeoff between predicted lifetime and the probability achieved. Further, we analyze an interesting limiting regime of massively deployed sensor networks and essentially solve a continuous version of the problem.« less

  18. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. DeVience; Ronald L. Walsworth; Matthew S. Rosen

    2012-01-06

    We measure the lifetime of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field and present a simple theoretical model that agrees well with our measurements, including the low-RF-power regime. We also measure the lifetime of a long-lived coherence between singlet and triplet states that does not require a spin-locking field for preservation. Our results indicate that for many molecules, singlet states can be created using weak RF spin-locking fields: more than two orders of magnitude lower RF power than in previous studies. Our findings suggest that in many biomolecules, singlets and related states with enhanced lifetimes might be achievable in vivo with safe levels of RF power.

  19. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVience, Stephen J; Rosen, Matthew S

    2012-01-01

    We measure the lifetime of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field and present a simple theoretical model that agrees well with our measurements, including the low-RF-power regime. We also measure the lifetime of a long-lived coherence between singlet and triplet states that does not require a spin-locking field for preservation. Our results indicate that for many molecules, singlet states can be created using weak RF spin-locking fields: more than two orders of magnitude lower RF power than in previous studies. Our findings suggest that in many biomolecules, singlets and related states with enhanced lifetimes might be achievable in vivo with safe levels of RF power.

  20. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the $(p,p^{\\prime}\\gamma$) reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, A; Mineva, M N; Petkov, P; Pickstone, S G; Spieker, M; Zilges, A

    2015-01-01

    In this article a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of $^{96}$Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting $\\gamma$-rays as well as the large number of particle and $\\gamma$-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where $(n,n^{\\prime}\\gamma$) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - ($\\gamma,\\gamma^{\\prime}$) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  1. Lifetime measurement of excited low-spin states via the $(p,p^{\\prime}?$) reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hennig; V. Derya; M. N. Mineva; P. Petkov; S. G. Pickstone; M. Spieker; A. Zilges

    2015-06-19

    In this article a method for lifetime measurements in the sub-picosecond regime via the Doppler-shift attenuation method (DSAM) following the inelastic proton scattering reaction is presented. In a pioneering experiment we extracted the lifetimes of 30 excited low-spin states of $^{96}$Ru, taking advantage of the coincident detection of scattered protons and de-exciting $\\gamma$-rays as well as the large number of particle and $\\gamma$-ray detectors provided by the SONIC@HORUS setup at the University of Cologne. The large amount of new experimental data shows that this technique is suited for the measurement of lifetimes of excited low-spin states, especially for isotopes with a low isotopic abundance, where $(n,n^{\\prime}\\gamma$) or - in case of investigating dipole excitations - ($\\gamma,\\gamma^{\\prime}$) experiments are not feasible due to the lack of sufficient isotopically enriched target material.

  2. Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition Bldg.Pedestrian Link from Ardmore Tower to Comprehensive Cancer Center on Ground Floor Emergency Room Parking Ardmore Cafeteria Ardmore Tower North Tower Janeway

  3. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  4. Note on an integral expression for the average lifetime of the bound state in 2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Prustel; Martin Meier-Schellersheim

    2012-10-04

    Recently, an exact Green's function of the diffusion equation for a pair of spherical interacting particles in two dimensions subject to a backreaction boundary condition was used to derive an exact expression for the average lifetime of the bound state. Here, we show that the corresponding divergent integral may be considered as the formal limit of a Stieltjes transform. Upon analytically calculating the Stieltjes transform one can obtain an exact expression for the finite part of the divergent integral and hence for the average lifetime.

  5. Lung Cancer James Nguyen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Lung Cancer James Nguyen Biochemistry 118Q Doug Brutlag A Case Study of Genetics and Environment #12;Lung Cancer · Leading cause of cancer for men and women in United States · Every year, about 164,000 new cases are diagnosed in the US, with an estimated 157,000 deaths. · Leading cause of cancer death

  6. The National Cancer Institute,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Cancer Institute, International Cancer Information Center Bldg. 82, Rm 123 Bethesda, MD 20892 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the Federal Government. NCI coordinates the government's cancer research program. It is the largest of the 17 biomedical research institutes and centers

  7. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  8. History-based, Online, Battery Lifetime Prediction for Embedded and Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    History-based, Online, Battery Lifetime Prediction for Embedded and Mobile Devices Ye Wen Rich approach on a widely used mobile device (HP iPAQ) running Linux, and compare it to two similar battery pre- diction technologies: ACPI and Smart Battery. We em- ploy twenty-two constant and variable workloads

  9. Lifetime-Aware Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Network Architecture with Mobile Overlays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    ,morteza,pedram}@usc.edu ABSTRACT-- Recent technological advances have led to the emergence of small battery-powered sensors battery replacement in a large network is not a feasible solution, we consider mobile relays. Mobility1 Lifetime-Aware Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Network Architecture with Mobile Overlays Maryam

  10. Genetic variation in nuclear and mitochondrial markers supports a large sex difference in lifetime reproductive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Research Council of Canada. YIV was supported by a start-up grant to TP from the University in skews of vertebrate lifetime reproductive success are difficult to measure directly. Evolutionary; Kokko et al. 1998, 1999). Variance in LRS may be smaller than expected because mating skews at leks

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF BACK SURFACE ACRYLIC SOLAR MIRRORS TO ASSURE 25 YEAR LIFETIME PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF BACK SURFACE ACRYLIC SOLAR MIRRORS TO ASSURE 25 YEAR LIFETIME at NREL was extremely valuable in completing this work. Funding for this project was obtained from Ohio 2. Literature Review 10 Solar Mirrors 10 Technology Development 15 Substrate PMMA Acrylic Weathering

  12. Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal, node energy, etc), the collected data are transmitted to their final destination, usually a fusion

  13. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  14. Z .Applied Surface Science 149 1999 97102 Unfolding positron lifetime spectra with neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Z .Applied Surface Science 149 1999 97­102 Unfolding positron lifetime spectra with neural networks is based on the use of artificial neural networks ANNs . By using data from simulated positron spectra: Artificial neural networks ANNs ; Amplitudes; Simulation model 1. Introduction Determination of mean

  15. Lifetime broadening in the gas phase ~BB2 electronic spectrum of C8H

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, John Paul

    . It is con- cluded that the rotational lines are broadened by rapid radiationless transitions fromLifetime broadening in the gas phase ~BB2 P ~XX2 P electronic spectrum of C8H Petre Birza, Dmitriy transition of linear C8H was recorded in a planar supersonic ex- pansion by a cw cavity ring

  16. Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Toughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    Lifetime Assessment for Thermal Barrier Coatings: Tests for Measuring Mixed Mode Delamination Mechanisms leading to degradation of the adherence of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) used in aircraft of coatings have not emerged based on predictions of the degradation processes due to their complexity

  17. Testing the effect of surface coatings on alkali atom polarization lifetimes S. J. Seltzer,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romalis, Mike

    Testing the effect of surface coatings on alkali atom polarization lifetimes S. J. Seltzer,1 D. M The evaluation of different surface coatings used in alkali metal atomic magnetometers is necessary in the region between substrates with different coatings was developed to determine the effectiveness

  18. Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Electron generation of leptons and hadrons with reciprocal -quantized lifetimes and masses generation occurs via an initial "-leap" from an electron pair to a "platform state" M, and then subsequent in the generation of hadron masses. In fact, the role of the electron in generating lepton masses has never been

  19. Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve Maximum Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    Centralized Routing Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks with Ultra Low Duty Cycle to Achieve performance because most of them are designed without considering a ultra low duty cycled environment to improve a network lifetime and a routing maintenance cost. We explain the issues of a ultra low duty

  20. Film drainage and the lifetime of bubbles C. T. Nguyen, H. M. Gonnermann, and Y. Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnermann, Helge

    Film drainage and the lifetime of bubbles C. T. Nguyen, H. M. Gonnermann, and Y. Chen Department film thinning and bubble coalescence as a consequence of liquid expulsion by gravitational.25 film drainage is due to capillary forces, whereas at Bo > 0.25 gravitational forces result in film

  1. Isolating signatures of major cloud-cloud collisions II: The lifetimes of broad bridge features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haworth, T J; Tasker, E J; Fukui, Y; Torii, K; Dale, J E; Takahira, K; Habe, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the longevity of broad bridge features in position-velocity diagrams that appear as a result of cloud-cloud collisions. Broad bridges will have a finite lifetime due to the action of feedback, conversion of gas into stars and the timescale of the collision. We make a series of analytic arguments with which to estimate these lifetimes. Our simple analytic arguments suggest that for collisions between clouds larger than R~10 pc the lifetime of the broad bridge is more likely to be determined by the lifetime of the collision rather than the radiative or wind feedback disruption timescale. However for smaller clouds feedback becomes much more effective. This is because the radiative feedback timescale scales with the ionising flux Nly as R^{7/4}Nly^{-1/4} so a reduction in cloud size requires a relatively large decrease in ionising photons to maintain a given timescale. We find that our analytic arguments are consistent with new synthetic observations of numerical simulations of cloud-cloud collisi...

  2. Lifetime Behavior and its Impact on Web Caching Xiangping Chen and Prasant Mohapatra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohapatra, Prasant

    Lifetime Behavior and its Impact on Web Caching Xiangping Chen and Prasant Mohapatra Department@iastate.edu Abstract The exponential growth of the World Wide Web has made it the most popular information on the web to al­ leviate the web server load, conserve the network band­ width, and reduce the retrieval

  3. Network lifetime maximization for time-sensitive data gathering in wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    or human inaccessible environments such as battlefields or nuclear polluted re- gions. Therefore, energy Keywords: Wireless sensor networks Network lifetime prolongation Energy optimization Load-balanced spanning tree Network flow Algorithm design a b s t r a c t Energy-constrained sensor networks have been widely

  4. Classes of multivariate lifetimes distributions based on the multivariate excess wealth function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    Classes of multivariate lifetimes distributions based on the multivariate excess wealth function of their quantile functions and excess wealth func- tions. Here we consider the multivariate versions of these characterizations, defining new multivariate aging classes based on properties of the multivariate u

  5. J-RoC: a Joint Routing and Charging Scheme to Prolong Sensor Network Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Daji

    -lasting and fundamental problem. To address this issue, harvesting the ambient energy such as solar [1], wind [2. Zhang et al. [7] apply this technique to replenish battery energy in med- ical sensors and implantableJ-RoC: a Joint Routing and Charging Scheme to Prolong Sensor Network Lifetime Zi Li, Yang Peng

  6. Maximizing Network Lifetime Via 3G Gateway Assignment in Dual-Radio Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    - ments, such as temperature, humidity, wind, solar radiation, etc. [3]. Sensor nodes are typically as well as in the idling cost [5]. If all sensors are gateways, they will run out of energy within a shortMaximizing Network Lifetime Via 3G Gateway Assignment in Dual-Radio Sensor Networks Xu Xu, Weifa

  7. Accurate economic analysis of photovoltaic (PV) systems performance over the system lifetime requires knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ABSTRACT Accurate economic analysis of photovoltaic (PV) systems performance over the system placed on the performance of the photovoltaic (PV) system over the lifetime of the system. Many. The economic evaluation is dependent on system production, MEASURING DEGRADATION OF PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE

  8. Aalborg Universitet Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    , telecommunications installations, large industrial and commercial installations, large uninterruptible power supply and drawback for any attempt to scale-up battery cells to the larger sizes as required for high power acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. Thereof

  9. Measured lifetimes of metastable levels of Mn X, Mn XI, Mn XII, and Mn XIII ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1999-01-01

    An ion storage technique, based on the capture of metastable multiply charged ions from an external ion source into a Kingdon ion trap, has been used to measure the lifetimes of eight metastable levels of Mn ions with 3s(2)3p(k) configurations, k...

  10. SENSOR PLACEMENT FOR MAXIMIZING LIFETIME PER UNIT COST IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    in a wireless sensor network (WSN). Analyzing the lifetime per unit cost of a linear WSN, we find that deploying commercial and military applications. A WSN consists of a large number of low-cost, low-power, energy the sen- sor placement and the transmission structure in a one- dimensional data-gathering WSN

  11. Temperature dependent vibrational lifetimes in supercritical fluids near the critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    also initially increases with increasing temperature. However, in supercritical CO2 at the critical, fluoroform, and CO2 solvents are presented and analyzed. The measurements are made at constant densityTemperature dependent vibrational lifetimes in supercritical fluids near the critical point D. J

  12. Robust Lifetime Measurement in Large-Scale P2P Systems with Non-Stationary Arrivals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Zhongmei

    @nec-labs.com Abstract--Characterizing user churn has become an important topic in studying P2P networks, both impossible. We overcome this problem using two contributions: a novel non-stationary ON/OFF churn model and the corresponding analysis of lifetime sampling. We focus on these issues next. A. Non-Stationary User Churn Recall

  13. Alternative Size and Lifetime Measurements for High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt; Silvio Petriconi

    2003-06-16

    Two-Particle correlations based on the interference of identical particles has provided the chief means for determining the shape and lifetime of sources in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Here, Strong and Coulomb induced correlations are shown to provide equivalent information.

  14. NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    annealing the samples at 280' C. INTRODUCTION Reactor pressure-vessel steel embrittlement is one ofthe mostNEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME spectroscopy to study the development of damage and annealing behavior ofneutron-irradiated reactor pressure

  15. Adaptive Data Collection Strategies for Lifetime-Constrained Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xueyan

    significantly improve the accuracy of data collected by the base station. Index Terms--data collection, energy to the energy constraint [7]. However, this approach is not effective. Consider, for example, a series of solar1 Adaptive Data Collection Strategies for Lifetime-Constrained Wireless Sensor Networks Xueyan Tang

  16. Excitation energies, polarizabilities, multipole transition rates, and lifetimes of ions along the francium isoelectronic sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safronova, Marianna

    Excitation energies, polarizabilities, multipole transition rates, and lifetimes of ions along rates and oscillator strengths for a limited number of transitions using the energies given by Blaise, energies of the 7s, 7p, 6d, and 5f states of Fr-like ions with nuclear charges Z =87­100 are calculated

  17. A LIFETIME PREDICTION MODEL FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOYS SUBJECTED TO THERMOMECHANICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    materials tensile, creep and LCF test data at different temperatures. Some parameters, independentA LIFETIME PREDICTION MODEL FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL SUPERALLOYS SUBJECTED TO THERMOMECHANICAL CREEP for Single Crystal Superalloys operated at high temperatures and subjected to creep, fatigue and oxidation

  18. Experimental determination of neutron lifetimes through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP Travessa R-400, 05508-900, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    The neutron lifetimes of the core, reflector, and global were experimentally obtained through macroscopic neutron noise in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor for five levels of subcriticality. The theoretical Auto Power Spectral Densities were derived by point kinetic equations taking the reflector effect into account, and one of the approaches consider an additional group of delayed neutrons.

  19. Fluorescence Lifetime of Emitters with Broad Homogeneous Linewidths Modified in Opal Photonic Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    Fluorescence Lifetime of Emitters with Broad Homogeneous Linewidths Modified in Opal Photonic, 2008 We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad homogeneous

  20. Extending the Lifetime of Portable Video Communication Devices Using Power-Rate-Distortion Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhihai "Henry"

    -Rate-Distortion Optimization Zhihai He, Wenye Cheng, and Xi Chen £ Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University framework to save the data processing energy and extend the operational lifetime of portable video communication devices. Video compression is computationally intensive and energy-consuming. However, portable

  1. Application and modeling of frequency-domain lifetime spectroscopy for microsphere-based optical glucose sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Feng

    2009-05-15

    changes in the presence of glucose at concentrations ranging from 0 to 224 mg/dL. The second set of experiments proved the feasibility of performing analyte sensing with FD lifetime spectroscopy using microsphere-based sensors in multiple scattering...

  2. STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY-dimensional morphology and life cycle of clouds. Detailing key cloud processes as they transit from the formation stage to precipitation onset and cloud dissipation is critical towards establishing uncertainties in climate models

  3. Efficient Battery Management for Sensor Lifetime Malka N. Halgamuge, Student Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halgamuge, Malka N.

    Efficient Battery Management for Sensor Lifetime Malka N. Halgamuge, Student Member, IEEE It is challenging to design a sensor network if sensors are battery powered. Efficient scheduling and budgeting battery power in sensor networks has become a critical issue in net- work design. We investigate how

  4. Exploiting Overhearing: Flow-Aware Routing for Improved Lifetime in Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mans, Bernard

    neighboring flows and adapt their local routing dynamically. By combining this awareness with battery- aware flow and neighborhood is then presented in Section II-D. By combining the flow awareness with batteryExploiting Overhearing: Flow-Aware Routing for Improved Lifetime in Ad Hoc Networks Nirisha

  5. Algorithms for Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography Data Analysis: Applications for Diagnosis of Atherosclerosis and Oral Cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Paritosh

    2014-05-16

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Javier A. Jo Committee Members, Brian E. Applegate Kristen C. Maitland Byung-Jun Yoon Head of Department, Gerard L. Cote´ August 2014 Major Subject...

  6. AT NORTHWESTERN EARLY CANCER DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    --including lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer-- there is simply no screening option available, such as pancreatic, ovarian, and lung cancer. · Improve existing screening techniques, such as those for colon cancer, with the THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE EARLY CANCER DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES INSTITUTE

  7. Predicting the Remaining Useful Lifetime of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using an Echo State Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Predicting the Remaining Useful Lifetime of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell using an Echo industrial Fuel Cell (FC) application resides in the system limited useful lifetime. Consequently, it Membrane Fuel Cell using an iterative predictive structure, which is the most common approach performing

  8. Energy-efficient Search for Finite-lifetime Resources in Sensor Networks with Time-constrained Queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharoufeh, Jeffrey P.

    Energy-efficient Search for Finite-lifetime Resources in Sensor Networks with Time to the originating node prior to the expiration of a specific deadline. From the per- spective of energy efficiency networks when resources are subject to limited lifetimes and queries are constrained by application

  9. Extending the Lifetime of Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Systems* Jianli Zhuo1, Chaitali Chakrabartil, Naehyuck Chang2, Sarma Vrudhula3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    34.1 Extending the Lifetime of Fuel Cell Based Hybrid Systems* Jianli Zhuo1, Chaitali Chakrabartil@asu.edu ABSTRACT for portable applications. Fuel cells have very high energy densities Fuel cells are clean power densities and lifetimes compared to batteries. However, fuel cells

  10. Supervised learning of a regression model based on latent process. Application to the estimation of Fuel Cell lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chamroukhi, Faicel

    of Fuel Cell lifetime Raïssa Onanena(1), Faicel Chamroukhi(1), Latifa Oukhellou(1), Denis Candusso(1 A probabilistic approach Parameter estimation 3 Fuel Cell lifetime estimation 4 Conclusion Faicel Chamroukhi maintenance of the Fuel Cells (FCs) Fuel Cells (FCs) are widely used in many domains including transport

  11. CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRA NSFO RMING LIVES THRO UG H RE SE ARC H #12;CancerProgressReport.org // AACR.org // #CancerProgress14 AACR CANCER PROGRESS REPORT 2014 TRANSFORMING LIVES THROUGH RESEARCH #12;II AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014

  12. Cancer Stage at Diagnosis, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    of avoiding death due to a particular cancer. Stage atdiagnosis by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual, sixth edition. Source:

  13. iSAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validation Jelena Mirkovic, Zhiguo Xu, Jun Li, Matthew Schnaider, Peter Reiher, and Lixia Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    iSAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validation Jelena Mirkovi´c, Zhiguo Xu, Jun Li of packets with spoofed source addresses. The SAVE protocol makes this information available at every router, although, in the absence of full deployment, it is difficult for SAVE to maintain either correct

  14. Theory of SEI Formation in Rechargeable Batteries: Capacity Fade, Accelerated Aging and Lifetime Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinson, Matthew B

    2012-01-01

    Cycle life is critically important in applications of rechargeable batteries, but lifetime prediction is mostly based on empirical trends, rather than mathematical models. In practical lithium-ion batteries, capacity fade occurs over thousands of cycles, limited by slow electrochemical processes, such as the formation of a solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) in the negative electrode, which compete with reversible lithium intercalation. Focusing on SEI growth as the canonical degradation mechanism, we show that a simple single-particle model can accurately explain experimentally observed capacity fade in commercial cells with graphite anodes, and predict future fade based on limited accelerated aging data for short times and elevated temperatures. The theory is extended to porous electrodes, predicting that SEI growth is essentially homogeneous throughout the electrode, even at high rates. The lifetime distribution for a sample of batteries is found to be consistent with Gaussian statistics, as predicted by th...

  15. Alignments Of Black Holes With Their Warped Accretion Disks And Episodic Lifetimes Of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yan-Rong; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Warped accretion disks have attracted intensive attention because of their critical role on shaping the spin of supermassive massive black holes (SMBHs) through the Bardeen-Petterson effect, a general relativistic effect that leads to final alignments or anti-alignments between black holes and warped accretion disks. We study such alignment processes by explicitly taking into account the finite sizes of accretion disks and the episodic lifetimes of AGNs that delineate the duration of gas fueling onto accretion disks. We employ an approximate global model to simulate the evolution of accretion disks, allowing to determine the gravitomagnetic torque that drives the alignments in a quite simple way. We then track down the evolutionary paths for mass and spin of black holes both in a single activity episode and over a series of episodes. Given with randomly and isotropically oriented gas fueling over episodes, we calculate the spin evolution with different episodic lifetimes and find that it is quite sensitive to...

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO); Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus for determining the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample includes a positioner for moving the sample relative to a coil. The coil is connected to a bridge circuit such that the impedance of one arm of the bridge circuit is varied as sample is positioned relative to the coil. The sample is positioned relative to the coil such that any change in the photoconductance of the sample created by illumination of the sample creates a linearly related change in the input impedance of the bridge circuit. In addition, the apparatus is calibrated to work at a fixed frequency so that the apparatus maintains a consistently high sensitivity and high linearity for samples of different sizes, shapes, and material properties. When a light source illuminates the sample, the impedance of the bridge circuit is altered as excess carriers are generated in the sample, thereby producing a measurable signal indicative of the minority carrier lifetimes or recombination rates of the sample.

  17. Preliminary lifetime predictions for 304 stainless steel as the LANL ABC blanket material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.J.; Buksa, J.J.; Houts, M.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1997-11-01

    The prediction of materials lifetime in the preconceptual Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Accelerator-Based Conversion of Plutonium (ABC) is of utmost interest. Because Hastelloy N showed good corrosion resistance to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Molten Salt Reactor Experiment fuel salt that is similar to the LANL ABC fuel salt, Hastelloy N was originally proposed for the LANL ABC blanket material. In this paper, the possibility of using 304 stainless steel as a replacement for the Hastelloy N is investigated in terms of corrosion issues and fluence-limit considerations. An attempt is made, based on the previous Fast Flux Test Facility design data, to predict the preliminary lifetime estimate of the 304 stainless steel used in the blanket region of the LANL ABC.

  18. Heating rate and spin flip lifetime due to near field noise in layered superconducting atom chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachele Fermani; Tobias Mueller; Bo Zhang; Michael J. Lim; Rainer Dumke

    2009-12-11

    We theoretically investigate the heating rate and spin flip lifetimes due to near field noise for atoms trapped close to layered superconducting structures. In particular, we compare the case of a gold layer deposited above a superconductor with the case of a bare superconductor. We study a niobium-based and a YBCO-based chip. For both niobium and YBCO chips at a temperature of 4.2 K, we find that the deposition of the gold layer can have a significant impact on the heating rate and spin flip lifetime, as a result of the increase of the near field noise. At a chip temperature of 77 K, this effect is less pronounced for the YBCO chip.

  19. Phosphazene Based Additives for Improvement of Safety and Battery Lifetimes in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K Harrup; Kevin L Gering; Harry W Rollins; Sergiy V Sazhin; Michael T Benson; David K Jamison; Christopher J Michelbacher

    2011-10-01

    There need to be significant improvements made in lithium-ion battery technology, principally in the areas of safety and useful lifetimes to truly enable widespread adoption of large format batteries for the electrification of the light transportation fleet. In order to effect the transition to lithium ion technology in a timely fashion, one promising next step is through improvements to the electrolyte in the form of novel additives that simultaneously improve safety and useful lifetimes without impairing performance characteristics over wide temperature and cycle duty ranges. Recent efforts in our laboratory have been focused on the development of such additives with all the requisite properties enumerated above. We present the results of the study of novel phosphazene based electrolytes additives.

  20. Radiative lifetime and energy of the low-energy isomeric level in $^{229}$Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tkalya, E V; Jeet, Justin; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the range of the radiative lifetime and energy of the anomalous, low-energy $3/2^+(7.8 \\pm 0.5$ eV) state in the $^{229}$Th nucleus. Our phenomenological calculations are based on the available experimental data for the intensities of $M1$ and $E2$ transitions between excited levels of the $^{229}$Th nucleus in the $K^{\\pi}[Nn_Z\\Lambda]=5/2^+[633]$ and $3/2^+[631]$ rotational bands. We also discuss the influence of certain branching coefficients, which affect the currently accepted measured energy of the isomeric state. From this work, we establish a favored region where the transition lifetime and energy should lie at roughly the 90% confidence level. We also suggest new nuclear physics measurements, which would significantly reduce the ambiguity in the present data.

  1. Post-diagnosis weight gain and breast cancer recurrence in women with early stage breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    1996): Nutrition and breast cancer. Cancer Causes Control 7:of premenopausal breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.BiomarkersDiagnosis Weight Gain and Breast Cancer Recurrence In Women

  2. Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellin, Paul

    Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics Mobility and lifetime mapping in wide bandgap uniformity #12;Paul Sellin, Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics µ mapping in CdZnTe with IBIC Electron µ for Nuclear and Radiation Physics µ maps of CdZnTe and CdTe CdZnTe CdTe Map of electron µ in CdZnTe shows µe

  3. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  4. Lifetime of oil drops pressed by buoyancy against a planar interface: Large drops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clara Rojas; Máximo García-Sucre; Germán Urbina-Villalba

    2011-09-22

    In a previous report [10] it was shown that emulsion stability simulations are able to reproduce the lifetime of micrometer-size drops of hexadecane pressed by buoyancy against a planar water-hexadecane interface. It was confirmed that small drops (rioil stabilized with bovine serum albumin. The potential obtained is then employed to study the lifetime of deformable drops in the range 10 \\leq ri \\leq 1000 {\\mu}m. It is established that the average lifetime of these drops can be adequately replicated using the model of truncated spheres. However, the results depend sensibly on the expressions of the initial distance of deformation and the maximum film radius used in the calculations. The set of equations adequate for large drops is not satisfactory for medium-size drops (10 \\leq ri \\leq 100 {\\mu}m), and vice versa. In the case of large particles, the increase in the interfacial area as a consequence of the deformation of the drops generates a very large repulsive barrier which opposes coalescence. Nevertheless, the buoyancy force prevails. As a consequence, it is the hydrodynamic tensor of the drops which determine the characteristic behavior of the lifetime as a function of the particle size. While the average values of the coalescence time of the drops can be justified by the mechanism of film thinning, the scattering of the experimental data of large drops cannot be rationalized using the methodology previously described. A possible explanation of this phenomenon required elaborate simulations which combine deformable drops, capillary waves, repulsive interaction forces, and a time-dependent surfactant adsorption.

  5. Bounds for Lifetime Maximization with Multiple Sinks in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    in the literature (e.g., [2], [3]). The network lifetime in a WSN can be defined as the time at which the first node-sink WSN. In [9], Oyman and Ersoy used multiple sinks to reduce the energy consumption of WSN. The network-efficient routing for multi-sink WSNs. In this scheme, each partition in the WSN has one sink and the source only

  6. Vibrational lifetimes and vibrational line positions in polyatomic supercritical fluids near the critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    of the asymmetric (T1u) CO stretching mode of W CO 6 in supercritical CO2, C2H6, and CHF3 as a function of solvent spectra of W CO 6 and Rh CO 2acac in supercritical CO2, C2H6, and CHF3 acquired for the same isothermsVibrational lifetimes and vibrational line positions in polyatomic supercritical fluids near

  7. Breakdown of the photon lifetime concept in optical cavities with negative group delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauprêtre, T; Ghosh, R; Carusotto, I; Goldfarb, F; Bretenaker, F

    2011-01-01

    The concept of photon lifetime in a cavity is shown to be non-relevant in the case where the cavity round-trip group delay is negative due to the presence of a strong intracavity negative dispersion. Causality is shown to forbid the cavity spectrum from being a single Lorentzian. These features are tested experimentally using intracavity detuned electromagnetically induced transparency in room-temperature metastable helium.

  8. Familial Breast Cancer Julie Saffarian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Familial Breast Cancer Julie Saffarian Genomics & Medicine Stanford University #12;Definitions metastasis" ­ Wikipedia.com What is Breast Cancer? - Breast Cancer is a disease in which the uncontrollable Breast Cancer? - Sporadic Breast Cancer is non-hereditary and represents 85-90% of Cancer cases

  9. 505: New Mass and Lifetime of the \\Xi + Sergio P. Ratti (for the E687 Collaboration ? ) (ratti@pv.infn.it)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratti, Sergio P.

    505: New Mass and Lifetime of the \\Xi + c Sergio P. Ratti (for the E687 Collaboration ? ) (ratti@pv

  10. Stochastic modeling and survival analysis of marginally trapped neutrons for a magnetic trapping neutron lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Coakley; M. S. Dewey; M. G. Huber; P. R. Huffman; C. R. Huffer; D. E. Marley; H. P. Mumm; C. M. O'Shaughnessy; K. W. Schelhammer; A. K. Thompson; A. T. Yue

    2015-08-10

    In a variety of neutron lifetime experiments, in addition to $\\beta-$decay, neutrons can be lost by other mechanisms including wall losses. Failure to account for these other loss mechanisms produces systematic measurement error and associated systematic uncertainties in neutron lifetime measurements. In this work, we develop a physical model for neutron wall losses and construct a competing risks survival analysis model to account for losses due to the joint effect of $\\beta-$decay losses, wall losses of marginally trapped neutrons, and an additional absorption mechanism. We determine the survival probability function associated with the wall loss mechanism by a Monte Carlo method. Based on a fit of the competing risks model to a subset of the NIST experimental data, we determine the mean lifetime of trapped neutrons to be approximately 700 s -- considerably less than the current best estimate of (880.1 $\\pm$ 1.1) s promulgated by the Particle Data Group [1]. Currently, experimental studies are underway to determine if this discrepancy can be explained by neutron capture by ${}^3$He impurities in the trapping volume. Analysis of the full NIST data will be presented in a later publication.

  11. Analysis of Lifetime Data for the Linac 201 MHz Power Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot McCrory and Robert C. Webber

    2002-07-09

    This document analyzes data on the lifetime of the 201-MHz triode power amplifier (PA) vacuum tube, model number 7835, used in the low-energy half of the Linac. We observe that a 7835 power amplifier vacuum tube has historically provided about one and one-third years service in the Linac. The lifetime of recently re-manufactured tubes is somewhat less, but it is not clear if this is because the manufacturer is ''loosing their touch,'' or because tubes cannot be effectively rebuilt after a certain number of times. Taking into account the expected tube lifetimes, the statistical fluctuations on this number, and the amount of time it takes for the manufacturer to make good tubes, we require about 14 tubes either operating, ready as good spares or being manufactured, in order to have sufficient spares to run the Linac. As a hedge against supplier drop out, we need to increase our inventory of good spare tubes by about three tubes per year for the next few years.

  12. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  13. Constraining the Lifetime of QSOs with Present-day Mass Function of Supermassive Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Hosokawa

    2002-05-13

    Using the theoretical models of the QSO formation, we can reproduce optical QSO luminosity functions (LFs) at high redshifts (z > 2.2). Two different models can reproduce LFs successfully, though the lifetime of QSOs, t_Q, and the relation between the black hole mass and the host halo mass are different each other; t_Q = 10^6yr, in one model, t_Q > 10^7yr, in other models. Here, we propose a method to break this degeneracy. We calculate the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at z=2.5, and compare the result with the current mass function obtained by Salucci et al.(1999). In the shorter lifetime model, the mass function at z=2.5 exceeds that of z=0.0 by one order of magnitude, then it should be ruled out. We conclude that the lifetime is at least t_Q > 10^7yr. Next, we examine the difference of the formation epoch of SMBHs existing at z=3.0 for each model under the model assumptions. We simply discuss the difference of formation epoch as another possible model-discriminator.

  14. Measurement of D0 lifetime with the BaBar detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simi, Gabriele; /Pisa U. /SLAC

    2009-12-17

    This work is the result of the researchers carried out during a three years Ph.D. period in the BABAR experiment. The first chapter consists in an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime determination and CP violation parameters, as well as an overview of the CP violation in the B sector, which is the main topic of the experiment. The description of the experimental apparatus follows with particular attention to the Silicon Vertex Tracker detector, the most critical detector for the determination of decay vertices and thus of lifetimes and time dependent CP violation asymmetries. In the fourth chapter the operation and running of the vertex detector is described, as a result from the experience as Operation Manager of the SVT, with particular attention to the safety of the device and the data quality assurance. The last chapter is dedicated to the determination of the D{sup 0} meson lifetime with the BABAR detector, which is the main data analysis carried out by the candidate. The analysis is characterized by the selection of an extremely pure sample of D{sup 0} mesons for which the decay flight length and proper time is reconstructed. The description of the unbinned maximum likelihood fit follows, as well as the discussion of the possible sources of systematic uncertainties. In the appendix is also presented a preliminary study of a possible development regarding the determination of mixing and CP violation parameters for the D{sup 0} meson.

  15. Studies of unicellular micro-organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubicz, E; Zgardzi?ska, B; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Gorgol, M; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Nied?wiecki, S; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rajfur, Z; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    Results of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and microscopic studies on simple microorganisms: brewing yeasts are presented. Lifetime of ortho - positronium (o-Ps) were found to change from 2.4 to 2.9 ns (longer lived component) for lyophilised and aqueous yeasts, respectively. Also hygroscopicity of yeasts in time was examined, allowing to check how water - the main component of the cell - affects PALS parameters, thus lifetime of o-Ps were found to change from 1.2 to 1.4 ns (shorter lived component) for the dried yeasts. The time sufficient to hydrate the cells was found below 10 hours. In the presence of liquid water an indication of reorganization of yeast in the molecular scale was observed. Microscopic images of the lyophilised, dried and wet yeasts with best possible resolution were obtained using Inverted Microscopy (IM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) methods. As a result visible changes to the surface of the cell membrane were observed in ESEM images.

  16. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgarian, Behrouz [K.N. Toosi University of Technology Tehran Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri [K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis.In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  17. Attempt to distinguish long-range temporal correlations from the statistics of the increments by natural time analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varotsos, P. A. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 157 84, Athens (Greece); Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 157 84, Athens (Greece); Sarlis, N. V.; Lazaridou, M. S. [Solid State Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 157 84, Athens (Greece); Skordas, E. S. [Solid Earth Physics Institute, Physics Department, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 157 84, Athens (Greece); Tanaka, H. K. [Earthquake Prediction Research Center, Tokai University 3-20-1, Shimizu-Orido, Shizuoka 424-8610 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    Self-similarity may originate from two origins: i.e., the process memory and the process' increments 'infinite' variance. A distinction is attempted by employing the natural time {chi}. Concerning the first origin, we analyze recent data on seismic electric signals, which support the view that they exhibit infinitely ranged temporal correlations. Concerning the second, slowly driven systems that emit bursts of various energies E obeying the power-law distribution--i.e., P(E){approx}E{sup -{gamma}}--are studied. An interrelation between the exponent {gamma} and the variance {kappa}{sub 1}({identical_to}<{chi}{sup 2}>-<{chi}>{sup 2}) is obtained for the shuffled (randomized) data. For real earthquake data, the most probable value of {kappa}{sub 1} of the shuffled data is found to be approximately equal to that of the original data, the difference most likely arising from temporal correlation. Finally, it is found that the differential entropy associated with the probability P({kappa}{sub 1}) maximizes for {gamma} around {gamma}{approx_equal}1.6-1.7, which is comparable to the value determined experimentally in diverse phenomena: e.g., solar flares, icequakes, dislocation glide in stressed single crystals of ice, etc. It also agrees with the b value in the Gutenberg-Richter law of earthquakes. In addition, the case of multiplicative cascades is studied in the natural time domain.

  18. Measurement of the B-cmeson lifetime in the decay B-c?J/???

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.

    2013-01-01

    The lifetime of the B-c meson is measured using 272 exclusive B-c?J/?(?????)?? decays reconstructed in data from proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb?¹ recorded by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The lifetime of the B-cmeson is measured to be ?(B-c)=0.452±0.048(stat)±0.027(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the B-c meson lifetime in a fully reconstructed hadronic channel, and it agrees with previous results and has comparable precision.

  19. Cancer: A suppression switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starobinets, H; Debnath, J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer A suppression switch The status of the protein p53it seems that p53 acts as a switch in pancreatic cancer thatthe ability of p53 to switch the clinical outcome of

  20. Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition Bldg.Pedestrian Link from Ardmore Tower to Comprehensive Cancer Center on Ground Floor Emergency Room Parking Pedestrian Link to Parking on 4th Floor Surgical

  1. PROSTATE CANCER EVIDENCE ACADEMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    PROSTATE CANCER EVIDENCE ACADEMY CME/CNE-Certified Course The Inn at Penn 3600 Sansom Street:30 PM R E G I S T E R O N L I N E AT PENNCMEONLINE.COM/NODE/57378 #12;OVERVIEW The Prostate Cancer, and model programs that are proven effective or being studied to improve prostate cancer prevention, control

  2. Elevated levels of somatic mutation of the glycophorin A locus in cancer patients: Relevance for incidence of secondary cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, S.G.; Bigbee, W.L. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The glycophorin A (GPA)-based human in vivo somatic mutation assay was used to survey a large number of newly diagnosed cancer patients presenting with a variety of solid tumors. This cancer patient population was sampled pre-therapy and frequencies of two types of variant cells determined: allele loss segregants arising by mutation, deletion, chromosome loss or gene inactivation, and allele loss and duplication segregants arising by chromosome missegregation, mitotic recombination and possibly gene conversion. When compared with matched controls, the cancer patient population exhibited significantly elevated frequencies of both types of segregants. Cancer patients undergoing genotoxic therapy with chemicals and/or ionizing radiation were then examined, yielding variable results depending on the particular agent. In patients receiving localized high dose radiotherapy there was no response with either endpoint. In most cases involving chemotherapy, a significant elevation in the frequency of allele loss variants was observed within one month of the initiation of therapy which persisted at least one erythrocyte lifetime ({approximately}4 months) post therapy. In a subset of these cases, specifically, involving the known stem cell mutagen cis-platinum, the allele loss variant cell frequency remained significantly elevated up to 7 years after treatment. These results indicate that individuals with cancer have inherently higher levels of somatic mutation and segregation, due to genetic predisposition or exposure to environmental genotoxicants, or both, and that certain types of cancer therapy add significantly to the burden of mutation. These data provide a molecular rationale for the increased frequency of secondary malignancy observed in primary cancer patients: they are at increased risk of already having or easily acquiring the necessary carcinogenic events implicated in the progression of multi-step oncogenesis.

  3. Lifetime of high-k gate dielectrics and analogy with strength of quasibrittle Jia-Liang Le,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    for breakdown lifetime increases in proportion to the thickness of the oxide layer and suggests new ideas in the gate oxide layer induces the trap-assisted tunneling process, which leads to the gate leakage current

  4. Evidence That New Hypnotics Cause Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: evidence from twowere associated with ovarian cancer (Harlow et al. 1998;

  5. Excited-Level Lifetimes and Hyperfine-Structure Measurements on Ions using Collinear Laser Ion-Beam Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The mean lifetimes tau of the Ca II 4p P-2(1/2) and 4p P-2(3/2) levels, and the Cl-35 II 4p' F-1(3) level, have been measured by a variant of the collinear laser-ion-beam lifetime technique applied previously to the Ar II 4p' F-2(7/2)o level [Jian...

  6. FIGHTING CANCER Cancer Research at the University of Notre Dame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buechler, Steven

    FIGHTING CANCER Cancer Research at the University of Notre Dame College of Science 168 Hurley Hall Fighting Cancer 5 Ani Aprahamian Isotopes for cancer therapy and immuno-diagnosis 7 Brian Baker Development of improved immunological therapies for cancer based on cellular immunity 9 Suzanne Bohlson Inflammation

  7. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA1 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC) is the most common hereditary form of breast and ovarian cancer. About 2% of women

  8. Intrinsic state lifetimes in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 106,107}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, S. F.; Thomas, N. J.; Regan, P. H.; Gelletly, W.; Andgren, K.; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Plettner, C.; Vinson, J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Clark, R. M.; Guerdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Papenberg, A.; Meyer, D. A.; Erduran, M. N.

    2007-12-15

    The mean-lifetimes, {tau}, of various medium-spin excited states in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 106,107}Cd have been deduced using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift technique and the Differential Decay Curve Method. In {sup 106}Cd, the mean-lifetimes of the I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} state at E{sub x}=5418 keV and the I{sup {pi}}=11{sup -} state at E{sub x}=4324 keV have been deduced as 11.4(17)ps and 8.2(7)ps, respectively. The associated {beta}{sub 2} deformation within the axially-symmetric deformed rotor model for these states are 0.14(1) and 0.14(1), respectively. The {beta}{sub 2} deformation of 0.14(1) for the I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} state in {sup 106}Cd compares with a predicted {beta}{sub 2} value from total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations of 0.17. In addition, the mean-lifetimes of the yrast I{sup {pi}}=(15/2){sup -} states in {sup 103}Pd (at E{sub x}=1262 keV) and {sup 107}Cd (at E{sub x}=1360 keV) have been deduced to be 31.2(44)ps and 31.4(17)ps, respectively, corresponding to {beta}{sub 2} values of 0.16(1) and 0.12(1) assuming axial symmetry. Agreement with TRS calculations are good for {sup 103}Pd but deviate for that predicted for {sup 107}Cd.

  9. Data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tishchenko; S. Battu; S. Cheekatmalla; D. B. Chitwood; S. Dhamija; T. P. Gorringe; F. Gray; K. R. Lynch; I. Logashenko; S. Rath; D. M. Webber

    2008-02-07

    We describe the data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment at Paul Scherrer Institute. The system was designed to record muon decays at rates up to 1 MHz and acquire data at rates up to 60 MB/sec. The system employed a parallel network of dual-processor machines and repeating acquisition cycles of deadtime-free time segments in order to reach the design goals. The system incorporated a versatile scheme for control and diagnostics and a custom web interface for monitoring experimental conditions.

  10. Improved Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuLan Collaboration; D. B. Chitwood; T. I. Banks; M. J. Barnes; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; S. Cheekatmalla; S. M. Clayton; J. Crnkovic; K. M. Crowe; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; M. Hance; D. W. Hertzog; M. F. Hare; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; C. S. Ozben; Q. Peng; C. C. Polly; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; V. Tishchenko; G. D. Wait; J. Wasserman; D. M. Webber; P. Winter; P. A. Zolnierczuk

    2008-02-08

    The mean life of the positive muon has been measured to a precision of 11 ppm using a low-energy, pulsed muon beam stopped in a ferromagnetic target, which was surrounded by a scintillator detector array. The result, tau_mu = 2.197013(24) us, is in excellent agreement with the previous world average. The new world average tau_mu = 2.197019(21) us determines the Fermi constant G_F = 1.166371(6) x 10^-5 GeV^-2 (5 ppm). Additionally, the precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime is needed to determine the nucleon pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  11. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-05

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  12. Temperature dependence of diffusion length, lifetime and minority electron mobility in GaInP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultes, F. J.; Haegel, N. M.; Christian, T.; Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Jones-Albertus, R.; Pickett, E.; Liu, T.; Misra, P.; Sukiasyan, A.; Yuen, H.

    2013-12-09

    The mobility of electrons in double heterostructures of p-type Ga{sub 0.50}In{sub 0.50}P has been determined by measuring minority carrier diffusion length and lifetime. The minority electron mobility increases monotonically from 300?K to 5?K, limited primarily by optical phonon and alloy scattering. Comparison to majority electron mobility over the same temperature range in comparably doped samples shows a significant reduction in ionized impurity scattering at lower temperatures, due to differences in interaction of repulsive versus attractive carriers with ionized dopant sites. These results should be useful in modeling and optimization for multi-junction solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  13. Backward air lasing actions induced by femtosecond laser filamentation: influence of population inversion lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Hongqiang; chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Jing, Chenrui; Li, Ziting; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate generation of backward 357 nm N2 laser in a gas mixture of N2/Ar using 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses, and examine the involved gain dynamics based on pump-probe measurements. Our findings show that a minimum lifetime of population inversion in the excited N2 molecules is required for generating intense backward nitrogen lasers, which is ~0.8 ns under our experimental conditions. The results shed new light on the mechanism for generating intense backward lasers from ambient air, which are highly in demand for high sensitivity remote atmospheric sensing application.

  14. Addressing Inter-set Write-Variation for Improving Lifetime of Non-Volatile Caches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mittal, Sparsh [ORNL] [ORNL; Vetter, Jeffrey S [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We propose a technique which minimizes inter-set write variation in NVM caches for improving its lifetime. Our technique uses cache coloring scheme to add a software-controlled mapping layer between groups of physical pages (called memory regions) and cache sets. Periodically, the number of writes to different colors of the cache is computed and based on this result, the mapping of a few colors is changed to channel the write traffic to least utilized cache colors. This change helps to achieve wear-leveling.

  15. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Arimoto; N. Higashi; Y. Igarashi; Y. Iwashita; T. Ino; R. Katayama; R. Kitahara; M. Kitaguchi; H. Matsumura; K. Mishima; H. Oide; H. Otono; R. Sakakibara; T. Shima; H. M. Shimizu; T. Sugino; N. Sumi; H. Sumino; K. Taketani; G. Tanaka; M. Tanaka; K. Tauchi; A. Toyoda; T. Yamada; S. Yamashita; H. Yokoyama; T. Yoshioka

    2015-09-11

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with $^6$Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  16. Measurements of the masses, lifetimes and mixings of B hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malde, S; /Oxford U.

    2009-09-01

    The Tevatron, with p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, can produce all flavors of B hadrons and allows for unprecedented studies in the B physics sector. The CDF and D0 collaborations have more than 5 fb{sup -1} of data recorded. I present here a selection of recent results on the masses, lifetimes and mixings of B hadrons using between 1.0 and 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data.

  17. Limits on the Higgs boson lifetime and width from its decay to four charged leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; A??lar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Constraints on the lifetime and width of the Higgs boson are obtained from $\\mathrm{H} \\to \\mathrm{ZZ} \\to 4\\ell$ events using data recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 with an integrated luminosity of 5.1 and 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson lifetime is derived from its flight distance in the CMS detector with an upper bound of $\\tau_{\\mathrm{H}} $ lower than $ 1.9 \\times 10^{-13}$ s at the 95% confidence level (CL), corresponding to a lower bound on the width of $\\Gamma_{\\mathrm{H}} $ larger than $ 3.5 \\times 10^{-9} $ MeV. The measurement of the width is obtained from an off-shell production technique, generalized to include anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to two electroweak bosons. From this measurement, a joint constraint is set on the Higgs boson width and a parameter $f_{\\Lambda Q}$ that expresses an anomalous coupling contribution as an on-shell cross-section fraction. The limit on the Higgs boson width is ...

  18. Lifetime measurements of normal deformed states in {sub 71}{sup 165}Lu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andgren, K. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Podolyak, Zs.; Gelletly, W.; Walker, P. M.; Wheldon, C. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Dewald, A.; Fitzler, A.; Moeller, O.; Pissulla, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Xu, F.R. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Algora, A. [IFIC, Valencia (Spain); MTA, ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Axiotis, M.; Angelis, G. de; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Marginean, N.; Martinez, T.; Rusu, C. [I.N.F.N., Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Bazzacco, D.; Lunardi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica and I.N.F.N., Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)] [and others

    2005-01-01

    Picosecond lifetimes of medium spin states in {sup 165}Lu were measured for the first time. The reaction used to populate the nucleus of interest was {sup 139}La({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 165}Lu at a beam energy of 135 MeV. The beam was provided by the XTU-tandem accelerator of Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. By using the differential decay curve method, lifetimes of 19 states in four different rotational bands were obtained. Therefrom the B(E2) values and the transitional quadrupole moments were deduced. The obtained Q{sub t} for the different bands are compared with total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations and particle-rotor-model calculations. The TRS calculations predict different axial symmetric shapes for the bands built on the 9/2{sup -}[514], 9/2{sup +}[404], and 1/2{sup -}[541] configurations, with a {gamma} softness for the 9/2{sup -}[514] configuration. This band has also been studied using the particle-rotor model, the results of which, however, are consistent with a triaxial shape with a {gamma} value of -15 degrees.

  19. Recoil Distance Method Lifetime Measurements in 107Cd and 103Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andgren, K.; Ashley, S. F.; Regan, P. H.; McCutchan, E. A.; Zamfir, N. V.; Casten, R. F.; Meyer, D. A.; Plettner, C.; Vinson, J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Erduran, M. N.; Clark, R. M.; Guerdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Papenberg, A.; Pietralla, N.; Rainovski, G.

    2006-04-26

    Preliminary lifetime values have been measured for a number of near-yrast states in the odd-A transitional nuclei 107Cd and 103Pd. The reaction used to populate the nuclei of interest was 98Mo(12C,3nx{alpha})107Cd, 103Pd, with the beam delivered by the tandem accelerator of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at an incident beam energy of 60 MeV. Our experiment was aimed at the investigation of collective excitations built on the unnatural parity, {nu} h11/2 orbital, specifically by measuring the B(E2) values of decays from the excited levels built on this intrinsic structure, using the Doppler Recoil Distance Method. We report lifetimes and associated transition probabilities for decays from the 15/2- and the 19/2- states in 107Cd and the first measurement of the 15/2- state in 103Pd. These results suggest that neither a simple rotational or vibrational interpretation is sufficient to explain the observed structures.

  20. Limits on the Higgs boson lifetime and width from its decay to four charged leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-07-23

    Constraints on the lifetime and width of the Higgs boson are obtained from H to ZZ to 4 lepton events using data recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 with an integrated luminosity of 5.1 and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at a center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The measurement of the Higgs boson lifetime is derived from its flight distance in the CMS detector with an upper bound of tau[H] 3.5E-9 MeV. The measurement of the width is obtained from an off-shell production technique, generalized to include anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson to two electroweak bosons. From this measurement, a joint constraint is set on the Higgs boson width and a parameter f[LQ] that expresses an anomalous coupling contribution as an on-shell cross-section fraction. The limit on the Higgs boson width is Gamma[H] Higgs boson width.

  1. The wear-out approach for predicting the remaining lifetime of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GILLEN,KENNETH T.; CELINA,MATHIAS C.

    2000-05-11

    Failure models based on the Palmgren-Miner concept that material damage is cumulative have been derived and used mainly for fatigue life predictions for metals and composite materials. The authors review the principles underlying such models and suggest ways in which they may be best applied to polymeric materials in temperature environments. They first outline expectations when polymer degradation data can be rigorously time-temperature superposed over a given temperature range. For a step change in temperature after damage has occurred at an initial temperature in this range, the authors show that the remaining lifetime at the second temperature should be linearly related to the aging time prior to the step. This predicted linearity implies that it should be possible to estimate the remaining and therefore the service lifetime of polymers by completing the aging at an accelerated temperature. They refer to this generic temperature-step method as the Wear-out approach. They next outline the expectations for Wear-out experiments when time-temperature superposition is invalid. Experimental Wear-out results are then analyzed for one material where time-temperature superposition is valid and for another where evidence suggests it is invalid. In analyzing the data, they introduce a procedure that they refer to as time-degradation superposition. This procedure not only utilizes all of the experimental data instead of a single point from each data set, but also allows them to determine the importance of any interaction effects.

  2. Work at FNAL to achieve long electron drift lifetime in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finley, D.; Jaskierny, W.; Kendziora, C.; Krider, J.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Tope, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This note records some of the work done between July 2005 and July 2006 to achieve long (many milliseconds) electron drift lifetimes in liquid argon at Fermilab. The work is part of a process to develop some experience at Fermilab with the technology required to construct a large liquid argon TPC. This technology has been largely developed by the ICARUS collaboration in Europe and this process can be seen as technology transfer. The capability to produce liquid argon in which electrons have drift lifetimes of several milliseconds is crucial to a successful device. Liquid argon calorimeters have been successfully operated at Fermilab; their electro-negative contaminants are at the level of 10{sup -7} while the TPC we are considering requires a contamination level at the level of 10{sup -11}, tens of parts per trillion (ppt). As well as demonstrating the ability to produce liquid argon at this level of purity, the work is part of a program to test the effect on the electron drift time of candidate materials for the construction of a TPC in liquid argon.

  3. Cancer Due to Prolonged Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01

    Werb J. Inflammation and cancer. Nature. 2002 December 19;J.T. , Szabo E. , et al. Cancer and inflammation: PromiseInflammation, a Key Event in Cancer Development. Molecular

  4. Bismuth 213 Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    See how INL scientists are increasing supplies of radioactive medical isotopes to treat cancer. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Sample-Specific Cancer Pathway Analysis Using PARADIGM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, Stephen Charles

    2012-01-01

    associated with Ovarian Cancer 29 3.2.3 Di?erentiallyOvarian Cancer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ovarian Cancer) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. Detailed Report of the MuLan Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tishchenko; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; D. B. Chitwood; J. Crnkovic; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; Z. Hartwig; D. W. Hertzog; B. Johnson; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; S. Kizilgul; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; Q. Peng; J. Phillips; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; D. M. Webber; P. Winter; B. Wolfe

    2012-11-05

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100%-polarized, surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing, plastic scintillator array. The measurement employed two target arrangements; a magnetized ferromagnetic target with a ~4 kG internal magnetic field and a crystal quartz target in a 130 G external magnetic field. Approximately 1.6 x 10^{12} positrons were accumulated and together the data yield a muon lifetime of tau_{mu}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps (1.0 ppm), thirty times more precise than previous generations of lifetime experiments. The lifetime measurement yields the most accurate value of the Fermi constant G_F (MuLan) = 1.1663787(6) x 10^{-5} GeV^{-2} (0.5 ppm). It also enables new precision studies of weak interactions via lifetime measurements of muonic atoms.

  7. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP (Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter) instrument on Spacelab 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.

    1988-10-01

    The flight of the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 allowed the collection of time sequences of diffraction-limited (0.5 arc second) granulation images with excellent pointing (0.003 arc second jitter RMS) and freedom from the distortion that plagues ground-based images. The solar 5 minute oscillations are clearly seen in the data. Using Fourier transforms in the temporal and spatial domain, the authors show that these dominate the autocorrelation lifetime in magnetic regions. When the oscillations are removed the autocorrelation lifetime is found to be 410 and 890 seconds, respectively, in quiet and magnetic regions. In quiet areas exploding granules are common. It is hard to find that neither explodes nor is unaffected by a nearby explosion. A significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Local correlation-tracking techniques are used to measure horizontal displacements, and thus transverse velocities, in the intensity field. In the quiet sun it is possible to detect both super- and mesogranulation. Horizontal velocities are as great as 1000 m/s quiet sun, and the average velocity is 400 m/s. In magnetic regions, horizontal velocities are much less, about 200 m/s. These flows effect the measured lifetime. A lower limit to the lifetime in quiet and magnetic sun is estimated to be 440 and 950 seconds respectively.

  8. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant to Part-per-Million Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Webber; V. Tishchenko; Q. ~Peng; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; D. B. Chitwood; J. Crnkovic; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; Z. Hartwig; D. W. Hertzog; B. Johnson; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; S. Kizilgul; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; J. Phillips; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; P. Winter; B. Wolfe

    2010-12-06

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 parts per million (ppm); it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2 x 10^{12} decays. Two different stopping target configurations were employed in independent data-taking periods. The combined results give tau_{mu^+}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps, more than 15 times as precise as any previous experiment. The muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi constant: G_F(MuLan) = 1.1663788 (7) x 10^-5 GeV^-2 (0.6 ppm). It is also used to extract the mu^-p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton's weak induced pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  9. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  10. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic waste repository: 1. Theory, illustrations, and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J; Normani, S D; Sudicky, E A; Sykes, J F

    2011-01-01

    Long-term solutions for the disposal of toxic wastes usually involve isolation of the wastes in a deep subsurface geologic environment. In the case of spent nuclear fuel, if radionuclide leakage occurs from the engineered barrier, the geological medium represents the ultimate barrier that is relied upon to ensure safety. Consequently, an evaluation of radionuclide travel times from a repository to the biosphere is critically important in a performance assessment analysis. In this study, we develop a travel time framework based on the concept of groundwater lifetime expectancy as a safety indicator. Lifetime expectancy characterizes the time that radionuclides will spend in the subsurface after their release from the repository and prior to discharging into the biosphere. The probability density function of lifetime expectancy is computed throughout the host rock by solving the backward-in-time solute transport adjoint equation subject to a properly posed set of boundary conditions. It can then be used to defi...

  11. Inflammation & Inflammation & cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beimel, Amos

    Tam & tnf dc cytokines metastasis metabolism #12;22 chemokine gradient in cancer (Balkwill et al. 2004 1861) Wound healing dc Tam & tnf cytokines metastasis therapeutics metabolism inflammation The end #12 & tnf cytokines metastasis metabolism #12;4 Motivation Cancer as an overhealing wound Lets Go! Wound

  12. Enhancement of minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with lateral composition modulation structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, K. W.; Ravindran, Sooraj; Kang, S. J.; Hwang, H. Y.; Jho, Y. D.; Park, C. Y.; Jo, Y. R.; Kim, B. J.; Lee, Y. T.

    2014-07-28

    We report the enhancement of the minority carrier lifetime of GaInP with a lateral composition modulated (LCM) structure grown using molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The structural and optical properties of the grown samples are studied by transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence, which reveal the formation of vertically aligned bright and dark slabs corresponding to Ga-rich and In-rich GaInP regions, respectively, with good crystal quality. With the decrease of V/III ratio during LCM GaInP growth, it is seen that the band gap of LCM GaInP is reduced, while the PL intensity remains high and is comparable to that of bulk GaInP. We also investigate the minority carrier lifetime of LCM structures made with different flux ratios. It is found that the minority carrier lifetime of LCM GaInP is ?37 times larger than that of bulk GaInP material, due to the spatial separation of electrons and holes by In-rich and Ga-rich regions of the LCM GaInP, respectively. We further demonstrate that the minority carrier lifetime of the grown LCM GaInP structures can easily be tuned by simply adjusting the V/III flux ratio during MBE growth, providing a simple yet powerful technique to tailor the electrical and optical properties at will. The exceptionally high carrier lifetime and the reduced band gap of LCM GaInP make them a highly attractive candidate for forming the top cell of multi-junction solar cells and can enhance their efficiency, and also make them suitable for other optoelectronics devices, such as photodetectors, where longer carrier lifetime is beneficial.

  13. Fast concurrent array-based stacks, queues and deques using fetch-and-increment-bounded, fetch-and-decrement-bounded and store-on-twin synchronization primitives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alana; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Wisniewski, Robert

    2014-09-16

    Implementation primitives for concurrent array-based stacks, queues, double-ended queues (deques) and wrapped deques are provided. In one aspect, each element of the stack, queue, deque or wrapped deque data structure has its own ticket lock, allowing multiple threads to concurrently use multiple elements of the data structure and thus achieving high performance. In another aspect, new synchronization primitives FetchAndIncrementBounded (Counter, Bound) and FetchAndDecrementBounded (Counter, Bound) are implemented. These primitives can be implemented in hardware and thus promise a very fast throughput for queues, stacks and double-ended queues.

  14. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Permana, Dony, E-mail: donypermana@students.itb.ac.id [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia and Statistics Study Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Padang State University (Indonesia); Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S. [Statistics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment MAMBO I and possible correction of neutron lifetime result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin

    2009-04-14

    We are discussing the present situation with neutron lifetime measurements. There is a serious discrepancy between the previous experiments and the recent precise experiment [1]. The possible reason of the discrepancy can be connected with a quasi-elastic scattering of UCN on the surface of liquid fomblin which was used for most of the previous experiments. The Monte Carlo simulation of one of the previous experiments [2] shows that the result of this experiment [2] has to be corrected and instead of the previous result 887.6 +/- 3 s the new result 880.4 +/- 3 s has to be claimed. [1] A.P. Serebrov et al., Phys. Lett. B 605 (2005) 72. [2] W. Mampe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 (1989) 593.

  16. Constraints on neutrino decay lifetime using long-baseline charged and neutral current data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Gomes; A. L. G. Gomes; O. L. G. Peres

    2014-12-11

    We investigate the status of a scenario involving oscillations and decay for charged and neutral current data from the MINOS and T2K experiments. We first present an analysis of charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino data from MINOS in the framework of oscillation with decay and obtain a best fit for non-zero decay parameter $\\alpha_3$. The MINOS charged and neutral current data analysis results in the best fit for $|\\Delta m_{32}^2| = 2.34\\times 10^{-3}$~eV$^2$, $\\sin^2 \\theta_{23} = 0.60$ and zero decay parameter, which corresponds to the limit for standard oscillations. Our combined MINOS and T2K analysis reports a constraint at the 90\\% confidence level for the neutrino decay lifetime $\\tau_3/m_3 > 2.8 \\times 10^{-12}$~s/eV. This is the best limit based only on accelerator produced neutrinos.

  17. Stochastic Boundary, Diffusion, Emittance Growth and Lifetime calculation for the RHIC e-lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.P.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2009-01-20

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a low energy electron beam with proper Gaussian transverse profiles was proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, using a modified version of SixTrack [1], we investigate stability of the single particle in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. The Lyapunov exponent and action diffusion are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation for two different working points and various bunch intensities. Using the action diffusion results the emittance growth rate and lifetime of the proton beam is also estimated for the different scenarios.

  18. Lifetime improvement of sheathed thermocouples for use in high-temperature and thermal transient operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Clift, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Premature failure of small-diameter, magnesium-oxide-insulated sheathed thermocouples occurred when they were placed within nuclear fuel rod simulators (FRSs) to measure high temperatures and to follow severe thermal transients encountered during simulation of nuclear reactor accidents in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) thermal-hydraulic test facilities. Investigation of thermally cycled thermocouples yielded three criteria for improvement of thermocouple lifetime: (1) reduction of oxygen impurities prior to and during their fabrication, (2) refinement of thermoelement grain size during their fabrication, and (3) elimination of prestrain prior to use above their recrystallization temperature. The first and third criteria were satisfied by improved techniques of thermocouple assembly and by a recovery anneal prior to thermocouple use.

  19. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  20. Cancer Cell Survival of Cancer Cells Is Maintained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    Cancer Cell Article Survival of Cancer Cells Is Maintained by EGFR Independent of Its Kinase,* and Mien-Chie Hung2,* 1Department of Cancer Biology 2Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA 3Present

  1. Mathematics for Cancer Research making optimal use of cancer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Mathematics for Cancer Research making optimal use of cancer data ACC Coolen King's College London ACC Coolen (KCL) Mathematics in cancer research January 2015 1 / 63 #12;1 Quality of raw data Bayesian projects ... ACC Coolen (KCL) Mathematics in cancer research January 2015 2 / 63 #12;biomedical research

  2. CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    CANCER GENETICS & PREVENTION HEREDITARY BREAST AND OVARIAN CANCER SYNDROME (HBOC) ­ BRCA2 PATIENT INFORMATION What is Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome? People with BRCA2 alterations have a genetic condition called Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome (HBOC). HBOC is caused by an error

  3. Evaluation of Lifetime of High Efficiency Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-379

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, D.

    2013-04-01

    As a part of this joint work, Solarmer and NREL will investigate the lifetime and stability of Organic Photovoltaic Devices based on Solarmer high efficiency active layer materials.

  4. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  5. Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    Digital Tomosynthesis: Advanced Breast Cancer Imaging Technique Max Wiedmann #12;Digital in CT. #12;Breast Cancer · The leading Cause of death for women ages 40-55. · Is only behind lung and bronchus cancer in terms of number of deaths in US. · Early detection of breast cancer is believed to save

  6. Survivorship Clinic Nutrition after Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    Survivorship Clinic Nutrition after Cancer Surviving cancer has a way of changing the way you look of practical, everyday questions that accompany life as a cancer survivor: Now what? How should I live successful treatment and are now leading vital, cancer- free lives. Maybe your doctor or dietitian has

  7. QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS & ANSWERS ABOUT LUNG CANCER Q: What are the early signs of lung cancer? How would I know I have it? A: Some of the early warning signs of lung cancer are: · A cough that doesn't go away what may be causing these symptoms. Q: How is lung cancer diagnosed? A: Your doctor may do one or more

  8. Prediction of the Creep-Fatigue Lifetime of Alloy 617: An Application of Non-destructive Evaluation and Information Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Richard Wright; Timothy Roney

    2014-08-01

    A relatively simple method using the nominal constant average stress information and the creep rupture model is developed to predict the creep-fatigue lifetime of Alloy 617, in terms of time to rupture. The nominal constant average stress is computed using the stress relaxation curve. The predicted time to rupture can be converted to number of cycles to failure using the strain range, the strain rate during each cycle, and the hold time information. The predicted creep-fatigue lifetime is validated against the experimental measurements of the creep-fatigue lifetime collected using conventional laboratory creep-fatigue tests. High temperature creep-fatigue tests of Alloy 617 were conducted in air at 950°C with a tensile hold period of up to 1800s in a cycle at total strain ranges of 0.3% and 0.6%. It was observed that the proposed method is conservative in that the predicted lifetime is less than the experimentally determined values. The approach would be relevant to calculate the remaining useful life to a component like a steam generator that might fail by the creep-fatigue mechanism.

  9. Doping dependence of the carrier lifetime crossover point upon dissociation of iron-boron pairs in crystalline silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in crystalline silicon D. Macdonald, T. Roth, P. N. K. Deenapanray, T. Trupke, and R. A. Bardos Citation: Applied in crystalline silicon by temperature- and injection-level-dependent lifetime measurements J. Appl. Phys. 97 crossover point upon dissociation of iron-boron pairs in crystalline silicon D. Macdonald,a T. Roth,b and P

  10. Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic of Physics. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Evolution

  11. Improving the lifetime performance of ceramic fuel cells Fuel cells generate electricity from fuels more efficiently and with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    2014 Improving the lifetime performance of ceramic fuel cells Fuel cells generate electricity from fuels more efficiently and with fewer emissions per watt than burning fossil fuels. But as fuel cells received an $800,000 Department of Energy grant to study how to make one type of fuel cell--solid oxide

  12. Fluorescence Lifetimes and Emission Patterns Probe the 3D Orientation of the Emitting Chromophore in a Multichromophoric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderlein, Jörg

    Fluorescence Lifetimes and Emission Patterns Probe the 3D Orientation of the Emitting Chromophore the orientation of the absorption transition dipole)15,16 and wide-field defocusing (probing the emission. It was suggested that, at any moment in time, the emission of a single dendrimer originates from the chromophore

  13. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

  14. Accelerating Solutions of Perfect Fluid Hydrodynamics for Initial Energy Density and Life-Time Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Csorgo; M. I. Nagy; M. Csanad

    2007-04-17

    A new class of accelerating, exact, explicit and simple solutions of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented. Since these new solutions yield a finite rapidity distribution, they lead to an advanced estimate of the initial energy density and life-time of high energy heavy ion reactions. Accelerating solutions are also given for spherical expansions in arbitrary number of spatial dimensions.

  15. MAXIMIZING THE LIFETIME OF CLUSTERS WITH SLEPIAN-WOLF CODING Tianqi Wang, Wendi Heinzelman, Alireza Seyedi, and Azadeh Vosoughi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzelman, Wendi

    is not energy constrained. When the fusion center is energy constrained, a near optimum solution is provided coding of data sent to a fusion center. Exact closed form solutions are derived when the fusion center-- Distributed source coding, Wireless sensor networks, Energy efficiency, Lifetime I. INTRODUCTION In general

  16. Magnetic dipole transition rates from measured lifetimes of levels of Be-like and B-like argon ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetimes of the 1s(2)2s2p P-3(2) level of Ar XV and 1s(2)2s(2)2p P-2(3/2) of Ar XIV have been measured using metastable Ar14+ and Ar13+ ions produced by an electron cyclotron resonance ion source, which were subsequently separately captured...

  17. Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power Stephen J. DeVience a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Matthew S

    Dependence of nuclear spin singlet lifetimes on RF spin-locking power Stephen J. DeVience a: Received 6 January 2012 Revised 14 March 2012 Available online 28 March 2012 Keywords: Nuclear singlet of long-lived nuclear spin singlet states as a function of the strength of the RF spin-locking field

  18. Measurements and calculations of metastable level lifetimes in Fe X, Fe XI, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Bhatti, M. I.; Church, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Lifetimes of metastable levels in the ground term of Fe ions within the 3s(2)3p(k), k=1-5, isoelectronic sequences have been measured. These measurements were performed utilizing ions that were selected by mass to charge ratio while transported from...

  19. Measurement of the [bar over B][0 over s] Meson Lifetime in D[+ over s]?[superscript ?] Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaij, R.

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the [bar over B][0 over s] meson lifetime, in the flavor-specific decay to D[+ over s]?[superscript ?], to that of the [bar over B][superscript 0] meson. The pp collision data used ...

  20. 1834 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2011 Analysis of Link Lifetimes and Neighbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Zhongmei

    , Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Several models of user churn, resilience, and link lifetime have recently restricted to the successor of the failed zone in the DHT space. To understand neighbor churn Churn. ! 1 INTRODUCTION RESILIENCE of distributed peer-to-peer (P2P) networks under user churn has

  1. Influence of local-field effects on the radiative lifetime of liquid suspensions of Nd:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Robert W.

    Influence of local-field effects on the radiative lifetime of liquid suspensions of Nd Received July 24, 2006; revised September 29, 2006; accepted October 13, 2006; posted October 25, 2006 (Doc information regarding local-field effects, we fitted the ex- perimental data to three different local

  2. Evidence That New Hypnotics Cause Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kripke, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    medication use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. , Hays, J. C. , Blazer,the likelihood of cancer causation is sufficiently strong

  3. Targeting mTOR in Pancreatic Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soares, Heloisa Prado

    2015-01-01

    Parsons J, Kern SE. Progression model for pancreatic cancer.Clinical Cancer Research. 2000;6(N8):2969-72.Martinelli P. Pancreatic Cancer Development and Progression:

  4. Extending the Lifetime of a Network of Battery-Powered Mobile Devices by Remote Processing: A Markovian Decision-based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Extending the Lifetime of a Network of Battery-Powered Mobile Devices by Remote Processing the lifetime of a battery- powered mobile host in a client-server wireless network by using task migration-line adaptive policy is proposed, which dynamically monitors the channel conditions and the server behavior

  5. Modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light-emitting devices with a weak/strong microcavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

    to their applications in display and lighting.1­4 Considering the microcavity effect, OLEDs can be roughly categorizedModifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency for organic light on the modifications of the exciton lifetime and internal quantum efficiency int for organic light-emitting devices

  6. Aneuploidy: Cancer's Fatal Flaw?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Bret R.

    Aneuploidy is a characteristic of cancer, with greater than 90% of all solid tumors in humans carrying an aberrant karyotype. Yet, whether or how this condition contributes to tumorigenesis is not understood. Here we ...

  7. Eye Cancer- Cobalt Treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has been shown to be a precursor to invasive ductal cancer (IDC). Though the progression of DCIS to IDC is believed to be an important aspect of tumor aggressiveness, prognosis and molecular markers that predict...

  8. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Ping

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and ...

  9. Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Cancer Epidemiology Greenebaum Cancer Center Population Research Program ­ Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer Associate Professor Tenuretrack Health is expanding research in Cancer Genetic Epidemiology to enrich an already robust campuswide

  10. The lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juanes, Ruben

    2013-12-30

    In carbon capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected underground into reservoirs like deep saline aquifers for long-term storage. While CCS may be critical for the continued use of fossil fuels in a carbon-constrained world, the deployment of CCS has been hindered by uncertainty in geologic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence of concerted government policy. Here, we clarify the potential of CCS to mitigate emissions in the United States by developing a storage-capacity supply curve that, unlike current large-scale capacity estimates, is derived from the fluid mechanics of CO2 injection and trapping and incorporates injection-rate constraints. We show that storage supply is a dynamic quantity that grows with the duration of CCS, and we interpret the lifetime of CCS as the time for which the storage supply curve exceeds the storage demand curve from CO2 production. We show that in the United States, if CO2 production from power generation continues to rise at recent rates, then CCS can store enough CO2 to stabilize emissions at current levels for at least 100 years. This result suggests that the large-scale implementation of CCS is a geologically viable climate-change mitigation option in the United States over the next century.

  11. An artificial Rb atom in a semiconductor with lifetime-limited linewidth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan-Philipp Jahn; Mathieu Munsch; Lucas Béguin; Andreas V. Kuhlmann; Martina Renggli; Yongheng Huo; Fei Ding; Rinaldo Trotta; Marcus Reindl; Oliver G. Schmidt; Armando Rastelli; Philipp Treutlein; Richard J. Warburton

    2015-08-26

    We report results important for the creation of a best-of-both-worlds quantum hybrid system consisting of a solid-state source of single photons and an atomic ensemble as quantum memory. We generate single photons from a GaAs quantum dot (QD) frequency-matched to the Rb D2-transitions and then use the Rb transitions to analyze spectrally the quantum dot photons. We demonstrate lifetime-limited QD linewidths (1.48 GHz) with both resonant and non-resonant excitation. The QD resonance fluorescence in the low power regime is dominated by Rayleigh scattering, a route to match quantum dot and Rb atom linewidths and to shape the temporal wave packet of the QD photons. Noise in the solid-state environment is relatively benign: there is a blinking of the resonance fluorescence at MHz rates but negligible upper state dephasing of the QD transition. We therefore establish a close-to-ideal solid-state source of single photons at a key wavelength for quantum technologies.

  12. Composite blend polymer membranes with increased proton selectivity and lifetime for vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dongyang; Kim, Soowhan; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Hickner, Michael A.

    2013-06-01

    Composite membranes based on sulfonated fluorinated poly(arylene ether) (SFPAE) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (P(VDF-co-HFP)) were prepared with various contents of P(VDF-co-HFP) for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) applications. The compatibility and interaction of SFPAE and P(VDF-co-HFP) were characterized by atomic force microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The water uptake, mechanical properties, thermal property, proton conductivity, VO2+ permeability and cell performance of the composite membranes were investigated in detail and compared to the pristine SFPAE membrane. It was found that SFPAE had good compatibility with P(VDF-co-HFP) and the incorporation of P(VDF-co-HFP) increased the mechanical properties, thermal property, and proton selectivity of the materials effectively. An SFPAE composite membrane with 10 wt.% P(VDF-co-HFP) exhibited a 44% increase in VRFB cell lifetime as compared to a cell with a pure SFPAE membrane. Therefore, the P(VDF-co-HFP) blending approach is a facile method for producing low-cost, high-performance VRFB membranes.

  13. Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

  14. Lifetime, turnover time, and fast magnetic field regeneration in random flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, S. E. M. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2007-10-15

    The fast dynamo is thought to be relevant in the regeneration of magnetic fields in astrophysics where the value of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm) is immense. The fast dynamo picture is one in which chaotic flows provide a mechanism for the stretching of magnetic field lines. Furthermore, a cascade of energy down to small scales results in intermittent regions of a small-scale, intense magnetic field. Given this scenario it is natural to invoke the use of kinematic random flows in order to understand field regeneration mechanisms better. Here a family of random flows is used to study the effects that L, the lifetime of the cell, and {tau}, the turnover time of the cell, may have on magnetic field regeneration. Defining the parameter {gamma}=L/{tau}, it has been varied according to {gamma}>1, {gamma}<1, {gamma}{approx}O(1). In the kinematic regime, dynamo growth rates and Lyapunov exponents are examined at varying values of Rm. The possibility of fast dynamo action is considered. In the nonlinear regime, magnetic and kinetic energies are examined. Results indicate that there does appear to be a relationship between {gamma} and dynamo efficiency. In particular, the most efficient dynamos seem to operate at lower values of {gamma}.

  15. Comparison of Minority Carrier Lifetime Measurements in Superstrate and Substrate CdTe PV Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.; Dhere, R. G.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Bergeson, J. D.

    2011-07-01

    We discuss typical and alternative procedures to analyze time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements of minority carrier lifetime (MCL) with the hope of enhancing our understanding of how this technique may be used to better analyze CdTe photovoltaic (PV) device functionality. Historically, TRPL measurements of the fast recombination rate (t1) have provided insightful correlation with broad device functionality. However, we have more recently found that t1 does not correlate as well with smaller changes in device performance, nor does it correlate well with performance differences observed between superstrate and substrate CdTe PV devices. This study presents TRPL data for both superstrate and substrate CdTe devices where both t1 and the slower TRPL decay (t2) are analyzed. The study shows that changes in performance expected from small changes in device processing may correlate better with t2. Numerical modeling further suggests that, for devices that are expected to have similar drift field in the depletion region, effects of changes in bulk MCL and interface recombination should be more pronounced in t2. Although this technique may provide future guidance to improving CdS/CdTe device performance, it is often difficult to extract statistically precise values for t2, and therefore t2 data may demonstrate significant scatter when correlated with performance parameters.

  16. Colorectal cancer and diet in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodoratou, Evropi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is a cancer that forms in the tissues of the colon and/ or rectum and more than 95% of colorectal cancers are adenocarcinomas. It is the third most common cancer in incidence and mortality ...

  17. Hollow nanoshells for cancer diagnostics and therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Protein Is a Marker for Ovarian-Cancer. Cancer Research,binding protein in ovarian cancers. International Journal ofTrophoblast and Ovarian-Cancer Antigen-Lk26 - Sensitivity

  18. CHEST Supplement Screening for Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    e78S CHEST Supplement Screening for Lung Cancer DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF LUNG CANCER, 3RD ED individuals). 3.2.2. In patients at risk for developing lung cancer, screening for lung cancer with sputum are age 55 to 74 and who have smoked for Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer

  19. Pegfilgrastim prophylaxis is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization of cancer patients than filgrastim prophylaxis: a retrospective United States claims analysis of granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, or colorectal cancer.cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, or colorectal cancerlung cancer, NHL, ovarian cancer, or colorectal cancer

  20. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  1. A new part-per-million measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Webber

    2011-09-29

    The Fermi Constant, G_F, describes the strength of the weak force and is determined most precisely from the mean life of the positive muon, tau_mu. Advances in theory have reduced the theoretical uncertainty on G_F as calculated from tau_mu to a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Until recently, the remaining uncertainty on G_F was entirely experimental and dominated by the uncertainty on tau_mu. We report the MuLan collaboration's recent 1.0 ppm measurement of the positive muon lifetime. This measurement is over a factor of 15 more precise than any previous measurement, and is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured low-energy muon beam and an array of plastic scintillators read-out by waveform digitizers and a fast data acquisition system to record over 2 times 10^{12} muon decays. Two different in-vacuum muon-stopping targets were used in separate data-taking periods. The results from these two data-taking periods are in excellent agreement. The combined results give tau_{mu^+}({MuLan})=2196980.3(2.2) ps. This measurement of the muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi Constant: G_F({MuLan}) = 1.1663788 (7) \\times 10^{-5} {GeV}^{-2} (0.6 ppm). The lifetime is also used to extract the mu^-p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton's weak induced pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  2. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1982-03-23

    A long-lifetime light source is discussed with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nightime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode.

  3. Design of a circuit for measuring the lifetimes of excited nuclear states of the order of nanoseconds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuritzky, Clarence Samuel

    1964-01-01

    the pulse shaper circuit. ABSTRACT Design of a Circuit for Measuring the Lifetimes of Excited Nuclear States of the Order of Nanoseconds (January 1964) Clarence S. Kuritzky, B. S. Air Force Institute of Technology Directed by Dr. Harnam S. Hans and Dr... rays emitted during the decay process and convert them into visible blue light. Photomultiplier tubes convert the visible light from the crystals into pulses whose amplitudes are proportional to the energies of the gamma rays. The output of one tube...

  4. Long lifetime, low intensity light source for use in nighttime viewing of equipment maps and other writings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.M.; Edwards, W.R.

    1983-10-11

    A long-lifetime light source with sufficiently low intensity to be used for reading a map or other writing at nighttime, while not obscuring the user's normal night vision is disclosed. This light source includes a diode electrically connected in series with a small power source and a lens properly positioned to focus at least a portion of the light produced by the diode. 1 fig.

  5. Breit-Pauli energy levels, transition probabilities, and lifetimes for 3d^5 levels in Fe IV of astrophysical interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charlotte Froese Fischer; Robert H. Rubin

    2004-08-24

    Energy levels, lifetimes, and transition probabilities for transitions between computed levels of 3d^5 of Fe IV are reported. The E2 and M1 transition probabilities are compared with earlier theoretical results, often only the values published by Garstang in 1958. From the available astronomical observations of optical emission lines arising from the same level, a few direct tests are now possible and they show consistency with the theoretical calculations.

  6. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R. [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamamoto, N. [Nagoya University Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M. [UVSOR, Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  7. Early Lung Cancer Detection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since 2000, DOE has made screening for occupational lung cancer with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) scans available to workers at high risk for lung cancer. Because former workers undertook essential activities to fulfill the Department's mission, many of them were at risk for lung cancer.

  8. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation Prostate Cancer Volume 2011, Article ID 176164, 7 pages doi:10.1155/2011/176164 Clinical Study Effect of Zoledronic Acid on Bone Mineral Density in Men with Prostate Cancer Receiving cancer is well recognized. We assessed the effects of quarterly infusion of zoledronic acid on bone

  9. Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Cancer Therapy with Particle Beams #12;· The potential to use high energy particle beams to treat many types of cancer has been known even before their creation. · The availability of these treatments to be used in medicine, specifically for the treatment of certain cancers. His paper was published when

  10. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-06-07

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  11. Measurement of the ?b? lifetime in the exclusive decay ?b??J/??? in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.

    2012-06-01

    We measure the ??b lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay ??b?J/??? using 10.4 fb?¹ of pp? collisions collected with the D0 detector at ?s=1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B??J/?K?S is also measured. We obtain ?(??b)=1.303±0.075(stat)±0.035(syst) ps and ?(B?)=1.508±0.025(stat)±0.043(syst) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of ?(??b)/?(B?)=0.864±0.052(stat)±0.033(syst).

  12. Potential molecular targeting of splice variants for cancer treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Christopher A; Zi, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    isoform contributes to ovarian cancer progression. Molin taxane-resistant ovarian cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 2011;Recent report in ovarian cancer has identified tumor-

  13. Diabetes and breast cancer : the women's healthy eating & living study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Kirsten Diann

    2011-01-01

    or experience significant weight gain after breast cancer.cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients [abstract]. Ja history of early stage breast cancer. Breast Cancer Res

  14. Quantum efficiency temporal response and lifetime of a GaAs cathode in SRF electron gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, E.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Kewisch, J.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2010-05-23

    RF electron guns with a strained super lattice GaAs cathode can generate polarized electron beam of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface. In a normal conducting RF gun, the extremely high vaccum required by these cathodes can not be met. We report on an experiment with a superconducting SRF gun, which can maintain a vacuum of nearly 10-12 torr because of cryo-pumping at the temperature of 4.2K. With conventional activation, we obtained a QE of 3% at 532 nm, with lifetime of nearly 3 days in the preparation chamber. We plan to use this cathode in a 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun to study its performance. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper. Future particle accelerators such as eRHIC and ILC require high brightness, high current polarized electrons Recently, using a superlattice crystal, the maximum polarization of 95% was reached. Activation with Cs,O lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons excited in to the conduction band and reach the surface to escape into the vacuum. Presently the polarized electron sources are based on DC gun, such as that at the CEBAF at Jlab. In these devices, the life time of the cathode is extended due to the reduced back bombardment in their UHV conditions. However, the low accelerating gradient of the DC guns lead to poor longitudinal emittance. The higher accelerating gradient of the RF gun generates low emittance beams. Superconducting RF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of the DC guns with the higher accelerating gradients of the RF guns and provide potentially a long lived cathode with very low transverse and longitudinal emittance. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the GaAs. The quantum efficient is 3% at 532 nm and is expected to improve further. In addition, we studied the multipacting at the location of cathode. A new model based on the Forkker-Planck equation which can estimate the bunch length of the electron beam is discussed in this paper.

  15. SU-E-T-208: Incidence Cancer Risk From the Radiation Treatment for Acoustic Neuroma Patient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D; Chung, W; Shin, D; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to compare the incidence risk of a secondary cancer from therapeutic doses in patients receiving intensitymodulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Four acoustic neuroma patients were treated with IMRT, VMAT, or SRS. Their incidnece excess relative risk (ERR), excess absolute risk (EAR), and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) were estimated using the corresponding therapeutic doses measured at various organs by radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeters (RPLGD) placed inside a humanoid phantom. Results: When a prescription dose was delivered in the planning target volume of the 4 patients, the average organ equivalent doses (OED) at the thyroid, lung, normal liver, colon, bladder, prostate (or ovary), and rectum were measured. The OED decreased as the distance from the primary beam increased. The thyroid received the highest OED compared to other organs. A LAR were estimated that more than 0.03% of AN patients would get radiation-induced cancer. Conclusion: The tyroid was highest radiation-induced cancer risk after radiation treatment for AN. We found that LAR can be increased by the transmitted dose from the primary beam. No modality-specific difference in radiation-induced cancer risk was observed in our study.

  16. Post-diagnosis weight gain and breast cancer recurrence in women with early stage breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Hunter DJ, Willett WC (1996): Nutrition and breast cancer.Cancer Causes Control 7:56- 37. Weiderpass E, Braaten T,of premenopausal breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.Biomarkers

  17. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spellman, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    Rahman N.  ATM and breast cancer susceptibility.  Oncogene genes for inherited breast cancer.  Cancer Cell 2007;11: study identifies novel breast  cancer susceptibility loci.  

  18. Colon Cancer Is colon cancer a func.on of race or gene.cs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Colon Cancer Is colon cancer a func.on of race or gene.cs? #12;Colon Cancer · What is colon cancer? · What genes are associated with colon cancer? · What external factors contribute to colon cancer? · What is done to diagnose

  19. US/UK second level panel discussions on the health and value of: Ageing and lifetime predictions (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, Richard G

    2011-01-18

    Many healthy physics, engineering, and materials exchanges are being accomplished in ageing and lifetime prediction that directly supports US and UK Stockpile Management Programs. Lifetime assessment studies of silicon foams under compression - Joint AWE/LANLlLLNL study of compression set in stress cushions completed. Provides phenomenological prediction out to 50 years. Polymer volatile out-gassing studies - New exchange on the out-gassing of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) using isotopic {sup 13}C labeling studies to interrogate mechanistic processes. Infra-red (IR) gas cell analytical capabilities developed by AWE will be used to monitor polymer out-gassing profiles. Pu Strength ageing Experiments and Constitutive Modeling - In recently compared modeling strategies for ageing effects on Pu yield strength at high strain rates, a US/UK consensus was reached on the general principle that the ageing effect is additive and not multiplicative. The fundamental mechanisms for age-strengthening in Pu remains unknown. Pu Surface and Interface Reactions - (1) US/UK secondment resulted in developing a metal-metal oxide model for radiation damaged studies consistent with a Modified Embedded Atom Method (MEAM) potential; and (2) Joint US/UK collaboration to study the role of impurities in hydride initiation. Detonator Ageing (wide range of activities) - (1) Long-term ageing study with field trials at Pantex incorporating materials from LANL, LLNL, SNL and AWE; (2) Characterization of PETN growth to detonation process; (3) Detonator performance modeling; and (4) Performance fault tree analysis. Benefits are a unified approach to lifetime prediction that Includes: materials characterization and the development of ageing models through improved understanding of the relationship between materials properties, ageing properties and detonator performance.

  20. A Measurement of the Lifetime of the Lambda_b Baryon with the CDF Detector at the Tevatron Run II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unverhau, Tatjana Alberta Hanna; /Glasgow U.

    2004-12-01

    In March 2001 the Tevatron accelerator entered its Run II phase, providing colliding proton and anti-proton beams with an unprecedented center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is currently the only accelerator to produce {Lambda}{sub b} baryons, which provides a unique opportunity to measure the properties of these particles. This thesis presents a measurement of the mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} baryon in the semileptonic channel {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}. In total 186 pb{sup -1} of data were used for this analysis, collected with the CDF detector between February 2002 and September 2003. To select the long-lived events from b-decays, the secondary vertex trigger was utilized. This significant addition to the trigger for Run II allows, for the first time, the selection of events with tracks displaced from the primary interaction vertex at the second trigger level. After the application of selection cuts this trigger sample contains approximately 991 {Lambda}{sub b} candidates. To extract the mean lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} baryons from this sample, they transverse decay length of the candidates is fitted with an unbinned maximum likelihood fit under the consideration of the missing neutrino momentum and the bias introduced by the secondary vertex trigger. The mean lifetime of the {Lambda}{sub b} is measured to be {tau} = 1.29 {+-} 0.11(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.) ps equivalent to a mean decay length of c{tau} = 387 {+-} 33(stat.) {+-} 21 (syst.) {micro}m.

  1. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ?}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ?}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ?}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ?10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ?}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ?}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ? 3 Myr and E = 1.2 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ?} yr for M {sub initial} ? 2 M {sub ?} (t ? 2 Myr for luminosities brighter than the red giant branch tip at log (L/L {sub ?}) > 3.4), decreasing to t = 0.4 Myr and E = 6.1 × 10{sup 9} L {sub ?} yr for stars with M {sub initial} ? 3.5 M {sub ?}. The implications of these results are discussed, especially with respect to general studies aimed at characterizing the integrated light output of TP-AGB stars in population synthesis models.

  2. Value Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Hacke, P.

    2012-06-01

    Most silicon PV road maps forecast a continued reduction in wafer thickness, despite rapid declines in the primary incentive for doing so -- polysilicon feedstock price. Another common feature of most silicon-technology forecasts is the quest for ever-higher device performance at the lowest possible costs. The authors present data from device-performance and manufacturing- and system-installation cost models to quantitatively establish the incentives for manufacturers to pursue advanced (thin) wafer and (high efficiency) cell technologies, in an age of reduced feedstock prices. This analysis exhaustively considers the value proposition for high lifetime (p-type) silicon materials across the entire c-Si PV supply chain.

  3. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  4. High temperature electron spin dynamics in bulk cubic GaN: Nanosecond spin lifetimes far above room-temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buß, J. H.; Schaefer, A.; Hägele, D.; Rudolph, J. [Arbeitsgruppe Spektroskopie der kondensierten Materie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstraße 150, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Schupp, T.; As, D. J. [Department of Physics, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33095 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-11-03

    The electron spin dynamics in n-doped bulk cubic GaN is investigated for very high temperatures from 293?K up to 500?K by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. We find extraordinarily long spin lifetimes exceeding 1?ns at 500?K. The temperature dependence of the spin relaxation time is in qualitative agreement with predictions of Dyakonov-Perel theory, while the absolute experimental times are an order of magnitude shorter than predicted. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed, including the role of phase mixtures of hexagonal and cubic GaN as well as the impact of localized carriers.

  5. THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS PROGRAM THE INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE #12;To maximize Northwestern's scientific contributions to the field of cancer Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University are partnering to create robust research collaborations

  6. Diet, MicroRNAs and Prostate Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2010-01-01

    deregulation in human cancer. Cell Cycle. 2008;7:2643–6. 25.genomic regions involved in cancers. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.A, Jacks T. MicroRNAs and cancer: short RNAs go a long way.

  7. Analysis of Senate Bill 255: Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program

    2011-01-01

    women with stage 1 or II breast cancer who Lumpectomy plus=1.06 (0.56-2.00) II breast cancer who received mastectomya Fact Sheet on Breast Cancer Surgery/Partial Mastectomies

  8. Precision lifetime measurement of the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ level using ultrafast pump-probe laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Brian M; Ehrenreich, Thomas; Gearba, Mirela A; Brooke, George M; Scoville, James; Knize, Randy J

    2014-01-01

    Using the inherent timing stability of pulses from a mode-locked laser, we have precisely measured the cesium $6P_{3/2}$ excited state lifetime. An initial pump pulse excites cesium atoms in two counter-propagating atomic beams to the $6P_{3/2}$ level. A subsequent synchronized probe pulse ionizes atoms which remain in the excited state, and the photo-ions are collected and counted. By selecting pump pulses which vary in time with respect to the probe pulses, we obtain a sampling of the excited state population in time, resulting in a lifetime value of 30.462(46) ns. The measurement uncertainty (0.15%) is larger than our previous report of 0.12% [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010501(R) (2011)] due to the inclusion of additional data and systematic errors. In this follow-up paper we present details of the primary systematic errors encountered in the measurement, which include atomic motion within the intensity profiles of the laser beams, quantum beating in the photo-ion signal, and radiation trapping. Improvements to furt...

  9. Phase-resolved nanosecond spectrofluorometry: theory, instrumentation, and new applications of multicomponent analysis by subnanosecond fluorescence lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattheis, J.R.; Mitchell, G.W.; Spencer, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    We describe a new method, phase-resolved subnanosecond spectroscopy (PRS), for the spectral differentiation of fluorophores in a mixture. The technique required adding a phase-variable rectifying detector to the SLM 4800S phasespectrofluorometer. The theory of PRS is based on the sinusoidal fluorescence emission of a population of molecules in response to sinusodially modulated exicitation light. The total a-c fluorescence signal is passed through the phase-variable detector which nulls the emission signal of any component in quadrature with the reference angle. The emission characteristics of the remaining component, or components, are more readily and accurately revealed. We investigated the sensitivity and selectivity of PRS. The sensitivity of PRS was demonstrated by nulling the contribution of the Raman scatter band of a nanomolar solution of quinine bisulfate to the real-time emission spectrum resolved at 8-nm bandpass. We demonstrated the selectivity of PRS by resolving the emission spectrum of anthracene and perylene from a 1 : 1 mixture with a lifetime differential of only 600 ps. The emission spectra of 2.2-phenylene bis-(5-phenyloxazole) and dimethyl 2.2-phenylene bis-(5-phenyloxazole) were also resolved from a 1 : 1 mixture in ethanol. The lifetime differential here was only 200 ps.

  10. Modelled Black Carbon Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetime in AeroCom Phase II Constrained by Aircraft Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, Andreas; Kondo, Yutaka; Li, Shao-Meng; Moteki, N.; Koike, Makoto; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, M.; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Lin, Guang; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2014-11-27

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols absorb solar radiation, and are generally held to exacerbate global warming through exerting a positive radiative forcing1. However, the total contribution of BC to the ongoing changes in global climate is presently under debate2-8. Both anthropogenic BC emissions and the resulting spatial and temporal distribution of BC concentration are highly uncertain2,9. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood, leading to large estimated uncertainty in BC concentration at high altitudes and far from emission sources10. These uncertainties limit our ability to quantify both the historical, present and future anthropogenic climate impact of BC. Here we compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns with 13 state of the art aerosol models, and show that recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing. Further, an atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in transport dominated remote regions. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in the multi-model median direct BC forcing from fossil fuel and biofuel burning over the industrial era.

  11. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumura, Noriomi

    2009-01-01

    A), but not to cisplatin (B) in ovarian cancer cell lines.al. Human epithelial ovarian cancer allelotype. Cancer Resallelotyping of human ovarian cancer. Br J Cancer 1994;69(

  12. Canadian Expert Panel on Tobacco Smoke and Breast Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    1996. Cigarette smoking and breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol.Cigarette smoking and breast cancer. BMJ 310, 1431-1433.smoking, and the risk of breast cancer. Cancer Detect. Prev.

  13. Mathematical Toolkit Unlocks Some Cancer Secrets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Mathematical Models Shed New Light on Cancer Mutations Calculations Run at NERSC Pinpoint Rare Mutants More Quickly November...

  14. Developed by the Yale Lung Screening and Nodule Program at Yale Cancer Center Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Copyright 2013, Yale Cancer Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    Developed by the Yale Lung Screening and Nodule Program at Yale Cancer Center Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven ©Copyright 2013, Yale Cancer Center Summary of Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines Program American Cancer Society (ACS) American Cancer Society. Interim Guidance on Lung Cancer Screening

  15. Incremental nonlinear dynamic data reconciliation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Der, Ralf

    by a compartment model including the chemical reactions, the heat transfer through the walls of the 1 #12; reaction estimation is a topic of central importance in plant control. The complexity of real world plants in the applications considered so far. 1 Introduction Measurement noise reduction and parameter estimation is a topic

  16. Improving Regulation Through Incremental Adjustment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.; Shapiro, Sidney A.

    2004-03-01

    if it oc curred"). 46. Schuck, supra note 44, at 283 ("By reducing the hardships and the sense of injustice suf· fered by those to whom a rule applies, exceptions diminish the pressure to challenge the rule it self."). 47. WAIT Radio v. FCC, 418 F.2d 1153... C.P.R. § 125.85(a)(2». . 1194 b. Evaluation KANSAS LAW REVIEW [Vol. 52 A regulated entity is entitled to a harm-based adjustment if it can establish that the adjustment would not lead to decreased protection for people or the environment. When...

  17. Incremental speech synthesis Jens Edlund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye, Johan

    that are unimportant for the interaction, such as a door slamming or someone coughing. These events are often brief

  18. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ±more »0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).« less

  19. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Moscow (Russia); Abbott, B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Acharya, B.? S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Agnew, J.? P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Alexeev, G.? D. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., St. Petersburg (Russia); Alton, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Askew, A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Atkins, S. [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Univ. de los Andes, Bogota (Columbia); Badaud, F. [Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont (France); Bagby, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bandurin, D.? V. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.? F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.? B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.? C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.? E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.? J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.? F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.? D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.? H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.? A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.? D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.? P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.? D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.? N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.? A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W.? M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.? L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.? G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.? K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.

    2015-02-01

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ± 0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).

  20. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2013-04-19

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  1. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  2. KEY FACTS The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated comprehensive cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    KEY FACTS The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designated comprehensive cancer center, the only one in Missouri and within a 240 that would speed discoveries in the lab into actual patient care. In 2009, Siteman Cancer

  3. Genetics of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer The majority of cancer cases are not attributable to hereditary causes. However, cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    May 2013 Genetics of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer The majority of cancer cases are not attributable to hereditary causes. However, cancer can be hereditary in some families. There are many factors that can increase the probability that the cancers in a family may be hereditary. Some of these factors are

  4. Prognostic and therapeutic relevance of molecular subtypes in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. Nat Rev Cancer. 2009;Brief Communication | JNCI ovarian cancer linked to clinicaldebulked patients with ovarian cancer. Cancer Res. 2008;68(

  5. Use of groundwater lifetime expectancy for the performance assessment of a deep geologic radioactive waste repository:2. Application to a Canadian Shield environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Y -J; Normani, S D; Sykes, J F; Sudicky, E A

    2011-01-01

    Cornaton et al. [2007] introduced the concept of lifetime expectancy as a performance measure of the safety of subsurface repositories, based upon the travel time for contaminants released at a certain point in the subsurface to reach the biosphere or compliance area. The methodologies are applied to a hypothetical but realistic Canadian Shield crystalline rock environment, which is considered to be one of the most geologically stable areas on Earth. In an approximately 10\\times10\\times1.5 km3 hypothetical study area, up to 1000 major and intermediate fracture zones are generated from surface lineament analyses and subsurface surveys. In the study area, mean and probability density of lifetime expectancy are analyzed with realistic geologic and hydrologic shield settings in order to demonstrate the applicability of the theory and the numerical model for optimally locating a deep subsurface repository for the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. The results demonstrate that, in general, groundwater lifetime exp...

  6. A Million Cancer Genome Warehouse David Haussler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Warehouse Regional Warehouses Design and Cost to Build and Operate a Million Cancer Genome Warehouse CAPEX

  7. What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    What Lung Cancer Patients Need to Know About Bone Health A Publication of The Bone and Cancer Foundation #12;Contents THIS PUBLICATION PROVIDES IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LUNG CANCER AND BONE HEALTH. HOW BONE WORKS (PAGE 2). WHAT LUNG CANCER CAN DO TO BONE (PAGE 2). TREATING BONE

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Clinical Trials Guest Expert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    about pancreatic cancer. In the United States in 2014 we are expecting to see about 45,000 cases and unfortunately, the death rate is about 40,000 deaths from pancreas cancer and although it is actually uncommon, only about 3% of all cancers diagnosed in the United States are pancreatic cancer, it is in fact

  9. AGE -A HEA Cancer FoRs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    CANCER CANCER R REVIEW D DR ADAM B FoRs RESEARCH DOCUMENT BUTLER, RE H COVERA T ESEARCH P AGE;Cancer FoRs 5 June 2013 Page 2 BACKGROUND This document was created for the Health and Medical Research Strategic Review and attempts to outline the coverage of cancer research throughout the university

  10. colon cancer Can genetics help tackle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasdeaconu, Rares

    Predicting colon cancer Can genetics help tackle the second leading cancer killer? momentum without cancer. #12;EDITOR Melissa Marino CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Stephanie Crowe Leigh MacMillan Cynthia, TN 37232-2390 (615) 322-4747 Momentum is published twice a year by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

  11. TARGETING CANCER STEM CELLS Summary of technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    TARGETING CANCER STEM CELLS Summary of technology Cancerstemcells(CSCs)playasignificantroleinleukemia, glioma, and breast, lung, gastrointestinal, prostate and ovarian cancer etiology, causing therapy of a new adjunct for targeted therapy of cancer involving CSCs, for use in combination with existing cancer

  12. Contact Details Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Home About Contact Details Facebook Search Journeying Beyond Breast Cancer making sense of the cancer experience Feeds: Posts Comments Cancer-fighting fountain pen May 20, 2009 by JBBC A research team be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments

  13. Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing Mari Suzuki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Breast Cancer and Genetic Testing Mari Suzuki BIOCHEM 118Q Professor Doug Brutlag Spring 2005 #12, which is often referred to as the breast cancer gene. My mother had fought off breast cancer and she the mutation means it's almost certain that I will develop breast cancer at some point in my life. It also

  14. Literature review of the lifetime of DOE materials: Aging of plastic bonded explosives and the explosives and polymers contained therein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.E.; Woodyard, J.D. [West Texas A and M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States); Rainwater, K.A. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lightfoot, J.M. [Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX (United States); Richardson, B.R. [Engineered Carbons, Inc., Borger, TX (United States)

    1998-09-01

    There are concerns about the lifetime of the nation`s stockpile of high explosives (HEs) and their components. The DOE`s Core Surveillance and Enhanced Surveillance programs specifically target degradation of HE, binders, and plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) for determination of component lifetimes and handling procedures. The principal goal of this project is to identify the decomposition mechanisms of HEs, plasticizers, and plastic polymer binders resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, heat, and humidity. The primary HEs of concern are 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazocyclooctane (HMX). Hexahydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is closely related to these two compounds and is also included in the literature review. Both Kel-F 800 and Estane are polymers of interest. A stabilizer, Irganox 1010, and an energetic plasticizer that is a blend of acetaldehyde 2,2-dinitropropyl acetal, are also of interest, but the focus of this report will be on the explosives and polymers. This presents a literature review that provides background on the synthesis, degradation, and techniques to analyze TATB, HMX, RDX, Kel-F 800, Estane, and the PBXs of these compounds. As there are many factors that can influence degradation of materials, the degradation discussion will be divided into sections based on each factor and how it might affect the degradation mechanism. The factors reviewed that influence the degradation of these materials are exposure to heat, UV- and {gamma}-irradiation, and the chemistry of these compounds. The report presents a recently compiled accounting of the available literature. 80 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Dominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    cancer fami- lies containing members with ovarian cancer or male breast cancer (1). However, mutations of female breast cancer but no cases of male breast cancer or ovarian cancer (1). It is, therefore, likelyDominant Negative ATM Mutations in Breast Cancer Families Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Amanda B

  16. Effect of selenium and vitamin E on risk of prostate cancer and other cancers: The selenium and vitamin E cancer prevention trial (SELECT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    PR, Albanes D. Selenium, vitamin E, and prostate cancer--Effect of Selenium and Vitamin E on Risk of Prostate CancerOther Cancers: The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention

  17. Second cancer incidence risk estimates using BEIR VII models for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, E. M.; James, H.; Bonora, M.; Yarnold, J. R.; Evans, P. M.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare organ specific cancer incidence risks for standard and complex external beam radiotherapy (including cone beam CT verification) following breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer.Method: Doses from breast radiotherapy and kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) exposures were obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom in which the positions of radiosensitive organs were delineated. Five treatment deliveries were investigated: (i) conventional tangential field whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT), (ii) noncoplanar conformal delivery applicable to accelerated partial beast irradiation (APBI), (iii) two-volume simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) treatment, (iv) forward planned three-volume SIB, and (v) inverse-planned three volume SIB. Conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy methods were used to plan the complex treatments. Techniques spanned the range from simple methods appropriate for patient cohorts with a low cancer recurrence risk to complex plans relevant to cohorts with high recurrence risk. Delineated organs at risk included brain, salivary glands, thyroid, contralateral breast, left and right lung, esophagus, stomach, liver, colon, and bladder. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII cancer incidence models were applied to the measured mean organ doses to determine lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for ages at exposure from 35 to 80 yr according to radiotherapy techniques, and included dose from the CBCT imaging. Results: All LAR decreased with age at exposure and were lowest for brain, thyroid, liver, and bladder (<0.1%). There was little dependence of LAR on radiotherapy technique for these organs and for colon and stomach. LAR values for the lungs for the three SIB techniques were two to three times those from WBRT and APBI. Uncertainties in the LAR models outweigh any differences in lung LAR between the SIB methods. Constraints in the planning of the SIB methods ensured that contralateral breast doses and LAR were comparable to WBRT, despite their added complexity. The smaller irradiated volume of the ABPI plan contributed to a halving of LAR for contralateral breast compared with the other plan types. Daily image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for a left breast protocol using kilovoltage CBCT contributed <10% to LAR for the majority of organs, and did not exceed 22% of total organ dose. Conclusions: Phantom measurements and calculations of LAR from the BEIR VII models predict that complex breast radiotherapy techniques do not increase the theoretical risk of second cancer incidence for organs distant from the treated breast, or the contralateral breast where appropriate plan constraints are applied. Complex SIB treatments are predicted to increase the risk of second cancer incidence in the lungs compared to standard whole breast radiotherapy; this is outweighed by the threefold reduction in 5 yr local recurrence risk for patients of high risk of recurrence, and young age, from the use of radiotherapy. APBI may have a favorable impact on risk of second cancer in the contralateral breast and lung for older patients at low risk of recurrence. Intensive use of IGRTincreased the estimated values of LAR but these are dominated by the effect of the dose from the radiotherapy, and any increase in LAR from IGRT is much lower than the models' uncertainties.

  18. Markers of chemically induced cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, G.; Milman, H.A. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This book is a concise review and evaluation of available data for recognizing and measuring markers of cancer or oncogenesis provoked in vivo by chemicals using relatively short-term experiments in animals. This review focuses on biochemical and immunological changes that correlate with carcinogenicity. Such ''markers,'' if occurring early enough, may be used to predict the onset of cancer in experimental animals exposed to potential chemical carcinogens long before morphological changes are seen. It is by examining all the information available about the potential carcinogenicity of chemicals that proper decisions can be made towards limiting the risk of cancer due to exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  19. The Cancer Genome Atlas Pan-Cancer analysis project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network has profiled and analyzed large numbers of human tumors to discover molecular aberrations at the DNA, RNA, protein and epigenetic levels. The resulting rich data provide a ...

  20. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01

    receptor-negative breast cancer patients. J Clin Invest 120,Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Distinguishing between Basaland Nonbasal Subtypes. Clin Cancer Res 15, 2302-2310. Reis-

  1. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print The cancer drug Gleevec is extremely specific, binding and inhibiting only the cancer-causing tyrosine protein...

  2. School Response to Families with Children with Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Shelley Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Coping with childhood cancer: Where do we go from here?issues in childhood cancer. School Psychology Review, 28(2),2001). Children surviving cancer: Psychosocial adjustment,

  3. Approaches to identifying synthetic lethal interactions in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, JM; Nguyen, QH; Singh, M; Razorenova, OV

    2015-01-01

    options in recurrent ovarian cancer: latest evidence andsensitive relapsed ovarian cancer. N Engl J Med. 2012;366:29. Agarwal R, Kaye SB. Ovarian cancer: strategies for over-

  4. Mapping Dysregulated Metabolic Pathways in Cancer Using Functional Metabolomic Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Daniel Isaac

    2015-01-01

    al. Adipocytes promote ovarian cancer metastasis and provideterm migration of human ovarian cancer cells. Cell Communand invasion of ovarian cancer cells, through direct

  5. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01

    2009). Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Distinguishing betweenreceptor-negative breast cancer patients. J Clin Invest 120,sporadic basal-like breast cancer. Oncogene 26, 2126-2132.

  6. Diffusion MRI Methods for Improved Treatment Monitoring in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, Sheye

    2009-01-01

    Breast Cancer Overview 2.1 Breast Anatomy . . . . .2.2 Breast Cancer Demographics . . . . . . . . 2.3 Breastii References Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Breast Cancer 5.1

  7. Breast Cancer and Melanoma in the Same Pedigree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seltzer, Murray H; Leachman, Sancy A

    2008-01-01

    6 [ PubMed ] 11. The Breast Cancer Linkage Consortium. (of ocular melanoma with breast cancer but not with cutaneousin women with previous breast cancer. Journal of Clinical

  8. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Sharif Burgette

    2012-01-01

    and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis. Anticancerand reduced risk of breast cancer: a population-based case-between vitamin D and breast cancer incidence and natural

  9. Cancer prevention for global health: a report from the ASPO International Cancer Prevention Interest Group.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braithwaite, Dejana; Boffetta, Paolo; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Meyskens, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Bull 14. WHO. International Agency for Research on Cancer:World Cancer Report. In Stuart BW, Kleihues P, editors.of environmental and occupational cancer. Oncogene 2004;23:

  10. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France); Rochel, Natacha [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR 7104, CNRS/INSERM/Université de Strasbourg, rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal [Faculté de Pharmacie, UMR 7213, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, route du Rhin, 67401 Illkirch (France); Weiss, Etienne, E-mail: eweiss@unistra.fr [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2013-04-01

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ? Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ? Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ? GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ? GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ? This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins.

  11. Protein engineering for cancer therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, David Victor

    2012-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of CD4?CD25? regulatory T cells (Tregs) interfere with anti-tumor immune responses in cancer patients. In the first part of this work, we present a novel class of engineered Interleukin-2 ...

  12. Chromatin organisation in breast cancer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafique, Sehrish

    2013-11-29

    Epigenetic misregulation of gene expression is known to be an important feature in cancer. This has mainly been studied at the level of changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications at individual genes. In this ...

  13. Measured Lifetimes of Selected Metastable Levels of Arq+ Ions (Q=2, 3, 9, and 10) Stored in an Electrostatic Ion-Trap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, L. S.; Church, David A.; Tu, S. G.; Jin, J.

    1994-01-01

    to the cylinder. The ions were selected on a charge-to-mass ratio basis before capture. Photons emitted in magnetic-dipole and electric-quadrupole transitions from levels with lifetimes exceeding 5 ms were selected by wavelength and recorded vs ion storage time...

  14. Assignment 5 Part B Statistical Lifetime-Models Oxford HT 2015 IX A.5 Censoring and truncation, Kaplan-Meier estimator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkel, Matthias

    , Kaplan-Meier estimator 1. Public health officials often compare the effects of different changes function in terms of the underlying lifetime distribution. What form will the Kaplan-Meier estimate that when no censoring or truncation occurs, the Kaplan-Meier estimator corresponds to the empirical

  15. Bayesian analysis of fluorescence lifetime imaging data Mark I Rowleya, Paul R Barbera,b, Anthony CC Coolena and Borivoj Vojnovica,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coolen, ACC "Ton"

    Biophysics, Guy's Campus, London, SE1 1UL, UK; bUniversity of Oxford, Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology count data, obtained by imaging human epithelial carcinoma cells expressing cdc42-GFP, Bayesian analysis acquisition in experiments that use Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), permitting the accurate

  16. Redundancy Method to assess Electromigration Lifetime in power grid design Boukary OUATTARA 1,2, Lise DOYEN 1, David NEY 1, Habib MEHREZ 2 , Pirouz BAZARGAN-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Redundancy Method to assess Electromigration Lifetime in power grid design Boukary OUATTARA 1). This phenomenon becomes critical in deep submicron design technology. In this paper we assess chip power grid prediction. In this paper we analyze the impact of EM degradation in power grid on a chip functionalities. We

  17. The Proceedings of the 17th Symposium on Computer Arithmetic are dedicated to William M. Kahan for his lifetime contributions to Computational Mathematics, Numerical Analysis, and Standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    to William M. Kahan for his lifetime contributions to Computational Mathematics, Numerical Analysis is a professor of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering at University of California to support numerical computation in an integrated fashion not seen before and seldom since. But the 7094

  18. Inelastic carrier lifetime in graphene E. H. Hwang,1 Ben Yu-Kuang Hu,2,1 and S. Das Sarma1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    and K points degeneracies, respectively. Thus, graphene is a gapless semiconductor. In intrinsic graphene, the Fermi level lies at the Dirac points, but as with other semiconductors it is possibleInelastic carrier lifetime in graphene E. H. Hwang,1 Ben Yu-Kuang Hu,2,1 and S. Das Sarma1 1

  19. Collinear Laser-Beam Ion-Beam Measurement of the Mean Lifetime of the Ar Ii 4p'2f-Degrees-7/2 Level 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, J.; Church, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The mean lifetime tau of the 4p'F-2(7/2)-degrees level of Ar II has been measured using a variant of the collinear laser-beam-fast-ion-beam spectroscopy technique. Our variant requires no mechanical motion or laser frequency tuning. The result...

  20. Effects of Cu Diffusion from ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts on Carrier Lifetime of CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M. R.; Johnston, S.; Dhere, R. G.; Duda, A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film PV devices processed with a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact to investigate how carrier lifetime in the CdTe layer is affected by Cu diffusion from the contact.

  1. Fusion genes in breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batty, Elizabeth

    2012-02-07

    Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth M. Batty Clare College, University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge in candidature for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy November 2010 ii... is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. It has not been submitted whole or in part for any other qualification at any other University. iii Summary Fusion genes in breast cancer Elizabeth Batty...

  2. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10{sup ?5} to 837.4 × 10{sup ?5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10{sup ?5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10{sup ?5} and 110.3 × 10{sup ?5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10{sup ?5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the treatment parameters, organ site in respect to treatment volume and patient's gender and age. The presented risk estimates may be useful in the follow-up studies of irradiated patients.

  3. H. J. Sutherland and John F. Mandell, "Application of the U.S. High Cycle Fatigue Data Base to Wind Turbine Blade Lifetime Predictions," Energy Week 1996, Book VIII: Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Wind Turbine Blade Lifetime Predictions," Energy Week 1996, Book VIII: Wind Energy, ASME, January PREDICTIONS Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Technology Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM 87185-February, 1996, pp. 85-92. APPLICATION OF THE U.S. HIGH CYCLE FATIGUE DATA BASE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LIFETIME

  4. Roles for Cardiac MyBP-C in Maintaining Myofilament Lattice Rigidity and Prolonging Myosin Cross-Bridge Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, B.M.; Sadayappan, S.; Wang, Y.; Weith, A.E.; Previs, M.J.; Bekyarova, T.; Irving, T.C.; Robbins, J.; Maughan, D.W. (Vermont)

    2011-10-06

    We investigated the influence of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) and its constitutively unphosphorylated status on the radial and longitudinal stiffnesses of the myofilament lattice in chemically skinned myocardial strips of the following mouse models: nontransgenic (NTG), effective null for cMyBP-C (t/t), wild-type cMyBP-C expressed into t/t (WT{sub t/t}), and constitutively unphosphorylated cMyBP-C (AllP{sub -t/t}). We found that the absence of cMyBP-C in the t/t and the unphosphorylated cMyBP-C in the AllP{sub -t/t} resulted in a compressible cardiac myofilament lattice induced by rigor not observed in the NTG and WT{sub t/t}. These results suggest that the presence and phosphorylation of the N-terminus of cMyBP-C provides structural support and radial rigidity to the myofilament lattice. Examination of myofilament longitudinal stiffness under rigor conditions demonstrated a significant reduction in cross-bridge-dependent stiffness in the t/t compared with NTG controls, but not in the AllP{sub -t/t} compared with WT{sub t/t} controls. The absence of cMyBP-C in the t/t and the unphosphorylated cMyBP-C in the AllP{sub -t/t} both resulted in a shorter myosin cross-bridge lifetime when myosin isoform was controlled. These data collectively suggest that cMyBP-C provides radial rigidity to the myofilament lattice through the N-terminus, and that disruption of the phosphorylation of cMyBP-C is sufficient to abolish this structural role of the N-terminus and shorten cross-bridge lifetime. Although the presence of cMyBP-C also provides longitudinal rigidity, phosphorylation of the N-terminus is not necessary to maintain longitudinal rigidity of the lattice, in contrast to radial rigidity.

  5. The effect of gender on Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheh, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death worldwide and the 4th most commonly diagnosed cancer worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the major risk factor of gastric cancer, and as such, this bacterium ...

  6. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, Sharif Burgette

    2012-01-01

    and prevention of breast cancer: pooled analysis. AnticancerBray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002.CA-Cancer J Clin. 2005;55(2):74-108. American Cancer

  7. An analytics approach to designing clinical trials for cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relyea, Stephen L. (Stephen Lawrence)

    2013-01-01

    Since chemotherapy began as a treatment for cancer in the 1940s, cancer drug development has become a multi-billion dollar industry. Combination chemotherapy remains the leading treatment for advanced cancers, and cancer ...

  8. Thermo-mechanical and neutron lifetime modeling and design of Be pebbles in the neutron multiplier for the LIFE engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMange, P; Marian, J; de Caro, M S; Caro, A

    2009-03-16

    Concept designs for the laser-initiated fusion/fission engine (LIFE) include a neutron multiplication blanket containing Be pebbles flowing in a molten salt coolant. These pebbles must be designed to withstand the extreme irradiation and temperature conditions in the blanket to enable a safe and cost-effective operation of LIFE. In this work, we develop design criteria for spherical Be pebbles on the basis of their thermomechanical behavior under continued neutron exposure. We consider the effects of high fluence/fast flux on the elastic, thermal and mechanical properties of nuclear-grade Be. Our results suggest a maximum pebble diameter of 30 mm to avoid tensile failure, coated with an anti-corrosive, high-strength metallic shell to avoid failure by pebble contact. Moreover, we find that the operation temperature must always be kept above 450 C to enable creep to relax the stresses induced by swelling, which we estimate to be at least 16 months if uncoated and up to six years when coated. We identify the sources of uncertainty on the properties used and discuss the advantages of new intermetallic beryllides and their use in LIFE's neutron multiplier. To establish Be-pebble lifetimes with improved confidence, reliable experiments to measure irradiation creep must be performed.

  9. Testing and Analysis for Lifetime Prediction of Crystalline Silicon PV Modules Undergoing Degradation by System Voltage Stress: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Smith, R.; Terwiliger, K.; Glick, S.; Jordan, D.; Johnston, S.; Kempe, M.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-07-01

    Acceleration factors are calculated for crystalline silicon PV modules under system voltage stress by comparing the module power during degradation outdoors to that in accelerated testing at three temperatures and 85% relative humidity. A lognormal analysis is applied to the accelerated lifetime test data considering failure at 80% of the initial module power. Activation energy of 0.73 eV for the rate of failure is determined, and the probability of module failure at an arbitrary temperature is predicted. To obtain statistical data for multiple modules over the course of degradation in-situ of the test chamber, dark I-V measurements are obtained and transformed using superposition, which is found well suited for rapid and quantitative evaluation of potential-induced degradation. It is determined that shunt resistance measurements alone do not represent the extent of power degradation. This is explained with a two-diode model analysis that shows an increasing second diode recombination current and ideality factor as the degradation in module power progresses. Failure modes of the modules stressed outdoors are examined and compared to those stressed in accelerated tests.

  10. Clinical Imaging and Intervention in Cancer: Imaging and Cryotherapy in Renal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    Clinical Imaging and Intervention in Cancer: Imaging and Cryotherapy in Renal Cancer Graeme Houston Fluoroscopy 2 #12;Treatments for Cancer Palliative ­ Relief of obstruction ­ Reduce Bleeding ­ Pain Control ­ Avoid complications Disease Modifying 4 #12;Disease Modifying Cancer Treatment In Situ Ablation

  11. Communication and Cancer Suggestions for Navigating Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    Communication and Cancer Suggestions for Navigating Relationships During and After Cancer Moving · Increased attention to the effect of communication · Increased awareness of communication styles · Introduction to theories about communication · Consider communication patterns in relationships · Resources

  12. Genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, M.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lippman, M. [Georgetown Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)] [comps.

    1992-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral presentations and poster sessions presented at the Cold Springs Harbor Meeting on Cancer Cells, this meeting entitled Genetics and Molecular Biology of Breast Cancer.

  13. Targeting cancer metabolism: a therapeutic window opens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    Genetic events in cancer activate signalling pathways that alter cell metabolism. Clinical evidence has linked cell metabolism with cancer outcomes. Together, these observations have raised interest in targeting metabolic ...

  14. ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANTI-CANCER NANOPARTICLE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION Fan Mei1 , Da-Ren Chen2 and Yin-Nan Lee1 1, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from Green tea, Irresa and resveratrol have been shown to exhibit cancer

  15. Lgr4 in Breast Cancer Stem Cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2014-12-11

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) comprise a huge family protein with almost 800 members. GPCRs sense molecules or other stimuli outside the cell, and activate intracellular...

  16. Risk of Salivary Gland Cancer After Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boukheris, Houda; Stovall, Marilyn; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Stratton, Kayla L.; Smith, Susan A.; Weathers, Rita; Hammond, Sue; Mertens, Ann C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate effects of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption on the risk of second primary salivary gland cancer (SGC) in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS). Methods and Materials: Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of SGC in the CCSS were calculated using incidence rates from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population-based cancer registries. Radiation dose to the salivary glands was estimated based on medical records. Poisson regression was used to assess risks with respect to radiation dose, chemotherapy, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Results: During the time period of the study, 23 cases of SGC were diagnosed among 14,135 childhood cancer survivors. The mean age at diagnosis of the first primary cancer was 8.3 years, and the mean age at SGC diagnosis was 24.8 years. The incidence of SGC was 39-fold higher in the cohort than in the general population (SIR = 39.4; 95% CI = 25.4-57.8). The EAR was 9.8 per 100,000 person-years. Risk increased linearly with radiation dose (excess relative risk = 0.36/Gy; 95% CI = 0.06-2.5) and remained elevated after 20 years. There was no significant trend of increasing risk with increasing dose of chemotherapeutic agents, pack-years of cigarette smoking, or alcohol intake. Conclusion: Although the cumulative incidence of SGC was low, childhood cancer survivors treated with radiation experienced significantly increased risk for at least 2 decades after exposure, and risk was positively associated with radiation dose. Results underscore the importance of long-term follow up of childhood cancer survivors for the development of new malignancies.

  17. Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Huidong "Warren"

    Identifying Risk Groups Associated with Colorectal Cancer Jie Chen1 , Hongxing He1 , Huidong Jin1 of identifying and describing risk groups for colorectal cancer (CRC) from population based administrative health are applied to the colorectal cancer patients' profiles in contrast to background pa- tients' profiles

  18. www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Screening Guest Experts: Lynn Tanoue, MD Professor of Therapeutic Radiology and an expert in the use of radiation to treat lung cancers and cutaneous lymphomas Oncology Program. Dr. Detterbeck and I also co- direct the new Yale Lung Cancer and Lung Nodule Screening

  19. www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Awareness Month Update Guest Expert: Frank Detterbeck, MD take a look at the prevention and treatment of lung cancer with Dr. Frank Detterbeck, Professor I want to start out with a question about cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Obviously

  20. www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Lung Cancer Awareness Month Update 2008 Guest Expert: Frank Detterbeck, MD reach the end of lung cancer awareness month, Ed and Ken welcome the Directors of the Yale Cancer Center of thoracic surgery at Yale and Dr. Tanoue is a Professor of pulmonary medicine. Tanoue Unfortunately, lung

  1. www.yalecancercenter.org Understanding Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Hern, Corey S.

    www.yalecancercenter.org Understanding Lung Cancer Guest Expert: Daniel Morgensztern, MD www of radiation to treat lung cancer and cutaneous lymphomas. If you would like to join the conversation, you can at the Yale School of Medicine and he specializes in the treatment and care of patients with lung cancer. Here

  2. Birgit Arb, MD Cape Fear Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Birgit Arb, MD Cape Fear Cancer Specialists Women of Hope is a charitable organization dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for the female cancer patient, their families, and friends. They provide through any type of cancer from diagnosis through survivorship. Women of Hope 1642 South 41st Street

  3. Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    Breast Cancer Research Finding Answers. Finding Cures. Thanks to improvements in treatment and early detection, more and more women are surviving breast cancer. In fact, the five-year survival rate for women with breast cancer today is 90%, up from only 63% in the 1960s. While progress has clearly been

  4. LITERATURE REVIEW Autism and Cancer Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crespi, Bernard J.

    LITERATURE REVIEW Autism and Cancer Risk B. Crespi A literature review was conducted on the genetic and developmental bases of autism in relation to genes and pathways associated with cancer risk. Convergent lines cancer-associated genes and pathways, and (4) contrasts with schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer

  5. Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Breast Cancer Awareness Day October 7, 2009 All are welcome to the different events organized by the Purdue Breast Cancer Discovery Group. Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecture "Genes and the microenvironment: the two faces of breast cancer" Deans Auditorium (PFEN241) Pfendler Hall ­ Purdue University 12

  6. In situ monitoring of stacking fault formation and its carrier lifetime mediation in p-type 4H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinmse@gmail.com; Chen, Jun; Yao, Yuanzhao; Sekiguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Okumura, Hajime [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    Using the fine control of an electron beam (e-beam) in scanning electron microscopy with the capabilities of both electrical and optical imaging, the stacking fault (SF) formation together with its tuning of carrier lifetime was in situ monitored and investigated in p-type 4H-SiC homoepitaxial films. The SFs were formed through engineering basal plane dislocations with the energy supplied by the e-beam. The e-beam intensity required for the SF formation in the p-type films was ?100 times higher than that in the n-type ones. The SFs reduced the minority-carrier lifetime in the p-type films, which was opposite to that observed in the n-type case. The reason for the peculiar SF behavior in the p-type 4H-SiC is discussed with the cathodoluminescence results.

  7. A Detailed Analysis and Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Lifetime Experiment S. Arzumanov et al., Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Fomin; A. P. Serebrov

    2010-05-17

    We performed a detailed analysis and the Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron lifetime experiment [S. Arzumanov et al., Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15] because of the strong disagreement by 5.6 standard deviations between the results of this experiment and our experiment [A. Serebrov et al., Phys. Lett. B 605 (2005) 72]. We found a few effects which were not taken into account in the experiment [S. Arzumanov et al., Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15]. The possible correction is -5.5 s with uncertainty of 2.4 s which comes from initial data knowledge. We assume that after taking into account this correction the result of work [S. Arzumanov et al., Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15] for neutron lifetime 885.4 +/- 0.9stat +/- 0.4syst s could be corrected to 879.9 +/- 0.9stat +/- 2.4syst s.

  8. This issue of the Stanford Cancer Institute Clinical Research Newsletter is focused on our multi-disciplinary Women's Cancer and Urologic Cancer Programs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    This issue of the Stanford Cancer Institute Clinical Research Newsletter is focused on our multi-disciplinary Women's Cancer and Urologic Cancer Programs. Both programs provide comprehensive cancer services, employ, including targeted therapies and vaccines. The new Stanford Women's Cancer Center opened on June 27, 2011

  9. Atmospheric lifetimes and global warming potentials of hydrofluoroethers: Reactivity toward OH, UV spectra, and IR absorption cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orkin, V.L.; Villenave, E.; Huie, R.E.; Kurylo, M.J.

    1999-12-02

    The rate constants for the reactions of OH radicals with the fluorinated ethers, CHF{sub 2}-O-CHF{sub 2} (HFOC-134) and CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}-O-CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (HFOC-356mff), were measured using the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique over the temperature range 277--370 K to give the following Arrhenius expressions: k{sub HFOC-356mff}(T) = (2.32{sub {minus}0.41}{sup +0.46}) x 10{sup {minus}12} exp{l{underscore}brace}{minus}(790 {+-} 47)/T{r{underscore}brace} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. On the basis of the analysis of the available experimental results, the following Arrhenius expression can be recommended for the rate constant of the reaction between OH and HFOC-134: k{sub HFOC-134}(T) = (0.82{sub {minus}0.24}{sup +0.34}) x 10{sup {minus}12} exp{l{underscore}brace}{minus}(1,730 {+-} 110)/T{r{underscore}brace} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Atmospheric lifetimes were estimated to be 24.8 years for HFOC-134 (23.8 years based on the results of this study alone) and 0.3 years for HFOC-356mff. Infrared absorption cross sections of HFOC-134, HFOC-356mff, and HFOC-125 (CHF{sub 2}-O-CF{sub 3}) were measured at T = 295 K from 500 to 1,600 cm{sup {minus}1} and the global warming potentials of the three compounds were estimated. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of the ethers were measured between 160 and 220 nm. The general pattern of reactivity of hydrofluoroethers toward OH is discussed.

  10. SKIN CANCER INSTITUTE THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    of specimens with unclear diagnoses sent from throughout the United States. Our pathologists are thus some than 75 percent of skin cancer deaths. It is now estimated that one in every 55 people will be diagnosed with melanoma. The incidence also is rising at a rate faster than that of the seven most common

  11. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s ? J/? f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/? f0(980) with J/? ? µ+µ- and f0(980) ? ?+?-. Using pp? collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of ?(B0s ? J/? f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/? f0(980)more »and f0(980) ? ?+?- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s ? J/?? and ??K+K- to be Rf0/? = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  12. Colorectal Cancer Video for the Deaf Community: A Randomized Control Trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabaik, Salma; LaHousse, Sheila F.; Branz, Patricia; Gandhi, Visha; Khan, Amir M.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2010-01-01

    cantly more colorectal cancer knowledge than the controlthe Deaf community about colorectal cancer. KeywordsASL . Cancer prevention . Colorectal cancer . Deaf .

  13. The path to personalized medicine in women?s cancers: challenges and recent advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konecny, GE

    2015-01-01

    staging system for ovarian cancer: what is new in comparisontarget tumor vasculature in ovarian cancer. Curr Opin Obstetbreast cancer and ovarian cancer therapy. Curr Opin Obstet

  14. The path to personalized medicine in women cancers: Challenges and recent advances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konecny, GE

    2015-01-01

    staging system for ovarian cancer: what is new in comparisontarget tumor vasculature in ovarian cancer. Curr Opin Obstetbreast cancer and ovarian cancer therapy. Curr Opin Obstet

  15. Chemotherapy of ovarian cancer directed by the human tumor stem cell assay.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01

    RC (1975) Chemotherapy of ovarian cancer: Past and present.treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. Cancer Treat Rep 63:for predicting response of ovarian cancer to chemotherapy.

  16. DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/5 DIESEL et CANCER Dominique Lafon INERIS (*) De nombreuses questions se posent sur la toxicité des émissions des moteurs diesel. C'est un sujet qui a beaucoup préoccupé les scientifiques ces EMISSIONS DU DIESEL. Avant d'aborder la toxicité des émissions du diesel, un rappel de leur composition est

  17. Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leikind, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Do cell phones, household electrical power wiring or appliance, or high voltage power lines cause cancer? Fuggedaboudit! No way! When pigs fly! When I'm the Pope! Don't text while you're driving, however, or eat your cell phone. All organisms absorb microwave radiation directly as thermal energy. In living organisms, the organisms' thermal control systems, including the blood flow, and various cooling mechanisms, such as sweating in humans, that work to maintain a stable body temperature rapidly transfer the absorbed energy to the environment. Any temperature rise is small or even unobserved. Any proposed mechanism by which cell phone radiation might cause cancer must begin with this fact. But the amount of radiation absorbed from a cell phone is less than that produced by normal metabolic processes, and much less than that produced by, for example, exercise. None of these normal metabolic processes cause cancer. Therefore, the much smaller amounts of energy from cell phones doesn't cause cancer either. All f...

  18. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  20. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Garden, Adam S.; Lindberg, Mary E.; Wei Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  1. Olkiluoto 1 and 2 - Plant efficiency improvement and lifetime extension-project (PELE) implemented during outages 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosonen, M.; Hakola, M. [Teollisuuden Voima Oyj, F- 27160 Eurajoki (Finland)

    2012-07-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) is a non-listed public company founded in 1969 to produce electricity for its stakeholders. TVO is the operator of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. TVO follows the principle of continuous improvement in the operation and maintenance of the Olkiluoto plant units. The PELE project (Plant Efficiency Improvement and Lifetime Extension), mainly completed during the annual outages in 2010 and 2011, and forms one part of the systematic development of Olkiluoto units. TVO maintains a long-term development program that aims at systematically modernizing the plant unit systems and equipment based on the latest technology. According to the program, the Olkiluoto 1 and Olkiluoto 2 plant units are constantly renovated with the intention of keeping them safe and reliable, The aim of the modernization projects is to improve the safety, reliability, and performance of the plant units. PELE project at Olkiluoto 1 was done in 2010 and at Olkiluoto 2 in 2011. The outage length of Olkiluoto 1 was 26 d 12 h 4 min and Olkiluoto 2 outage length was 28 d 23 h 46 min. (Normal service-outage is about 14 days including refueling and refueling-outage length is about seven days. See figure 1) The PELE project consisted of several single projects collected into one for coordinated project management. Some of the main projects were as follows: - Low pressure turbines: rotor, stator vane, casing and turbine instrumentation replacement. - Replacement of Condenser Cooling Water (later called seawater pumps) pumps - Replacement of inner isolation valves on the main steam lines. - Generator and the generator cooling system replacement. - Low voltage switchgear replacement. This project will continue during future outages. PELE was a success. 100 TVO employees and 1500 subcontractor employees participated in the project. The execution of the PELE projects went extremely well during the outages. The replacement of the low pressure turbines and seawater pumps improved the efficiency of the plant units, and a power increase of nearly 20 MW was achieved at both plant units. PELE wonderfully manifests one of the strategic goals of our company; developing the competence of our in-house personnel by working in projects. (authors)

  2. Anti-cancer Technology Summary 121 Research Drive, Suite 501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Anti-cancer Technology Summary 121 Research Drive, Suite 501 Saskatoon, SK, S7N 1K2 Tel: (306) 966 cancers are ranked 2ed , 3ed and 11th of the most diagnosed cancers (National Cancer Institute, USA cancer cells but also healthy ones. A great opportunity exists for targeted therapies for the use solely

  3. Cancer Research in Botswana Surbhi Grover, MD MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    Cancer Research in Botswana Surbhi Grover, MD MPH Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology, UPENN and are developing cancers and other NCDs #12;3 HIV and Cancer wHIV infection increases the risk of cancer wIn the later stages of HIV infection, chronic immunosuppression (& other co-factors) leads to cancer formation

  4. PrincetonUniversity In-Vitro Studies of Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    PrincetonUniversity In-Vitro Studies of Cancer Cell Death Due to Hyperthermia C. Barkey1, RUniversity Cancer: Facts and Figures World Wide 10.1 million newly diagnoses/year with ~10% increase 6.2 million deaths are attributed to cancer and its complication each year American Cancer Society 2007 and Le Cancer

  5. Selective pressures for and against genetic instability in cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    Selective pressures for and against genetic instability in cancer: a time-dependent problem Natalia instability in cancer is a two-edge sword. It can both increase the rate of cancer progression (by increasing the probability of cancerous mutations) and decrease the rate of cancer growth (by imposing a large death toll

  6. High Throughput Analysis of Breast Cancer Specimens on the Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer accounts for about 30% of all cancers and 15% of all cancer deaths in women in the United States in the United States. Women living in North America have the highest rate of breast cancer in the world [1]. In spite of the increase in the incidence of the disease, the death rates of breast cancer continue

  7. Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer: Detect and Destroy PrincetonPrinceton iGEMiGEM TeamTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer: Detect and Destroy PrincetonPrinceton iGEMiGEM TeamTeam PresentedPresentation Overview What is Synthetic Biology?What is Synthetic Biology? ProjectProject Cancer: Detect and DestroyCancer regeneration Diabetes Cancer therapy Artificial immune system Environmental Biosensing Environmental

  8. Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa-Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell's physiological state and various

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Global modeling of cancer gene expression signa- tures Cancer leads to permanent changes in cell cancer types. Less is known about the underlying biological processes, or relationships between different cancer types with respect to these changes. While each specific cancer type has a set of unique

  9. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2010-01-08

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks ? particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  10. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-07

    August 4, 2009 Berkeley Lab lecture: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  11. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  12. Predictors of Severe Acute and Late Toxicities in Patients With Localized Head-and-Neck Cancer Treated With Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Francois, E-mail: francois.meyer@chuq.qc.ca [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Andre; Wang, Chang Shu [Radiation Therapy Department, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Geoffrey [Applied Molecular Oncology, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Bairati, Isabelle [Laval University Cancer Research Center, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec - L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) causes acute and late toxicities that affect various organs and functions. In a large cohort of patients treated with RT for localized head and neck cancer (HNC), we prospectively assessed the occurrence of RT-induced acute and late toxicities and identified characteristics that predicted these toxicities. Methods and Materials: We conducted a randomized trial among 540 patients treated with RT for localized HNC to assess whether vitamin E supplementation could improve disease outcomes. Adverse effects of RT were assessed using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute Radiation Morbidity Criteria during RT and one month after RT, and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Scheme at six and 12 months after RT. The most severe adverse effect among the organs/tissues was selected as an overall measure of either acute or late toxicity. Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were considered as severe. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify all independent predictors (p < 0.05) of acute or late toxicity and to estimate odds ratios (OR) for severe toxicity with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 23% and 4% of patients, respectively, for acute and late toxicity. Four independent predictors of severe acute toxicity were identified: sex (female vs. male: OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.80), Karnofsky Performance Status (OR = 0.67 for a 10-point increment, 95% CI: 0.52-0.88), body mass index (above 25 vs. below: OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.22-2.90), TNM stage (Stage II vs. I: OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.25-2.92). Two independent predictors were found for severe late toxicity: female sex (OR = 3.96, 95% CI: 1.41-11.08) and weight loss during RT (OR = 1.26 for a 1 kg increment, 95% CI: 1.12-1.41). Conclusions: Knowledge of these predictors easily collected in a clinical setting could help tailoring therapies to reduce toxicities among patients treated with RT for HNC.

  13. Perspectives on the mesenchymal origin of metastatic cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huysentruyt, Leanne C.; Seyfried, Thomas N.

    2010-01-01

    of metastasis. Nature Reviews Cancer, 9(4), 239–252. 12.M. , & Kovarik, J. (1987). Is cancer a macrophage- mediatedof secondary growths in cancer of the breast. Lancet, 1,

  14. Nanomaterials for the detection of cancer-associated biomarkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Chunyao Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer persists as a major public health issue in the United States and remains the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Early detection and disease monitoring in prostate cancer can significantly improve ...

  15. Microwave imaging for ultra-wideband antenna based cancer detection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Haoyu

    2015-06-29

    Breast cancer is one of the most widespread types of cancer in the world. The key factor in treatment is to reliably diagnose the cancer in the early stages. Moreover, currently used clinical diagnostic methods, such as ...

  16. Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Ancient Proteins Help Unravel a Modern Cancer Drug's Mechanism Print Tuesday, 23 June 2015 13:00 The cancer drug...

  17. The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Scott L.

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of male cancer deaths in the United States. However, the full range of prostate cancer genomic alterations is incompletely characterized. Here we present the complete sequence ...

  18. Analysis of Assembly Bill 547: Ovarian Cancer Screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2004-01-01

    al. (1999). Screening for ovarian cancer: a pilot randomizedLung, Colorectal & Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial ( P L CA Snapshot of Ovarian Cancer. http://prg.nci.nih.gov/

  19. Cell Motility and Deformability in the Pathogenesis of Lung Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagano, Paul Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. PLoS One 2012;cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Nanomedicine :metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells. PLoS One 2012;

  20. A comparative analysis of 3D conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold and free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reardon, Kelli A.; Read, Paul W.; Morris, Monica M.; Reardon, Michael A.; Geesey, Constance; Wijesooriya, Krishni

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing radiation for left-sided breast cancer have increased rates of coronary artery disease. Free-breathing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (FB-IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal deep inspiratory–breath hold (3D-DIBH) reduce cardiac irradiation. The purpose of this study is to compare the dose to organs at risk in FB-IMRT vs 3D-DIBH for patients with left-sided breast cancer. Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer had 2 computed tomography scans: free breathing and voluntary DIBH. Optimization of the IMRT plan was performed on the free-breathing scan using 6 noncoplanar tangential beams. The 3D-DIBH plan was optimized on the DIBH scan and used standard tangents. Mean volumes of the heart, the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), the total lung, and the right breast receiving 5% to 95% (5% increments) of the prescription dose were calculated. Mean volumes of the heart and the LAD were lower (p<0.05) in 3D-DIBH for volumes receiving 5% to 80% of the prescription dose for the heart and 5% for the LAD. Mean dose to the LAD and heart were lower in 3D-DIBH (p?0.01). Mean volumes of the total lung were lower in FB-IMRT for dose levels 20% to 75% (p<0.05), but mean dose was not different. Mean volumes of the right breast were not different for any dose; however, mean dose was lower for 3D-DIBH (p = 0.04). 3D-DIBH is an alternative approach to FB-IMRT that provides a clinically equivalent treatment for patients with left-sided breast cancer while sparing organs at risk with increased ease of implementation.